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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

Miami

Stairway to Academic Achievement

Florida Memorial University Brings Back Football Program After More Than 60 Years

Meet MDC’s New Kendall Campus President Dr. Pascale Charlot

Technical Centers Helping to Reduce Poverty Dr. Pascale Charlot

Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Educators of 2019


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 S  outh Florida’s Top Black Educators of 2019 6 CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT By Audrey M. Edmonson

VITAS HEALTHCARE

By Lyn Peugeot

8 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

By Stanley Zamor

10 COVER STORY

Dr. Pascale Charlot Prepares to Lead as Kendall Campus President By Russell Motley

12 TRADE SCHOOL Miami Springs Adult Center Helps  Eliminate Poverty One Student at a Time By Zach Rinkins

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As early as pre-school, I can remember every one of my teachers all the way through high school. Some were more influential to me than others. Mrs. Lee, for example, operated a pre-school out of her red brick home. I adored her. She was a slender, pretty brunette, who had two kids of her own. She patiently helped us with arts and crafts and prepared a mean Shepherd’s Pie for lunch. I can still smell the mix of

mashed potatoes and beef, fresh from the oven. In third grade, I was taught by Miss Smith, a black teacher in her late 20s who treated us like young adults. It was in her class that I realized math was not my strongest subject; however, I excelled in reading and writing. I didn’t have a strong black male figure in the classroom until the sixth grade. But that was only after Miss Cole, a short, mousy white woman, could no longer endure the repeated threats and taunts from 11-yearold bullies. (Of course, I wasn’t a participant. I sat back in my desk, amused by the daily spectacle.) Mr. Price replaced her midway through the school year. He didn’t play. Fully aware of Miss Cole’s demise, he blessed the class with tough love which, for some of my classmates, may have been missing at home. Then in high school, there was my math teacher Mr. Bacon, who always wore short sleeve shirts with a tie. I recall staring blankly at his chalkboard as he wrote algebraic equations. For me, anything involving numbers was still

a foreign language. It didn’t help that Mr. Bacon spent far more time tutoring the girls in our class than he did with us guys. Because of him, I barely passed high school math. In this issue of Legacy, you’ll meet our Top Black Educators of 2019. Our honorees are not only instructors but counselors, principals, and college presidents, to name a few. They are incredible forces who are molding young lives and, as my teachers did for me, creating lots of fond memories. As an educator myself, at Florida Memorial University in Miami Gardens, I am mindful of the countless hours I spend with my students and the impact of everything I say and do around them. I can only hope that their experience in my classroom, writing news stories and filming videos, is effective and memorable to them for years to come. Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com

Supports Women’s Reproductive Health By Shelly-Ann M. Parkinson

14 SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

40 UNDER 40

By Dr. Alexia Rolle

16  FMU Aims to Kickoff Football Rebirth in 2020 By Zach Rinkins and Jordean Matthews

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP  Primary Medical Care Center Issues Weight-Loss Challenge By Shelly-Ann M. Parkinson

17 ABOUT TOWN  Salute to Education, Inc. Scholarship Awards Luncheon 18 LEGACY BRIEFS

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Shannel Escoffery

Director of Operations

Sabrina Moss-Solomon Designer

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Joe Wesley Cover Photo

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Rory Lee

Cover Make-up Artist

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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South Florida’s Top Black Educators of 2019

DR. HENRY L. BROWN, III

STEFANIE R. BROWN, MD, FACP, FAAP

Principal Pine Ridge Education Center

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Section Chief - Pediatric Hospital Medicine and Med-Peds University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

DR. KATHERINE CHUNG-BRIDGES MD

DR. ADRIENNE COOPER

YANIQUE BRYAN

Assistant Principal Broward County Public Schools

DR. LOUIS DASH

ADRIENNE TIA PAUL

DONALD E. FENNOY II, Ed.D.

Provost Florida Memorial University

Adult Assistant Principal Miami Springs Adult & Community Education Center Site Location: Ronald W. Reagan/Doral Adult

DARRELL HARDGE

ILONA HOLMES

JO ANN JONES

CARMELLO N. MOUSSIGNAC

Elementary Educator (K-6)/Education Services Provider RISE Academy School of Science & Technology/ VIRTUE Tutors of Excellence

TAMARA F. LAWSON

KATHLEEN KARRAN-MCCOY

DR. CARMEN Z. MCKENZIE

Dean and Professor of Law St. Thomas University School of Law

JOSHUA NEAL

DEREK NEGRON

ANDRE L. NEWTON

MANOUSHKA SAINTIL

MONEEK SCOTT-MCTIER, Ed.D.

