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EDITOR'S NOTE

Miami

4. Legacy Miami’s 40 Under 40 Honorees 6. SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor 8. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT By Gary Hartfield SPECIAL TO LEGACY Another Under-40 Milestone: Advance Planning for End-of-Life Care By Donna Borland 10. MIAMI-DADE BEACON COUNCIL By Michael Finney CAREER, LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids 11. ENTREPRENEUR Teenage Filmmaker Lands Streaming Deal with Amazon Prime By Isheka Harrison 12. COVER STORY Presenting Miami’s Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow By Zach Rinkins 14. MILLENNIAL By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw POLITICS By Chris Norwood 16. PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP George Ray III Shares How He Went from Selling Dope to Hope on New BET Show By Janey Tate 17. ABOUT TOWN Legacy’s “Top Black Educator” Reception 18. ABOUT TOWN BOMA Awards 19. LEGACY BRIEFS On the cover: Photo shoot location is Art Africa Miami, 920 NW 2nd Ave., Historic Overtown. ArtAfricaMiamiFair.com

Andrew Gillum is not listed among the distinguished honorees in this issue of Legacy’s “40 Under 40.” But had he still resided in South Florida, where he was born and briefly raised, he most certainly would have made the cut. At 39, Gillum is one of Tallahassee’s youngest mayor. The Florida A&M University graduate has established a lengthy political career stretching back to his college days—first serving as president of FAMU’s Student Government Association, then becoming Tallahassee’s

youngest city councilman before garnering the trust of Tallahassee voters to lead City Hall. Now Gillum is revving up for the political fight of his life as Florida’s Democratic nominee for governor. And he doesn’t even turn 40 until next July. Gillum isn’t the only standout missing from the list. Broward College President Gregory Haile is 40. However, he was just featured on the cover of Legacy South Florida’s last issue honoring Top Black Educators. It’s worth noting that Haile graciously hosted Legacy’s awards reception for educators at Broward College’s main campus in Davie. For that, we thank him for his generosity (see photos on page 21). Another 40-year-old standout who could have made the list is the University of Miami’s Dr. Ryan Holmes. But UM’s dean of students just recently graced the cover of Legacy Miami’s “Education” issue, where he discussed his unconventional rise from music artist to university administrator.

Their absence makes room for 40 other young professionals who deserve to be recognized for their outstanding professional accomplishments and community involvement. This year’s honorees reflect the drive, commitment and passion that make South Florida great. Their creativity, vision, and passion enrich our region. We look forward to honoring them all at Legacy’s 40 Under 40 Awards event on Oct. 14 at the Miramar Cultural Center. For more than a decade, Legacy has awarded hundreds of young artists, entrepreneurs, doctors, educators, nonprofit executives, public figures, business leaders, behind-the-scenes contributors, to name few. It is my pleasure to honor the movers and shakers who help expand our view of what it means to shape our future.

Russell Motley

Editor-in-Chief, Legacy Miami rm@miamediagrp.com

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine #BeInformed #BeInfluential #Legacy40under40 Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder Zachary Rinkins Editor-at-Large Shannel Escoffery Associate Editor

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor Md Shahidullah Art Director

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS "The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and na�onal antagonisms when it accords to every person, regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Ha�ng no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back."


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Legacy Miami’s 40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow for 2018

Shonee Alicia CEO Shuckin & Jivin

Ernest Anderson Chief Opera�ng Officer Shuckin & Jivin Restaurant

James Canty, Jr. Founder/Co-Owner Mr Exo�cs Automo�ves LLC

Kassandra Ceneas CEO Convivial Link, Inc

Niyala Harrison

A�orney Squire Pa�on Boggs

Nicole Kidd Owner Nikki Kidd Entertainment

Geoffrey Rowan GBSA President Miami Business School

Kathleen Barreau Realtor Innova�ve World Realty

Micah Bell Human Capital Project Manager Health System Solu�ons

Marcus Bright, Ph.D. Servant of The People 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project

Venesia Briscoe Founder/CEO Vanguard Preparatory Academy

Simone Buford Ar�s�c Director/ Founder Simone's Just Dance Performing Arts Dance Studio Inc.

Museum Execu�ve Director City of Miami Black Police Precinct and Courthouse Museum

Ar�s�c Director & Founder Just Dance Too Performing Arts Dance Company

Execu�ve Director Girls on the Run of Miami

Katrina Ductant, MBA

Wendy Francois, Esq. A�orney Self-Employed

Florence Gaspard CEO & Co-Founder Innovated Investment Solu�ons

Domini Gibbs, Esq. Assistant City A�orney City of Miami

Aaron Johnson Interna�onal Award-Winning Writer & Director Aaron Avont Johnson Produc�ons LLC

Linda Julien Government Compliance Manager City of North Miami

Mental Health Therapist Childrens Harbor

CEO & Founder PrPL, LLC

LaShannon Pe�t

Eric Raines, Jr. Execu�ve Director Resolute Outreach Inc.

Ronnell Robinzine, Esq. Business Law A�orney Foley & Lardner LLP

Davica Williams MDIV Wonder Twinz LLC

Khadija Williams-Frazier Health Coach/Personal Trainer Khadija’s Wholis�c Fitness, LLC

Sharonda Wright-Placide Legisla�ve Assistant Florida State Senate

Terrance Cribbs-Lorrant

India Demings

Director, Strategy and Opera�ons Bilmor with Adver�sing Special�es, Inc.

Professor of Marke�ng Florida Gulf Coast University

Dr. Yve�e Holmes

Rodney Jacobs, Jr. Assistant Director/1LT United States Army City of Miami Civilian Inves�ga�ve Panel/United States Army

Daniela Jean, M.S.

