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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Art of

Black Miami Celebrates 5 Years

HELPFUL GUIDE

MIA ONE-ON-ONE

Director Steven Caple

Scores TKO with ‘Creed II’

Art Africa

Miami Founder Neil Hall Explains

Why ‘Black Art Matters’

‘Miami Motel Stories’

Offers Theatrical

Historic View of

BISCAYNE BOULEVARD

‘American Pharoah’ by Marcus Blake

WINNER OF THE 4TH ANNUAL ART OF BLACK COVER COMPETITION

MIA MAGAZINE IS THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF ART OF BLACK MIAMI 2018


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ArtofBlackMiami.com • #ArtofBlackMiami

Art of Black Miami is a marketing platform and destination driver organized by the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau that showcases the diversity of the visual arts locally, nationally and internationally, celebrating the black diaspora. This initiative highlights the artistic and cultural landscape found in Miami’s heritage neighborhoods and communities year-round throughout Greater Miami and the Beaches.

Art by artist Tracy Guiteau | Miami Urban Contemporary Experience.

CELEBRATING 5 YEARS OF ARTS CULTURE DIVERSITY

© Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau — The Official Destination Sales & Marketing Organization for Greater Miami and the Beaches. CS-020TBD


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EDITOR'S NOTE

4.

Do & Dine

5.

Art of Black Miami Schedule ‘Motel Stories’ Offers Artistic Historical Scenes from Miami’s Biscayne Boulevard By MIA Staff

6.

Art Africa Miami Founder Neil Hall Explains Why ‘Black Art Matters’ By MIA Staff

8.

COVER STORY Miami Infused with Artist Marcus Blake’s Creativity By Kallan Louis

10. Exhibit Honoring Iconic Painter Ernie Barnes to Debut in Overtown Performing Arts Center By Chris Norwood

11. Historian Pays Homage to the Harlem Renaissance, Restoring 15-Room Hotel in the Heart of Overtown By Shelly-Ann Parkinson

12. A Tribute to Miami Photographer Adrian D. Freeman By Russell Motley

13. ‘Creed II’ Director Scores TKO with Latest Franchise Installment By Russell Motley

14. ALL ACCESS Art Africa Kick-off Party The Miami Dolphins Football Unite Program at Cref Creole AfriCOBRA

MIA magazine is proud to highlight the soulful artistic explosion that is defining Historic Overtown. At a time when many Black Americans feel disenfranchised, from voter suppression to civil rights violations, Art of Black

Miami is allowing creatives to freely express their point of view on a local, national and international platform. Take artist Marcus Blake, for example, whose abstract work graces the cover of this issue. I recently met Blake at an exclusive event for influencers in Wynwood, where guests watched as he took his paint brush and made broad colorful strokes across a 6’x 6’canvas. Sporting oversized rectangular sunglasses, a white jumpsuit, and

a Colgate smile, Blake exudes creativity. His geometric images, designed in part by using masking tape, is known for adding a certain pop to everything from buildings to office walls to furniture. See for yourself on Instagram @mdotblake. Support these talented artists not just during Art of Black Miami, but year round. Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief, Legacy Miami rm@miamediagrp.com

GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU The Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau (GMCVB) is excited to celebrate the 5th year anniversary of Art of Black Miami! The collaboration is organized by the Multicultural Tourism & Development Department and focuses on promoting the art, culture and diversity that resides in greater Miami and to shine a spotlight on local, national and

international art and artists representing the African diaspora. The Art of Black Miami collaborative has a strong presence each year during Art Basel but continues year-round to celebrate the abundant artistic diversity found within Miami's mosaic neighborhoods. We encourage residents and visitors to venture out to the communities in the MiamiDade and experience some of the unique exhibits and programming throughout the entire city. The dedicated web page www.ArtofBlackMiami.com provides the most current updates and more information on events and programs

available to visit and attend in December and year round. For social media purposes when making posts, please use our hashtag #ArtofBlackMiami #FoundinMiami Venture out and visit some of our artistic and cultural treasures during this season’s kick-off of Art of Black Miami!

