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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2020

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Introducing Miami’s Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow HEALTH ACADEMIA

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African Americans account for nearly a quarter of all COVID-related deaths. Dr. William Alexis explains why it’s imperative this population is included in clinical trials.

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Miami-native Danielle Geathers made national headlines after being elected MIT’s first Black female student body president. At 19, meet this year’s youngest 40 Under 40 honoree.

MONEY ENTREPRENEUR

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OneUnited Bank is seeing a surge in customers. Find out how President Kevin Cohee says the unity seen in protests across America is helping to increase business for the largest Black bank in America.

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When LaToya Stirrup and her two sisters started wearing a natural hairstyle, they quickly realized that combing their hair was “knot” easy. Find out how their brilliant solution landed them on QVC and HSN.


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 ON THE COVER  2020 40 Under 40 Honorees at Miami-Dade County Courthouse IMPORTANT 2020 ELECTION DATES 6 CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT By Audrey Edmonson

COVID-19 REPORT By Dr. William Alexis

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP MIT STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT MAKES HISTORY AS FIRST BLACK FEMALE LEADER By Monique Howard ARTS & CULTURE PERPETUA PHILLIPS MAKES IMPACT  ON DANCE COMMUNITY AT BE STUDIOS By Josie Gulliksen

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THE BUSINESS REPORT

By Beatrice Louissaint

12-13 INTRODUCING THE 2020 40 UNDER 40 HONOREES 14 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary V. Davids

SOCIAL MEDIA By Tracy Timberlake

a high personal price. They endured racial slurs and taunting, brutal “nightstick” beatings, and countless violent arrests following peaceful protests. While in their 20s and 30s, they marched alongside the likes of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in their quest for equality. Essentially, they were the Millennials of their day — strategizing a plan to level the playing field for people of color, never wavering. Enter today’s Millennials. In this issue, you’ll meet some of the most wo civil rights heroes who risked extraordinary young Black men and their lives daily while on the women as we honor the 2020 class of frontline of nearly every civil rights Legacy South Florida’s “40 Under 40.” campaign and confrontation in the The proverbial baton has now been 1960s, are now gone. The deaths of passed on to this youthful, energized Rev. Dr. C.T. Vivian, 95, and U.S. Representative John R. Lewis, 80, may generation of advocates, which has birthed proactive movements such as have physically silenced these giant the Dream Defenders and Black Lives voices. Nonetheless, their legacy rings Matter. loudly today as African Americans, This year’s honorees run the gamut reflecting on the Great March on — from a former Miss Black Florida Washington 57 years ago this month, find themselves standing up to the same pageant queen who runs a dance studio systemic and pervasive nature of racism to a Miami native elected the first Black student body president at the that eerily continues to hang over the Massachusetts Institute of Technology nation like a dark cloud. in Cambridge. Vivian and Lewis paved the way The next decade will be a pivotal for a better America — and they paid

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time for all of our honorees for several reasons. First, who will be elected this fall to local, state, and federal leadership matters more than ever Educated Black Millennials are faced with paying back mounting student loan debt. Many are finding they are having to save longer to purchase a home. And, in welldocumented cases, thanks to viral cell phone video, simply walking, driving, shopping, or breathing while Black remains a challenge. This blatant evidence of racism repeatedly demonstrates to the rest of America what we’ve been proclaiming all along — there are still double standards held against Black Americans. It’s imperative that our leadership, regardless of their color, dismantle institutional racism and guard against the undermining influence of that structure. After all, that’s what Rev. Vivian and Congressman Lewis would have wanted.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

15 MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP KIESHA EDGE HELPS OTHERS TACKLE ISSUES OF RACIAL BIAS By Michelle Solomon THE FINANCE REPORT By Kevin Cadette

18 4 STEPS BLACK BUSINESS OWNERS CAN TAKE TO SURVIVE PANDEMIC By Danielle St. Luce

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DIVERSITY IS TRUE MEASURE OF DIVERSITY AT THE TOP By Mark Kent EXECUTIVE SUITE BLACK  BANK MOVEMENT ENCOURAGES FINANCIAL POWER TO CREATE SOCIAL CHANGE By Michelle Solomon

21 ENTREPRENEURSHIP NEW  START-UP FEATURES TOOL FOR DETANGLING NATURAL HAIR By Janey Tate

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LEGACY BRIEFS

MEDIA GROUP LLC LIFESTYLE

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

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#BeInformed #BeInfluential Visit our website: miamediagrp.com

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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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ON THE COVER Several Legacy Miami “40 Under 40” honorees proudly stand at the steps of the historic Miami-Dade County Courthouse on 73 W. Flagler Street in downtown Miami. Built in 1925, this courthouse is a powerful symbol of justice and the rule of law — all central to America’s founding principles. It is a fitting backdrop at a challenging time for African Americans who simply demand equality. As leaders in their respective communities, we asked the honorees how they feel the Black Lives Matter and similar movements are influencing the nation’s current racial climate?

RAHEL WELDEYESUS “I think this is more than a movement. It is a about Black lives matter and, yes, we know all lives matter but we know this moment right now is about us. It’s about our people and the fact that our lives do matter.”

XAVIER JONES “I think it’s one of the greatest times in history. It’s a time for us to make a new mark. It’s a time for us to see the greatest change we’ve ever seen. And it’s going to be our hard work and dedication that we’re going to see take us to the next level.” NEXCY DE LA ROSA-MONROE “I think it’s definitely a step in the right direction. But I also believe that as a lawyer the only way for us to have that equal justice is to demand that our bench is diverse and that it represents us. And that we’re represented as prosecutors, defense counsel, and definitely as judges because I know for my clients it definitely makes a difference when I walk into the courtroom and they see [a

judge] on the bench that looks like them that can relate to them and is able to feel and understand where they’re coming from so that they feel they got their fair date in court.”

