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‘Natural Born’ Leader

MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

Jackson Health System CEO Carlos Migoya

CEO Roy Hawkins Jr. Leads the Way at Jackson Memorial Where He Was Welcomed into the World

‘Aggressively’ Invests in Healthcare Network

Nursing Excellence

Baptist Health Exec. Reveals What It Takes to Maintain Best Staff

Roy Hawkins Jr.

Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019


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Excellence. Achievement. Celebration.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

We extend our warmest congratulations to Diane Amado-Tate, vice president and chief nursing officer for Doctors Hospital, on her recognition by Legacy Magazine as a Top Black Healthcare Professional of 2019. We salute you and your fellow honorees for your fine work in the community.

BaptistHealth.net

A not-for-proďŹ t organization supported by philanthropy and committed to our faith-based charitable mission of medical excellence. For giving opportunities, visit BaptistHealth.net/Foundation


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EDITOR’S NOTE

4 INTRODUCING SOUTH FLORIDA’S TOP BLACK HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS OF 2019 6 CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT By Audrey M. Edmonson 8 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids

SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

10 COVER STORY Healthcare Administrator

Becomes CEO of Hospital Where He Was Born

By Janiah Adams

12 MONEY MATTERS By Joann Milord

Why aren’t there more African-American doctors? It’s an important question facing the healthcare industry. And I’m not just talking about medical doctors. Why don’t we see more Black dentists filling our cavities, Black nurses taking our blood pressure, Black psychiatrists treating our mental disorders, and Black hospital administrators calling the shots? African-American men and women made up just 6 percent of all U.S. physicians in 2008; 6.9 percent of enrolled medical students in 2013; and 7.3 percent of all medical school applicants, according to a study published last year in the journal AIMS Public Health. In this issue of Legacy magazine, we honor that talented 6 percent by introducing

you to our selection of South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019. Perhaps the driving force responsible for producing the most African-American healthcare professionals is Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Just ask some of our honorees: Community Health of South Florida V.P. Jean Pierre of Florida A&M University; Broward Health’s LaRae P. Floyd of Florida Memorial University; and Walgreens pharmacy leader Dr. Lekeshia Bush of FAMU. Bush says HBCUs are a key factor in this equation for a few reasons: Their academic programs are designed to embrace and nurture the next generation of physicians and students traditionally follow in the footsteps of family members who attended an HBCU. Bush suggests this debunks any notion that HBCUs are no longer relevant. “Are they relevant? The answer is emphatically yes because the playing field is not even and there’s so much that you will not get at other institutions like the sense of (HBCU) pride and the requirement of African-American studies,” Bush said. Some experts have even identified a correlation between Black physicians and the health of the Black community. “African-American doctors are woefully underrepresented in the physician

workforce, leading fewer African Americans to see a doctor,” said Dr. William F. Owen Jr., dean and chancellor of Ross University School of Medicine (based in Barbados with a campus in Miramar), in a press release announcing its partnership with Oakwood University in Huntsville, Ala. to create a pathway program for graduates of the HBCU to attend medical school. “This has significant negative healthcare outcomes in communities already prone to high rates of chronic diseases.” The AIMS Public Health study suggests that diversifying the medical field is a job that shouldn’t only be shouldered by HBCUs. In fact, all colleges and universities should be creating more opportunities and pipelines for aspiring Black healthcare professionals. In the words of Marian Wright Edelman, “You can’t be what you can’t see.” This is why I hope our younger readers look closely at the faces in this special healthcare issue to see exactly what they, too, can become.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

14  Jackson Health CEO ‘Aggressively’ Invests in Future of Public Healthcare Network

By Denise Lothian

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

 rowth in Local NAHSE Highlights G Need for More C-Suite Healthcare Leadership

By Kallan Louis

16 EXECUTIVE SUITE Chief Nursing Officer Sees

Challenges, Positive Strides in Healthcare Industry

By Josie Gulliksen

18 LEGACY BRIEFS

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Yanela G. McLeod Managing Editor

Shannel Escoffery Vice President

Sabrina Moss-Solomon

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

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Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Joe Wesley Cover Photo

Rory Lee

Cover Makeup Artist

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals of 2019

ALIYA AARON

CEO & Principal AMR Healthcare Consulting LLC

GARY MICHAEL CLAY, JR., M.D. Doctor Jessie Trice Community Health System Inc.