Alexander Mar�n, M.S.Ed.

Sakeena Mathis Business Owner/ Independent Filmmaker & Media Consultant Urban Professional Lifestyle & Media, LLC.

James Mungin II Founder & CEO All Like Minds Media

Nkechi, Okpala

LaTasha Russell, Psy.D. Doctor Clinical Psychology Drive-By Therapy

LaToya S�rrup

Andrew Headley, MBA

Assistant Director, Student Athlete Development University of Miami

Val Butler, MBA Community Rela�ons Manager Florida Interna�onal University

Co-Founder KAZMALEJE

Ashlee Thomas Co-Founder, President MUSE

CEO/Author Arts at Work

Principal Kech This Inc.

Tamara Wadley

Public Affairs Director City of Miami Gardens

Ebony Kennedy


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SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

I got my start in the online world as a YouTube Beauty Blogger. My first video was of me on my bathroom floor, talking about a flat iron. Humble beginnings, I know. More than 400 videos and 3 million video views later, I proudly say that one video changed the course of my whole life. Each year YouTube holds a Next Up Contest where the company spends five days mentoring contest winners. I received an email directly from YouTube encouraging me to apply because, this year, they are specifically looking for Black and Latino content creators. One of the questions I was asked was: “Do you think Black voices matter on

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2018

Black Voices Matter on YouTube YouTube?” In short, yes. Historically, black voices have been underrepresented in virtually every industry in America. In most sectors from education, enterprise, to entertainment, the black community's contribution has been significantly marginalized. But platforms like YouTube, that are cost effective with a low barrier to entry, allow for anyone to participate and be successful at it. More than 5 billion videos are being watched every single day. Thusly, I highly encourage all black leaders with power and influence to use the platform as a means to share their message to the masses. Secondly, young African-American children need to see this successful representation sooner rather than later. In May, I spoke at career day at a local South Florida elementary school. None of them knew what I did for a living. Before I

started my talk, I made each one stand up, say their name, and state what they wanted to be when they grew up. There were the traditional responses of NFL player, fireman, and the like. But something unexpected was brought to my attention. Out of more than 130 fifth graders, 35 percent wanted to be YouTubers. That percentage was higher than any other "industry" or career choice in the room. It even outweighed the conventional doctor-lawyer type responses. More importantly, this school was roughly 85 percent Black. Statistics show that kids don’t watch TV as much anymore. Instead they are watching YouTube where children’s channels are quite successful. So, these fifth graders, and millions of other children across the country are seeing their peers’ success and naturally want to imitate it.

While I don’t necessarily recommend every child be given free reign of the Internet, it would be irresponsible not to take note of society’s trajectory. The youth of today are seeing YouTube as a viable career option, and with good reason. Studies show that traditional job markets will cease to exist in the next 20-30 years. Therefore, they will need to have other choices. They also need to see those choices exemplified in a successful manner. The more positive black voices on YouTube, the better for the community, our enterprises, and our future. Dr. Tracy Timberlake is a coach, speaker, and digital strategist. Her area of expertise is in digital leadership and online entrepreneurship. Email: tracy@tracytimberlakeonline.com Instagram: @tracytimberlake YouTube: youtube.com/tracytimberlake Facebook: facebook.com/drtracytimberlake

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

The 6 Principles of Influence: The Psychology of Negotiation & Persuasion By Stanley Zamor “…For over 60 years researchers have been studying the factors that influence us to say “yes”…. It is undeniable and surprising that there is a science behind decision-making and what persuades and influences people…There are six universal principles that are shortcuts that can guide how we influence others and make decisions…” — Dr. Robert Cialdini Real-Life and True Negotiation: David vs. Goliath It was the classic David versus Goliath mediation. Big Company X (Goliath) entered the room with its litigation and negotiation team and boxes of demonstrative aids. While the plaintiff walked in with her lawyer and an associate. There was an obvious power imbalance in the room.

As the six-hour mediation unfolded, the balance throughout the negotiations were ebbed and flowed. The intimidation tactics and the strategic negotiating of Big Company X didn’t seem to work. A mutually acceptable agreement was eventually executed, and all the parties seemed satisfied. Question: How did David maintain balance and ultimately negotiate better than anticipated? As I casually spoke with the plaintiff’s attorney said to him, “I found it interesting how you negotiated throughout the mediation.” He smiled then stated, “I attribute how I negotiate to certain principles of influence that I learned from reading Dr. Robert Cialdini’s book, ‘Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.’” Dr. Cialdini’s Six Principles Include: 1. Reciprocity Think of this as the principle of “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” If

you make someone feel you’ve done something nice for them, they in turn should do something nice (a favor) for you. 2. Scarcity Simply put, people want more of the things that they can have less of. Or people who negotiate from a position of “plenty” negotiate differently from a position of having “less-than” (i.e. scarcity). 3. Authority This is the idea that people follow the lead of credible, knowledgeable experts. 4. Consistency People like to be consistent with the things they have previously said or done. When negotiating and offering small concessions people have a self-image, that once presented with an idea or appeal that fits their own self-image they are likely to convert and agree. 5. Liking People prefer to say “Yes” to people they like. We like people who are like us, we like people who pay us compliments, and

we like people who cooperate with us towards mutual goals. 6. Consensus People who are uncertain will look at the behaviors of others to determine, “legitimize,” their own behavior. So, there you are – six scientifically based principles of persuasion that often require small, costless approaches yet often yield big decision-making results. Stanley Zamoris a Florida Supreme Court Certified circuit/family/county mediator, primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/arbitration rosters and has a private mediation and ADR consulting company. He regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants.com www. effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600


