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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

The Rise from Chief Nurse to Chief Executive Officer

MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

Broward Health System CEO Gino Santorio Takes Strides to Service Black Community

Leah Carpenter

Brings Unique Leadership to Memorial Hospital West

Nursing Excellence Baptist Health Exec. Reveals What It Takes to Maintain Top Staff

Mental Health Education in Palm Beach Public Schools Promises to Improve Classroom Success

Leah Carpenter

Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019 6 BROWARD MAYOR’S REPORT By Mayor Dale V.C. Holness

THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT

By Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh

7 MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

By Stanley Zamor

8 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP Local Nurse Organizations Advocate for Patient Care and Professional Inclusion By Kallan Louis

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE By Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin

9 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP Wellington Regional’s Interim Chief Nursing Officer Hopes to Use Role to Bring Positive Change By Christian Portilla

EXECUTIVE SUITE Chief Nursing Officer See Challenges, Positive Strides in Healthcare Industry By Josie Gulliksen

10 COVER STORY Memorial West CEO Leads with Passion and Compassion

By Zach Rinkins

12 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake 14  Broward Health Takes Strides to Service Black Community

Why aren’t there more African-American doctors? It’s an important question facing the healthcare industry. And I’m not just talking about medical doctors. Why don’t we see more Black dentists filling our cavities, Black nurses taking our blood pressure, Black psychiatrists treating our mental disorders, and Black hospital administrators calling the shots? African-American men and women made up just 6 percent of all U.S. physicians in 2008; 6.9 percent of enrolled medical students in 2013; and 7.3 percent of all medical school applicants, according to a study published last year in the journal AIMS Public Health. In this issue of Legacy magazine, we honor that talented 6 percent by introducing

you to our selection of South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019. Perhaps the driving force responsible for producing the most African-American healthcare professionals is Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Just ask some of our honorees: Community Health of South Florida V.P. Jean Pierre of Florida A&M University; Broward Health’s LaRae P. Floyd of Florida Memorial University; and Walgreens pharmacy leader Dr. Lekeshia Bush of FAMU. Bush says HBCUs are a key factor in this equation for a few reasons: Their academic programs are designed to embrace and nurture the next generation of physicians and students traditionally follow in the footsteps of family members who attended an HBCU. Bush suggests this debunks any notion that HBCUs are no longer relevant. “Are they relevant? The answer is emphatically yes because the playing field is not even and there’s so much that you will not get at other institutions like the sense of (HBCU) pride and the requirement of African-American studies,” Bush said. Some experts have even identified a correlation between Black physicians and the health of the Black community. “African-American doctors are

woefully underrepresented in the physician workforce, leading fewer African Americans to see a doctor,” said Dr. William F. Owen Jr., dean and chancellor of Ross University School of Medicine (based in Barbados with a campus in Miramar), in a press release announcing its partnership with Oakwood University in Huntsville, Ala. to create a pathway program for graduates of the HBCU to attend medical school. “This has significant negative healthcare outcomes in communities already prone to high rates of chronic diseases.” The AIMS Public Health study suggests that diversifying the medical field is a job that shouldn’t only be shouldered by HBCUs. In fact, all colleges and universities should be creating more opportunities and pipelines for aspiring Black healthcare professionals. In the words of Marian Wright Edelman, “You can’t be what you can’t see.” This is why I hope our younger readers look closely at the faces in this special healthcare issue to see exactly what they, too, can become.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

By Denise Lothian

 rowth in Local NAHSE Highlights Need G for More C-Suite Healthcare Leadership By Kallan Louis

15 BUSINESS REPORT

By Beatrice Louissaint

PALM BEACH REPORT

By Ann Marie Sorrell

16 YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

By Soulan Johnson

MONEY MATTERS

By Joann Milord

17 ABOUT TOWN • Broward Black Chamber of Commerce Luncheon • Arsht Center and Kindred Arts Unveil “All Power to All People” Sculpture • Groundbreaking Ceremony for Barbara J. Jordan Community Health and Wellness Center 18 LEGACY BRIEFS

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor

Shannel Escoffery Vice President

Sabrina Moss-Solomon

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Designer

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Joe Wesley Cover Photo

Rory Lee

Cover Makeup Artist

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019

ALIYA AARON

CEO & Principal AMR Healthcare Consulting LLC

GARY MICHAEL CLAY, JR., M.D.

Doctor Jessie Trice Community Health System Inc.

DR. STEPHEN HENRY

Primary Care, Sports Medicine - Uhealth Sports Medicine

DR. VENUS MILLER

Family & Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Time To Talk For Real Inc , VM Consulting Firm, LLC, Jessie Health Community Health Center, Inc

DIANE AMADO-TATE

Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Baptist Health South FloridaDoctors Hospital

DR. J’NELLE DELICA

Periodontist and Implant Surgeon Delicate Periodontics and Implant Dentistry

KEITH JONES

Vascular and Endovascular Surgeon Tenet Healthcare

JANICE MITCHELL

Associate Vice President of Hospital Revenue Cycle Operation Broward Health

KIMBERLY PRINCE, DC

Chiropractic Physician Florida Spine and Joint Institute

DR. CAROL BIGGS, MBA-HA, DHSC

CHERYL BREWSTER

LEKESHIA BUSH

Chief Nursing Officer Jackson Memorial Hospital

Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

LARAE FLOYD

EVA M FRANCIS MN, RN, CCRN,NEA-BC President Brilliant Healthcare Training and Consulting Inc.

Research Assistant Professor - UHealth

ROMAINE LAYNE

PAMELA MANNING MSN.ED, MSN, APRN, AGNP-BC

Manager, Supply Chain Operations & Business Development Broward Health

Chief Financial Officer at Broward Health Imperial Point Broward Health Imperial Point

DR. LYN M. PEUGEOT

Dr. Lyn M. Peugeot Assistant Professor Ron and Kathy Assaf College of Nursing Nova Southeastern University

NETONUA REYES, MSN, RN

Chief Operations & Nursing Officer Broward Health Imperial Point

Nurse Practitioner Legacy Advanced Health

JEAN D. PIERRE JR

Vice President/Chief Behavioral Health Officer Community Health of South Florida

NATALIE ROWLES, D.C.