DR. STEPHEN HENRY

Primary Care, Sports Medicine Uhealth Sports Medicine

DR. VENUS MILLER

Family & Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Time To Talk For Real Inc , VM Consulting Firm, LLC, Jessie Health Community Health Center, Inc

Diane Amado-Tate Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Baptist Health South FloridaDoctors Hospital

DR. J’NELLE DELICA

Periodontist and Implant Surgeon Delicate Periodontics and Implant Dentistry

KEITH JONES

Vascular and Endovascular Surgeon Tenet Healthcare

JANICE MITCHELL

Associate Vice President of Hospital Revenue Cycle Operation Broward Health

KIMBERLY PRINCE, DC

Chiropractic Physician Florida Spine and Joint Institute

DR. CAROL BIGGS, MBA-HA, DHSC

CHERYL BREWSTER

LEKESHIA BUSH

DORINDA CAROLINA

Chief Nursing Officer Jackson Memorial Hospital

Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

LARAE FLOYD

EVA M FRANCIS MN, RN, CCRN,NEA-BC President Brilliant Healthcare Training and Consulting Inc.

Research Assistant Professor UHealth

SOPHIA GEORGE

MELLISSA HEATH, MBA, MSN, RN

ROMAINE LAYNE

PAMELA MANNING MSN.ED, MSN, APRN, AGNP-BC

DR. TIFFANY MCCALLA BOTTORFF

GRANT S. MCGAUGH

JEAN D. PIERRE JR

DR. GARVEY PINKSTON II, PHARM. D

KIA NICOLE PRESCOTT DNP, APRN, WHNP-BC

Manager, Supply Chain Operations & Business Development Broward Health

Chief Financial Officer at Broward Health Imperial Point Broward Health Imperial Point

DR. LYN M. PEUGEOT

Dr. Lyn M. Peugeot Assistant Professor Ron and Kathy Assaf College of Nursing Nova Southeastern University

NETONUA REYES, MSN, RN

Chief Operations & Nursing Officer Broward Health Imperial Point

Nurse Practitioner Legacy Advanced Health

Vice President/Chief Behavioral Health Officer Community Health of South Florida

NATALIE ROWLES, D.C.

Chiropractic Physician Florida Spine and Joint Institute

Pharmacy Manager Walgreens at Jessie Trice Community Health Center

Chief Human Resources Officer UHealth

Medical Doctor TLJMS

Interim Chief Nursing Officer Wellington Regional Medical Center

Managing Director 5Star BDM

CEO & Co-Founder of Southern Hills Doctor of Nursing Practice, Women’s Health Pharmacy Southern Hills Pharmacy Advanced Practitioner- Board Certified Jessie Trice Community Health System

JUDY-ANN ROYE MSN, APRN, FNP-C Family Nurse Practitioner Founder/President of Black Nurse Practitioners of Palm Beach County

DR. ANGELA WALKER

South Regional Manager/Doctor Of Chiropractic Florida Spine & Joint Institute


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT

County Initiative ‘Getting to Zero’ in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS

Audrey M. Edmonson

BY AUDREY M. EDMONSON

In the nearly four decades since HIV/ AIDS was first identified, significant progress has been made in the treatment of the epidemic, enabling patients to live longer and healthier lives. But AIDS remains a devastating disease. Unfortunately, it continues to hit MiamiDade County especially hard. It is estimated that 1-in-85 adults in Miami-Dade County is living with HIV. Among African Americans, that rate is much higher. According to estimates, 1-in-31 black residents in Miami-Dade could be living with the HIV virus. MiamiDade County also ranks No. 1 in the United States for new HIV infections per 100,000, with 1,224 newly diagnosed HIV infections in 2018, up 5.1 percent from the previous year, bucking a trend that saw some significant declines in new HIV cases over the previous 10 years. While these numbers are troubling, we can take some comfort in the fact that we have made significant progress among some populations over the last decade. Between 2009 and 2018, HIV diagnoses decreased 37 percent among blacks and 6 percent among whites. On the other hand, there was a 28 percent increase in HIV diagnoses among Hispanics during this same time. To address the ongoing health crisis, the Miami-Dade County Commission established the County’s “Getting to Zero”