ORLANDO ARNOLD “I think it’s important right now for this time. I think it has finally hit a head where everyone’s coming together. It’s needed for this country. The most important thing is we don’t let it get caught up in the midst and forget about why we’re doing it and why it needs to continue moving forward. As long as we stay on the same page and unite as a country and understand why Black lives matter is important, we can start to make some real changes in this country.” ALEX FINNIE “It’s so important that we’re continuing the conversation. The first step toward any kind of change we want to see is obviously educating open minds.

I think we have taken very active, positive steps in the right direction and from this point on we still need to continue pushing that conversation on to hopefully see the change that so many people in this country not only want to see but need to see.”

DANIELLE GEATHERS “I’m definitely hopeful. Now is the time a lot of people are reflecting on their own prejudices and biases. I think, historically, Black people have been the ones leading this movement and the only ones passionate about it. But now, even in my own circles, I’ve seen a lot of white people reflecting on their own biases and really wanting to educate themselves on the history of oppression.” n

IMPORTANT 2020 ELECTION DATES MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PRIMARY ELECTION: AUG. 18 LAST DAY TO REGISTER: JULY 30 EARLY VOTING: AUG. 3-AUG. 16 GENERAL ELECTION: NOV. 3 LAST DAY TO REGISTER: OCT. 5 EARLY VOTING: TBA LAST DAY TO REQUEST VOTE-BY-MAIL BALLOT: AUG. 8 VOTE-BY-MAIL BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED — NOT POSTMARKED — BY THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTION’S OFFICE NO LATER THAN 7 P.M. ON ELECTION DAY. You can hand deliver Vote-by-Mail ballots to the Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections office: 2822 NW 87th Ave. Doral, FL 33172 or STEPHEN P. CLARK CENTER 111 NW 1st Street, Miami, FL 33128

For more information: Iamelectionready.org


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CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT

RISE Miami-Dade Fund Helps Small Businesses Survive Coronavirus Crisis

BY AUDREY M. EDMONSON Small businesses have long been considered the backbone of America’s economy, delivering the entrepreneurial drive that vitalizes neighborhoods, supplies residents’ needs, and fuels local economies with commerce and job growth. Small businesses also are an important part of the tax base, generating revenue that sustains vital infrastructure

and public safety, and they help keep consumer prices low by providing healthy competition. But lockdowns and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic have hit small businesses harder than perhaps any other sector of the economy, and many minority-owned businesses have suffered disproportionately during these challenging times. But here in Miami-Dade, a transformative new revolving loan fund for small and micro businesses in MiamiDade County is helping them weather the Coronavirus crisis. Businesses with fewer than 25 employees and annual revenues of less than $2 million can now apply for loans of up to $30,000 from the ReInvesting in our Small Business Economy Miami-Dade Fund. The Rise Miami-Dade Fund is the result of legislation approved by the Miami-Dade County Commission in June. It allocates $25 million in Coronavirus relief dollars from the federal CARES Act to provide small businesses access to capital and allow them to receive the

technical financial assistance they need to recover from the COVID-19 crisis. In the longer term, it will become part of Miami-Dade’s permanent small business infrastructure, helping mostly minority-owned businesses gain access to capital and assistance they wouldn’t have otherwise. The Dade County Federal Credit Union, as the RISE Fund administrator, is working directly with local community development financial institutions that will originate and package the loans. The CDFIs are Accion, the Black Business Investment Fund, and the Miami Bayside Foundation. After a business is issued a loan, the CDFIs will continue to provide technical assistance to the businesses to help them survive the crisis and strengthen for the future. Loan funds can be used for employee wages, inventory, utilities, commercial lease, mortgage or rent payments, to pay off high interest debt, and for other expenses incurred due to Coronavirus safety provisions. Besides having fewer than 25

employees and annual revenue of less than $2 million, Miami-Dade businesses must be in operation for at least two years to qualify for the program, as well as have a credit score greater than 575 with no bankruptcies or foreclosures in the last three years. In addition, the program requires that the business owner’s primary residence be Miami-Dade County. For more information about the RISE Miami-Dade Fund and to apply, visit www.risemiamidade.com. This RISE Miami-Dade Fund will be a key component in our county’s efforts to recover from the Coronavirus crisis in the near term and foster a thriving economy in the years ahead. It is my hope that small business owners – especially those that have historically faced challenges in accessing capital – will take advantage of this opportunity to not only keep their doors open in the days of COVID-19, but to prosper well into the future. Audrey M. Edmonson is chairwoman of the Miami-Dade County Commission. n

COVID-19 REPORT

African Americans Must Be Included in COVID-19 Clinical Trials

BY WILLIAM ALEXIS The COVID-19 pandemic has claimed in excess of 150,000 American lives. The United States is now the “global hotspot” with Florida second only to California in number of cases. The devastating impact of the pandemic upon the African-American community cannot be overstated. Sources estimate that

the infection rate is in excess of 30 percent among African Americans and the death rate is 2 to 6 times that of whites. African Americans account for nearly a quarter of all COVID-related deaths nationally despite being only 13 percent of the U.S. population. It remains unclear as to why the infection and death statistics among African Americans have been so disproportionately high. Preexisting medical conditions, lack of healthcare access and utilization, as well as many socioeconomic factors have all been suggested as possible reasons. Experts agree that while face coverings, social distancing, and isolation of infected individuals and contacts may serve to mitigate further spread of the virus, a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed to control the pandemic. This July, the National Institutes of Health announced the launch of Phase 3 clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy of the investigational vaccine known as mRNA1273 to prevent symptomatic COVID-19 infection in adults. The trial is expected to enroll approximately 30,000 healthy adult