Yours Truly,

Connie W. Kinnard Vice President, Multicultural Tourism & Development Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau

CITY OF MIAMI COMMISSIONER Welcome to Historic Overtown, one of Miami's oldest Black communities. Here you will experience the cultural vibrancy that this neighborhood has to offer. In partnership with the Southeast Overtown Park West Community Redevelopment Agency, Soul Basel has become a tradition to highlight the revitalization of this community. Soul Basel has attracted thousands of visitors from around the world to experience Overtown. Events such as Art Africa and Art of Conversation provide attendees the opportunity to mingle, while experiencing a fusion of art, food, music and entertainment. Please enjoy your time in Overtown. I am sure it will make for an unforgettable experience.

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder Shannel Escoffery Associate Editor

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor Md Shahidullah Art Director

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Sincerely,

Keon Hardemon Chairman, SEOPW CRA

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

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DO & DINE

In celebration of the Art of Black Miami, here’s MIA magazine’s Soul Guide to experience what do and where to eat Miami’s art & culture scene on the go this Miami Art Fair Season.

THINGS TO DO It is Written: Redline Letters to Report 1947 Dec. 1, 2018 March 1, 2019 Historic Black Police Precinct & Courthouse Museum 480 NW 11th Street, Miami www.HistoricBlackPrecinct.org The inaugural exhibition of the actual printed responses from then-Chief Frank Mitchell, responding to other state precincts surrounding Miami Dade-County’s hiring of Black patrolmen, carefully carves out the landscape that conditionally keeps these typed letters in context with the era and times of segregation. Prizm Art Fair Dec. 3-12, 2018 Alfred I. Dupont Building 169 E. Flagler St., Miami www.Prizim ArtFair.com Curated by Mikhaile Solomon and William Cordova, Prizm Art Fair features three exhibitions from national and international galleries that depict the varying degrees of currency from Africa and the African Diaspora. Art Africa Miami Arts Fair Dec. 4-9, 2018 Art Africa Miami Art Gallery 920 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami www.ArtAfricaMiamiFair.com

Welcome to the Afrofuture Dec. 5-9, 2018 The Urban 1000 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami www.theurban.miami Created by Urban Philanthropies, The Urban launches and hosts the most anticipated four-day art and performance activation in Overtown. With the theme “Welcome to the Afrofuture,” The Urban and curator Gia Hamilton, a New Orleans-based author, will feature more than 20 visual and performing artists, both local and from across the U.S. Pigment International -Miami Reveal Dec. 4-8, 2018 The Penthouse at Riverside Wharf 125 SW North River Dr., Miami www.pigmentintl.com PIGMENT International is a multimedia, multicultural collective that promotes art, culture, curation and innovation. Pigment will present the curated works of both seasoned and emerging artists that encourage artistic cognitive dissonance. Umbrellas of Little Havana Dec. 7-Dec. 9, 2019 Futurama 1637 Art Galleries 1637 SW 8th Street, Miami www.ViernesCulturales.org A colorful display of painted patio umbrellas will be exhibited from local and international artists to celebrate the spirit of Art Basel in the historic Calle 8.

Now or Neverland Ode to Hip Hop Art Exhibition Dec. 5-9, 2018 Little Haiti Cultural Arts Center 212 NE 59th Terrace, Miami www.Odetohiphop.eventbrite.com The Miami Urban Contemporary Experience (MUCE) presents Now or Neverland: Ode to Hip Hop, an exhibition that explores the intersection of music, architecture and art. It will feature artists and hip hop influencers like Ted Lucas of Slip-N-Slide Records and artists Ashley Brown and Yidah Exposito. The Urban 1000 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami www.theurban.miami The Urban is a new 53,000-square-foot public space located in Historic Overtown. With its grand opening during Art of Black Miami week; this new-age food hall features bars, food vendors, art and live entertainment.