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BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT By Gary T. Hartfield

Collaboration and Mentorship Can Strengthen Small Firms

MiamiDade County aims to provide its local businesses with access to various avenues of opportunity for growth. It is well known that small businesses sometimes face challenges with accessing resources, managing financial risks when embarking on new endeavors, and maintaining sufficient cash flow. Being able to partner with other companies can reduce and even eliminate some of these obstacles. In addition to its Small Business Enterprise Certification Programs, the County permits collaborations that allow companies to join together to share insight, pool resources, and increase capacity. These collaborations include joint venture agreements and

participation in the Mentor-Protégé Program. A joint venture is a business arrangement of two or more parties, in which at least one is a certified SBE that agrees to pool its resources for the purpose of accomplishing a specific task and is registered with Small Business Development. Companies that create a lawfully established joint venture can combine their property, finances, and expertise under a separate legal entity and compete for opportunities that may have been less obtainable for their independent businesses. Joint ventures can participate under the SBE program on contracts with set-asides, subcontractor goals, bid preferences, and selection factors. Qualification as a joint venture requires a written joint venture agreement that must be completed by all parties, executed before a notary public, and which clearly delineates the rights and responsibilities of each member or partner

with a time commitment that lasts, at a minimum, for the duration of the project. Joint ventures also receive bid preferences or selection factors depending on the percentage of ownership that is allocated to the certified SBE. This option is just one way smaller firms can team up with other businesses to gain a competitive edge. Similarly, the county seeks to foster relationships between established companies and local developing small businesses through its Mentor-Protégé Program. In this program, experienced mentor companies can share insights and knowledge with smaller protégés while improving the county’s overall business and economic climate. Mentor companies will assist with the development of these smaller firms’ business plans by targeting their most critical needs and implementing plans of action for achievement of identified goals. In addition to major companies and

small business enterprises, the program will involve financial and bonding institutions, contracting associations, and support service organizations in the effort to mitigate the obstacles that limit the success of small businesses. The goal is to promote growth, profitability, and long-range stability for the protégé companies, but mentoring firms will also benefit. Mentors who complete the commitment period of one year will be eligible for an incentive on bidding on Miami-Dade County contracts for one year after completion of the commitment period. Overall, these initiatives are designed to develop and strengthen smaller businesses through partnership, optimize opportunities for these companies, and improve the economic landscape for all businesses. Leveraging experience, sharing resources, and having greater access to needed information is sure to bolster our small businesses and our local economy.

SPECIAL TO LEGACY

Another Under-40 Milestone: Advance Planning for Your End-of-Life Care By Donna Borland

This issue of Legacy showcases South Florida individuals who have made their mark and achieved success before the age of 40. Not only is middle adulthood the perfect juncture to focus on your life and career accomplishments, it is also the ideal time to have serious conversations with family members, doctors, faith leaders, and others about your plans for the remaining decades of life. In the hospice and palliative care professions, those conversations are called Advance Care Planning, marked by honest and goal-oriented discussions about the care you want – and do not want – if you are ever diagnosed with a

life-limiting illness, seriously injured or unable to speak for yourself. Make decisions now about the next critical decades Even for people in their 30s, 40s and 50s, these ACP discussions are never too early, given the real-world implications of injury or illness from chronic diseases, motor vehicle accidents, even gun-related violence and the stresses of the “sandwich generation.” According to the Pew Research Center, nearly half, 47 percent, of U.S. adults are responsible for multiple generations — sandwiched between raising their own families and caring for aging parents, while pursuing their own careers. VITAS® Healthcare, the nation’s leading provider of end-of-life care and the first licensed hospice provider in Florida, is uniquely positioned to offer ACP guidance, expertise and the necessary documents (e.g., a living will) for families

and individuals to put into writing their preferences for care at the end of life. ACP addresses such questions as: • Do you (or your aging parents) want doctors to exhaust all efforts to prolong life, even when curative treatments are no longer effective? Or is the quality of life at the end a better option? • Do you (or your loved ones) want to be kept alive by artificial means (e.g., respirator, feeding tubes)? Or is dying in the comfort of home, supported by family, friends, and an expert hospice team a more suitable alternative? VITAS professionals also can reassure individuals and families about what compassionate hospice care involves: a focus on comfort, calm, symptom management, pain relief, and quality of life at the end of life. Having the conversation while you are able is a far better alternative than leaving difficult decisions to family members,

caregivers or medical teams who do not know your values and preferences or who must make choices under distress or in an emergency. Indeed, one of life’s most difficult conversations might also be the most rewarding, especially if it is initiated now, during a stage in life that is marked by the milestones of success, not crisis. For more information about hospice care or end-of-life care options, call VITAS Healthcare at 866.759.6695 or visit VITAS.com. Donna Borland is general manager of VITAS Healthcare in Broward County.


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Nurse. Manager. Hospice Advocate. Problem-Solver. Volunteer. Mom.

40 Under 40 Winner. For all you do. For all you inspire. For all you stand for.

Karla Martinez, from all 11,913 of your VITAS colleagues.