Delinquency Court Administrator Broward County Public Schools

Instructional Superintendent, Glades Region School District of Palm Beach County

Principal Carol City Middle School

Assistant Director Atlantic Technical College Arthur Ashe, Jr. Campus

SUZETTE DENISE SPENCER

DR. MARIA STEVENS

Associate Dean, Library Services, Broward College Libraries Broward College

LINDSEY GRANT, MBA

Superintendent School District of Palm Beach County

Retired Teacher Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Secondary Principal Calvary Christian Academy Hollywood

DR. PASCALE CHARLOT

President, Kendall Campus Miami Dade College

Specialist Broward County Public Schools

President University of Fort Lauderdale

Specialist, PBIS Broward County Public Schools

ACKIMO H. CHARLES

Professor Emeritus Nova Southeastern University

Assistant Professor FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Educational Consultant New Dimension International

DR. MICHAEL CALDWELL

Business Education Teacher Broward County Public Schools

Assistant Professor FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Dean of Student Development Palm Beach State College

DR. KIMBERLY L. REYNOLDS

Educator Watson B. Duncan Middle School

CLAIRE MICHELLE RICE

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics; Pediatric Hospitalist University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Interim Chair, Department of Conflict Resolution Studies College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Nova Southeastern University

GIOVANA R. THOMAS, MD, FACS

PATRICK WILLIAMS, PH.D.

Associate Professor. Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Oncologic and Robotic Surgery, Co-Director Fellowship Training Program in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

Associate Faculty University of Phoenix


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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE TOP BLACK EDUCATORS FOR 2019 including our very own:

STEFANIE R. BROWN, M.D., FACP, FAAP

KIMBERLY L. REYNOLDS, M.D.

GIOVANA THOMAS, M.D., FACS

Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

On behalf of your colleagues and friends at the University of Miami Health System and Miller School of Medicine, congratulations on this well-deserved honor. We thank you for your commitment to the health and wellness of our South Florida community and beyond.

UMiamiHealth.org

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CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT

Year-round Education Programs Help Transform Community

BY AUDREY M. EDMONSON

I have always been a firm believer in the power of education. It’s the key to unlocking a young person’s potential and opening the doors of opportunity for people of all backgrounds. No matter where they come from, a good education can lift individuals out of poverty and give them a shot at a bright future. That’s why it’s so important to invest in our children’s schooling and make sure

they have the tools to learn and succeed. This is especially true for at-risk youth, for whom it can literally make the difference between life and death. A good education acts as a lifeline that can keep an underprivileged young person out of a life of crime and violence and put them on the path toward a respectable career, which in turn fosters safer, more prosperous neighborhoods and better outcomes for the entire community. This philosophy is at the heart of the Miami Children’s Initiative, a nonprofit organization that I am very proud to have helped establish. MCI seeks to transform Liberty City, where I was born and raised, from an underperforming area into a prosperous community by investing in its children and their education. Modeled after the Harlem Children’s Zone’s evidenced-based “Cradle to Career” program, MCI offers year-round education programs for children and families – including: early childhood programs, parenting classes, summer afterschool and

athletic programs, and health and social services for the entire family. The aim of all these programs is to engage and support each member of the family in promoting safe, nurturing, and positive environments for every child in the neighborhood. In partnership with Miami-Dade County Public Schools, MCI also provides after school, weekend, holiday and summer programming for students in Miami Northwestern High School. Programs included: academic remediation, homework assistance, tutoring, mentoring, Project Based Learning, social emotional learning, career readiness and more – all designed to complement and enrich school-day learning. Several years ago, I was thrilled to cut the ribbon at the MCI Community Space at the Annie Coleman Complex, a “safe space” for neighborhood children. The complex features: a computer room, a reading room full of books, games and art supplies, and a training room for children and families to gather and enjoy movie nights and other

events seven days a week. By providing a host of wraparound services that foster parental and family involvement, this community space perfectly illustrates the MCI philosophy that it’s only when we get families positively engaged in their children’s development and education, that we can ensure successful outcomes. Get involved with MCI today by visiting www.iamlibertycity.org.Learn how you can volunteer and have a positive impact on a child’s life, whether it’s by reading to students or serving food at special events. You can also help make a difference by donating or becoming a corporate partner. Together, I believe we really can transform Liberty City and our entire community – one child at a time!

Audrey M. Edmonson is chairwoman of the Miami-Dade County Commission. n

VITAS HEALTHCARE

Mistrust in Healthcare Leads to Low Hospice Use Rates Among African Americans

BY LYN PEUGEOT, MSN, RN

Hospice is a philosophy of care rooted in equal opportunity. Available to any American diagnosed with six or fewer months to live, hospice offers a chance for dying individuals to retain comfort and dignity, and to spend more time among loved ones near the end of life — regardless of race, ethnicity, gender or sexuality. However, codifying access to a service for all people does not guarantee equal accessibility — especially when it comes to Black communities and other

communities of color. As a senior clinical nurse educator and national speaker for VITAS® Healthcare, the nation’s leading provider of end-of-life care, I have spent nearly a decade educating various communities about the benefits of hospice and advance care planning. Many of these are communities of color, where mistrust in healthcare has led to alarmingly low hospice utilization rates. Only 8.3 percent of hospice patients identified as African American in 2016, while Caucasian patients represented 86.5 percent. Sadly, this lack of trust is not surprising. The systemic abuse of racial and ethnic minorities in healthcare is an unfortunate part of our nation’s history. As recently as the 1960s, segregation was the norm throughout many U.S. hospital systems. It wasn’t until 1972, that the government ended its experimentation on African-American men in the infamous “Tuskegee Experiment” syphilis study. Aside from institutional mistrust, cultural and religious differences can create a barrier to hospice access. The Pew Research Center found that African Americans are