PLACES TO DINE Jackson Soul Food 950 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami www. jackson soulfood. com A local Miami food staple in the heart of Historic Overtown, Jackson’s fish and grits is the one to try. Choose from tilapia or grouper, fried or boiled, accompanied by creamy grits, which will keep you filled the entire day. Lil Greenhouse Grill 1300 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami www.lil green house grill.com Located in Historic Overtown, Lil Green House Grill is the perfect place to end your day. From the food to the

people, you are bound to leave with a take-away box and a few great connections too. The pork spare rib dinner with collard greens and corn bread always makes you feel at home. House of Wings Miami 1039 NW 3rd Avenue Miami, FL 33136 www. houseofwingsmiami.com “What’s your flavor?” That’s what the staff at House of Wings will ask. Naked please! World Famous House of Mac 2055 NW 2nd Ave, Miami www. house ofmac.com World Famous House of Mac puts a spin on the classic mac-n-cheese. With an array of combinations like lobster, chicken parmesan, curry chicken mac, there are plenty of options to choose from. The jerk chicken mac has a savory tone with a touch of spice. The Kitchen at Cuba Ocho 1465 SW 8th Street, Miami www.the kitchen atcubaocho.com Enjoy salsa class while you eat! The plantain sandwich will easily take you to that happy place. A fusion of Latin American and Caribbean cuisine, the plantain sandwich by Chef Rose comes with your choice of chicken, beef, pork, shrimp or vegetables with a side of pikliz (spiced pickled cabbage and carrots).


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‘Motel Stories’ Offers Artistic Historical Scenes from Miami’s Biscayne Boulevard By MIA Staff A unique, artistic expression of historical events in Miami returns for a second season during Art Basel week. Juggerknot Theatre Company is proud to present the Miami Motel Stories. Sponsored by Chivas Regal, in partnership with Miami’s Avra Jain, founder of The Vagabond Group, Miami Motel Stories: MiMo will highlight the historic Biscayne Boulevard corridor from the 1950s to the present day at the Gold Dust Motel, the future home of Selina, formerly known as Motel Blu on 7700 Biscayne Biscayne Boulevard. As part of the show, audience members are invited to the tiki-themed 1957 grand opening of the Gold Dust. They’ll have the option to purchase a pink, blue or yellow key, unlocking doors to different

decades between 1957 and 2018. Small audiences will actually walk into the motel room to experience inspired-by-true-life stories that took place there. The stories include an encounter with a Playboy Bunny who worked across the street at the Playboy Club in 1964; a young hustler from gritty 1995; and a 1950’s couple on their first road trip the Magic City. There’s also a scene from 1993 in the hotel room where an African American man faces his demons while surrounded by a stack of Bibles. “We have a responsibility to preserve these authentic Miami stories,” said Tanya Bravo, executive artistic director of Juggerknot Theatre Company. “Our unique relationship with developers allows

us to provide Miami audiences a new way to experience history through immersive theatre.” Awarded the Knight Arts Challenge Grant, Miami Motel Stories is a real-time immersive theatre experience that takes place inside motel spaces within developing neighborhoods. Writers work alongside motel developers to tell the story of Miami’s past, present, and future, one room at a time. The work will reflect the undercurrent of history, both real and imagined, bringing artistry and homegrown craft to Miami’s ever-quickening rush to develop. "Miami is a city of stories, with many of them rooted in our ever-evolving neighborhoods and buildings,” said Victoria Rogers,

Actor Chat Atkins plays a man facing his demons inside a Biscayne Boulev ard hotel room as part of the Miami Motel Stories. Photo by Pedro Portal

vice president for arts at Knight Foundation. “This project provides a chance to tell those stories and bring our city together through the arts.” WHAT: Miami Motel Stories: MiMo WHEN: Nov. 30 - Dec 23, 2018 WHERE: Gold Dust by Selina, 7700 Biscayne Blvd. For tickets: www.MiamiMotel Stories.com