volunteers at 89 clinical research sites across the United States. Given the disproportionate impact of the disease upon African Americans, it is of paramount importance that these trials include those who most stand to benefit from the vaccine. To what extent African Americans will participate or have the opportunity to do so remains to be seen. To be sure, the progress achieved thus far in the development of a vaccine has been rapid, but necessary. Dubbed “Operation Warp Speed,” the multi-agency collaboration implementing this trial has the stated aims to accelerate development, manufacturing and distribution of medical countermeasures to COVID-19. African Americans have been traditionally underrepresented in clinical research trials. The most often invoked reason for this is the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, which damaged the trust African Americans place in clinical researchers and healthcare providers. More impactful, however, may be the role that racial bias plays in the enrollment of African Americans

in clinical research. Researchers often assume that the results of clinical trials may be applied to the general population. In studies where African Americans are underrepresented, it can only be “assumed” that the findings also apply to them. This has led researchers to believe that racial disparities in clinical trial participation could fail to identify important differences in treatment effects based on race and genetic factors. Given that the African-American population has been most affected by COVID-19, clinical trials must be designed to ensure that the vaccine works in African Americans. This can only be accomplished through the inclusion and participation of African Americans in these clinical trials. The recovery of the African-American community from this pandemic may depend on it. Dr. William Alexis is a clinical and interventional cardiologist and is chief of Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Memorial Hospital West in Pembroke Pines. n


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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

MIT Student Body President Makes History as First Black Female Leader

Danielle Geathers

BY MONIQUE HOWARD

Danielle Geathers is the first black female student body president in the 159-year history of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, commonly known as MIT.

“I think the biggest thing is being a transparent government,” shared Geathers, who said some of her goals include demonstrating that she is listening to the student body, working to amplify their voices, and working with administrators. At 19, Geathers is the youngest person to make Legacy magazine’s “Top 40 under 40” recognition list. In her junior year at MIT, she is majoring in mechanical engineering with a concentration in product design. Geathers said she is also interested in black culture and historical research. During her time in high school at the Miami Country Day School, she created the Black Student Union and supported peers who were involved in student government. “I was in a predominantly white private school, and there was a very small number of black students,” Geathers said

about the club’s origin. “There were a bunch of student groups on campus, but there wasn’t one that catered directly to our needs. One thing I thought was important for building a community was to create a forum in which all of us could get together and talk. I also thought it’d be helpful to have a budget for better community-building efforts. We did that in my sophomore year. Then as the club grew, we started turning more towards advocacy.” Geathers continues to be actively involved at MIT. “The Black Student Union was something I knew I always wanted to join,” she reflected. “They have five committees and I joined three of them. I really had goals for making the Student Union more visible and supportive of unrepresented communities.” According to Geathers, MIT is allowing seniors to return for in-person

learning in the fall, but most students are being offered online learning options. Kits will be provided as well as synchronized lectures with professors. Geathers said the pandemic has affected her educational experience and endeavors as a student body president during the COVID era, but she is not deterred. “It’s much harder to bond with professors and network when you’re virtually learning,” she said. “As a student organization on campus, it’s hard enough getting to students when they’re all in the same place and when they are all over the world, it’s pretty hard for a government to stay transparent and in touch with their students.” With so many accomplishments already achieved, Geathers is still on the rise as she plans for future success. n

ARTS & CULTURE

Perpetua Phillips Makes Impact on Dance Community at BE Dance Studios BY JOSIE GULLIKSEN.

Perpetua Phillips’ career path was determined at the tender age of 3. That is when she began dancing while observing the passion with which many of her family members performed. “I’m the youngest of 39 grandchildren and many of the cousins and siblings around me were dancers, so I followed in their footsteps,” said the 39-year-old who co-founded BE Dance Studios in Miami Gardens 11 years ago with her sister. Through elementary and middle school, Phillips kept dancing. At Miami Northwestern Senior High School she studied with dance teacher Edwin Holland. “Mr. Holland was a tapper, so tap was the focus, but we also did ballet, jazz and even acrobatics and tumbling,” Phillips said. While in high school as a 16-yearold, she got the opportunity of a lifetime and traveled to New York City. “I knew pretty early on that I wanted to teach dance and then at 16

Ultimately, she graduated from Florida International University with a Bachelor of Arts in Dance. The day after receiving her degree, “I took over the Edwin Holland Dance Studio and was there for two years,” she said. But school beckoned once again, so she returned to attend graduate Dance instructor Perpetua Phillips assists one of her talented students at school at Full Sail BE Dance Studios, which she co-founded in Miami Gardens. University. After when I went to New York and Alvin receiving her MBA, Ailey Dance Co. it changed my life,” she freelanced as a dancer with several she said. “I knew right away while I companies before opening BE Dance was there this was what Miami’s dance Studios in 2009. community was missing.” In her 11 years at BE Dance, she She finished high school and has hosted ballerinas of color from began teaching while in undergraduate the Dutch National Ballet, Dance school in 1999. Her undergraduate Theatre of Harlem, and Miami City studies began in Ohio State University. Ballet. She also serves as mentor and

role model, empowering her students through the launch of the Brown Ballerina Empowerment Summit, BE Mighty - BDS Virtual Studio, as well as presenting productions of the Nutcracker and other live and recorded events. Add to that the title of former Miss Black Florida USA and Goodwill Ambassador to the Republic of Gambia, yet she still remains humble. “I’ve never thought what I was doing was so impactful, it’s just in me,” she said, “but I know I’ve improved the quality of life for my students and my community. I’m extremely happy to provide something a little out of the ordinary.” Phillips recalls someone once telling her “‘It’s something people didn’t know they needed, and once they do hopefully it has a ripple effect and helps other people.’ It still seems small to me,” she added. “None of it feels on such a grand scale, yet I know this is how we make each other stronger and better and that brings me immense joy.” n