more religious than other racial or ethnic groups, with about 75 percent saying they pray daily and nearly half attending weekly church services. In many churches of color, especially evangelical “mega churches,” the messaging around sickness is that only God knows the day and hour, and when our time is at hand, any intervention beyond prayer is testing His will. Hospice educators like me spend plenty of time navigating through these types of situations. When we arrive to share a message, we must first act as students, learning the unique values and concerns that guide each community. Only then can we bridge the divide between our thought process and theirs. We can help those with religious aversions to end-of-life care understand that hospice doesn’t detract from God’s work. After all, patients have to cease curative treatment before being admitted to hospice care. Hospice’s compassionate focus is on making the most of the time a patient has left, not artificially altering that time. Many families of color already opt to

provide care at home to their loved ones with advanced illnesses. Introducing hospice provides patients with clinical care, while the patients’ caregivers receive the education and emotional support to help them take care of their loved one, along with numerous hospice benefits covered by the Medicare hospice benefit. Starting conversations about advance planning early can help patients and families maintain dignity and decision-making, even as they are required to relinquish some level of control. Starting the dialogue isn’t easy, but by educating communities of color about endof-life care, we can assist our brothers and sisters in taking control of how they receive care while encouraging access to healthcare at all stages of life. Lyn Peugeot, MSN, RN, is senior clinical nurse educator for VITAS® Healthcare in Broward. For more information about end-of-life care, call VITAS Healthcare at (866) 759-6695 or visit VITAS.com. n


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CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

When, How, and Why You Should Ask for a Raise

BY MARY DAVIDS

Asking for a raise can be tough, especially if you don’t know where to start. Of course you may deserve a raise, but if you don’t build up the guts to ask for it, chances are you won’t get it. There are two distinct fears people have when

asking for a raise: 1. Fear of rejection 2. Fear of conflict The good news is you can prepare for both these scenarios. Here are some tips to help you start the conversation. When: While there is never a perfect time to ask for more money, it is important to check the temperature of your work environment before approaching your boss. It’s best to avoid asking for more when there have been recent layoffs or if you hear a lot of chatter about cutbacks and expense reporting issues. Once you’re certain you can articulate the fact that you have consistently delivered quality work (noting special projects or high-performance results) you can start outlining your approach strategy. How: Always start the conversation with a history lesson. It is important to

lead with success stories that remind your boss just how valuable you are to the company. Share how you contributed to the organization and how you intend on continuing to deliver great work in the future. Stay on topic. Don’t veer off into talking about your financial woes. Making it too personal will take the focus off how the company can benefit by further investing in you. If you are successful in your request, be sure to get the terms in writing if possible. Should there be a denial of your request, make sure to get a timeline to follow up and conditions that need to be met. Why: It is crucial you make negotiating your salary part of your career development strategy. Your worth is your work, and your bank account is proof that others value that work. Not every employer will be willing to compensate

you the way they should, but it is 100 percent up to you, and only you, to take control of your career. Continue to deliver results that can’t be disputed when the time comes for you to have that necessary conversation. You can’t get what you don’t ask for. Make it your annual goal to continue adding skills and knowledge as you build your career. Let your work speak for you whenever you are faced with a situation requiring you to defend your value.

Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.marydavids.comor follow @ MVDavids on Instagram or Twitter. n

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

When ‘Pre-Suit Mediation’ Works in Your Favor

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

It happened again. Their worn-out disappointed faces told the entire story when I announced to the plaintiffs that the defendants stated they were done mediating and intended to file for bankruptcy; so they’ll take their chances in court. The plaintiffs’ corporate representative leaned back and said, “We should have resolved this matter a year ago. It would have saved us thousands. Now we’re stuck, and even if we win

at trial, it’s just a piece of paper and we recover nothing. At least last year we could have gotten something… and maybe even saved this venture.” The cost and complexities of litigation are rarely understood until you’re engaged in it. Litigation is similar to an iceberg—only 30 percent of the iceberg is seen, yet many decisions made are with that limited viewpoint. The most dangerous part of the iceberg, the mass below the waterline, is rarely considered until it’s too late. And no matter how you try to maneuver, there is no avoiding the inevitable. Lawsuits are similar to a large vessel, set on a course where you have no control. However, “pre-suit mediation” is an option available before filing a lawsuit. What is Pre-suit Mediation? Pre-suit mediation offers both sides an opportunity to voluntarily negotiate in a private conference before filing a lawsuit. A mediator facilitates the conference and encourages exploring resolutions. Both sides can choose to have legal representation present. At the end of the conference, they may enter into a negotiated written agreement.