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Art Africa Miami Founder Neil Hall Explains Why ‘Black Art Matters’ By MIA Staff “Art stirs the soul and your imagination. The visual arts are a critical aspect to all of us as human beings. It started with the caveman just sketching things. It is important to our own psyche and thoughts.” – Neil Hall. Neil Hall is a licensed architect with a graduate degree from the University of Florida in Architecture and Design. Over the past 27 years, his architectural practice, The Hall Group, has developed an extensive resume in urban development consulting, urban planning, interior design, and architecture. Out of his passion for good design, Hall created The Urban Collective, an urban lifestyle boutique and design studio highlighting the rich aesthetics of African art, as well as, other unique handmade treasures from around the globe. In 2010, alarmed by the lack of diversity of artists and galleries featured in the country's largest and most prestigious art fair, “Art Basel Miami,” The Urban Collective produced “Art Africa Miami Arts Fair,” the first large-scale art fair solely featuring artists from the African diaspora in an 8,000-square-foot tent located in Miami’s Historic Overtown neighborhood. From its inaugural year in 2010, Art Africa has spawned Soul Basel, with over 14 additional fairs, art exhibitions, art talks and panel discussions in neighborhoods throughout South Florida, highlighting the contributions of artists from the diaspora. As a lover of art with a passion for community involvement in arts and culture, Hall has received numerous awards for his dedicated service to his community and profession. Describe yourself in exactly five words. Charming, creative, arrogant, kind, and honest. What would your dream architectural project be?

It has changed over the years, but today if you ask me that, my answer would be: I would like to create a wonderful art center in Overtown, that showcases our culture. If you weren't an architect, what would you do? I have never thought of any other profession. I wanted to be an architect since the age of six. I probably would’ve been a visual artist, and the last thing I think I would want to be is an attorney. What is the relationship between art and architecture? The relationship for me, art and architecture, I don’t think you can have buildings that are truly architecture without it having an artistic relevance. To me, that’s how we have integrated art and architecture, versus art and science. Architecture has always been coupled with art. It is just part of that creative juice that happens with all architects. We are frustrated artists, and it is reflective sometimes in our buildings. It saddens me sometimes when I see ugly buildings. I believe it came out a mind of an artist with a cold heart. What is your favorite building in Miami? The world? Miami has a few buildings that I admire. The one that has struck me from the day I came here is the Bacardi Building. I think it was done in 1963, I think by Gutierrez. That building is the Caribbean, it is Latin, and it is Miami. It has art all over it, yet it’s a beautiful architectural building. One of my favorite in the world, it wouldn’t be a favorite for any other artist or architect, is the Frank Lloyd Wright Falling Water. The reason for that one is because when I saw it I was blown away. Not only because of the setting at which it was done but the idea you can cantilever a space over a waterfall, caused me to desire to want to be an architect. In your opinion, what does the future of architecture and design

Art Africa Miami founder Neil Hall

look like? One of the things that caused me to enter this profession is that even today [Blacks] represent only 1 percent of architects in the nation. It’s a very elitist profession. I felt that I would grow up to change it. I went through a series of pathways, becoming president of our local Miami chapter of the American Institute of Architects. I thought I would be doing some incredible buildings, but those never came to pass. I think it has to do with my attitude. I have an attitude somewhat abrasive to clients considering I feel that we are not doing the type of architecture, the type of spaces such as minority communities that begin to look at the architecture of Black aesthetics. That’s just something that I have chased for the past 30 years. I am happy to believe I am beginning to affect that in another way through an initiative that I started about 8 years ago called Art Africa in Overtown. Hopefully, we can change that space with some of the architecture that will be coming up. We’ll see. How does architecture fulfill a social justice function? It is not yet fulfilled. We continue to beholden to a client base whose interest is not necessarily that. If we were to look at ourselves and look at what it can become. Housing, for instance, we have always as a community been redlined to various spaces. This is where you are supposed to be, you cannot go there, we do not want you here. If we can gain the confidence, we should be

designing spaces, how it fits us. One of the things that are unique to us, the Caribbean and Black people in general, we use our space and our streets as an outdoor space as our living room. I believe that when we start to design buildings such as homes, office buildings that begin to relate to our community, then I believe we can start to look at social justice as a method by which architecture can help. What can people who attend Art Africa this year look forward to? Why should they attend? One of the beautiful things about what we are doing with Art Africa is we are exposing the community, the nation, the world to the incredible talents that artists of African descent and minority, architects and minority parties have created. We believe we are one of the finest, most bold, most irreverent exhibitions that will be seen during Art Basel. Our theme this year is “Black Art Matters, It’s Not A Choice.” I encourage anyone that has any interest in art, community, and development, any interest in beautiful things, should come out to Art Africa. We are coining the phrase Soul Basel. Art Africa celebrates eight years of helping to transform arts and culture in Historic Overtown. The event will take place during Art Basel 2018 in Miami, December 5-9, 2018. Visit:www.artafricaMiamifair.com. Follow on Instagram @artafricamia