800.723.3233 • VITAS.com

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MIAMI-DADE BEACON COUNCIL

One Community, One Goal Promotes Economic Prosperity in Miami-Dade County By Michael A. Finney One Community One Goal is a collaborative platform that promotes community-wide economic prosperity in Miami-Dade County. It offers strategic recommendations aimed at creating an environment where significant job creation occurs with a focus on new higher paying jobs in the targeted industries. Its mission is to bring together a broad spectrum of Miami-Dade organizations working to advance the goal of a thriving, inclusive and diverse community. The foundation of OCOG is the development and expansion of seven community priorities: 1) physical infrastructure and resiliency, 2) entrepreneurship and innovation,

3) education and workforce development, 4) business climate and policy, 5) target industries, 6) economic development marketing, and 7) leadership. Through our community engagement process, it was determined that these priorities are the necessary elements needed to enhance Miami-Dade’s successful business environment. We recently celebrated the sixth year of OCOG community-wide strategy. Since 2012, there has been an 18 percent increase in job growth in our target industries, representing more than 67,000 jobs in aviation, banking and finance, creative design, hospitality and tourism, life sciences and healthcare, trade and logistics, and technology. While we are experiencing solid economic growth in Miami-Dade, our goal is to ensure that the entire community has an opportunity to participate in this development. We heard loud and clear from community leaders that many

economically distressed communities are not enjoying the outcomes that OCOG is driving. They challenged OCOG to revisit key aspects of the strategy and to be even more intentional in our efforts to solicit input from underrepresented communities. As we remain focused on creating high paying jobs and building a world-class educational ecosystem, we are actively expanding our network to include affinity groups that have not historically engaged with OCOG. We are designing key initiatives to better address the unique employment, education and training, and transportation challenges faced by economically distressed communities. OCOG will further expand its platform to include solutions for community-wide challenges such as workforce/affordable housing, resiliency, and talent enhancement. We will also seek greater community inclusion by continuing to host “Access

Breakfast” events throughout MiamiDade County to specifically address these community issues. All OCOG events are free to ensure inclusiveness for all community members. If you haven’t done so yet, we invite you to sign up today to receive our weekly newsletter at www.beaconcouncil.com /media/latest-news/newsletter/or follow us on social media @beaconcouncil to stay updated with the latest news and events. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council serves as the secretariat for the OCOG initiative. This includes communicating, collaborating and partnering with other organizations to achieve OCOG’s goals. The Miami-Dade Beacon Council also has responsibility for the successful implementation of the OCOG economic development recommendations. For more information, visit our new website: www.BeaconCouncil.com Michael A. Finney is president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council

CAREER, LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

How To Know When You’ve Outgrown Your Workplace By Mary V. Davids When you started, it was exciting, then challenging, then too easy, sometimes frustrating, and now you’re over it. Here are some reasons why you may need to rethink your career strategy: 1. No leadership opportunities available to you. It’s a small department /company and you’re either waiting for someone to retire, move, or (worse) die. There is nowhere to go, which means there are no opportunities for you to grow your skills and knowledge. 2. Proactive ideas are discouraged by

decision makers. Where you work just isn’t open to new ideas or pro-active problem solving strategies. They are stuck in their ways and they want all employees to be silent and tow the line. You can’t grow there, and they don’t want you to. 3. The flame you once had withered away. Simply put: you just don’t love it anymore. Before you walk through those doors or log onto that computer, you suddenly feel annoyed and bored. There is no excitement, no challenges and no motivation to do your best. According Gallup’s 2017 “State of the Global Workplace”report, 85 percent of U.S. employees are not engaged or are actively disengaged at work. You are not alone. 4. Though you always give advice, there is no one at work you can go to for advice. When you’re pouring out and

there’s no one to pour back into you, you become empty and frustrated with problem solving. An industry mentor is a great way to stay progressive in your career. They don’t always have to work in the same building as you do. Networking helps. 5. You’ve become a robot. This one is the most subtle, yet damaging, to your career. Routine is difficult to break because once we adapt we convince ourselves the routine is better for us. Before you know it, your routine (as comfortable as it may be) has stolen time you can never get back. Sure, there are times when you need things to be basic, but don’t get stuck riding the “basic” wave for too long. 6. You’re not learning anything. The one thing that is consistent in business and life is change. Business practices, policies, and procedures are ever evolving. If

organizations aren’t conscious they can easily become left behind. If you feel you know everything there is to know about your job area or industry, then you aren’t growing. If you’re not growing you are not progressing, and that is when you know it’s time to make a change. Do a career check-in at least once every six months. Asking yourself a few simple questions twice a year about where you are in your career and how you can improve will help you stay focused and on track with achieving your career goals. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For career tips and advice visit www.marydavids.com, on Facebook/CoachMaryD, or email info@marydavids.com.


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ENTREPRENEUR By Isheka N. Harrison

Teenage filmmaker Lands Streaming Deal with Amazon Prime

Young filmmaker Aaron Avont Johnson with Miami Mayor Francis Suarez. Most 17-year-olds can’t boast that they are award-winning filmmakers, but Miami Gardens native Aaron Avont Johnson isn’t a typical teenager. In 2009, while many 9-year-olds were selling lemonade and candy, Johnson was launching Aaron Avont Johnson Productions. By age 12, he made his first short film. Johnson became interested in filmmaking after helping his mother use video editing software to create a commercial for the church she and his father pastored. “I took the Acer laptop from her and ended up staying up all night long making

videos,” Johnson recalled. “From that moment on I fell in love with making films and making videos. Even at that age I knew I wanted to be in the film industry in some type of way, shape, or form.” Today, Johnson has completed four films, two YouTube series, two books and sold-out stage plays to his credit. His projects range in genre from dramatic narratives to period pieces. “My mindset starting out is that I wanted to do things that I’d never seen any other kid my age do,” he explained. “The way my creative process and the way my creative thinking works is a lot different than the average (person my age),” added