campaign in collaboration with the Florida Department of Health and the Miami-Dade HIV/AIDS Partnership – with the goal of reducing the number of new HIV cases in Miami-Dade County to zero. The Miami-Dade Office of Community Advocacy kicked off the public awareness and education campaign on Feb. 14, 2018 with an annual health fair featuring free HIV testing, educational forums on HIV nutrition, mental health, and the PrEP HIV prevention pill, along with a free distribution of new Countybranded condoms, which are also available year-round through various County partners. The “Getting to Zero” Task Force – made up a diverse group of community stakeholders in academia, the private sector, and the HIV/AIDS population – has been created to help reduce new HIV/ AIDS infections, increase access to care, reduce stigma, and promote health equality in the community. Miami-Dade was also recently selected by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Centers for Disease Control to participate in the “Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America” Initiative, which seeks to reduce new HIV infections by 90 percent by 2030 through identifying the highestimpact HIV prevention, care, treatment, and outbreak response strategies. The initiative includes surveys and town hall meetings that give affected communities an opportunity to contribute to the development of a local plan by sharing their input into how Miami-Dade can enhance HIV prevention and care efforts. We must do a better job reducing new HIV cases in our community. Be part of the solution by raising awareness, getting tested, and practicing prevention. Together, I know we can make a difference. Let’s keep getting the word out and remaining active in this fight until this terrible disease is finally eradicated. Audrey M. Edmonson is chairwoman of the Miami-Dade County Commission. n

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CAREER & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

3 Ways Mental Health Impacts the Workplace

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

A 2002 Pfizer Outcomes Research study showed approximately 217 million days of work are lost annually because of productivity decline related to mental illness and substance abuse disorders, costing Unites States employers $17 billion each year. Today, that number has grown to more than $193 billion in lost revenue. Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness each year.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Statistics like these are why businesses are realizing more and more that not making mental health a top priority can cost them big time. When I consult with companies facing high employee turnover and low engagement, I encourage better training for senior leaders and managers to help them take a more active approach in reducing the stigma related to mental health. Loss in Productivity. Work demands and challenges can lead to increased anxiety and stress, causing a reduction in engagement, productivity, and an increase in mistakes. Because many mental health disorders are not easily recognizable, it’s common for managers to label bad performance as laziness or lack of competency. Instead, managers should provide employees with a variety of resources to help improve performance, including options within their healthcare packages directly focused on mental health awareness and aid. Communication. While there is an increase in awareness surrounding

the mental health industry, it is still a stigma among many, preventing them from getting the help they need. Having open and transparent communication is essential to reducing the mental health challenges affecting the workplace. As employees, it is important to let your manager know when you are feeling overwhelmed at work. Don’t be ashamed to be human. You want to avoid feeling burned out, especially if you love what you do. While our hearts may be in the right place, we are not exempt from having a bad day, or being impacted by undiagnosed health conditions. Addressing issues head-on will not only help you get your life back on track, it may help others take more of an active approach in seeking help within their own lives. Engagement. One of the most effective ways to increase engagement in the workplace is through transparency. As leaders, it is important for you to be transparent about how you handle high-stress situations at work. Your staff needs to feel that you can relate to them and sharing your challenges

and strategies could help them to build a more trusting relationship with you, and in turn increase their interest and engagement. During your meetings, make mental health a topic of discussion and look for ideas from your team. Some things that have worked well for my clients is to develop a recognition program that rewards leaders and managers who demonstrate evidencebased improvements in metrics of mental health and well-being and measurable business results. Improving the health and well-being of employees is worth the investment and up-front cost. It may not seem like it at first, but the long-term benefits of investing in mental health programs and strategies can help your business to remain competitive and reduce the hidden cost of employee turnover. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.com or follow @ MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n

TikTok Emerging as Latest Social Media Trend

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

I recently gave a TED Talk at Tedx Hollywood Young Circle Park. During the intro, I made mention of an up-andcoming app called TikTok, a reiteration of the previously known Musically. It allows users to upload up to 60 seconds of video content with filters, text, and other features for the world to see.