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BUSINESS REPORT

Sponsorship Vital in Building Next Level of Leadership

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT You’re probably aware of the role that mentors play in a career and in business, but you may not have given much thought to the importance of a sponsor. The two roles are very different, and I would argue that sponsors are even more important in helping minorities move into leadership positions and grow their businesses. A mentor provides counsel and advice, helping the mentee

make wise career or business choices, set goals, prepare to advance throughout their career or grow their business. In contrast, a sponsor actively advocates for their protégé’s advancement, and this extends in several directions. A sponsor may recommend a protégé for key assignments, campaign for their promotion, make sure they participate in critical industry functions (and sometimes pay for their attendance), introduce them to company or industry leaders when appropriate, or recommend them for corporate or nonprofit boards. While mentors come from any level of an organization or the wider business community, sponsors are usually in executive leadership. In addition, sponsors must be very handson, changing the course of the person’s professional and leadership development. In order to build the next level of minority business leadership, we need current leaders to commit to sponsoring younger people. Minorities are often overlooked for promotion or challenging

Lil Greenhouse Grill congratulates our Managing Partner and Creative Lead:

NICOLE GATES

South Florida’s 50 Top Black Business Leaders for 2020! “Nicole...we are so proud of you. You embody what it means to be a strong entrepreneur, business partner, mother and an amazing woman.” --CHEF KARIM BRYANT, SR.

assignments and need a sponsor who actively and vocally advocates for them. Minority entrepreneurs need sponsors who can introduce them to key business contacts and financing sources, advocate for their company to be considered for important contracts, and more. In short, minorities need sponsors who take meaningful actions to advance their careers or help grow their companies. This is one component of the proactive action required at the corporate and business leadership levels in order for more minorities to break into those ranks. Sponsors also benefit from these relationships. The Center for Talent Innovation’s recent report, “The Sponsor Dividend,” found that sponsors see an expansion in the bench of talent they can call on and feel that their own careers advance more satisfactorily than those of non-sponsors. We all hope that new generations of minority business leaders will be larger than the current generation. A key ingredient in realizing this vision is for

current leaders to sponsor high-potential protégés. Sponsorship is an active, visible role. If you are in a leadership position, identify at least one protégé whose career you will help advance. If you are younger, identify a sponsor who can help you advance, and be prepared to take advice and make the most of this relationship. Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council (FSMSDC), one of 23 regional councils affiliated with the National Minority Supplier Development Council. The FSMSDC acts as a liaison between corporate America and government agencies and Minority Business Enterprises in Florida and operates the U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers serving southern and central Florida. Learn more about FSMSDC’s programs and services at fsmsdc.org, or call (305) 762-6151. n


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PROGRESSIVE CITY COUNCIL, PROGRESSIVE COMPENSATION STRUCTURE. WHAT IS THIS AMENDMENT? The City Council shall determine the annual salary and professional expenses of the Mayor and Council Members by Ordinance at budget time and shall only be considered HYHU\´YH  \HDUV

On Tuesday August 18, 2020, Miami Gardens residents will be asked to vote on the proposed amendment to Section 2.6 of the City Charter. Other cities pay their Mayor and City Council tens of thousands more per year, ZKLOH0LDPL*DUGHQV0D\RU &LW\&RXQFLO KDYHQ­WKDGDUDLVHLQ\HDUV

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CITY COUNCIL’S ANNUAL SALARY


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Introducing Legacy Miami’s

CLIFTON ADDISON, 33

ORLANDO ARNOLD, MBA, 37

FATHIYYAH “TIA” DOSTER, 36

RONALD “STACKS” DUPONT, 37 Jeweler Stacks Customs Jewelz

National Director of Operations, Education Anti-Defamation League

Anchor/Reporter WPLG Local 10 News

DORIS JEAN PIERRE, 26

LAMONT JOHNSON, 35

XAVIER LAMAR JONES, MPA, 33 Division Chief/Lead Pastor Coral Gables Fire Rescue

JAZMIN JONES-OLIVER, 30

Theater Marketing Manager African Heritage Cultural Arts Center

Community Health Educator Planned Parenthood

REV. NATHANIEL ROBINSON III, 39

AKIESHA GILCRIST SAINVIL, 32

REGINALD SAINVIL, 30

KEYMIA SHARPE, 37

ARTRICE SHEPHERD, 20

Sports Agent/Director at the Florida Democratic Party Agency 1

Entrepreneur JuiceDefined, LLC

Founder & CEO AccessBridge

Senior Pastor, President/CEO Greater St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church, St. Paul Community Development Corporation

President & CEO Pyramid Sports and Entertainment Group

CEO/Publicist The Art Department, LLC

Akiesha Gilcrist Sainvil, Esq. Foley & Larder LLP

STEVEN BAPTISTE, 31

RASHADA CAMPBELL, 38 Director of Operations Girl Power Rocks

Businesswoman, Educator, Community Activist Kita Corporation/Live Miami Gardens/ Miami Dade School Board

KIESHA EDGE, 38

ALEX FINNIE, 29

MARIAH C. FORDE, 28

Marketing Mobile Billboard Miami LLC

Reginald Sainvil, Esq. Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Creator & Owner Key2MIA

MYKITA CHERRY PRIME, 37

Special Events Manager Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County

JOANE E. KETANT, 36

Chief Operating Officer Impact Apparel


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2020

2020

40 Under 40 Honorees

VERNON K CHIPMAN II, 34 Coach Chipman Coach’s Closet

DANIELLE A. GEATHERS, 20

President Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Undergraduate Association

WHITNEY LUBIN, 31 CEO/Software Engineer The Startup Life

KRYSTAL SHEPPARD, 34 CEO, Lead Designer KTD

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AMBER M COLE, 29

MICHELLE A. COLLINS, 37

NEXCY DE LA ROSA-MONROE, 39 Attorney De La Rosa-Monroe Law Firm

Professor Miami Dade College - Wolfson Campus

DR. HAJAR HASAN-VERRETT, DDS, 39

MICHAEL A. HEPBURN, M.S.ED., 37 District Director of Operations Progressive Turnout Project PAC

SIERRA HILAIRE, 34

Self-Care Strategist Divine Potential Services, Inc.