Johnson, who is the youngest honoree for Legacy Magazine’s elite Top 40 Under 40 Leaders of Today and Tomorrow. Earlier this year, the uniqueness of Johnson’s creative process earned the young writer, producer, and director two awards for his latest film “Lost” at the London International Festival. He received the award for Talented New Filmmaker and his leading actress, Latoya Ward, was awarded Best Lead Actress. The win also garnered “Lost” an entry as a finalist into the Sundance Film Festival. “We won two awards for ‘Lost,’ which was amazing, and when we came back ‘Lost’ was picked up for streaming on Amazon Prime,” Johnson excitedly recalled. Set in Miami, “Lost” tells the story of a young man who loses his family to a tragedy at an early age and ultimately ends up homeless after getting lost in the various trials of life. Like his previous work, “Lost” has a very mature subject matter that outweighs Johnson’s years. Johnsons said he aspires to tell stories in a way no one else will. “I evolved a lot over the years, in the way I tell stories, in the way I create them,” he said. “It’s definitely different from what I used to do. My goal as a filmmaker from each project is to tell a better story, to tell a story that’s different from the last.” Because of the demands of his burgeoning career, Johnson has been homeschooled for the last five years. However, prior to his success he attended Norland Middle School, where he was under the tutelage of theatre instructor Tanisha Cidel. If Cidel’s name sounds familiar, it’s because her theatre program received prominent recognition after several of her students worked on and starred in the Oscar-winning movie “Moonlight.” Johnson credits her with encouraging him to soar and even found his lead actor for “Lost” in his mentor’s classroom. “That’s my Drama Mama right there,” he exclaimed. “She influenced me to take the lead and take ownership of the content I created and taught me how to dig into my characters.” Currently, Johnson is shooting a television pilot to pitch to Netflix and

several other networks. “I am not at liberty to release too much information, but this particular pilot, it’s going somewhere. This is a very monumental moment for me right now because the story line is extremely different from what I would’ve seen myself do, especially a few years ago starting out,” Johnson said. The middle of three boys, Johnson is also a motivational speaker, entrepreneur, and master class instructor who was honored with a 365 Black Award from McDonald’s. He counts himself extremely blessed by God and believes it is his duty to inspire other kids his age and younger to be fearless and to go after their dreams. He shared, “You can’t let fear stop them from doing it. My responsibility is to continue to be an inspiration and a role model for a lot of these younger children. I’ve traveled a lot … and I’ve come to realize that a lot of our youth, they need someone to look up to. They need a positive light. They need to see someone their particular age doing something to know they can do it too.” To learn more about Johnson, visit www.aaronavontjohnson.com. To learn more about “Lost,” visit www.lostthemovie.com.

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COVER STORY By Zach Rinkins

Presenting Miami’s Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow

Whether writing an award-winning script, curating an exhibition, or helping yoga students perfect their bridge poses, Legacy Miami’s 2018 class of “40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow,” have one thing in common – they are gaining ground in their vocations and contributing to their communities. Legacy canvassed Miami seeking recommendations for young people age 40 and younger who have established themselves as leaders or who have the potential to create an impact in the region. After assessing hundreds of candidates, a steering committee of area leaders and former honorees selected the crème de la crème. Among them are health care providers, attorneys, government employees, entrepreneurs and a personal trainer. At 17, writer and filmmaker Aaron A. Johnson is this year’s youngest honoree. The 17-year-old creative’s film, “Lost,”

aired at the London International Film Festival 2018 and is available on Amazon Prime. “I want to be a light to a generation that wants to pursue creative arts,” said Johnson, who is currently producing an undisclosed television project. Johnson encourages everyone to, “Continue to go after what you believe in and don’t cave into fear.” Thirty-nine old Khadijah Williams-Frazier is among the seasoned honorees. Williams-Frazier is a health coach and personal trainer who defines holistic health as an approach that, “Considers the whole person – mind, body, and soul. This includes the disciplines of exercise, nutrition, introspection, rest, spirituality, and healthy social interaction,” WilliamsFrazier advised. “Improper balance of those disciplines leads to depression, anxiety, and worst of all, disease.”

She enjoys spending quality time with herself and transforming lives through holistic health.“As soon as you wake up in the morning, before your feet touch the ground, give thanks for being granted another day of life,” Williams-Frazier encouraged. “Life is truly the one thing that is promised to no one.” You’d have to go to Overtown to meet Terrance Cribbs-Lórrant, the first staffed executive director for the City of Miami Black Police Precinct and Courthouse Museum. Cribbs-Lórrant, 39, said, “Museums are not only a place where history has been preserved.” He challenges people to reimagine museums as, “Living spaces that harvest progressive conversations that can lead to solutions.” Cribbs-Lórrant revealed, “Within the current climate of self-indulgent justice, it is my sincere hope to brighten up the dialogue around social justice and the responsibilities that community and

policing both play in the construction of justice for all,” Cribbs-Lórrant first whet his curator curiosity while performing as an operatic singer helping with set and costumedesigns for performances. “I get excited about exploring history and curating unlikely spaces with art and culture,” he shared. “I enjoy tossing in a little performance-art as a classically trained tenor.” Ultimately, he aspires to promote Black Police Precinct and Courthouse Museum as an, “Edifice for safety and change in social justice reform.” While their interests and professions differ, these honorees all have proven their dedication to excellence and philanthropy. These recipients offer a snapshot of the leadership that will take us into the next decades.