When? A pre-suit mediation can take place at any time before a lawsuit is filed. Why Pre-Suit Mediation? Cost: Many like Pre-suit mediation because they see a considerable cost saving. The mediator’s time is the only cost and is typically split between the parties. Control: Unlike in court, the disputing parties have complete control of the outcome. Less Stress: Pre-suit mediation is informal and does not have the same level of stress as litigation. Pre-suit mediation is also free from the rules of court. Time: Pre-suit mediation usually takes hours to negotiate a resolution, while court can take months or years before a resolution is reached. Is It Right for Me? Maybe. Pre-suit mediation is best for certain types of disputes where the cost, time and uncertainty of litigation must be

considered. Every situation is different so you’ll have to weigh your options and the risks of litigation. Also, pre-suit mediation is often beneficial when the parties need to preserve the relationship. There are various situations where there is a long standing relationship in place, or the industry that the parties work in is small and having a long drawn out lawsuit harms their position or reputation in that industry. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court Certified Circuit/Family/County Mediator & Primary Trainer and Qualified Arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the Agree2Disagree (ATD) Mediation Group. As an ADR consultants he regularly lectures on a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and Family/Business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants.com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr 954-261-8600 n


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COVER STORY

A New Chapter at Miami Dade College

Dr. Pascale Charlot Prepares to Lead as Kendall Campus President BY RUSSELL MOTLEY

Dr. Pascale Charlot knows a thing or two about running marathons. In May, she joined about 30,000 runners in the Brooklyn Half Marathon, the largest 13.1mile race in the country. In late September, she’ll be among thousands of runners at the starting line on Lakeshore Drive as part of the Chicago Half Marathon. She’ll run her seventh Miami Half Marathon next January. But now the Brooklyn, New York native is lacing up at the starting line of a new challenge as president of the Miami Dade College Kendall Campus. “The question is, given the changing dynamics in the world we live in right now, how can [MDC] remain relevant? How do we continue to be a place that the community embraces that provides opportunity for all? And the key in that is ‘for all,’” said Charlot, who spoke to Legacy magazine on her nineth day on the job. Charlot was promoted to Kendall campus president after serving as dean of The Honors College at MDC. For eight years, she led one of the most prestigious programs of its kind, which, under her leadership, she said became the single institution earning the most Jack Kemp Cooke Foundation College Scholarships, worth up to $40,000 a year per student. “Given those types of outcomes, I think the college recognized that not only am I invested in the mission of the college, but I also have an appetite to scale up and take on more complex problems,” said Charlot, referring to a key reason she was hired as president. Charlot said she’s proud that The Honors College serves as a pipeline to four-year Ivy League institutions for many of the 500 students enrolled in the program. “The key is we’re trying to prepare them to transfer to selective institutions,” said Charlot about The Honors College, which requires students to maintain a 3.5 Grade Point Average. “So they’re transferring to Yale and Princeton and Georgetown, and Cornell… and with scholarships.” Charlot didn’t take the traditional

to undergraduate studies. “We (lawyers) are trained how to listen, ask the right questions, look for the problems that need to be solved,” said Charlot, who said she believes lawyers are equipped to be social engineers. “We tend to be solutions oriented and often many of us have a commitment to being collaborative in that process.” In preparation for her new position, Charlot has been selected by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program to join the 2019-2020 class of the Aspen Presidential Fellowship for Community College Excellence. This prestigious leadership program is aimed at Dr. Pascale Charlot (center), president of Miami Dade College Kendall Campus, introduces herself to students enrolled in preparing the next generation the summer session. of community college just focused on your client.” route to become MDC’s Kendall campus presidents to transform After years in the courtroom, Charlot president. She earned her bachelor’s in institutions to achieve higher and more said she realized she wanted to impact sociology and economics with a certificate equitable levels of student success, both in in women studies from college and in the labor market. Duke University and “Our task is to try to mark a new her juris doctorate direction in order to increase the imprint from the University of “The question is, given the changing that this campus has and the communities Michigan Law School, dynamics in the world we live in right now, that we touch,” Charlot said. where she was a Dean’s In her first few weeks on the job, Scholar. She then went how can [MDC] remain relevant? How do we Charlot has been busy settling into her on to be an assistant continue to be a place that the community Building 6 office and getting to know district attorney in her leadership team. She said she’s eager embraces that provides opportunity for all? New York, where she to meet with people and leaders in the prosecuted sex crimes. And the key in that is ‘for all.’” surrounding community to ensure that they “My original continue to invest in students at MDC’s strategy was to become Kendall campus. a defense attorney and “Whether that means developing people’s lives in a more positive way I thought if I infiltrated the prosecutor’s relationships for internships, finding rather than a punitive way. That revelation, resources for scholarships, looking office, I could better understand how to coupled with her strong Haitian-American craft arguments and to better manage for supplemental support, I think it’s work ethic and caring spirit, led her to an the system,” explained Charlot. “What I important that we recognize that every academic career path. Charlot transitioned didn’t anticipate happening in that process student here belongs to everyone who by first working at NYU Law School. is that when you’re a prosecutor you’re lives in this community and this county,” She then worked at Rutgers Law School responsible for everybody. You’ve got Charlot said. before choosing to come to MDC, to manage both sides of an argument; n transitioning from professional education whereas, with a defense attorney you’re


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Miami Dade College congratulates Pascale Charlot on being recognized by Legacy magazine as one of South Florida’s Top Black Educators for 2019.

Pascale Charlot, J.D. President, MDC, Kendall Campus Aspen Presidential Fellow for Community College Excellence, 2019-20

We salute your formidable contributions to higher education and steadfast commitment to serving future generations.