Chiropractic Physician Florida Spine and Joint Institute

DORINDA CAROLINA

Pharmacy Manager Walgreens at Jessie Trice Community Health Center

Chief Human Resources Officer UHealth

SOPHIA GEORGE

MELLISSA HEATH, MBA, MSN, RN

DR. TIFFANY MCCALLA BOTTORFF

GRANT S. MCGAUGH

Medical Doctor TLJMS

DR. GARVEY PINKSTON II, PHARM. D

CEO & Co-Founder of Southern Hills Pharmacy Southern Hills Pharmacy

JUDY-ANN ROYE MSN, APRN, FNP-C Family Nurse Practitioner Founder/President of Black Nurse Practitioners of Palm Beach County

Interim Chief Nursing Officer Wellington Regional Medical Center

Managing Director 5Star BDM

KIA NICOLE PRESCOTT DNP, APRN, WHNP-BC

Doctor of Nursing Practice, Women’s Health Advanced Practitioner- Board Certified Jessie Trice Community Health System

DR. ANGELA WALKER

South Regional Manager/Doctor Of Chiropractic Florida Spine & Joint Institute


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

BROWARD MAYOR'S REPORT

Mission as Mayor Moves Broward Forward with Prosperity for All

BY MAYOR DALE V.C. HOLNESS

I’ve been a resident of Broward County for more than 45 years, and I believe this is one of the best places to live, work, and raise a family. For all the great things that Broward County has to offer, there are many who have been left behind and are less fortunate. For those who are struggling, we must do what we can to help uplift

them. There are critical areas that affect our community: unemployment, affordable housing, education, healthcare, criminal justice, our local economy, environment, traffic congestion, and pollution. There are zip codes in Broward County with unemployment rates of 10 percent and some neighborhoods with rates higher than 15 percent. Yes, our economy is doing well with a median income of $51, 000, however almost 15 percent of our population lives in poverty. According to the “United Way Alice Report,” 50 percent of our people struggle to make ends meet. We need to improve the wages earned by the Black population, many who are living from paycheck to paycheck. We have an affordable housing crisis with many people being homeless. Though we’re building many housing units, our home ownership rate lags the national average.

The educational system in Broward County works diligently to educate our population, yet we have many gaps in the system. There are many jobs that go unfilled because we don’t have people trained for these positions. We spend in excess of $250 million per year to keep people in jail, many of whom are there because of mental illness, drug addiction, and poverty. Our black youth are disproportionately arrested and charged compared to other youth of other races. Criminal justice reform is critical. There are many people without access to healthcare, especially mental healthcare. We also need to better train medical and emergency response personnel about how to interact with individuals who suffer from mental health illnesses. There are environmental issues

that we must plan for so we will have a resilient community for our kids and grandkids. We passed a Penny Tax for Transportation last year, now we must work together to quickly and efficiently implement our plan to reduce traffic congestion and pollution. In order to address these critical areas, we must work together. This is part of my Broward 2050 plan. My mission as mayor of Broward County for the next year is to empower our community, strengthen our households and businesses, create policies that afford access to opportunities, and unify everyone across racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. We must set benchmarks and goals that address these critical issues in order to improve the lives of residents and make Broward County an inclusive, prosperous community for all.

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THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT

Broward County Urban League Addresses Causes of Community Health Challenges

BY DR. GERMAINE SMITH-BAUGH

Good health and access to healthcare are at the crux of our ability to live, work, and play in our communities. We are in a season when we are renewing our commitment to the fight for healthy living. Yet, health equity at times escapes our grasp. Without access to quality care, we find persistent and concerning disparities that run across infant and maternal health, chronic disease

prevalence and mental health and substance abuse that disproportionately affect minority populations. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, Florida has the third largest Black population in the nation and has one of the highest rates of uninsured in the nation, with millions now living without health insurance. In Broward County, the uninsured rate was 14.5 percent, according to the Sun Sentinel. The health of our community goes beyond just the numbers or the surface causes of disease. We aim to go deeper to understand both social and economic determinants and to get to the root causes of well-being and illness. These are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age. In partnership with key community leaders including Sunshine Health and the Children’s Services Council, our State of Black Broward Health Report in 2013 found troubling

data about the health of our residents. Sadly in 2019, many of the disparities still remain. For example, we know the United States is the only developed country in the world where maternal mortality has actually increased in recent decades. The outlook is even grimmer for Black women, who are three to four times more likely to die during or after pregnancy than White women. In Broward County, Black infants die at three times the rate of their White or Hispanic counterparts. Additionally, Non-Hispanic Blacks are more than three times as likely to die from HIV/AIDS when compared to Hispanics and NonHispanic Whites. In fact, in 2018, Blacks accounted for more than 57 percent of all deaths from HIV/AIDS in Broward County. With an acute focus on the social and economic determinants of health, the Urban League of Broward County strives to respond to the call to address

the underlying causes of health challenges in our community. We are investing in individuals to build strong, resilient communities and promoting a culture of health. Because we know that community health impacts individual health, the Urban League hosts several events throughout the year to advance good health and to share knowledge that can save lives and families. We ensure that our families and children have equal access to the necessary resources to live healthy and prosperous lives. The Baughtom Line is This: We are making strides in improving health outcomes but we are not there yet. As community leaders, we must continue our efforts to eradicate these disparities for all Broward County citizens. Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh is president and CEO of the Urban League of Broward County. n


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Mutual Agreement, Not War, is Goal of Mediation

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

As I closed the door, exhaled and turned to take my seat at the head of the 16-person table, I again noticed the impressive tech-heavy modern conference room. As I looked at the adverse parties and observed the mountains of papers, binders, notes, pens, highlighters and personnel on both sides, I surmised that both sides

came prepared for war. My opening statement was short and concise. I focused on being open to exploring the value of a diversity of perspectives and ideas. Once I saw the plaintiff’s attorney’s smirk and give a “low key” grin, I paused, broke protocol, stood up and said to that attorney, “Why are you here today?” They were silent and appeared caught off guard. Then I turned to the other attorney, “Did you come here to WIN, or negotiate?” Again, another surprised expression. I continued. “We are here to negotiate. We are here to hear and explore opportunities of resolution that may not be what we saw possible. Mediation is not an opportunity to impress upon the mediator how sound your case is or how flawed the opposing side is, or how “stare decisis law” compels your legal position… Although you may feel the merits of your case is just. It is the ambiguity that has not allowed you to prevail yet…