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Miami Infused with Artist Marcus Blake’s Creativity By Kallan Louis

Art of Black Miami contest winner Marcus Blake

The term “Renaissance Man” is often used when people talk about Marcus Blake. Born in Jamaica and raised in Miami, his “just try it” attitude has impacted Miami’s fashion, art, and poetry scenes. “I do it because it's necessary, Blake said. “One – because I live in this city, and two – because discovering a creative environment to be comfortable in here is rare. If you can’t find it, you just make it. That’s just my mentality with whatever I do.” As an artist, his work is prevalent across the city. He has createdvibrantly colored pieces using his signature style of “tapenology” and swirls on structures especially in Little Haiti and Little River. Blake’s “tapenology” uses tape to generate an artistic effect. Blake has also been commissioned for interior spaces including CIC Miami, a co-working space on N.W. 19 Street and N.W. 7 Avenue. In October, he was awarded the inaugural “Ellies 2018 Creator Award”

from Art Center/South Florida. The recognition comes with a $6,000 grant he said he will use for his “Miamilith” public art installation. The project will use slabs of concrete from the demolished Liberty Square housing complex to create public artwork around Liberty City. Blake’s first love was actually fashion, which he said was the seed that bloomed his creativity. His fashion line sparked his interest in drawing. He designed his own t-shirts using tape and acrylic paint. Some shirts featured poems he wrote. Blake never attended art school and as a child he didn’t dream about Marcus Blake's "American Pharoah" becoming a fashion designer. He was just creative and and performed on the local poetry inquisitive. He recalled a time as a kid scene. After spending time in when he painted the walls of his Amsterdam, he was inspired to host mother’s home. He told her he did open mic events where creatives not know why he did it, which was an could gather. The result evolved into answer his mother did not appreci“Stone Groove,” one of Miami’s most ate. But he now reflects that it was his popular open mic events, hosted at need to create. His natural curiosity The Vagabond and then Imperial at also led him to disassemble a The Stage Miami. number of his toys as part of his “The Vagabond experience taught creative interest. me a lot,” Blake said. “There’s no Blake, who enjoyed the Miami open mic event currently going on in Beach nightlife, became a regular on Miami to that capacity. The city the scene. He said he learned a lot misses it. During that era, every place from Gerry Kelly, haute couture had a stage and it was accustomed designer and Miami Beach nightlife for artist. Now there is no place like legend. Blake’s creativity also that.” extended into social entertainment. For now, Blake continues to focus He explained that when he reached on his art, but don’t be surprised to a point where he felt he could see him execute something out of the coordinate parties, he parlayed that box real soon. into organizing and hosting events. “I try to get away from using the Poetry is another hat Blake wears. term artist,” he explained. “I’m not He released multiple spoken word even sure what that is. I rather say I’m albums under the alias Sosa Black

a creative person. Art is what I am. I keep trying to come up with new ideas instead of manifesting on one great idea.”

First runner-up: Renee Rutherford's "Rooted in Love"


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Exhibit Honoring Iconic Painter Ernie Barnes to Debut in Overtown Performing Arts Center By Chris Norwood

"Critics Corner"

Ernie Barnes was an AfricanAmerican painter best known for his unique figurative style. His work was immortalized on everything from a classic television show to popular album covers. Art critic Frank Getlein called Barnes the creator of Neo-mannerism. Others called him “the most expressive painter of sports since George Bellows.” In 2009, Barnes died before completing an exhibition titled “Liberating Humanity From Within.” This exhibition would have been a return to the concept of “The Beauty of the Ghetto” exhibition, which marked the beginning of Barnes’ genre period that debuted in 1972 at the distinguished Heritage Gallery. To honor his 80-year anniversary, there is now a unique opportunity to share and sell never-before-seen masterpieces from Barnes’ posthumous exhibition. Hampton Art Lovers presents “Eyes Closed” at the Overtown Performing Arts Center, Dec. 5-10. Admission is free. The event is in partnership with the Ernie Barnes Estate, International Review of African-American Art, Miami CRA, Chairman Keon Hardemon, The Black Archives, Urban Collective, Key West Africana, Brooklyn Combine, and UPS (The Fountains of Boynton Beach). Barnes’ art has been admired and collected internationally. His national