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Great leaders inspire us In every community, there are people who can inspire others to work for positive change. Legacy 40 under 40 recipients, it’s an honor to recognize you. wellsfargo.com

© 2018 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. IHA-23318_A1

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MILLENNIAL

Electing Gillum as Florida Governor Will Create More Equity for More People

By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw

Across this country, with midterm elections looming dangerously near, we are at pivotal political crossroads. For the past 20 years in Florida, we have been living under a Republican governor, and Republican majorities in the House of Representatives and Senate. This has meant: constant attacks on reproductive rights, bigoted legislation against undocumented immigrants, draining affordable housing trust funds, refusing to prioritize education, and a failing criminal “justice” system, all enacted by a government that is in no way representative of the demographics of this state. Simply put, there is too much at

stake. After an historic midterm election, we have an opportunity to turn the tides for our state this November. In an interview with gubernatorial candidate, Andrew Gillum, the current mayor of Tallahassee said he hopes to change history as the first Black governor of Florida, proving that money doesn’t vote, the people do. Every year, Legacy Magazine honors the top 40 South Florida leaders under 40 years old. Mayor Gillum just recently celebrated his 39th birthday while on the campaign trail, and earns an honorable mention for “40 Under 40.” Gillum has a long career of political engagement that began with his election to the Tallahassee city commission at just 23. Since then, he has been working to build equity for the residents of Tallahassee through early childhood education programs, building more opportunities for minority owned

business, and ensuring businesses create family-friendly workplaces. And when elected in November, he plans to bring that equity to the governor’s mansion. Gillum has chosen radical progressivism, calling for: the abolition of Immigration and Custom Enforcement, and a repeal of Stand Your Ground. He has also made it clear that he is not ignorant about the lack of equity that blankets this state, which for him makes the experiences of women of color a priority. He acknowledged that while this state possesses many women with brilliant ideas, “There are systems that suppress the potential of women, specifically women of color.” As mayor, he said he has been working to “pursue public policy that expands and creates greater opportunity for women and girls.” He expressed being emotionally close to his praying Black grandmother; being the child of a

hardworking Black mother; being married to an “extremely capable, individually brilliant” Black women; and being father to a beautiful Black daughter. “If we don’t have a governor that understands the plight of women, the future will not be bright for them,” he shared. “Women ought to make their own reproductive decisions,” and work at businesses that honor the labor of parenting. Gillum has the personal experiences to lead this state in a progressive direction that will guarantee more equity for more people. On Nov. 6, make civic engagement a community affair, and vote for equity and progress. Make sure to complete the entire ballot to the end. Jasmen Rogers-Shaw is a community organizer in South Florida, focusing on issues of racial and gender justice. Email: jasmen.m.rogers@gmail.com IG: @thebeautyofthesoul Twitter: @beautyofthesoul

POLITICS

The ‘Anonymous Nobodies’ Appear as Gillum Campaigns for Florida Governor

By Chris Norwood

I've known Andrew Gillum professionally for over 15 years. We worked together when I served as the Florida Deputy Director for People for the American Way Foundation (PFAW), a national civil rights organization founded in 1980 by Norman Lear and Barbara Jordan to fight the Christian Right agenda of the Moral Majority. Andrew was running the National Youth Engagement Programs for PFAW from our Tallahassee office when we met and, at the time, he had been recently elected to the city council while still a FAMU student. For the past year, people have wondered whether a small city mayor from a college town could win the Democratic nomination for governor. The

questions were all the same: can he raise the money necessary? Is he too left of center? Would Florida Democrats vote for an African American? Those questions loomed large for traditional Democratic donors, politicos and others. Luckily these folks don't move votes. “Florida Insider Poll” is produced by the Tampa Bay Times and includes more than 220 campaign operatives, lobbyists, money-raisers and assorted other veterans of Florida politics. It predicted Gwen Graham to win (80 percent), and only 5 percent of them predicted Andrew Gillum to win. Meanwhile, in the real world, those who knew Andrew knew better. We knew those 517,863 “Anonymous Nobodies” who voted for Gillum and shocked the pollsters and the politicos. My response to those who wondered about his viability was simple: “Under what scenario do nearly 30 percent of the Florida Democratic Voters who are African-American not vote for the most

qualified candidate in the Democratic primary, who has more public service than the other candidates combined twice over? Who happens to be African American himself (with a beautiful family), in a crowded primary where someone with less than 35 percent of the vote can win the primary?” Gillum won the Florida Democratic Primary with 34 percent of the vote. As the Gillum campaign tent widens, my hope is that Andrew never forgets the Anonymous Nobody. He should never forget that when the Sun Sentinel endorsed Jeff Greene, the Anonymous Nobodies didn't know and didn't care and gave him victory in Broward (40 percent). When the Miami Herald endorsed Philip Levine, the Anonymous Nobodies gave him victory in Dade County (40 percent). When the Tampa Bay Tribune and Palm Beach Post endorsed Gwen Graham, the anonymous nobodies gave you victory in Hillsborough (40 percent) and Palm

Beach (30 percent). When the Florida Education Association endorsed Gwen Graham and called her “the public education dream candidate...an easy choice for anyone concerned about Florida's schools,” despite Gillum's call for $50,000 starting salary for teachers (and a mechanism to pay for it), the Anonymous Nobodies didn't know who the FEA was and didn't care. Gillum's campaign brought many of my friends together organically to volunteer, a “self-less” group of all backgrounds and shades. They came together and asked “why not stand on our values and get behind a Democratic candidate for Governor that isn't shy about being a Democrat”. They bucked the prevailing ethos of middle of the road Democratic nominees. Andrew Gillum will #BringItHome in November by standing with and fighting for the Anonymous Nobodies that are showing the nation what People for the American Way truly means.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2018

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Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust

Homeownership Assistance Program (HAP) Making Homeownership Affordable

Expanding Our Industry Network

First-time Home Buyer Program

HAP Orientation Seminars

MDEAT Homeownership Assistance Program (HAP) provides first-time homebuyers with down payment and closing costs assistance through a zero-interest, non-amortized, forgivable loan.