So! Here, we are. What do you want? And how much are you willing to mutually agree to so you can fight the next fight, move past this issue so you can engage in more pressing ones?” The room was silent, but the faces were easily understood. This mediation was not going to be like others. Mediation never has to be a continuation of what they experienced in court. Mediation is an opportunity to learn, grow, explore solutions and go beyond the strategic moves litigation offers. Litigation is war. Meditation is the first and only time where selfdetermination can be achieved. As you engage and prepare with your legal team and/or legal counsel, ask yourself, “At the end of the day what do I want to achieve?” If you want to destroy your adversary or embarrass your former spouse, business partner, relative, friend or employer, mediation may not be what you need or expect. I have seen the ugliest of relationships find solace,

healing, empathy, understanding and respect within the construct of a “wellfacilitated” mediation process, by a full-time dedicated skilled neutral (not a part-timer). Do you really want war or mutual agreement? Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/arbitration rosters and mediates with the Agree2Disagree (ATD) Mediation Group. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, crosscultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediation consultants.com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Local Nurse Organizations Advocate for Patient Care and Professional Inclusion BY KALLAN LOUIS

As the majority of the Baby Boomer generation have entered elder age, medical needs of this large group are growing, and so is the price of care. Area nurse practitioners, who also serve in local advocacy leadership roles for Black nurses, say healthcare affordability remains a major concern. “One of the biggest issues I see is how difficult it is for people living with chronic conditions to obtain the necessary health care,” said Judy-Ann Roye, founder and president of Black Nurse Practitioner of Palm Beach County. “The percentage is high and I think the cause of this is not having access to affordable health insurance.” Roye said as the cost of healthcare increases, some patients are unable to get the level of care needed to prevent chronic illnesses and diseases from developing. “This leads to an increase in severely ill patients and higher hospital bills as well as increased healthcare costs,” she explained. “Patients are worried that if

diverse makeup of its patients, many of whom rely on organizations to advocate on their behalf for fair access, treatment, and care. Of the more than 2.8 million registered nurses in the country, less than 10 percent self-identify as Black, according to Avis Spradley Brown Judy-Ann Roye data compiled by president, Palm Beach County founder and president, Black Nurse Black Nurses Association Practitioner of Palm Beach County Minority Nurse trade magazine. they don’t have a managed care cover, Black and Latino nurses remain they won’t get the same level of treatment underrepresented in nursing compared to that a person with traditional insurance their makeup in South Florida, according would.” to Dr. Avis Spradley Brown, president of With the understanding that cultural the PBC Black Nurses Association. perspective is pivotal as the country The mission of the PBCBNA is to continues to become more diverse, bring nurses together, with the aim to organizations like the BNP Palm Beach advocate and empower persons of color County and Palm Beach County Black to make significant improvements in their Nurses Association also strive to make health status. sure the healthcare profession reflects the

“Nursing has historically been a predominantly ‘white woman’s occupation,’ but for the last decade, the workforce is trending closer to a reflective composite of our population,” Brown said. “While the nursing workforce is still disproportionate to our nation’s composite, it is a trend in the right direction as we have become a more racially and ethnically heterogeneous state.” Roye added that being able to understand perspectives helps nurses provide better care to patients. Brown and Roye lead organizations that are providing support to local black nurses in numerous ways, including the implementation of student mentoring programs, and advocating for mental health awareness for patients and colleagues. They say in an industry that the Department of Labor expects to remain in high demand over the next 10 years, professional organizations for nurse practitioners will be integral to diversify the industry. n

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Take Steps to Stay in the Black in 2020

Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Esq.

BY SHAHEEWA JARRETT GELIN

At the end of each year, everyone tends to slow down a bit to relax. This year, however, take a moment, perhaps one day, to reflect on how your company performed this year. Don’t wait until the new year to do this. Did you increase your revenue? If so, what was the cause? If not, why not? Did you add an

additional product or service? How did it perform? Where did you go wrong? You have to understand where you are in order to create a pathway forward to more money. Every company wants to end the year in the black, meaning making a profit. It allows you to demonstrate that you are a stable, revenue-generating company which reflects well when you go after contracts. Based upon some of the feedback and observations we made in 2019, we offer the following recommendations to help you stay in the black in 2020.

Customer Service - A sure way

to lose revenue is to have bad service. Routinely measure the customer experience with your company, whether it is via an online survey or personal inquiry. You have to know what you are doing right and what you need to improve. Don’t shy away from constructive feedback. Lean in and get customer suggestions about how you

can improve as well. Every business, large and small, will get something wrong from time to time. The important step is to CORRECT the mistake and put policies in place to prevent it from happening in the future.

Professional appearance - Make

your logo, email, and website do the talking. Your public facing presence has to be professional and coordinated. If you have a company, please do not have an @yahoo or @gmail email address. I see this from business owners of all backgrounds. Buy a domain name and go to G Suite, where you can pay $6 a month for an email address associated with your company. Get a logo and website professionally designed, with a media kit etc. We have a Chamber company that can do this for you. The saying is true, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. You will not be considered for contacting opportunities when you fail to deliver on the basics. I have heard this from

customers and buyers in the public and private sectors. Do not go into 2020 without addressing these fundamentals.

Bulk Up - Look bigger and better in

2020. By its very definition, a small business is small. This fact may leave a small business incapable of going after bigger opportunities, covering a larger regional area, or connecting with more customers. Overcome those limitations by forming partnerships and joint ventures with other companies. Make a point to meet with someone in your direct or complementary industry to figure out how you can work together for a mutual benefit. This will unlock additional revenue that you could not have earned on your own.

Make 2020 your best year ever! Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq. is president of the Broward County Black Chamber. n


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Wellington Regional’s Interim Chief Nursing Officer Hopes to Use Role to Bring Positive Change

Mellissa Heath

BY CHRISTIAN PORTILLA

As the interim chief nursing officer at Wellington Regional Medical Center, Mellissa Heath says she starts

each day the same way: checking in with her physicians and other leadership within the hospital. She also goes visits the nursing units and checks on patients. For her, it’s always about patient safety and satisfaction. “I’m responsible for budgeting the overall nursing staff,” said the Boca Raton native, who began her nursing career in 1999 when she graduated from Broward College, eventually earning her MBA from Florida Atlantic University. “I also have a hand at recruiting and retention along with our HR department, and I’m also responsible for productivity and that we meet the demands of our patients while also containing costs,” Heath said. Although Heath is currently in the interim position, she says it has been a

“blessing” to be allowed to learn and make decisions with her staff as their CNO. She says she loved her role as director and never considered a career as a CNO, but now as interim CNO she has been able to merge what she sees every day on the nursing floor and take the feedback and experiences to the level of decision making. “Sitting in this role has given me a different perspective, a positive perspective, and now I can genuinely in the future and now impact nursing even more than when I was in a director role,” Heath said. “I can bring the nursing issues we face on the floor into the boardroom so that the administrative team knows what is happening out there. Sometimes administrators have competing priorities, and we don’t

always know what other entities are facing. In this role, I can voice the challenges and positives others face.” One of the topics Heath consistently keeps at the top of her mind is her nursing team. She says that there is no job a single person can do without the help of others. Most recently, in a demonstration of the teamwork within the unit, the Wellington Regional Medical Center obtained the Nationally Recognized Leapfrog “A” grade for the last two quarters for patient safety. “You can’t be successful without other people. Everyone has to be on board to reach their goals,” Heath said. “My team knows they can count on me and I on them.” n

EXECUTIVE SUITE

Chief Nursing Officer Sees Challenges, Positive Strides in Healthcare Industry

Diane Amado-Tate, vice president and chief nursing officer at Baptist Health South Florida

BY JOSIE GULLIKSEN

With nearly three decades in the nursing profession, Diane AmadoTate, vice president and chief nursing officer at Baptist Health South Florida, can attest to the many challenges faced in her profession.