Gen Z-ers and Millennials are flocking to the platform! It is the fastest growing social media platform in the world, boasting more than 1 million users – the same as Instagram. I focus a lot of my work in the digital space and help businesses and personal brands understand how to use the power of social media to increase influence, share their message, expand vision, and increase bottom lines. One of the most frequent questions I get asked is, which social media platform is next? What should I be paying attention to? Quite frankly, it’s been a while since I have seen a new social media platform worth investing energy in, until now. I have spent the last eight months studying TikTok. What I observed the most is the uncanny ability for young people to spot trends. When Facebook opened its digital doors to the public in 2004, it was for college students. When Instagram graced us with its presence in

2010, it was for teenagers. Because these platforms were new and trendy, a lot of adults swore they would never use them. Social media is for kids, right? But now, these same people seek professionals like me for assistance to understand how they can leverage this digital technology to increase their company’s reach or for their own personal brand awareness. So, what was once for kids is now a staple for people of all ages. Could TikTok be the next big thing? Who knows. But it is worth exploring. I am starting to see more Gen X-ers take advantage. I see doctors giving advice to patients, career coaches offering tips to clients, and other professionals starting to see the value of the platform and use it to their advantage. So, how can you do the same: 1. Know who uses the platform and market to them. Traditionally, it is very difficult to make a digital introduction to the Gen Z market. Knowing that they are

on this platform could help a great deal – if that is your market. 2. Keep the content fun and creative. Utilize the tools to create your 60-second clips. Use filters, music, and captions to attract your ideal clients and customers. 3. The biggest advantage I see is the social storytelling ability. TikTok #storytime posts are super popular right now, and social storytelling is one of the most effective marketing tools you can employ. Do it with video using the app. It may be too early to make a definitive decision on whether TikTok is going to be the next big thing, but so far, it looks very promising.

Dr. Tracy Timberlake www.tracytimberlake.com/freeresources Instagram.com/tracytimberlake Facebook.com/drtracytimberlake n


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COVER STORY

Healthcare Administrator Becomes CEO of Hospital Where He Was Born BY JANIAH ADAMS

Becoming a healthcare administrator wasn’t in Roy Hawkins Jr.’s plan. He entered Howard University to become an OB-GYN. “I... quickly found that I wasn’t quite cut out for that side of the medical field,” Hawkins laughed. Now, Hawkins is the senior vice president and chief executive officer of Jackson Memorial Hospital — the same hospital where he was born 44 years ago. He says his attachment to the hospital breeds dedication to his role and to the community he serves. Hawkins’ journey began with the realization that he had to take a different approach. He said he stumbled upon the National Association of Health Services Executives, and new career opportunities in healthcare Jackson Memorial Senior V.P. and CEO Roy Hawkins Jr. visits with nurse manager Marlene Augustin while making his morning rounds on the hospital’s west emerged. wing, which is dedicated to serving transplant patients. “It took my personal skills, which involved leadership, and at “Ensuring that every person develop JMH. Americans, to STEM education at the time my career goal and really that interacts with our patients “Ultimately, what I’m hoping an early age.” combined the two,” he said. shows compassion, shows to do is to eliminate healthcare Hawkins focuses part of his Hawkins graduated from HU accountability, shows respect disparities that may exist,” he said. time on mentorship. He participates with a bachelor’s Having diversity within a hospital’s at Miami Carol City Senior High in business staff may be easier for a city like School, the same school from “Ensuring that every person that interacts administration, Miami, but it’s not necessarily which he graduated. with our patients shows compassion, then received his the same for hospitals around the “I think it’s important that folks master’s in healthcare nation, particularly as it relates to get to see people that look like shows accountability, shows respect and administration from African Americans. them, from the same places they’re expertise … motivates me to be involved in Florida International In college, Hawkins said he from, in positions of power,” he working on our organizational culture.” University. He was surrounded by hundreds of said. Roy Hawkins Jr. black medical students, but those landed his first job Hawkins said he hopes his as an administrator numbers aren’t always there at work translates into JMH being of medical services, larger schools. a place of hope, healing, and eventually becoming the CEO of and expertise … I think that is a “When you take a step back community. “[We want] to make Jackson North Medical center, then universal challenge and one that and look at some of the nation’s sure that people can see the Jackson Memorial Hospital. really motivates me to be involved largest medical schools, I would organization as a place of wellness Although Hawkins has only in working on our organizational challenge it and say that there are and not always a place of traumatic been in his position for a little more culture,” he said. opportunities to increase numbers,” care, and really a part of their daily than 90 days, he says he is working Compassion, Accountability, he said. “I’d also back that up and lives and a part of their wellbeing,” to make sure he understands the Respect and Expertise — CARE say that it’s really about exposing he said. n patient experience firsthand. — is how Hawkins says he plans to minorities, particularly African