MDC.EDU • 305-237-8888 Largest degree-granting institution in the country | more than 300 academic pathways, associate and bachelor’s degrees, career certificates | 8 campuses | mdc.edu | 305-237-8888

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TRADE SCHOOL

Miami Springs Adult Center Helps Eliminate Poverty One Student at a Time

Dr. Louis Dash

BY ZACH RINKINS

Recent socio-economic data are confirming something many South Floridians already knew: Miami is too expensive for lowincome residents. According to a study by real estate website Trulia.com, South Florida ranked last out of 40 U.S. metro areas because of low starting salaries and high housing costs. HSH, a mortgage research firm, noted in its recent study that prospective homeowners needed to earn $71,644 to purchase a median-priced house in the region. In the best cases, that is roughly

$25,000 higher than the median household income of $46,338, per the U.S. Census. In the worst cases, that salary could seem hopelessly out of reach for residents with a U.S. Census-recorded per capita income of $25,481. Miami-Dade County Public Schools, through its Technical Colleges and Adult Education Centers, is helping students acquire the skills they need to progressively transition away from poverty and compete for higher paying jobs. “A quality education will open doors and creates options for you,” said Dr. Louis Dash, an assistant principal of Ronald W. Reagan/Doral Adult Center within the Miami Springs Adult Center feeder pattern. “Options are wonderful things because they allow you to move out of your current situation and rise above your circumstances.” For M-DCPS, a quality education for non-traditional students is delivered through its more than 65 Adult and Career Technical Education programs that prepare students to enter their chosen career through technical training. Students can enroll in the Adult Basic Education Program and/or Career Technical Education programs. The Adult Basic Education Program helps adults boost

the basic knowledge and literacy skills required to enter post-secondary education training. Many students use this program to learn English as a second language and/or help prepare for the Graduate Equivalency Diploma test. “Adult education deals with people that fall outside of the mainstream. You’re dealing with various adults who may want to learn English, earn their U.S. citizenship, learn basic education skills and get vocational training,” revealed Dash, a 2019 Legacy Miami Top Black Educator honoree. The upstate New Yorker said this total family, holistic approach helps elevate families out of poverty and improves academic literacy and success within households. “Sometimes children fall through the cracks of education. They become adults who sometimes have children in the system. If the parents don’t have successful learning strategies themselves, how can they help their children?” Dash said. Miami Springs Adult Education Center offers vocational training in a dozen high-paying fields that include manicuristpedicurist, electrical occupations, and

web development, among others. Web development offers the greatest earning potential. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for web developers is $69,430 or $33.48 per hour. This sector has a 15-percent projected growth over the next ten years. Conversely, food preparation workers earn $23,730 per year or $11.41 per hour with 8-percent projected sector growth. “What I love the most is seeing deserving students benefit from quality education, advance their lives, and make something of themselves,” Dash revealed. Most programs offer a one-year completion cycle and are dramatically cheaper than their for-profit peer schools. Students may also qualify for need-based federal aid to pay for post-secondary training. “When you learn and master your skillsets, you can transfer those skills to other avenues,” Dash added. “You now have something you can be proud of and it helps you create a better life for yourself and your family.” For more information, log on to www. miamispringsadultedu.com. n

PRODUCT LAUNCH

New Natural Herbal Supplement Supports Women’s Reproductive Health

Dr. Lynn Labrousse, creator and founder of Fey Essence

BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON

Early in their marriage, Lynn Labrousse, M.D., and her husband wanted to start a family. She became pregnant right away, but unfortunately the pregnancy ended in a miscarriage, followed by several other miscarriages.

This was the beginning of a decade of disappointments that she said took a toll on their marriage, career, mental health, and finances. During this time, the couple pursued multiple types of fertility treatments after being diagnosed with unexplained infertility. “Fey Essence helped me when conventional medicine failed me,” exclaimed Labrousse, a Miami-based chiropractor who has been in private practice since 2002. Labrousse, whose practice focuses on chiropractic, acupuncture and physiotherapy, was not alone. TheCenters for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 6.1 percent of American women are infertile, and 25 percent of those women have no diagnosable explanation for their infertility. Labrousse and her husband eventually decided to try surrogacy, a process that for them produced beautiful identical twin daughters, Elise and Elle. At this point, Labrousse said she had pretty much given up on her own body’s ability to bear children. Yet, deep down, she

yearned to carry a baby. Knowing that she had already tried leading methods known to science and modern medicine, Labrousse, who also holds a Ph.D. in biomedical science, said her mother introduced her to an herbal cocktail blend passed down through family folk oral traditions. “As a first generation American, my education in modern medicine roots me in science,” Labrousse shared. “Doubt and skepticism filled me, but I decided to give it a shot anyway. To my surprise, we discovered that I was pregnant with our son Elijah, at exactly three months to the day that I began the regimen.” Not only did Labrousse give birth to Elijah, she also gave birth to the idea of launching Fey Essence, a product developed to tackle the problem of infertility and other female reproductive issues such as painful periods, fibroids, and endometriosis. Labrousse infused her chiropractic care with earthy teas and steams to help increase a woman’s chance of conceiving. Knowing