After 27 years in the healthcare industry, Amado-Tate said she has seen constant changes. “I’ve seen regulatory, reimbursement,and quality ratings changes, plus the introduction of the Affordable Healthcare Act (Obamacare),” she said. “In nursing, we deal with technology changes, nurse burnout, and sicker patients.” Those “sicker patients” are mainly because of the boom in urgent care centers throughout South Florida. Hospitals now see patients with more severe health issues because patients with less life-threatening injuries or ailments can visit an Urgent Care Center. “All of this has shifted the acuity level of patients,” she explained. The large population of Baby Boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964), are also now collecting Medicare, using their healthcare resources.

“People nowadays are much more conscious of hospitals and what is covered by their insurance plans,” she shared. “They can research on the Internet for this as well as the hospital’s ratings for quality care. Hospitals have to show the government they’re providing high quality care.” Her day-to-day responsibilities include overseeing Doctors Hospital where she reports directly to the CEO and oversees patient care and services. “I’ll visit the director of a certain department to discuss any issues they may be facing. It’s part of my duties overseeing the entire healthcare team.” Amado-Tate said she has witnessed positive changes, including improved quality of care, mainly because, “…hospitals are held accountable for this and are penalized by the government if it’s not up to standards. Also, we’ve seen a shift in care from inpatient to outpatient.”

For example, patients with hip replacements are normally released in 24 hours because studies indicate they heal better at home. Also, nurses are now graduating with bachelor’s degrees, which helps with the typical shortage of nurses in the industry. Amado-Tate considers herself fortunate to work for a highly-rated institution like Baptist Health. “We’re 10 hospitals from Palm Beach to the Florida Keys and maintain some of the highest quality ratings in the industry.” In May, Baptist Hospital achieved Magnet Designation, the highest designation a hospital can receive. “Only 7 percent of hospitals in the country have achieved it,” she said. “We received it for nursing excellence. It was a long journey and lots of hard work and we’re very proud.” n


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COVER STORY

Memorial West CEO Leads with Passion and Compassion BY ZACH RINKINS

Leah A. Carpenter is not a typical business leader. She overcame poverty and a physical disability to rise and earn a spot as one of South Florida’s few AfricanAmerican CEOs of a major healthcare enterprise. Her tenacity and ascension prove this service-oriented executive is anything but typical. McKinsey & Company’s recent Women in the Workplace report reveals only 1-in-25 C-suite leaders is a woman of color and only 1-in-10 black women ever interact with senior leaders about their work. Despite her cultural pride, the Newark, New Jersey native does not consider that designation worthy of much conversation or promotion. “I don’t look at that anymore,” declared Carpenter, administrator and CEO of Memorial Hospital West, a multi-disciplinary, fullservice healthcare complex located in Pembroke Pines. “I no longer compartmentalize myself, other than to know I have to work harder and longer. I am very convinced that regardless of my color, ethnicity, or religious background, I deserve to be at that table just like everybody else.” As MHW’s top administrator, Carpenter is passionate about empowering healthcare providers with resources to deliver excellent healthcare to patients. “My No. 1 priority is to make sure patients and families have absolutely everything that they need from a quality, safety, and service standpoint,” Carpenter continued. “We do all that we can to make sure that we have the funding to give every single person who comes into our facilities the highest quality of care, regardless of their ability to pay. It is equally important that the people who work for us have everything that they need to fulfill that mission.” Originally a nurse, Carpenter started in Memorial Healthcare System’s six-hospital system more than 18 years ago. Since then, she

Memorial Hospital West CEO Leah Carpenter visits the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, which holds special meaning to her. Carpenter started her career as a nurse caring for newborns.

has served as the chief nursing officer at two facilities and CEO at three hospitals. If she had her way, Carpenter would still be caring for patients as a nurse. “I experienced progressive hearing loss over my career,” reveals Carpenter, who worked in various pediatric and obstetric nursing specialties. She recounts her time in

Like many hard-charging professionals, Carpenter was at a crossroads and was forced to make a career transition. Her decision launched a journey that included progressive management and leadership opportunities. “When I was younger, I thought the only impact I could make was at the bedside clinically,” she recalled. “I began to realize through education “I no longer compartmentalize myself, and mentoring that I could have a greater other than to know I have to work even if I wasn’t harder and longer. I am very convinced impact physically touching the that regardless of my color, ethnicity, or patient.” religious background, I deserve to be at The registered nurse eventually worked that table just like everybody else.” as a charge nurse, clinical manager, nurse manager, and the neonatal intensive care unit as her, director. She also ran an outpatient “love of all loves.” program, was appointed acting “If I had my druthers, I would’ve CNO, and later became MHS’ first stayed bedside taking care of patients African-American CNO and hospital for the rest of my career. But, CEO. She highlights, “Designing, losing your hearing is a problem building, and opening up Memorial because you cannot do good patient Hospital Miramar,” as her crowning assessments.” professional achievement. Adding,

“the team was amazing. Very few executives get that experience in their healthcare careers.” Carpenter encourages aspiring leaders to enhance their competence, seek mentors, and strengthen their intangibles. When hiring prospects, she looks for “passion and compassion.” “Though important, your resume is probably the least important to me. I look for the things that are not on your resume,” Carpenter said. “I am looking for passion and compassion. I must see a selfless drive to want to do the right thing for the right reason every time. Why do they want to do the job? What is it that they’re going to bring to the job from inside of who they are? Those are the things that are more important to me.” That personal conviction extends from her professional responsibilities into her community service. “Premature babies are near and dear to my heart,” shared Carpenter, whose son was born prematurely. “I work with the March of Dimes and the American Diabetes Association,” added Carpenter, an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. and the YMCA. Carpenter says she gets tremendous satisfaction when giving back to others and sharing her experiences with less experienced professionals. “I’ve had so many great mentors. I am honored to mentor and guide others and then watch them fly and grow to be the best they can be. Mentorship is valuable and I hope it is a powerful piece of my legacy.” She also emphasizes the importance of self-care. “I’ve come to value my downtime and take my vacations. I take care of my physical health by working out. I take care of my mental health with yoga and meditation. I make sure my family gets the best of me like my career gets the best of me. It is all about balance.”