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MONEY MATTERS

Being Prepared for Financing is Necessary for Business Growth expenses or a term loan for equipment financing that is best for you and your business? Make sure to consider all available financing options.

2. Record Keeping: Have you been maintaining proper accounting and administrative records? Do you routinely review your bank account statements and monthly expense budget? Are your business licenses up to date? Accurate financial statements verify the value and growth potential of a business.

5. Financing Costs: What costs are related to the financing? What are the closing costs? Is there a prepayment penalty fee? What is a reasonable interest rate? Make sure you know all the costs associated with the financing to accurately compare options. Obtaining financing can be an involved process. If you do not prepare in advance, your business could find itself suddenly needing to secure funds with the only option available being a high-interest, short-term lender. Even if traditional bank financing is not available to you that does not mean there are no viable options, such as the Miami Bayside Foundation. MBF is a nonprofit organization with a mission to further economic development in Miami. MBF accomplishes this through loans and technical assistance to minority and women-owned small businesses, and through educational scholarships and grants. In 2018, MBF partnered with the State of Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity to become the administrator of the Black Business Loan Program for Miami-Dade County. Since 2011, and with amounts ranging from $2,500 to $150,000, MBF has awarded more than 100 low-interest loans totaling more than $5.2 million, helping create more than 450 jobs in Miami.

3. Business Plan: Do you have a clear strategic plan to grow your business? Based on trends in your industry what does growth for your business look like? Is it adding an additional product or service? Is it increasing marketing or adding staff? It is important to outline your goals for the business and the action steps to achieve them.

Joann Milord is the Black Business Loan Program manager at the Miami Bayside Foundation. She can be reached at joann@ miamibaysidefoundation.orgor (786) 703-5768. Visit http://www. miamibaysidefoundation.org for more information.

BY JOANN MILORD

Whether you are starting a business, expanding, or have just been awarded a new contract, financing is necessary for growth at any stage of a business. While you may not need funding today, circumstances can rapidly change. Keep these in mind to be prepared for financing your business: 1. Check your Credit: What is your credit score? Are there any inaccuracies or recent late payments? Are you maxed out on your credit cards? What steps can you take to improve your credit score before applying for a loan? A strong credit score shows financial responsibility and is a lower risk to lenders.

4. Research Funding Options: Is a line of credit for short-term operational

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

Jackson Health CEO ‘Aggressively’ Invests in Future of Public Healthcare Network BY DENISE LOTHIAN Carlos Migoya said Jackson Health System is concerned about patient care and welcomes the county’s poor and those who do not have access to health care. Sporting his “Movember Mustache” and beard in support of men’s health, the president and CEO of Miami-Dade’s safety net health care system beamed as he stated the mission of Jackson Health. “We are colorblind,” said Migoya, who in May 2011, took the helm of one of the nation’s largest and most respected public healthcare networks. “The No. 1 mission for Jackson is to provide the best quality of care for all MiamiDade residents regardless of their ability to pay,” he said. “It’s not about white, Black, Hispanic, or green. It’s all about everybody – and we do just that.” Migoya, who earned a bachelor’s and MBA, both in finance, from Florida International University, touts the academic partnership with the University of Miami and FIU, which he says gives patient’s access to “some of the greatest doctors.” The partnership allows patients, doctors and students access to the Miami-Dade health system, which