that some female reproductive issues cause pelvic pain, she said used essential oils and special pain relief sprays to ease and eliminate discomfort. Labrousse said she has created a Fey Essence service plan suitable for everyone by using natural methods, incorporating in-house womb therapy treatment, as well as chiropractic, acupuncture, and manual therapy. Along with the products and treatments, Labrousse said she knows first-hand just how important it is to have emotional support and access to information. So she created a Facebook group for peer-to-peer support, instructional videos, health education, YouTube demonstrations, and a 90-day journal that includes affirmations and mindfulness exercises, as well as on-going guidance from Labrousse and a board-certified psychologist. For more information and a free Fey Essence consultation, call (305) 757-5117 or visit www.feyessence.com. n


MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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SOCIAL MEDIA

Entrepreneur Vs. Intrapreneur

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

Being an entrepreneur seems to be the new “it” thing. It is trendy. And successful entrepreneurs are viewed as rock stars in the business world. You can’t open any social media channel without having one of them appear on your feed. But let’s be honest, not everyone is cut out to be a solo-venture kind of individual. Merriam-Webster defines an

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entrepreneur as a person “who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise.” They create the product, curate the launch plan, secure the resources, and execute the strategy – and all within the resources that they themselves can acquire. In other words, it’s a lot of risk and responsibility when you are your own business. This is no small feat. As such, not everyone desires to or has the resources that allow them to forsake all and take the trek down the long, winding road of solo start-up life. So, for the millions who are attracted to entrepreneurship, but not all of the risk that comes with it, enter something called intraprenuership. What is an intrapreneur? These are individuals who get to operate like entrepreneurs, but within an existing organization. This means they get to do similar things with regards to product development and launch plans but under the umbrella of a larger brand. An added benefit to this includes the fact that they also get to use the larger brand’s resources,

which is significant, especially when capital is concerned. Further, large corporations are recognizing the need to foster entrepreneurial spirit within their organizations. Companies like Facebook, 3M, and Google all value the innovation that has come from allowing their employees to operate as entrepreneurs within the walls of the company. When companies create environments that celebrate and appreciate the entrepreneurial spirit, intrapreneurs can flourish. Time and time again this has proven to be a very valuable asset, and everyone from company to consumer gets to reap the benefits. As you can see, both entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs are cut from the same cloth. They are creative, passionate, proactive, and like to exercise elements of control over their own projects. They simply operate in two different contexts, and society needs them both to contribute. Personally, I believe the vast

majority of people have at least some entrepreneurial essence inside of them. Remember, corporation was a product of the 18th century industrial revolution. Prior to that, most people learned an entrepreneurial trade and joined the family business. But having worked with thousands of entrepreneurs, I know that it is not always easy. If you are someone who has the drive of an entrepreneur, but are not ready to venture off on your own, or perhaps you have no desire to leave an industry or job you love, finding space within your organization to exercise your entrepreneurial skills may be a win-win situation. So, entrepreneur or intrapreneur? Which one are you? Dr. Tracy Timberlake is an awardwinning digital business coach for entrepreneurs and influencers. n

We Must Take Stance Against Food Inequality Among African-American Communities

BY DR. ALEXIA Q. ROLLE

Racial inequality, oppression, and discrimination have been some of the key ingredients in keeping African Americans in a disadvantaged cycle. This imbalance has been visible in labor markets, accessibility to housing, and the education system. 2019 has been eye opening regarding how strategically oppressed Black communities have been and remain when it comes to food insecurity — the “limited

availability and/or the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable and nutritious foods.” As a young black girl, I never found it disturbing that “corner stores” (i.e. gas stations), fast food spots, and liquor stores were more readily accessible in my community than a quality grocery store. That was my norm. However, food insecurity is a serious threat to the black community because areas that do not have access to quality nutritional food have been impacted with chronic health problems such as heart disease, hyperlipidemia, obesity, high blood pressure, and poor mental health. According to “Slave Food: The Impact of Unhealthy Eating Habits on the Black Community,” approximately 47.8 percent of African Americans are obese compared to 32.6 percent of Whites. Also, 35.1 percent of African-American children ages 2 to 19 are overweight. These numbers suggest that we

continually expose our children to unhealthy eating habits that can eventually lead to shorter life spans because of chronic health issues occurring at early stages of life. The survival of our community is completely aligned with the legacy we leave for our children to follow. While I thoroughly enjoy the good ole soul food I grew up on with my grandmother, mother, and aunts — hooking up smothered pork chops with yellow rice, greens (collards to be exact), Mac & Cheese, and please don’t forget the cornbread — there needs to be a shift of understanding and appreciation for the evolution of soul food. We can enjoy the finer aspects of soul food but must leave the legacy of “slave food” behind. Gone are the days when we had to eat slave masters’ scraps because that was the only thing on which we had to survive. We are empowered now to take a stance to not allow the system to strategically kills us off based on unavailability of quality food.