traveling “The Beauty of the Ghetto” exhibition in the 1970s featured some of his timeless works, including: “Storyteller,” “High Aspirations,” “The Graduate,” and his most famous “The Sugar Shack.” During this period, almost all of the people in Barnes’ paintings were depicted with their faces obscured or their eyes closed. Barnes once explained, “I won’t paint people with their eyes open. We don’t see each other. We are blind to each other’s humanity.” Barnes was the first professional athlete to become a renowned artist after playing six years in the NFL. In 1966, the New York Jets owner signed him as a free agent. In what was one of the most unusual moves in the history of the NFL, Barnes was retained as a salaried player, but was positioned in front of his canvas instead of on the football field. The Jets owner told Barnes, “You have more value to the country as an artist than as a football player.” Before beginning a nationwide tour to museums around the country, “The Beauty of the Ghetto” exhibition, which featured Barnes’ famous 1971 “The Sugar Shack” dance scene, was hosted by such dignitaries as Ethel Kennedy, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson, and Durham (North Carolina) Mayor James Hawkins.

"In the Moment"

“The Sugar Shack,” which appeared on the “Good Times” television show, became his most iconic image of the era. Singers also loved his artwork for their album covers. Marvin Gaye used “The Sugar Shack” for his album “I Want You” (1976). Other cover artwork included “Late Night DJ” for Curtis Mayfield’s “Something to Believe In” (1980), an untitled painting for Donald Byrd’s “Donald Byrd and 125th Street, NYC” (1979), “Head Over Heels” for The Crusaders, “The Good and Bad Times” (1986), and “In Rapture” for B.B. King’s “Making Love is Good for You” (2000).

"The Runway"


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Historian Pays Homage to the Harlem Renaissance, Restoring 15-Room Hotel in the Heart of Overtown By Shelly-Ann Parkinson Kristin Kitchen is The founding partner and CEO of the newlyrenovated Dunns Josephine Hotel, located at 1028 NW 3rd Avenue in Historic Overtown. When this 15-room Harlem Renaisance-themed boutique hotel opens its doors to guests this year, Kitchen and her partners in this project will undoubtedly experience a monumental sense of relief and excitement in restoring not only a physical structure, but restoring pride to a once flourishing Black community. Former Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence Jones first approached Kitchen about this hotel project six years ago. This was because of Kitchen's established success as a historian and her background of taking older properties and bringing them back to life. Kitchen is a founding member of a brand of hotels called the Sojourn Heritage Accommodations, which encourages community tourism, sourcing products from Black-owned artisans and businesses, and hiring from shelters with the thinking that these community partners will become business ambassadors. Before opening the Dunns Josephine Hotel, Kitchen also owned the Six Acres Bed and Breakfast Inn in Cincinnati, Ohio, another historic site she renovated, which was once a part of the Underground Railroad. It was the rich history of Overtown and the opportunity to tell the story of the Dunn and Josephine Hotels (originally two separate hotels that eventually merged)—now the last remaining hotel structure left in Overtown since segregation—that attracted Kitchen to this project. She is joined by business partners Shirlene Ingraham, owner of Jackson’s Soul Food Restaurant, and Graylyn Swilley-Woods, of the Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau.