includes: Jackson Memorial Hospital, Holtz Children’s Hospital, Jackson Behavioral Health Hospital, Jackson Rehabilitation Hospital, two nursing homes, several urgent care centers, physician practices, and Carlos Migoya clinics. Because of the long-term partnership, Migoya said the system has been able to identify illnesses that are common to the community such as Sickle Cell Anemia and Diabetes. Migoya is best known for turning around Jackson Health System from taking losses since 2006 to obtaining and sustaining surpluses since his first year at the helm. He worked in government and banking in his career before Jackson. He gets excited when it comes to Jackson Health’s business responsibility within the community, which includes procurement awards based on the

system’s commitment to diversity. Following the pattern of the County, Migoya said Jackson Health is race neutral in procurement, but has programs that make the contracting and procurement process accessible to small and minority-owned businesses. Its Mentor/Protege Development Program pairs certified small business enterprise-construction firms with industry leaders in healthcare construction management services. Each protégé will work with a construction management firm contracted with Jackson Health System to build one of its signature projects. Migoya chairs the United Way of Miami-Dade board, and serves on the boards of Miami Dade College, Florida Chamber of Commerce, the Beacon Council and MEDNAX. He is a member of the Florida Council of 100, an organization that promotes the economic growth of Florida. In November 2013, when Miami-Dade voters approved a $830 million Jackson Miracle-Building Bond program, Jackson Health added funds to the bond, which tops out at a $1.8 billion capital plan to modernize and expand the system’s footprint in the community. Migoya said he saw the need for

the bond, which received 65 percent voter approval. “We added approximately $1 billion from Jackson cash flow to help towards that,” Migoya said. “By doing that we are doing a lot of things throughout [the system].” Coming online will be a rehabilitation hospital at Northwest 16th Street and 12th Avenue to treat brain, spinal, or any kind of rehab. Jackson Memorial Hospital is undergoing the first phase of adding 50 intensive care unit beds, and a new hospital in Doral is expected to be completed in January 2021. All facilities in the system are getting some renovations as well, Migoya said. About $90-$100 million was spent at Jackson North. Urgent care centers were added around the community. Additionally, $5 million were used to upgrade North Dade Health Center in Miami Gardens with an urgent care center. “That $1.8 billion will almost be completely exhausted by the end of 2021,” Migoya shared. “We have been aggressive in spending…From the beginning of this thing, by the end of eight years from vision to completion, that kind of capital expenditure is pretty aggressive and we are very proud of that.” n

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Growth in Local NAHSE Highlights Need for More C-Suite Healthcare Leadership BY KALLAN LOUIS

In the state of Florida, healthcare is big business. Total healthcare spending is more than $132 billion — more than 18 percent of the state’s Gross Domestic Product. Creating a leadership pipeline into this robust industry is part of the mission of the National Association of Health Services Executives. Grant McGaugh, outgoing president of the South Florida chapter, said he is proud of his team’s strategy of showcasing local minority healthcare leaders. “We really need to hone in on how to make those leaps,” said McGaugh, a healthcare IT executive and consultant. “You’re getting your first job and then getting stuck in a silo. How do you then transition to the next position above? We felt like there was a significant gap in that area, so the first step was to tell the story of senior level executives.”