DR. MICHAEL HORNE MBA, 39

TIERREL “T.J.” MATHIS, 36

PERPETUA J. PHILLIPS, 39

BRITTNEY REASON-PERRIMAN, 29

Family Therapist & Doctoral Fellow Westcare/Translucent Resin

General Dentist Verrett Dental Center

Assistant United States Attorney United States Attorney’s Office

BRITTANI SHINGLES, 34 Licensed Title Agent Safe Title & Escrow, Inc.

Founder and Owner Chelle’s Cutie Pies

Artistic Director BE Dance Studios, Inc.

JASON T. SMITH, J.D., MBA, 39 Legislative Director for County Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava

Entrepreneur My Baby Cakes and Treats/Golden Strandz of Luxe

MARK ST. VIL, ESQ, 31

Attorney at Law Berk Merchant Sims, PLC./ People About Change, Inc.

JESSICA LYNN WAY, ESQ, 33 District Policy Director Office of U.S. Congresswoman Frederica Wilson

FRANDLEY DEFILIE, 37

Chief Program Officer The Family Christian Association America, Inc.

ANGEL N. ROBINSON, 38

Educator & Travel With An Angel CEO Miami- Dade County Public Schools

RAHEL WELDEYESUS, 37

Chief of Staff Miami-Dade County Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2020

CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

3 Characteristics Every Effective Leader Must Possess workplace environment, and cultural norms.

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

An effective leader is someone who has the passion to do the work and someone who knows how to use the right tools at the right time. The strategies that work in one situation may not work in another. For example, there’s no need to use a nail and hammer when a simple thumbtack will do. Great leaders understand how to use a balanced approach to reach desired outcomes while considering the

1. Effective Communication. It has been said that communication is the key to success. While I agree it is a significant part of being successful in life, I also understand the challenge when noise gets between your message and its delivery. Many leaders make the mistake of spending more time relaying a specific message and not enough time considering elements that will impact its effectiveness such as timing, the appetite of the audience, and the communication method or approach. To be effective, a leader must approach communication strategically by considering the who, what, when, where, why, how concept. Without considering these factors, a leader could face challenges in getting the desired results. 2. Cultural Intelligence (CQ). A leader with cultural intelligence can adapt, interpret, and lead multicultural environments by understanding diversity

dimensions impacting the workforce. In her book, International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Nancy J. Adler describes three components of cultural intelligence: Cognitive, Motivational, and Behavioral. The cognitive portion (thinking, learning, strategizing) is often the most used method when leading, however, motivational intelligence and behavioral intelligence are necessary as well. Motivational intelligence is the understanding of why people act/ react the way they do to life situations. Behavioral intelligence is used by leaders who understand how to use the right behaviors themselves so they are more effective when dealing with employees. These three components together will allow a leader to bridge gaps within the organization and build trust among a diverse workforce. 3. Decision-Making Ability. As a leader, employees will look to you for answers and help to resolve problems especially in times of unrest and uncertainty. Generally, employees desire to do

the right thing and they look to their leader for support in this effort. Making decisions quickly and confidently will allow employees to be more productive and reduce lag time when meeting deadlines. When employees are unable to obtain a specific and clear process to follow they may complete tasks that do not meet quality standards or they will seek help from others who may provide inaccurate information. To be clear, there is no single approach to being a “successful leader.” Whether you were born with it or if you’re just getting started on your leadership path, you’ll need to be able to use many tools and strategies including these to get results for your organization. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n

SOCIAL MEDIA

Industries Thriving During Global Pandemic Have Strong Digital Strategies

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

The U.S. economy has certainly been shaken up by COVID-19. Much of what you will hear is the gloom and doom of employees being laid off and businesses shutting their doors. However, there are some industries that have been uniquely positioned to

thrive. Those who have fared well had a business that catered specifically to helping people navigate COVID-19. Cleaning services, grocery delivery, fitness equipment and on-demand entertainment have seen upticks in their profit margins. They had something available that made it easier for people to adhere to social distancing protocols. Others have products that are necessities during a world health crisis. This includes: medical supply companies, technology-based companies that made it possible for learning and working, as well products that appealed to the panic buyer (i.e. toilet paper). Before March 2020, I don’t think Purell knew it was going to have one of the best fiscal years ever. However, there are other types of businesses who do not fit in these categories, yet have still been able

to thrive. They all have something in common as well, and that is a solid digital strategy. I co-own and operate a digital marketing firm, Flourish Media, in South Florida. We have doubled our client base in the last three months because everyone needs online marketing support in this season Whether it’s Facebook ads, Instagram graphics, or YouTube videos, going digital is 100 percent the right thing to do for any type of business. We have been so excited to see increased revenue across many of our clients’ industries, including real estate, medical offices, law practices, apparel, you name it. Here are a few tips to help get you started:

1. Focus on strengthening your digital community, not just sales. Your followers will appreciate the personal touch they get from being

a part of your online tribe. Ask them what they would like to see. Encourage them to engage. Let them be a part of the narrative.