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

CAREER & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

3 Ways Mental Health Impacts the Workplace

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

A 2002 Pfizer Outcomes Research study showed approximately 217 million days of work are lost annually because of productivity decline related to mental illness and substance abuse disorders, costing Unites States employers $17 billion each year. Today, that number has grown to more than $193 billion in lost revenue. Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness each year.

Statistics like these are why businesses are realizing more and more that not making mental health a top priority can cost them big time. When I consult with companies facing high employee turnover and low engagement, I encourage better training for senior leaders and managers to help them take a more active approach in reducing the stigma related to mental health. Loss in Productivity. Work demands and challenges can lead to increased anxiety and stress, causing a reduction in engagement, productivity, and an increase in mistakes. Because many mental health disorders are not easily recognizable, it’s common for managers to label bad performance as laziness or lack of competency. Instead, managers should provide employees with a variety of resources to help improve performance, including options within their healthcare packages directly focused on mental health awareness and aid. Communication. While there is an increase in awareness surrounding the mental health industry, it is still a

stigma among many, preventing them from getting the help they need. Having open and transparent communication is essential to reducing the mental health challenges affecting the workplace. As employees, it is important to let your manager know when you are feeling overwhelmed at work. Don’t be ashamed to be human. You want to avoid feeling burned out, especially if you love what you do. While our hearts may be in the right place, we are not exempt from having a bad day, or being impacted by undiagnosed health conditions. Addressing issues head-on will not only help you get your life back on track, it may help others take more of an active approach in seeking help within their own lives. Engagement. One of the most effective ways to increase engagement in the workplace is through transparency. As leaders, it is important for you to be transparent about how you handle high-stress situations at work. Your staff needs to feel that you can relate to them and sharing your challenges and strategies could help them to build a more trusting

relationship with you, and in turn increase their interest and engagement. During your meetings, make mental health a topic of discussion and look for ideas from your team. Some things that have worked well for my clients is to develop a recognition program that rewards leaders and managers who demonstrate evidence-based improvements in metrics of mental health and well-being and measurable business results. Improving the health and wellbeing of employees is worth the investment and up-front cost. It may not seem like it at first, but the long-term benefits of investing in mental health programs and strategies can help your business to remain competitive and reduce the hidden cost of employee turnover. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace. com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter.

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SOCIAL MEDIA

TikTok Emerging as Latest Social Media Trend

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

I recently gave a TED Talk at Tedx Hollywood Young Circle Park. During the intro, I made mention of an up-andcoming app called TikTok, a reiteration of the previously known Musically. It allows users to upload up to 60 seconds of video content with filters, text, and other features for the world to see.

Gen Z-ers and Millennials are flocking to the platform! It is the fastest growing social media platform in the world, boasting more than 1 million users – the same as Instagram. I focus a lot of my work in the digital space and help businesses and personal brands understand how to use the power of social media to increase influence, share their message, expand vision, and increase bottom lines. One of the most frequent questions I get asked is, which social media platform is next? What should I be paying attention to? Quite frankly, it’s been a while since I have seen a new social media platform worth investing energy in, until now. I have spent the last eight months studying TikTok. What I observed the most is the uncanny ability for young people to spot trends. When Facebook opened its digital doors to the public in 2004, it was for college students. When Instagram graced us with its presence

in 2010, it was for teenagers. Because these platforms were new and trendy, a lot of adults swore they would never use them. Social media is for kids, right? But now, these same people seek professionals like me for assistance to understand how they can leverage this digital technology to increase their company’s reach or for their own personal brand awareness. So, what was once for kids is now a staple for people of all ages. Could TikTok be the next big thing? Who knows. But it is worth exploring. I am starting to see more Gen X-ers take advantage. I see doctors giving advice to patients, career coaches offering tips to clients, and other professionals starting to see the value of the platform and use it to their advantage. So, how can you do the same: 1. Know who uses the platform and market to them. Traditionally, it is very difficult to make a digital introduction to the Gen Z market.

Knowing that they are on this platform could help a great deal – if that is your market. 2. Keep the content fun and creative. Utilize the tools to create your 60-second clips. Use filters, music, and captions to attract your ideal clients and customers. 3. The biggest advantage I see is the social storytelling ability. TikTok #storytime posts are super popular right now, and social storytelling is one of the most effective marketing tools you can employ. Do it with video using the app. It may be too early to make a definitive decision on whether TikTok is going to be the next big thing, but so far, it looks very promising. Dr. Tracy Timberlake www.tracytimberlake.com/freeresources Instagram.com/tracytimberlake Facebook.com/drtracytimberlake n


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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Broward Health Takes Strides to Service Black Community

BY DENISE LOTHIAN

Gino Santorio, president and CEO of Broward Health System, says he is proud of the relationship the patient-care network he oversees has with the Black community. He’s proud of the gains it has made when it comes to patient care, and he is proud of the system being a good business partner and employer. “The goal is to improve health statistics and provide all preventative care, especially to at-risk populations,” said Santorio, who joined Broward Health in September 2017, serving as executive vice president and chief operating officer. He was appointed president and CEO in December 2018. Santorio received a bachelor’s degree in business leadership from Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, and a master’s degree in public administration from the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy at the University of Albany in New York. Santorio says Broward Health accepts the responsibility of improving health outcomes for the residents it serves. In Broward County, about 17 percent of residents under 65 do not have health

insurance. Broward Health is the county’s largest safety net hospital system that includes: Broward Health Medical Center, Broward Health North, Broward Health Coral Springs, Broward Gino Santorio Health Imperial Point, and Salah Foundation Children’s Hospital. Santorio said it is natural for the health system to be committed to Broward’s Black community, where 30 percent of the population is black, according to 2018 U.S. Census data. Forty-seven percent of Broward Health’s staff is black, and 21 percent of its health management and executive leadership is black, including its vice president and up. He explained Broward Health uses artificial intelligence to determine where people live and where they need treatment. This approach is coupled with

health surveys, education, as well as its mobile health services to extend its reach to patients, especially those vulnerable to Diabetes, HIV/AIDs, and infant mortality. The system also allocates $480 million a year to procurement. It has its own supplier diversity department, which accounts for 11 percent of spending with Black businesses. Santorio said he is not just trying to make numbers when it comes to buying from small and Black-owned businesses. He wants to have a meaningful and robust program that includes mentoring businesses. Beatrice Louissaint, president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council, said, “They do a valuable service,” lauding Broward Health, which hosts an annual health fair and a construction expo that provides an opportunity to meet with system staff and end-users. “You can meet with doctors and they showcase and focus on minority and small businesses,” Louissaint said. “The procurement officer has an open door policy.” Broward Health partnered with the