When guests check in to the Dunns Josephine Hotel, they will know why Overtown was once called the 'Harlem of the South'. Kitchen credits the tireless efforts of Commissioner Keon Hardemon and the Miami Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for helping to fund the project. According to Kitchen, Miami-Dade County's tedious permitting issues didn’t always make it easy and there were several hurdles to overcome. Kitchen shared that the hardest part was “just getting it done.” The Dunn and Josephine Hotel, as it was first known, was originally built in 1938. It was later rebuilt in 1947. Until six years ago, the building housed a barbershop and a shoe shop and thus had to be gutted to restore it to the original hotel design. Modern features were added to what’s now known as the Dunns Josephine Hotel, including hurricane windows and bathrooms in every suite, which was not customary in early hotels. The property has also been updated for ADA compliance. When guests check into the new Dunns Josephine Hotel, they will know why Overtown was once called the “Harlem of the South.” Each suite is a biographical shrine to some of the greatest Black figures of the Harlem Renaissance: Nat king Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, the Nicholas Brothers, Billie Holiday, Madame C.J. Walker, Josephine Baker, Langston Hughes, Marcus Garvey, Cab Calloway,

Kristin Kitchen stands in the lobby of the new Dunns Josephine Hotel which she plans to open this fall.

William H. Johnson, Aaron Douglas, Zora Neale Hurston, and Moms Mabley, to name a few. It was in this very space where these notable Black figures found a safe-haven during segregation and where the Black elite of Overtown sustained itself. After decades of urban decay and neglect, that appeared to have raped the soul of Overtown, Kitchen and her fellow business leaders are visionaries who are aware that Black communities did, indeed, flourish when they held the power. Kitchen said that this may be the answer to present-day gentrification. Kitchen plans to expand her brand. At The Dunns Josephine,

there is a wine shop and a bar on premises that serves products produced by wine makers from across the African Diaspora. A complimentary bottle of wine comes with each suite. Other amenities include locally-handcrafted shea butter, a full healthy breakfast, Wi-Fi, cable television, and a library where guests can learn about local and national historical Black figures. “I'm just thrilled! It is a model to take across the country,” said Kitchen. “We have an amazing opportunity to create these spaces.” By creating these spaces, Kitchen said she is returning a sense of pride to communities like Overtown that are distinctly “for us, by us.”


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018

A Tribute to Miami Photographer Adrian D. Freeman By Russell Motley

Through his camera lens, Adrian D. Freeman shared his photographic art with Miami and the world. On Nov. 9, the beloved father, husband, photographer, author, speaker and friend to many, died following a long battle with cancer. He was 45. “He was one of our artists capturing the lives of black people throughout South Florida,” said Jessica Garrett Modkins, Freeman’s friend and founder of Hip Rock Star advertising agency. Freeman was the driving force behind AFreeman Photography. He was known as the “go to guy” for portraits and event coverage in South Florida. With high-profile clients such as Miami-Dade County, the City of Miramar, Florida Memorial University, the Trayvon Martin Foundation and the Black Archives at the Historic Lyric Theater, Freeman worked diligently to produce dazzling images for all his clients. According to Modkins, one of Freeman’s proudest moments was when he was commissioned in 2017 to photograph the powerful images of influential Black men in Miami. “Being selected by Miami-Dade County’s Black Affairs Advisory Board to shoot these amazing gentlemen was an honor,” Freeman shared with Modkins. “It’s not an easy feat to schedule the busiest men in South Florida for a photo shoot, but we

H.T. Smith, attorney and law professor

managed to make it happen.” The project was called “Triumphant Spirits: Portraits of African American Men” which featured some 40 South Florida men who have made an impact on the communities they serve. The photographs on this page show Freeman celebrating the opening of the exhibit. In addition to being a successful photographer, Freeman was also the executive director of L.E.A.D Nation (Leaders by Empowerment, Activists by Development), a non-profit organization that mentors students and produces the largest youth summit in South Florida. Under his leadership, 100 percent of participating students graduated high school and enrolled in college. “I am so happy Adrian was able to resign from his corporate job at the University of Miami and pursue his passion of photography full time,” said Modkins. “He was called to do this. He lived out his passion.”

Alvin West, Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau vice president and CFO

Adrian D. Freeman

Adrian D. Freeman shares a moment with his family at the “Triumphant Spirits: Portraits of African American Men” exhibit in February 2017.

Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert

Jeff Cazeau, North Miami city attorney

Attorney Robert Holland


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Creed II Director Scores TKO with Latest Franchise Installment By Russell Motley

Steven Caple Jr. was just 2 years old when “Rocky V” premiered in theaters in 1988. Now 30, the Hollywood newcomer has added “Creed II,” the latest installment of Sylvester Stallone’s “Rocky” franchise, to his film directing credits. And it all came with the blessings of some heavy hitters, including Stallone, Michael B. Jordan (Adonis Creed), and “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler, who directed the 2015 “Creed.” “They all gave me the head nod,” Caple told MIA magazine while sitting at a Hollywood Starbucks, as part of the South Florida leg of his national press tour. “[They told me] just do what you need to do. Your style, your way. That felt reassuring.” Caple said he joined “Creed II” after Coogler, his USC film school classmate, passed on the project to focus on the forthcoming “Black Panther” sequel. Caple was discovered following his 2016 feature debut “The Land,” about a group of Cleveland teens who dream of becoming professional skateboarders, which he wrote and directed. Almost overnight, Caple jumped from indie filmmaker to big-studio writer and director. With Stallone’s franchise on his shoulders, he said his job simply required good storytelling—both inside, yet mostly outside, the boxing ring.

“I’m hoping people have a memorable experience,” said Caple, who Forbes named one of 2017’s 30 Under 30 in Hollywood and Entertainment. “The first time I saw Creed was in a Black movie theater in Crenshaw and just to hear the people walk out talking about Adonis and Apollo as if they were real boxers tripped me out.” Caple’s goal: to take the movie to the next level. Adonis Creed has been challenged to a fight by Viktor Drago, the son of the Russian boxer responsible for killing Adonis’s father, Apollo Creed, in a tragic match. Most of the movie is spent peeling back the layers of Adonis Creed, watching him mature, start a family, and connect with the dead father he never knew. “In the first movie he was very much a boy trying to figure it out, trying to get out of his dad’s shadow. Now he’s a man trying to create his legacy and that’s what he’s focused on.” “Creed II’s” Thanksgiving week opening is expected to surpass its $50 million budget. Caple is optimistic this won’t be the final time movie goers see Adonis Creed enter the ring. “If this one holds up, which I think it does, and people respond to it, I think [Michael B. Jordan] wants to keep it alive,” said Caple.

In a scene from “Creed II,” Adonis Creed heads to the ring to Viktor Drago.

“Creed II” director Steven Caple discusses a fight scene with Michael B. Jordon.

Michael B. Jordan listens as director Steven Caple gives direction before shooting a scene.

Steven Caple went from indie filmmaker to big-studio director with “Creed II.”

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018

ALL ACCESS Fifth annual Art of Black Miami kick-off event inside the Brightline Central Station in Overtown on November 8, 2018. Art of Black Miami is organized by the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau.

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4 1. Brightline COO Chris Siergo and Carol Henderson 2. Connie Kinnard, GMCVB VP Multicultural Tourism addressing Art of Black Miami audience at Brightline 3. Marilyn Holifield, Holland and Knight; Gene Prescott, Biltmore Hotel; William Talbert III, GMCVB; Henry Crespo, Urgent, Inc. 4. Jazz Saxophonist Kirk Whalum 5. Rosie Gordon-Wallace with artist Sanford Biggers

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6. GMCVB team with Kirk Whalum

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Miami Dolphins Football Unite Program stops at Chef Creole restaurant as part of its cultural tour.

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AfriCOBRA: Messages to the People and its Impact 50 Years Later, sponsored by Art Africa Miami Arts Fair 2018, Nov. 20, Overtown.

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1. Chef Creole owner Wilkinson "Ken" Sejour

1. Donna Marie Baptiste, Art African consultant; Jeffreen Hayes, Art Africa executive director and curator; Franklin Sirmans, Perez Art Museum director; Neil Hall, Art Africa founder

2. Miami-Dade Commissioner Audrey Edmonson 3. Children enjoy food at Chef Creole

2. Neil Hall, Donnamarie Baptiste, Jeffreen Hayes, Franklin Sirmans, Marilyn Holifield 3. Franklin Sirmans, director of the Perez Art Museum Miami

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4. Neil Hall


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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2018 Art of Black - MIA Magazine  

2018 Art of Black - MIA Magazine  

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