2. Have a sales funnel in place for your products and services. Outline how you plan to have someone go from stranger to paying customer. This should include email marketing, digital advertising with Facebook and Google, as well as strong content strategy. 3. Put as much effort into this as any other form of advertising. Your social media accounts should never be mere afterthoughts, especially in this season. Your clients and customers are there, you should be too! Dr. Tracy Timberlake is a multiaward winning digital business coach. Instagram.com/tracytimberlake Facebook.com/drtracytimberlake n


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MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Techniques That Work When Negotiating Online

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

Editor’s Note: The following is Part 3 of a three-part series. The sound of a notification from my Samsung smartwatch and cellular woke me. I must admit, I was a bit annoyed, knowing I had at least 15 more minutes of rest before my alarm. But then I smiled as I noticed it was a text from a mediation party from the day before (the Plaintiff). It

simply said, “Thank you. We were able to figure something out. And it was the first time we actually spoke in months…” I got up to start my morning routine. Twenty minutes later I received another text notification. But this time it was from the Defendant. The message stated, “Thank you,” and asked if I would change my Mediation Disposition Report to indicate the matter was fully settled. “Yes,” I replied. I then stated that I would confirm with their lawyers by the end of the day as my report was not yet filed. This case ended in an impasse (no agreement) one day prior and yet, as we ended the mediation, I encouraged one last joint session where I went through the benefits of continued dialogue and that mediation provided a model for better communication. They did and found a solution that worked for them. Techniques that Work Part 1 and 2 in this series discussed the various aspects of how to have an online negotiation meeting. This third and

last installment offers a limited number of techniques that have shown to be effective when negotiating using online platforms. This is not a full or exhaustive list, but rather a top 3 of 12 techniques that have worked best for me (and other professional neutrals): 1) Schedule Pre-Conference Meetings Have individual pre-conference meetings before the negotiation session. Try not to go over case specifics or document exchange issues, but rather what has the communication been like. You can then gauge your opening session to address such concerns. 2) Hold a Concise Orientation/ Opening Session to Build Trust If you want negotiating parties to better communicate, they must feel comfortable with the process. Having a joint orientation/opening session where you preemptively discuss anxieties and apprehensions to transparent negotiations usually has the effect of reducing the barriers of communication.

3) Create Ground Rules - Managing expectations while building perspectives is a major part of successful negotiations. Having the parties create their own ground rules can encourage creativity and respect for adverse positions. Ask, “Other than allowing for uninterrupted time when each other speaks, what other rules should we come up with?” Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court Certified Circuit/Family/County Mediator & Primary Trainer and Qualified Arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the ATD (Agree2Disagree) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. As an ADR consultant he regularly lectures on a variety of topics from ethics, crosscultural issues, diversity, bullying, and Family/Business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.LinkedIn.com/in/ stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Kiesha Edge Helps Others Tackle Issues of Racial Bias

BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

Kiesha Edge said she always had a stirring in her soul. It was what the “40 under 40” honoree said was present for as long as she can remember.

Edge, 38, calls it a “burn of passion” for wanting people to understand what she couldn’t put into words as a young girl growing up in Daytona Beach. As national director of Education Operations for the Anti-Defamation League, she has a platform to educate others and work with facilitators on programs that address diversity and race. Promoted twice since she began working with ADL in 2016, she is now at the organization’s national office in Manhattan, where she oversees more than 450 education facilitators across the United States. Her home base remains Broward County. “One of the things that we teach is that everyone has bias . . . Some people don’t want to address it, while some are more willing than others,”

Edge said. “We live in a society where systemic racism is alive and well.” Hers is a “progressive story,” from growing up in Daytona Beach as the only Black child in an elementary class, vividly recalling a teacher making overtly racist remarks, and the feeling of being out of place as the only person of color in her Girl Scouts troop. She wasn’t searching for a new job when she applied to work with the Anti-Defamation League,” Edge explained. As program director at the Florida Department of Health in Broward County, she had a string of successes. “I wasn’t looking to make a move, but I felt like there was something else I had to do.” In 2016, Edge became education project director for the Florida Region, where one of her efforts was to provide anti-bias training for law enforcement, including Miami

Beach and the City of Miami police departments. Edge reflected that one of the most profound wake-up calls in her desire to make a difference happened when she was eight months pregnant with her son, Kyson, in 2013. She had a moment of panic and called her husband and said, “Do you think bringing another Black boy into this world is what we should be doing?” She thought it was tragic that she was second guessing starting a family because of her race. In the wake of George Floyd’s death, Edge said she feels even more deeply about the work she is doing. “As a Black woman in this country, implicit bias and working against racism has always been a concern of mine. Now people of other races are starting to see and feel that it is just as important to them, too. n


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THE FINANCE REPORT

Now is Perfect Opportunity to Support Young, Brilliant Professional Leaders

BY KEVIN CADETTE Celebrating Legacy magazine’s “40 under 40” is an opportune time to shine a light on young excellence. As a community we not only need to shine a light and support their ascendance, but for those in corporate America, we need to support their careers with mentorship and guidance regardless of their level. And for those with their own ventures, we need to invest in them, especially the ones who are going to be creating more jobs, and more opportunities for our community. For the corporate trailblazers, a growing body of data clearly demonstrates that diverse management teams drive strong returns. Companies in the top quartile for ethnic diversity at the management level are 33 percent more likely to drive industry leading profitability. Diversity of thought gives companies an edge over competitors. It’s good business for corporations to support diversity at all levels. For the entrepreneurs, the business owners, and the job creators, they chart their own path to wealth — and they need our support. How many people do we all know that are simply brilliant, but don’t have the opportunity to bring their passions, expertise or genius to life. Too often our entrepreneurs are undercapitalized where their

counterparts from other groups are openly given the capital and opportunity to give their businesses a fair chance to bear fruit. We not only need to support businesses as patrons, we need to invest in them. If we do not, who will? For those entrepreneurs looking to fly high with high growth ventures, we know access to capital is not equitable, particularly for founders in the Black community. There is a clear misallocation of capital and yet the statistics show that we are more likely to outperform or perform on par with entrepreneurs from other ethnic groups. For those at the earliest stages where friends and family are the first investors, angel capital is here too. Venture capital will most likely give you a pass because you may be too early, but realistically it will be a challenge even if you are more established. Venture capital firms have historically invested less than 1 percent of their capital in startups with Black founders. We need the same access to capital as offered to White founders (87 percent) and Asian founders (12 percent). Black Angels Miami is where you can find Angels investors, and a clear opportunity for entrepreneurs to have a fair shot of attaining capital. For those thinking about being investors, BAM is there to support you taking those first steps. BAM does not require its members to invest. We simply want to make sure that angel investors are exposed to spectacular early-stage companies that need their help. There are many ways to support the brilliance in our community. To the “40 under 40” – shine on!