Broward Urban League, which has a small business mentoring program. The system plans to start its own mentorship program, where large contractors work with small businesses, helping them to scale up to handle larger orders on their own. The system does business with certified and uncertified vendors, helping them to obtain certification. “We still do business with them whether we get credit,” Santorio said. Broward Health’s participation with certified Black-owned businesses has increased. In 2017, it did $1.9 million in business. In 2018, that number jumped to $2.5 million; and in 2019, $3 million. Santorio worked for Jackson Health System before joining Broward Health. He served as senior vice president and chief executive officer for Jackson North Medical Center and was vice president and chief operating officer of Jackson Memorial Hospital. “In five years, I want Broward Health to be recognized as a disruptor in procurement by creating new vendors,” added Santorio, who said his goal is to improve an already impressive procurement system. n

Growth in Local NAHSE Highlights Need for More C-Suite Healthcare Leadership BY KALLAN LOUIS

In the state of Florida, healthcare is big business. Total healthcare spending is more than $132 billion — more than 18 percent of the state’s Gross Domestic Product. Creating a leadership pipeline into this robust industry is part of the mission of the National Association of Health Services Executives. Grant McGaugh, outgoing president of the South Florida chapter, said he is proud of his team’s strategy of showcasing local minority healthcare leaders. “We really need to hone in on how to make those leaps,” said McGaugh, a healthcare IT executive and consultant. “You’re getting your first job and then getting stuck in a silo. How do you then transition to the next position above? We felt like there was a significant gap in that area, so the first step was to tell the story of senior level executives.”

While there are a number of opportunities in the healthcare industry, minority executive leadership makes up only 11 percent Grant McGaugh, outgoing and remains president of South Florida one of the chapter of NAHSE challenges for industry professionals nationwide, according to research from the Kaiser Family Foundation Health Research & Educational Trust. McGaugh helped increase the growing visibility of the South Florida chapter and its members through sharing their stories in the organization’s newsletters and eventually online news

publication. McGaugh has more than 20 years of experience in the IT sector working at the executive level with companies including Zones, Inc., Centurylink, and Avaya. Sharing his story and others, coupled by building relationships with community associations, organizations and local healthcare systems helped the local chapter, which according to McGaugh was established in 1995 primarily focusing on Broward County, expand to a statewide network. Under his administration, Florida membership has tripled, sponsorships have quadrupled and its social media following has grown from 13 to 10,000. As conversations surrounding leadership opportunities for minorities in healthcare continue, the sudden passing of Kaiser Permanente Chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson amplify the need for action. Revered for his leadership, Tyson was the first Black CEO of the

nonprofit healthcare provider — one of the country’s largest, serving more than 12 million people. The NAHSE South Florida chapter also started the Stars program to target minority Masters of Health Administration candidates, giving them exposure to senior-level executives, and participating in boardroom mock interviews. “It’s important to mentor and help our young people to become more confident in what they want to achieve in their life and their career,” McGaugh said. “I’ve been blessed with this particular forum to put together a portfolio of different individuals, that have been successful in healthcare, so people of color know that there are people who are successful in the career choices in to which they are looking to endeavor.” n


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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BUSINESS REPORT

New Program Helps Small Businesses Contract with Federal Government

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT

The U.S. federal government is the largest customer of goods and services in the world, spending hundreds of billions of dollars each year. Its stated goal is to award at least 23 percent of those procurement contracts to small businesses. There are two broad categories of government contractor: prime contractors, which have contracts directly with government agencies, and subcontractors, which join prime contractors’ teams to provide a specific service or product. Many

smaller businesses start out as subcontractors, and many subcontractors are able to grow into prime contractors. Yet, too many minority-owned businesses don’t fully explore or take advantage of doing business with the federal government. Why? There are many reasons, from a lack of knowledge about federal contracting opportunities and lack of preparation to bid for them, to not having financing or proper certifications lined up. The U.S. Small Business Administration hopes to expand the number of minorityowned and economically disadvantaged companies that do business with the federal government by funding the 7(j) Management and Technical Assistance Program, for which the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council is a provider. The program will provide management and technical assistance and guidance focused on teaming with other businesses, mastering the process of procuring a federal government contract, and securing loan financing or private equity funding. The program will also have an accelerator that will help businesses quickly become federal-

contract-ready. Several types of businesses are eligible for the training and to participate in the accelerator, including socially or economically disadvantaged businesses, SBA 8(a) certified businesses, HUBZone certified businesses, and businesses operating in high-unemployment or low-income areas. The Federal Procurement Accelerator will bring together a cohort of small businesses to learn from industry experts and ready their companies for federal government contracting. Training topics including: • The ins and outs of navigating the federal contracting landscape • What it takes to be governmentcontract-ready • The types of federal government buyers looking to purchase their products and services • Industry-specific secrets and strategies for successfully winning and executing government contracts • How to connect with the Office of Small & Disadvantaged Business Utilization at each government agency to find contract opportunities

The SBA’s 7(j) Management & Technical Assistance Training helps small businesses and entrepreneurs grow their companies. SBA is the only cabinet-level federal agency fully dedicated to small business. It provides counseling, capital and contracting expertise, as well as a voice for small business in the federal government. Businesses interested in learning more about training or joining the Federal Procurement Accelerator can visit www. smallbiz assistance.com or call (305) 762-6151. Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council, one of 23 regional councils affiliated with the National Minority Supplier Development Council. The FSMSDC acts as a liaison between corporate America and government agencies and Minority Business Enterprises in the state of Florida. It operates U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers serving southern and central Florida. Learn more about the FSMSDC at fsmsdc.org,or call (305) 762-6151.n

PALM BEACH REPORT

Local Healthcare Professionals Disrupt Status Quo in Chronic Wound Care Management BY ANN MARIE SORRELL