From realtors to closing agents to mortgage providers, HAP operates within a growing network of industry professionals. MDEAT trains and certifies these professionals which stimulates growth of the subsidized first-time home-buying market.

Educating Buyers

Advocating for Homeownership Housing Advocacy Committee (HAC)

Housing Education Workshops HAP partners with housing counseling agencies from across Miami-Dade County. Reaching nearly 1000 first-time homebuyers a year, HAP helps to increase their understanding of the purchase process so they can make well-informed purchase decisions for themselves and their families.

MDEAT invites industry professionals and concerned housing advocates to join HAC. Through its breakfast discussion series as well as its strategic and event planning sessions, HAC advocates for housing program changes, helps homeowners retain their homes, promotes comprehensive financial literacy, and reports on the state of housing for low-to-moderate income residents.

FOR MORE INFORMATION MDEAT Homeownership Assistance Program (HAP) www.miamidade.gov/EconomicAdvocacyTrust 5t.%&"5*OGP!NJBNJEBEFHPW

WE SALUTE THE EIGHT OUTSTANDING FIU ALUMNI WHO HAVE THE DISTINCT HONOR OF BEING AMONG LEGACY MAGAZINE’S 40 UNDER 40 LEADERS OF TODAY AND TOMORROW. KARLA MARTINEZ ‘15 DANIELA JEAN ‘17 ASHLEE THOMAS ‘16 MARCUS BRIGHT ‘08 FLORENCE GASPARD ‘02 KATHLEEN BARREAU ‘05 CARL A. BRITTON, JR. ‘17 VAL BUTLER ‘12

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

George Ray III Shares How He Went from Selling Dope to Hope on New BET Show

By Janey Tate George Ray III has become one of the Gardens during a murder and drug was a pre-destined opportunity. Ray had most polarizing cast members on BET’s epidemic and a lot of people around me written down on a vision board two years business competition reality show, “The perished,” said Ray. “I was fortunate before being casted that he wanted to Grand Hustle.” He has caused fellow cast enough to make it. I was able to overcome work for the rap mogul. He had done members to plot against him and to have those obstacles. And Against all odd I was previous work with T.I.’s production him kicked off the show—all vying for a able to make it.” company and wanted to do more work dream job to work at rap mogul T.I.’s Ray said his love for business began with T.I.’s other brands. Grand Hustle Business empire. Ray, a Miami Gardens native, said this type of “hate,” as he calls it, isn’t new for him. He said growing up in the tough neighborhood of Lake Lucerne gave him the strong attitude he needs to succeed in business and on the show. Ray had a rough start as a teen, finding himself in situations that landed him on a fast path to nowhere. “Growing up for me all I saw was people selling drugs,” said Ray. “You be what you see, and that’s what I saw. That’s what I got involved in.” George mainly attended grade school in Miami Gardens but, after getting arrested as a teen, his mother moved him to the city of Homestead to change his environment. He attended South Dade and became the first of his siblings to receive a high school diploma. He then went on to attend Talladega College for undergrad and Florida International University for his MBA. Ray decided that being a juvenile delinGeorge Ray stands alongside rapper T.I. on the set of BET’s reality show ‘The Grand Hustle.’ quent wasn’t for him. He credits Congresswomen Frederica Wilson’s 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project for keeping him busy when he was a young kid selling “It’s kind of funny when you write and off the streets. newspapers and washing cars. Now he’s a things down and it happens,” Ray said. “Fortunate enough for me I was able professor, a consultant and certified “From the time I applied to be on the to have great mentors in my life through a business analyst, who specializes in show, to the time I was cast was a span of very special program called the 5000 Role pre-ventures and launching start-ups and two weeks. So, weeks before I was literally Models,” said Ray, specifically referring to franchises, including food, clothing and listening to a T.I. song, the next thing you his mentor, the late Robert Parker. “They professional-services companies. He also know, two weeks later I didn’t know who were very impactful in my progress and develops sustainable growth strategies for I was going to meet. I meet this guy and development.” existing businesses. it’s T.I.” “I grew up in the inner city of Miami Being cast for “The Grand Hustle” He learned about the casting via

LinkedIn, and jumped at the opportunity to be on the show. From there Ray was on his way to Atlanta where the show was filmed. Ray said he’s always been a fan of T.I., and has learned so much from him just from following his business moves. Being a part of the show has taken that respect for the King of the South to another level. “Through this show I learned a lot about business and myself from observing [T.I.] him,” said Ray. “If you work hard enough the universe can’t deny you forever. At some point it has to give you what you want.” Although Ray’s cast mates don’t like how he’s playing the game, his business savvy moves are undeniable while watching the show. Every team he’s been on has won. But being the most hated guy in the house hasn’t phased Ray or his work ethic, which has allowed him to missed four eliminations. “Every week someone goes home and I leave nothing for chance. I get a little hate, a little push back but if you don’t have any critics then you’re probably not relevant in the things you do. So it’s like a mirror of my life. I faced a lot of rejection,” said Ray. Although he couldn’t share what his fate on the show will be, Ray said that he has other projects in the works that will be launching them soon including a speaking tour and hosting business boot camps. Ray is also engaged to be married. “I’m happy to be on this network and to be and to be working with T.I. who’s also a role model to me,” said Ray. “A real boss put’s a boss to be in position to be a boss. That’s what T.I. has done.” The Grand Hustle airs Thursdays at 10 p.m. on BET.