We have a responsibility to place pressure on local elected officials to advocate for grocery stores that provide items of nutritional value that are available in other communities where people don’t look like us. There is equal responsibility on our behalf as well to put in the work needed to change our eating habits and be more creative in combating oppressive systems designed to destroy our quality of living through limited food access.

Alexia Q. Rolle is president of the Legacy 40 Under 40 executive board, chairwoman of the Black Professionals Network board, director of operations for DIBIA DREAM, Inc. and director of Career & Technical Education at Miami Dade College. Henri A. LaSane, MPS, Youth Advocate & Education Consultant, contributed to this commentary. n


MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

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FMU Aims to Kickoff Football Rebirth in 2020 BY ZACH RINKINS AND JORDEAN MATTHEWS After a 61-year hiatus, Florida Memorial University recently announced the return of its storied football program at the Betty T. Ferguson Recreational Complex in Miami Gardens. The press conference attracted over 200 people, including FMU students, employees, and alumni; Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver G. Gilbert, III and four city council members; civic and business leaders and university supporters. Retired legendary Miami Dolphins players Nat Moore and Pro Football Hall of Famer Larry Little showed up to lend their support. The Lions will play its first game during the fall of 2020. This ambitious initiative is a component of FMU President Jaffus Hardrick’s vision to fully integrate the university into the greater community and expand educational and economic opportunities in South Florida. “We are elated about the impact the Football program will have on FMU’s enrollment, retention, and student engagement,” Hardrick said. “It will also galvanize our alumni and community, and elevate our university on a national scale.” The Lions’ last foray onto the football field took place more than six decades ago. Then called Florida Normal and Industrial Institute, the Lions defeated the Albany State

this community together! It’s a new day at FMU. We are encouraging students to enroll now if they are interested in excelling academically, competing for championships, and serving this community.” With the first game projected to start in 2020, Florida Memorial University President Dr. Jaffus Hardrick (center) announces the plans to form return of the football program at a press conference with (l-r) The Sun Conference Commissioner Dustin Wilke, Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert III, and former FMU the team began Board Chairwoman JoLinda Herring. right away. The university Golden Rams 14–8. plans to hire a head coach during the fall Ernest T. Jones, FMU’s director of semester. Prospective student-athletes can Intercollegiate Athletics, presented his plan enroll and begin getting in shape with the to reignite the Lions’ football tradition and strength and conditioning coach. FMU will tap into the team’s championship pedigree. hire the rest of the coaching staff during the The team will compete in the National academic year. The rebirth also includes Association of Intercollegiate Athletics as a plans for a marching band, expanded member of the Sun Conference. cheering team, and dancing team. “We’ve rebirthed the football program Most of the university’s field to ignite the pride and tradition of FMU and sports teams (track and field, soccer, create an impact in this community,” Jones and football) will compete at the Betty said. “We are coming to add value and bring T. Ferguson Recreational Complex.

Renovations are underway in anticipation of an active athletic schedule. The use of the recreational complex was facilitated through a mutually-beneficial partnership with the City of Miami Gardens. “Football is more than just a game, it brings immeasurable value in uniting people and having a social and cultural impact on the community and quality of life of our residents,” said Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver G. Gilbert, III. “This partnership between Miami Gardens, Florida’s largest predominantly black city and FMU, South Florida’s only HBCU, underscores our commitment to bring first-rate programs to the community. FMU has a rich history of producing graduates who are trailblazers in their respective fields, and this will be no exception.” The announcement incited great excitement from alumni and recent graduates. “I’m just ecstatic,” said Troy Mitchell, a 2018 FMU graduate majoring in Communication. “I just know this energy is going to be a game changer with football back on the campus.” For more information about FMU’s football program, log on to www. fmuathletics.com. Prospective students can apply for admission at www.fmuniv.edu. n

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Primary Medical Care Center Issues Weight-Loss Challenge

BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON

What’s the key to weight-loss success? Consistency, according to Prinston JeanGlaude, CEO of Primary Medical Care Centers. In December 2017, he was in his mid-forties and in relatively good health. However, he was 212 pounds, with one chronic health issue he had struggled to maintain since his twenties. Jean-Glaude was slightly embarrassed when he found it difficult to bend over to tie his shoelaces due to those extra pounds around his waist. So, he decided to do something about it. He challenged himself to lose the weight in a healthy way, knowing that his health would improve by doing so. After consulting his physician, Prinston set a weight-loss goal of 195 pounds for 2018. He achieved that goal by December 2018, primarily through consistent exercise. Prinston hits the

gym three times each week for cardio and weight-training and he also does a combination of daily sit-ups and pushups at home. Encouraged by his weight-loss success and finally having his health condition within normal limits, Prinston decided to challenge himself even further, with guidance from Prinston Jean-Glaude his physician. For 2019, he set a weight-loss goal of 180 pounds. A deeply religious man, Prinston credits his faith for any success he achieves. That also includes his weight-