Imagine you have developed a wound because of an injury and you are diabetic, which makes healing a long and sensitive process. Your wound will take a team of professionals and specialized healthcare treatments to ensure proper and healthy healing. Treatment is only available to you at your local hospital, which are often cold, not very relaxing, and at times not the most hopeful place. Two Palm Beach County healthcare professionals are disrupting this status quo by opening the first private practice wound care center in South Florida, Fantastic Wound Care & Wellness Spa. Now imagine, upon arriving for treatment of your wound you are greeted with a warm welcoming smile, conciergestyle check in, calming background music, an option to indulge in a foot soak, pedicure, or massage, and an assortment of light, healthy refreshments as you wait — all in a revolutionary, state-of-the-art center. You are now experiencing. Fantastic Wound Care & Wellness Spa provides a comprehensive and

Dr. Olayemi Olajide Osiyemi, co-founder

Mario D. Dickerson, co-founder

personalized approach to wound management and renewed vitality. Clients will receive advanced and specialized care and treatment through the hyperbaric oxygen chambers and a highly qualified multidisciplinary team including: podiatrists, surgeons and infectious disease specialists. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can treat patients who have experienced wounds caused by injuries, Diabetes, poor circulation, skin grafts and flaps, osteomyelitis or other conditions.

Additional services include intravenous infusion therapy, diagnostic imaging (ultrasound) diabetic management, anti-aging treatments, post hospital care/ transitional care management, and PICC and midline insertion. “Fantastic Wound Care & Wellness Spa is committed to providing fantastic health and wellness care, resulting in improved quality of life through education, innovation, and prevention,’’ says Olayemi Olajide Osiyemi, medical director. Osiyemi, who has extensive years of experience in wound care management, is a board-certified infectious disease specialist based in West Palm Beach. He serves as the Chief of Infectious disease at Good Samaritan Medical Center and St. Mary’s medical center. He is the president and CEO of both Triple O Medical Services and Triple O Research Institute. Osiyemi is also past president of T. Leroy Jefferson medical society in Palm Beach County.

Fantastic Wound Care’s co-founder Mario D. Dickerson is a businessman entrepreneur, registered nurse, and registered respiratory therapist in West Palm Beach. Dickerson is the owner of M.D. Home Health, LLC, a home health care agency serving clients in Palm Beach County since 2005. His extensive professional medical career includes: respiratory therapy supervisor of Physiodiagnostics, staff registered respiratory therapist MICU / SICU/ NICU, trauma ICU, staff/charge registered nurse MICU/SICU, pharmaceutical research coordinator, and home health administrator. The center will open its doors in January 2020. The grand opening will include a tour of the facility, demonstrations of the hyperbaric oxygen chambers, spa services, meet-and-greet of the healthcare team, and refreshments. Learn more about Fantastic Wound Care & Wellness Spa and the grand opening celebration at www. fantasticwoundcare.com. n


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

Mental Health and School Success Closely Linked

BY SOULAN JOHNSON

“We know that Mental Illness is not something that happens to other people. It touches us all. Why then is mental illness met with so much misunderstanding and fear?” — Tipper Gore According to the Palm Beach County School District, Palm Beach County families will see dramatic improvements in school mental health services starting next year, thanks to a

new state law passed after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre in February. The changes announced at a school board meeting range from additional school mental health counselors to mandatory “active shooter” training for school staff. The changes will be paid for with $3.9 million coming from the state Legislature. According to Sonja Isger with the Palm Beach Post, in between reading, writing and arithmetic, science and social studies, Florida’s public schools must now guarantee every child from 6-12th grade gets five hours a year of mental health education. Mental health and school success are closely linked, and untreated mental health challenges can create significant barriers to academic, social, emotional, and career success. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, half of all lifetime mental conditions begin by age 14, making it essential that schools and

communities take a proactive stance in promoting student mental health awareness through support and early intervention. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that: • 1 in 5 children ages 13-18 has, or will have a serious mental illness. • 11 percent of youth have a mood disorder. • 10 percent of youth have a behavior or conduct disorder. • 8 percent of youth have an anxiety disorder. One way the school district is working to combat these realities is by collaborating with community stakeholders in the “Get Your Green on” campaign. The goal of the campaign is to promote awareness of mental health, educate and reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness, and encourage action on mental health issues. Many organizations such as the Urban League of Palm Beach County,

offer programs to help teens and young adults deal with troubling issues. The ULPBC offers the Children In Need of Services/Families In Need of Services program, which provides troubled or ungovernable youth and their parents or guardians professional counseling services. There is help for youth going through very hard times including: counseling, residential shelter, case management, referral service and case staffing committee. Case management is reported to have an impact on dealing with teens and young adults who have the inability to relate to others and their thinking, feeling or mood is altered. To learn more visit www.ulpbc.org or call 561-833-1461. Soulan Johnson is vice president of Development and Marketing for Urban League of Palm Beach County, Inc. n

MONEY MATTERS

Being Prepared for Financing is Necessary for Business Growth

BY JOANN MILORD

Whether you are starting a business, expanding, or have just been awarded a new contract, financing is necessary for growth at any stage of a business. While you may not need funding today, circumstances can rapidly change. Keep these in mind to be prepared for financing your business: 1. Check your Credit: What is your credit score? Are there any inaccuracies or recent late payments?

Are you maxed out on your credit cards? What steps can you take to improve your credit score before applying for a loan? A strong credit score shows financial responsibility and is a lower risk to lenders. 2. Record Keeping: Have you been maintaining proper accounting and administrative records? Do you routinely review your bank account statements and monthly expense budget? Are your business licenses up to date? Accurate financial statements verify the value and growth potential of a business. 3. Business Plan: Do you have a clear strategic plan to grow your business? Based on trends in your industry what does growth for your business look like? Is it adding an additional product or service? Is it increasing marketing or adding staff? It is important to outline your goals for the business and the action steps to achieve them. 4. Research Funding Options: Is a line of credit for short-

term operational expenses or a term loan for equipment financing that is best for you and your business? Make sure to consider all available financing options. 5. Financing Costs: What costs are related to the financing? What are the closing costs? Is there a prepayment penalty fee? What is a reasonable interest rate? Make sure you know all the costs associated with the financing to accurately compare options. Obtaining financing can be an involved process. If you do not prepare in advance, your business could find itself suddenly needing to secure funds with the only option available being a high-interest, short-term lender. Even if traditional bank financing is not available to you that does not mean there are no viable options, such as the Miami Bayside Foundation. MBF is a nonprofit organization with a mission to further economic development in Miami. MBF accomplishes this through loans and technical assistance to minority and

women-owned small businesses, and through educational scholarships and grants. In 2018, MBF partnered with the State of Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity to become the administrator of the Black Business Loan Program for Miami-Dade County. Since 2011, and with amounts ranging from $2,500 to $150,000, MBF has awarded more than 100 low-interest loans totaling more than $5.2 million, helping create more than 450 jobs in Miami. Joann Milord is the Black Business Loan Program manager at the Miami Bayside Foundation. She can be reached at joann@ miamibaysidefoundation.orgor (786) 703-5768. Visit http://www. miamibaysidefoundation.org for more information. n


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ABOUT TOWN

The Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce’s 1st Chamber Celebration Luncheon, Renaissance Fort Lauderdale-Plantation Hotel, Dec. 10, 2019.