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ABOUT TOWN

Legacy’s 2018 “Top Black Educator” reception, Aug. 30, Broward College – A. Hugh Adams Center Campus, Davie.

ANDREW GILLUM FOR GOVERNOR

Let’s Make History! WE HAVE THE CANDIDATE

WE HAVE THE POWER

WE HAVE OUR FUTURE AT STAKE

Andrew Gillum is from our community and for our community.

Black, Latino, and White progressive voters are the new majority in this state. Together, we can win.

Andrew Gillum isn’t just our best defense against Trump and his party, he’s got the best plan for a better future.

Tell Your Friends & Family

Early Voting Starts October 22nd – Election Day is November 6th VOTE

Early, By Mail, or on November 6th

Text Gillum to 90975 to find your polling place or how to get involved. Paid political advertisement paid for by New Florida Vision PAC (10800 Biscayne Blvd., Ste 1050, Miami, FL. 33138) independently of any candidate. Not approved by any candidate.

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ABOUT TOWN

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2018

The Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA) holds the 2nd Annual BOMA Awards, honoring South Florida media professionals, at Miami’s Hilton Airport Hotel, Sept. 21, 2018.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2018

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LEGACY BRIEFS Broward County, youth from the Israeli Consulate in Miami, North Miami PAL, North Miami Beach PAL and the Greater Miami Pop Warner Tamiami Colts Jr. Varsity football program.

Cisely Scott Promoted to Principal Cisely Scott was promoted to principal of Agenoria S. Paschal/Olinda Elementary School in Miami-Dade County Public Schools. She was previously assistant principal. Scott is an FIU alumna who last year was named Miami-Dade Assistant Principal of the Year while working at Miami’s Lenora B. Smith Elementary

Courtney Newell, a branding and marketing strategist who owns Crowned Marketing & Communications, has won the prestigious Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s (FSMSDC) MBE Supplier of the Year Class 1 award at the FSMSDC’s 43rd Annual Awards Gala. Her company was selected from a large group of thriving businesses throughout the state. Newell started Crowned Marketing & Communications in 2011 with a $500 Scholarship from winning a local Miss America Pageant. Since then, she has grown the business and now works with Fortune 1000 companies, government agencies and small to mid-sized businesses, providing web design, digital marketing, PR and signature events. Courtney is a graduate of Florida International University and holds a Business Certificate from Dartmouth College

Domini Gibbs Receives NBA Honor City of Miami Attorney Domini Gibbs received the National Bar Association’s Best Advocate Top 40 Under 40 honor. The National Bar Association is the Nation’s largest Bar Association of African American Attorney’s. Gibbs received her MBA and bachelor’s degree from Lynn University and her law degree from Florida A & M University.

Miami Dolphins Announce Football Unites Captains Program The Miami Dolphins announced the creation of the Football Unites Captains Program, a diversity and inclusion initiative that will bring 80 to 100 middle school students from various backgrounds together once a month for a day of learning about tolerance, acceptance and leadership. Dolphins players and alumni will join these students to share their stories, perspectives and experiences. The Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality (RISE) will assist with programming and program evaluation. “We are excited to launch the Football Unites Captains Program with the goal of stimulating conversations, encouraging inclusivity and uniting our South Florida youth,” said Miami Dolphins Senior Vice President of Communications & Community Affairs Jason Jenkins. Participating students will come from the following organizations: The Alliance for GLBTQ Youth, Boys & Girls Club of

The remaining categories for the 2018 BOMA Awards include: • Marketing Firm of the Year Award Hip Rock Star Advertising ONEUNITED AND BB&T EXECS GARNER TOP HONORS AT BOMA AWARDS The Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA) awarded Teri Williams, president of OneUnited Bank, and Tony Coley, regional president of BB&T Bank the BOMA Champion of the Year Award. They were both honored for their commitment to support and advocate for equality in the media as well as their efforts to support South Florida’s Black community. This year’s ceremony was held on Sept. 20 at the Hilton Miami Airport. The BOMA awards was established to recognize outstanding media-related agencies, businesses, and individuals who make a positive impact in the South Florida Black community. Other top honorees include: • Icon of the Year Award - Bernadette Morris, founder and chairman of Sonshine Communications

• PR Firm of the Year Award – S.A. Nelson & Associates • Advertising Agency of the Year Award – WOW Factor • Black Advertisement Agency of the Year Award – The Mosaic Group • Best Communicator of the Year TV Award – Calibe Thompson (Blondie Ras Productions, Inc.) • Best Communicator of the Year Radio Award - Lynda Harris (Financial) • Best Communicator of the Year Print Award – Russell Motley (MIA Media Group) • Best Communicator of the Year Digital Award – Tracy Timberlake (Timberlake Ventures)

• Advocate of the Year Award - Publix

• Best Social Media Communicator of the Year Award – LaShannon Petit (PRPL

• Legend of the Year Award - Tamara Phillippeaux, president of Island TV

• Photo/Video Journalist of the Year Award – David Muir

• Vanguard of the Year Award - Sandy Walker, publisher of The Gospel Truth

• BOMA Rising Star Award – Arriale Henry (The Westside Gazette)

• Visionary of the Year Award - Peter Webley, publisher of Caribbean Today • Luminary of the Year Award - John Yearwood, Yearwood Media Group

Did you recently get a promotion? Are you a new hire at a South Florida company? Does your firm have a major announcement to make? Let us know by sharing your announcement for possible inclusion in Legacy Briefs. Send your press release and professional photo to rm@miamediagrp.com and include Legacy Briefs in the subject line.


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2018 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow- Legacy Miami  

2018 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow- Legacy Miami  

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