Black Angels Miami: Supporting Brilliance with Capital. Enabling investing for a higher reward. Website: www.blackangels.miami Twitter: @ blackangelsmia n


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4 Steps Black Business Owners Can Take to Survive Pandemic

on certain recurring expenses. For example, instead of paying that monthly Quickbooks subscription, switch to a free accounting software like Freshbooks, Xero or Wave.

BY DANIELLE ST. LUCE

RISE Miami-Dade Fund & Black Business Initiative Fund It’s no surprise small Black-owned businesses have been disproportionately hurt by COVID-19. From February to April 2020, the number of Black-owned enterprises diminished by 41 percent, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research. Some of the decline is attributed to being in hard hit industries, like restaurants or retail. But much of it is associated with a historic lack of access to capital and the inability to move business online. Still, it’s critical to ensure small Black-owned businesses weather this crisis. Here are four moves entrepreneurs can make to protect themselves: RENEGOTIATE PAYMENTS Don’t be afraid to negotiate for better payment terms during the pandemic. Landlords and suppliers are often open to this because their own options are limited, too. Ask to defer payments for a number of months or create a payment plan. Remember, not every vendor will be amenable, so prioritize paying providers who won’t negotiate while you work with ones who are more flexible. CUT COSTS If you can’t increase income, you must cut costs. This pandemic should open your eyes to the expenses that are essential to keep your business functioning — and, just as important, what’s non-essential. Most business owners will cut their own salaries, reduce staff, and even break a lease. If these options aren’t viable, try chiseling down

REFINANCE YOUR DEBT Nationwide, interest rates have dropped to near zero, making now a great time to refinance or restructure debt. Start by calculating your prepandemic debt-to-income ratio by dividing your monthly debt by your monthly income. If your pre-pandemic DTI was above 30 percent, think about refinancing or restructuring your debt. Ideally, look for opportunities that will keep your monthly debt payments at or below 25 percent of your monthly income. One major opportunity are low-cost emergency loan programs that offer interest below 4 percent. Other opportunities exist with Community Development Financial Institutions, local credit unions, and community banks. Smaller financial institutions tend to have better rates and more flexibility than their larger counterparts. At minimum, you should be taking advantage of your lender’s forbearance options and penaltyfree prepayment, if available. TAP INTO EMERGENCY RELIEF FUNDING Emergency relief programs — like the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program or the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan — can be a very safe way to protect your business. The RISE Miami-Dade Fund is an example of a relief program operating locally. It’s designed specifically for Miami-Dade small businesses, with fewer than 25 employees and less than $2 million in annual revenue, that have been hurt by COVID-19. Unlike most loans that require debt-to-income ratios, complicated lists of documents and a two-month wait to receive funding, RISE is easy and fast. The online application is simple, the list of required documents is short, and funds can be secured in as few as 15 days. Learn more and apply at RiseMiamiDade.com. n

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2020


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Diversity is True Measure of Leadership at the Top companies have been scrutinized for lackluster internal initiatives to truly cultivate a diverse workforce and leadership team.

BY MARK KENT

Thirty-six years ago, Wendy’s debuted its now-iconic “Where’s the Beef?” commercial, starring an elderly woman demanding more meat from her fast-food hamburger. The catchphrase was a jab at burger rivals. It was so impactful the company still uses the campaign. Amid the energized social injustice movement, numerous Fortune 500

While some corporations have created new roles and departments within corporate and supplier diversity, what really counts are the results. The lack of results has left very little meat between the buns, making many of us wonder where’s the diversity? In order to get results, we need to know where the process of hiring diverse candidates breaks down into actual practice. There must be processes in place to ensure that diverse candidates are prepared for opportunities to gain P&L (profit and loss) and functional experience. I think of myself during my time at Humana, which ranks No. 56 on the Fortune 500 list of companies. I joined Humana in 2004 as a project manager and left the company 10 years later as the regional president and CEO leading the medical practice division of the company responsible for nearly $1.3 billion in

revenue. I look back on my time there fondly because I was constantly challenged. There is an established process for diverse candidates to be identified, given an opportunity to gain necessary experience, and most importantly mentorship from executives. From Humana’s boardroom through its leadership ranks it is a very diverse company, which has consistently outperformed its peers in many ways including the bottom line. Many companies publicly promote the idea of diversity on their websites, and in their ad campaigns, but behind closed doors brush over the issue. These companies are missing the business case for diversity. Not only is it a good thing to do, it’s also good for business. Research has shown diverse workforces bring measurable, positive results. One study found that U.S. companies, from 2012 to 2017, with three or more women directors, reported earnings per share that were 42 percent higher than

those companies with no women as directors. In 2017, another study found that companies with at least one ethnic minority on the board had an average increased return on equity of 2 percent more than companies without such diversity. We must demand to know how companies measure their diversity pipeline to the C-Suite and if diversity is a metric used in the performance evaluation of executives and the board. We must also know what percentage of their performance evaluation diversity constitutes, and the aligned incentives. As we say in business, show me your budget and your trackable metrics and I will tell you what’s important to you. Mark D. Kent, FACHE, FACMPE is the CEO of Total Health Medical Centers. He is a board certified Fellow with the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) and American College of Medical Practice Executives (MGMA) n