While there are a number of opportunities in the healthcare industry, minority executive leadership makes up only 11 percent and remains one of the Grant McGaugh, outgoing president of South Florida challenges chapter of NAHSE for industry professionals nationwide, according to research from the Kaiser Family Foundation Health Research & Educational Trust. McGaugh helped increase the growing visibility of the South Florida chapter and its members through

sharing their stories in the organization’s newsletters and eventually online news publication. McGaugh has more than 20 years of experience in the IT sector working at the executive level with companies including Zones, Inc., Centurylink, and Avaya. Sharing his story and others, coupled by building relationships with community associations, organizations and local healthcare systems helped the local chapter, which according to McGaugh was established in 1995 primarily focusing on Broward County, expand to a statewide network. Under his administration, Florida membership has tripled, sponsorships have quadrupled and its social media following has grown from 13 to 10,000. As conversations surrounding leadership opportunities for minorities in healthcare continue, the sudden passing of Kaiser Permanente Chairman and

CEO Bernard Tyson amplify the need for action. Revered for his leadership, Tyson was the first Black CEO of the nonprofit healthcare provider — one of the country’s largest, serving more than 12 million people. The NAHSE South Florida chapter also started the Stars program to target minority Masters of Health Administration candidates, giving them exposure to senior-level executives, and participating in boardroom mock interviews. “It’s important to mentor and help our young people to become more confident in what they want to achieve in their life and their career,” McGaugh said. “I’ve been blessed with this particular forum to put together a portfolio of different individuals, that have been successful in healthcare, so people of color know that there are people who are successful in the career choices in to which they are looking to endeavor.” n


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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EXECUTIVE SUITE

Chief Nursing Officer Sees Challenges, Positive Strides in Healthcare Industry

Diane Amado-Tate, vice president and chief nursing officer at Baptist Health South Florida

BY JOSIE GULLIKSEN

With nearly three decades in the nursing profession, Diane Amado-Tate, vice president and chief nursing officer at Baptist Health South Florida, can

attest to the many challenges faced in her profession. After 27 years in the healthcare industry, Amado-Tate said she has seen constant changes. “I’ve seen regulatory, reimbursement,and quality ratings changes, plus the introduction of the Affordable Healthcare Act (Obamacare),” she said. “In nursing, we deal with technology changes, nurse burnout, and sicker patients.” Those “sicker patients” are mainly because of the boom in urgent care centers throughout South Florida. Hospitals now see patients with more severe health issues because patients with less life-threatening injuries or ailments can visit an Urgent Care Center. “All of this has shifted the acuity level of patients,” she explained. The large population of Baby Boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964), are also now collecting Medicare,

using their healthcare resources. “People nowadays are much more conscious of hospitals and what is covered by their insurance plans,” she shared. “They can research on the Internet for this as well as the hospital’s ratings for quality care. Hospitals have to show the government they’re providing high quality care.” Her day-to-day responsibilities include overseeing Doctors Hospital where she reports directly to the CEO and oversees patient care and services. “I’ll visit the director of a certain department to discuss any issues they may be facing. It’s part of my duties overseeing the entire healthcare team.” Amado-Tate said she has witnessed positive changes, including improved quality of care, mainly because, “… hospitals are held accountable for this and are penalized by the government if it’s not up to standards. Also, we’ve

seen a shift in care from inpatient to outpatient.” For example, patients with hip replacements are normally released in 24 hours because studies indicate they heal better at home. Also, nurses are now graduating with bachelor’s degrees, which helps with the typical shortage of nurses in the industry. Amado-Tate considers herself fortunate to work for a highly-rated institution like Baptist Health. “We’re 10 hospitals from Palm Beach to the Florida Keys and maintain some of the highest quality ratings in the industry.” In May, Baptist Hospital achieved Magnet Designation, the highest designation a hospital can receive. “Only 7 percent of hospitals in the country have achieved it,” she said. “We received it for nursing excellence. It was a long journey and lots of hard work and we’re very proud.” n


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LEGACY BRIEFS health system dedicated to eradicating cancer. Watkins has more than 15 years of combined healthcare administration and general management experience. He

FMU HIRES WENDY ELLIS FOR DIRECTOR’S ROLE

capital campaign initiatives. He has more than 25 years of experience working with corporations and nonprofit organizations. Diggs is the former president of the Mourning Family Foundation, a Miamibased nonprofit organization focused on youth development. He is also the former president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce. JARROD BENJAMIN JOINS FIU ACADEMIC PROGRAMS DEPT.