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1. Chamber board member Brian C. Johnson 2. Chamber board members Bryan Cunningham and Anthea Pennant; Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Chamber founder and president; Reginald Dixon, guest speaker, director of Disaster Recovery, Florida DEO; board members Garrie Harris and Brian C. Johnson 3. Karrelle Chang, president Lauderhill Chamber of Commerce; Brian C. Johnson 4. Bryan Cunningham, Brian C. Johnson, Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin

Adrienne Arsht Center and Kindred Arts Unveil Hank Willis Thomas’ Iconographic “All Power to All People” Sculpture at the Adrienne Arsht Center’s Outdoor Thomson Plaza for the Arts, Dec. 3, 2019. 1. Arsht Center Board Member Rosie Gordon-Wallace

2. A  rsht Center President and

CEO Johann Zietsman, artist Hank Willis Thomas, WPLG anchor Calvin Hughes, MIA magazine Editor-in-Chief Russell Motley

3. W  illie Logan, Opa-Locka

Community Development Corporation President, with artist Hank Willis Thomas

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Photos by Amanda Smith

Jessie Trice Community Health System Holds Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Barbara J. Jordan Community Health & Wellness Center, 20612 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami Gardens, Dec. 12, 2019.

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1. Miami-Dade Commissioner Barbara J. Jordan 2. Barbara Jordan with supporters 3. Dinah Stephenson, Dwight Stephenson, Jessie Trice Community Health Center staff member, Sandy Walker 4. Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert, Dinah Stephenson, Dwight Stephenson, Miami Gardens Councilman David Williams Jr.


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

LEGACY BRIEFS FMU HIRES WENDY ELLIS FOR DIRECTOR’S ROLE

Dr. Wendy Ellis has been named director of Community Engagement & Partnership Development at Florida Memorial University. She was previously vice president of operations for Ellis Honey Shine, Inc. Ellis is a graduate of Loras College and University of Wisconsin-Lacrosse and holds a doctorate of education from Olivet Nazarene University.

BANKING EXEC. TONY COLEY PROMOTED

Tony Coley has been named South Florida regional president for Truist Financial Corp., the company formed by the merger of SunTrust and BB&T. Coley was previously president of Coley BB&T’s South Florida region. Coley is a 1996 graduate of the University of Miami, where he earned a bachelor of science degree and was a starting linebacker on the football team.

CONVERGE NAMES MARIO J. BAILEY SENIOR GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS ADVISER

Converge Government Affairs of Florida, Inc. welcomes Mario Bailey to its growing roster of top tier government affairs professionals. As a senior government affairs Bailey adviser, Bailey will strengthen the firm’s footprint in Tallahassee and South Florida. Bailey brings to Converge more than a decade of public policy and advocacy experience working on behalf of local governments, school districts,

universities and businesses. Known for his prowess in the appropriations process, Baily has successfully secured millions in state funding for clients. In addition to advocating on a wide range of regulatory matters, he has worked behind the scenes on high profile civic issues such as the historic legislation adding a statue of educator and civil rights leader Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune to National Statutory Hall in Washington, D.C. Bailey currently serves on the board of directors of the Florida Association of Professional Lobbyists. Before joining Converge Government Affairs, he served as a senior government relations consultant at the law firm of Becker and Poliakoff, where he worked for eight years. Bailey also served on the campaign of former Congressman Joe Garcia and as the legislative aide to former State Representative Dwight Bullard. Bailey is a graduate of the University of Alabama and was named to their Division of Community Affairs Board of Advisors in 2019.

CTCA HIRES HOSPITAL EXEC JONATHAN WATKINS

Cancer Treatment Centers of America has hired Jonathan Watkins as the president of Hospital Operations. He will oversee multisite operations within a national health system Watkins dedicated to eradicating cancer. Watkins has more than 15 years of combined healthcare administration and general management experience. He most recently served as chief executive officer of Broward Health Imperial Point providing overall leadership for the 210-bed acute care hospital, which offers medical-surgical inpatient care, behavioral health services and a wide variety of outpatient services. In his role within CTCA Hospitals & Clinics, Watkins will be responsible for leading his organizations to be both operationally and fiscally sound. Additionally, he will ensure CTCA is connected and tied to the community in new, innovative ways.

BILL DIGGS TO LEAD BROWARD HEALTH’S FUNDRAISING ARM

Bill Diggs has been named president of the Fort Lauderdale-based Broward

Health Foundation. Diggs is responsible for the Foundation’s fund development, major gifts, annual giving, special events and all capital campaign initiatives. He has more than 25 years of experience working with corporations and nonprofit organizations. Diggs is the former president of the Mourning Family Foundation, a Miami-based nonprofit organization focused on youth development. He Diggs is also the former president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce.

JARROD BENJAMIN

Jarrod Benjamin, a native of Louisiana, has joined the Florida International University Academic Programs and Partnership Department to lead Florida’s workforce development solution to the cyber workforce shortage. Currently, there are 24,000 vacant cyber positions

in the state of Florida. In this role, Benjamin will work with the Department of Labor, Florida Department of Education, and nationwide companies to place cyber Benjamin apprentices that desire to re-skilled and up skilled to meet the demanding need of cyber professionals. n

DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE?

Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.

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To o learn more about the CSC and our funded programs call (954) 377-1000 or visit CSCBROWARD.ORG

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

Broward Health Congratulates the Recipients of this Year’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals in South Florida and Extends a Special Thank You to Janice Mitchell Associate Vice President, Hospital Revenue Cycle Operations

LaRae Floyd Manager, Material Operations & Business Development

Romaine Layne Chief Financial Officer, Broward Health Imperial Point

for their commitment to caring for our community.

For career opportunities visit BrowardHealth.org/Careers

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Legacy South Florida - Health Care Issue (2019)  

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