loss journey. Now, he has added diet as part of his weight-loss regimen. He has eliminated meat, sugar, and rice from his diet and continues to exercise in the same manner as before. His diet was mainly based on the biblical Daniel Fast which not only heals the body, but the mind, and spirit through the discipline of the process. Since the beginning of 2019, Prinston has already lost more than 10 pounds and is so excited about it, that he is challenging everyone to set their own health goals, work at them, and achieve them. His wife, Edwige, and sister-in-law, Alie, both accepted his challenge this year and have already achieved their weight-loss goals so far. So, are you up for the challenge? What are your health goals for 2019 and beyond? Prinston is specifically challenging community leaders, pastors, priests, employers, civic leaders, educators, and anyone with a following, to join him

in taking the lead in your organization to mobilize your group to reach their individual fitness and health goals. He does understand that everyone is different. He knows that everyone does not necessarily need to have weight-loss goals to be healthy. Their goals may be to gain muscle mass or to lower their cholesterol or simply to maintain where they are. The most important thing is to visit your doctor first. Get a proper assessment and discuss your personal health options. Then find the right regimen that works for you. Do not embark upon any diet or exercise routine before consulting your physician. If you do not have a physician, please feel free to make an appointment or walk-in to one of the Primary Medical Care Centers in Miami or Lauderdale Lakes. Any one of our friendly healthcare providers will be happy to assist you. n


MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

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ABOUT TOWN Salute to Education Inc., a scholarship program created and funded by the MiamiDade and Broward County Ford and Lincoln dealers and Ford Motor Company, awarded $168,000 in scholarships and laptop computers to 112 recent South Florida high school graduates during the 25th Annual Salute to Education Scholarship Awards Luncheon, June 1, 2019.

Kayla Easington, Shaundrea Dixon, Meilyn Muñoz and Ernest Modock

Broward County Salute to Education scholarship award recipients

Victor Benitez, Ernest Modock, David Menten

Shaundrea Dixon, Karen Siegel, Colleen Warren


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LEGACY BRIEFS ED PONDER NAMED MANAGER OF THE BETSY

Ed Ponder has been promoted to Hotel Manager at The Betsy South Beach, Greater Miami’s only four-star and fourdiamond boutique hotel. Ponder had served as The Betsy’s director of food and beverage since 2018. He joined hotel in 2011. “People choose to stay at The Betsy and I try to lead the team to exceed their expectations,” said Ponder. Ponder previously worked in leadership roles Ponder at The Delano and The National Hotel, The Grand Bay Hotel and the Hyatt Regency Miami.

GMCVB NAMES DEBRA LEE DIRECTOR OF SALES

The Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau has appointed Debra Lee

as Director of Sales for the Southeast, Southwest, West and Caribbean markets. Lee comes to the position after a strong tenure of 20 years in sales, marketing and public relations with a specific concentration in the Caribbean and Latin American markets. Lee Lee has forged a career in the travel industry, working with key travel companies such as American Airlines, AA Vacations and Travelport. Most recently, she served as the Business Development Officer for the Jamaica Tourist Board. Within her role at the GMCVB, Lee will play a crucial part in further developing relationships with travel advisors in top feeder markets within the U.S. and Caribbean territories. Lee holds a degree from the University of Miami in Communications with a major in Public Relations and

a minor in Marketing.

MARILYN HOLIFIELD RECEIVES DADE COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION’S HIGHEST AWARD

Holland & Knight partner Marilyn Holifield was recently honored with the 2019 David W. Dyer Professionalism Award, the highest award given by the Dade County Bar Association. The David W. Dyer Professionalism Award was established in 1997 and is Holifield given to a lawyer or judge whose conduct reflects the “integrity, humility, compassion, and professionalism” displayed by Judge David Dyer. Holifield practices in the general litigation area, with a specific emphasis on representing corporate clients. Her practice includes employment, business litigation,

corporate governance, trade secrets, covenants-not-to-compete, class action and intellectual property litigation.

MDCC HIRES MATTHEW PIGATT

The Miami-Dade County Chamber of Commerce has hired Matthew Pigatt as the Minority & Small Business Enterprise Manager. Pigatt is responsible for providing technical assistance to businesses located in Miami-Dade County and coordinating the Chamber’s micro-loan program. The MDCC provides Miami-Dade County business with $5,000 $25,000 in loans at an 8 percent interest rate based upon personal and business financials. No credit check is needed. If you Pigatt have a business that needs access to capital, contact Pigatt at the Mpigatt@m-dcc.org. n


MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

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CareerSource South Florida Commends Top Black Educators

Recruitment Assistance

We can become an extension of your Human Resources department by facilitating your search for qualified employees, thus saving your business time and expenses.

Training Incentives

We have programs that can offset costs when training prospective and existing employees. We can also provide information on how to access state training grants.

Tax Incentives

Your business can be eligible for tax credits that can possibly recoup thousands per year just for hiring the right people.

To learn more visit us at www.careersourcesfl.com CareerSource South Florida is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

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An Educated Community is a Healthier Community Congratulations to educators everywhere, for their commitment to smarter, healthier communities that support quality of life, all the way to the end of life. As the nation’s leading provider of end-of-life care, VITAS® Healthcare prides itself on educating South Florida healthcare partners, healthcare providers, our patients and their families about the benefits of patient-centered, compassionate hospice care.

800.93.VITAS VITAS.com

MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2019

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2019 Education Issue - Legacy Miami  

2019 Education Issue - Legacy Miami  

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