Bailey Ellis

Dr. Wendy Ellis has been named director of Community Engagement & Partnership Development at Florida Memorial University. She was previously vice president of operations for Honey Shine, Inc. Ellis is a graduate of Loras College and University of Wisconsin-Lacrosse and holds a doctorate of education from Olivet Nazarene University. BANKING EXEC. TONY COLEY PROMOTED

Coley

Tony Coley has been named South Florida regional president for Truist Financial Corp., the company formed by the merger of SunTrust and BB&T. Coley was previously president of BB&T’s South Florida region. Coley is a 1996 graduate of the University of Miami, where he earned a bachelor of science degree and was a starting linebacker on the football team.

CONVERGE NAMES MARIO J. BAILEY SENIOR GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS ADVISER Converge Government Affairs of Florida,

Inc. welcomes Mario Bailey to its growing roster of top tier government affairs professionals. As a senior government affairs adviser, Bailey will strengthen the firm’s footprint in Tallahassee and South Florida. Bailey brings to Converge more than a decade of public policy and advocacy experience working on behalf of local governments, school districts, universities and businesses. Known for his prowess in the appropriations process, Baily has successfully secured millions in state funding for clients. In addition to advocating on a wide range of regulatory matters, he has worked behind the scenes on high profile civic issues such as the historic legislation adding a statue of educator and civil rights leader Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune to National Statutory Hall in Washington, D.C. Bailey currently serves on the board of directors of the Florida Association of Professional Lobbyists. Before joining Converge Government Affairs, he served as a senior government relations consultant at the law firm of Becker and Poliakoff, where he worked for eight years. Bailey also served on the campaign of former Congressman Joe Garcia and as the legislative aide to former State Representative Dwight Bullard. Bailey is a graduate of the University of Alabama and was named to their Division of Community Affairs Board of Advisors in 2019. CTCA HIRES HOSPITAL EXEC JONATHAN WATKINS Cancer Treatment Centers of America has hired Jonathan Watkins as the president of Hospital Operations. He will oversee multi-site operations within a national

Watkins

most recently served as chief executive officer of Broward Health Imperial Point providing overall leadership for the 210-bed acute care hospital, which offers medical-surgical inpatient care, behavioral health services and a wide variety of outpatient services. In his role within CTCA Hospitals & Clinics, Watkins will be responsible for leading his organizations to be both operationally and fiscally sound. Additionally, he will ensure CTCA is connected and tied to the community in new, innovative ways. BILL DIGGS TO LEAD BROWARD HEALTH’S FUNDRAISING ARM

Benjamin

Jarrod Benjamin, a native of Louisiana, has joined the Florida International University Academic Programs and Partnership Department to lead Florida’s workforce development solution to the cyber workforce shortage. Currently, there are 24,000 vacant cyber positions in the state of Florida. In this role, Benjamin will work with the Department of Labor, Florida Department of Education, and nationwide companies to place cyber apprentices that desire to re-skilled and up skilled to meet the demanding need of cyber professionals. n

Diggs

Bill Diggs has been named president of the Fort Lauderdale-based Broward Health Foundation. Diggs is responsible for the Foundation’s fund development, major gifts, annual giving, special events and all

DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE?

Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.


MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2019

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CONGRATULATIONS UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HEALTH SYSTEM CONGRATULATES THE TOP BLACK HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS FOR 2019 including our very own:

DORINDA CAROLINA

SOPHIA GEORGE, PH.D.

STEPHEN HENRY, D.O.

Chief Human Resources Officer

Cancer Researcher, Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

Dual Board-Certified Family Physician

UHealth – University of Miami Health System

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Sports Medicine Physician UHealth Sports Medicine Institute

On behalf of your colleagues and friends at the University of Miami Health System and Miller School of Medicine, congratulations on this well-deserved honor. We thank you for your commitment to the health and wellness of our South Florida community and beyond.

UMiamiHealth.org

19-UHealth-141 Legacy Top Black Healthcare Professionals 2019 FINAL.indd 1

12/13/19 4:57 PM

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Legacy Miami - Health Care Issue (2019)  

Legacy Miami - Health Care Issue (2019)  

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