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EXECUTIVE SUITE

Black Bank Movement Encourages Financial Power to Create Social Change

BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

Like the collective unity seen in protests across the United States, Kevin Cohee said the same effect for change works when looked at from a financial point of view to make a powerful statement about racial equality in America. “It’s all about garnering the economic spending power of Black America and rechanneling it back to our communities in ways that can help us build political and social strengths,” said Cohee, owner, chairman, and chief executive officer of OneUnited Bank, the largest Black-owned bank and the first Black-owned Internet bank in the country. In 2016, he also spearheaded the #BankBlack movement, where Black Americans were encouraged to transfer their money into Black-owned banks as a form of social protest. The movement continues with the intention that when people #BankBlack, the result is better circulation of Black dollars with Black businesses, and the power of the Black dollar is increased. “We need to rechannel that money back into Black-American communities and causes,” said Cohee, who is at the forefront of making it happen. Aligning financial literacy with social protest is an agent of change, Cohee explained. “OneUnited Bank started to help organize Black Americans to be more effective from an economic perspective…to empower the community and close the racial wealth

Entrepreneurship was Cohee’s initial route. He founded a consulting firm in 1979, which specialized in acquisitions of minority-owned radio and television stations. Six years later, he earned his Juris Doctor degree, a Master of Business Administration, and became an investment banker. Three years after that, he acquired Military Professional Services, a company that marketed credit cards to military personnel. He turned it profitable and by 1993, sold the company’s assets, which by that time had a $40 million portfolio and 20,000 customers. “The advice that I was given when I was little Kevin guided me through life,” he shared. “I made a lot of money when I was really young, so it gave me the freedom and the resources.” Since then, Cohee has harnessed the power of the Internet for banking, which he says is a continually opening door. “Technology levels the playing field for

every American,” he said. In July, OneUnited Bank doubled its customer base to “50,000 new customers because of technology that can bring in accounts across the county,” he explained. Corporations are also taking notice of Black America’s spending power and the racial wealth gap. At the end of June, Netflix became the latest corporation to invest major resources in Black-owned banks, CNN reported. It has committed to depositing 2 percent of its cash, or an estimated $100 million, into Black-owned financial institutions. “Corporations are recognizing that maybe they need to do the right thing to help perpetuate American values – justice and liberty, all those concepts that have bypassed Black Americans since we got here.” n

LUCIDO GLOBAL KELLER WILLIAMS PARTNERS REALTY

let’s talk REAL ESTATE.

Kevin Cohee

gap,” Cohee added. There are 21 Black-owned banks in the U.S., a staggeringly small number considering that there are more than 5,500 banks across the country. Minority-owned banks and credit unions represent just 1 percent of America’s total commercial banking assets. It is Cohee’s OneUnited Bank that remains the largest Black-owned bank. Since 1996, OneUnited’s assets have grown from $56 million to more than $656 million. OneUnited Bank’s People’s National Bank of Commerce in the Liberty City neighborhood of Miami became part of the OneUnited Bank group when Cohee began combining several community banks across the country after purchasing a controlling interest in Boston Bank of Commerce in Boston’s Roxbury neighborhood in 1995. That was the beginning. The Liberty City bank was one of three Cohee picked up, which also included Founders National Bank, and Family Savings Bank in South Central, Los Angeles. The seed of this fire for the power in financial literacy started as a kid growing up in Kansas City, Mo. “In the beginning, there was little Kevin who was born into a family of Black Panthers,” Cohee reflected. “I had all of these uncles and all of these cousins who were young, strong men, on their way to college or in college, who, in the 1960s, were doing what they could to bring equality to society.... From the time I was 3, 4, 5-years old – they’d be in the basement of my house having meetings.” Cohee said he would be at the top of the stairs listening. He recalled, “like it was yesterday” a defining moment. “One day, one of the brothers says to me, ‘You know, Katman, look, the thing is we have enough brothers out here in these streets fighting these battles, what we need are some brothers to be doing some stuff to be in control of some institutions in order for us to be effective in our society. We need you to do something like get a bank, own a bank, something like that.’” Banking didn’t happen first.


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ENTREPRENEURSHIP

New Start-Up Features Tool for Detangling Natural Hair BY JANEY TATE

When the Stirrup sisters went natural they realized combing and detangling their hair was a less-than-fun experience because of the hair styling tools they were forced to use. As more people opted to use their fingers to detangle their tresses instead of combs and brushes, the three Stirrup sisters thought to create a hair tool that would mimic the human finger while also improving the traditional comb and brush to cut down on styling time. “The magic of our hair tool is the design of the teeth,” said LaToya Stirrup, who was also recognized as one of Legacy magazine’s “40 Under 40” in 2018. “With our hair tool, the detangling is faster and there is not nearly as much shedding.” As a result of the innovation by LaToya, LaTasha and LaTrice Stirrup, the KurlsPlus Detanlgers were launched in 2019 as their first line of patentpending hair tools under their new beauty and lifestyle company, Kazmaleje. “In a sea of hair care products, we were the only hair tools,” LaToya Stirrup said. “There is security in knowing that I have a product that works.” The KurlsPlus three set by Kazmaleje, a Black-owned In 2019, Kazmaleje (pronounced Cosmology), beauty brand. submitted for QVC and HSN’s “The Big Find” both networks to find and promote competition, a joint venture by small businesses. Out of nearly

LaToya, LaTrice, and LaTasha Stirrup, sisters and co-founders of the Kazmaleje Beauty brand.

700 applicants, Kazmaleje was chosen as one of the 75 finalists. The co-founders traveled to St. Petersburg to pitch their business to the network and were eventually chosen to showcase their hair tools on QVC and HSN online. In June of this year, they premiered live on HSN. “In only one year on the market, now we’re on HSN,” Stirrup said. “It’s been a fantastic experience.” She said since launching their company, they have not done a major marketing push but have

seen an increase in sales just from word of mouth. To date, the company has sold more than 11,000 hair tools and doesn’t plan on stopping until everyone knows their name. For entrepreneurs who want to follow in their footsteps, Stirrup advises, “When you take a project management approach to launch a product it allows you to take your big idea and turn it into manageable steps that keep you moving toward your goal.” n


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(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21))

DR. RUDOLPH MOISE MAKES HISTORY AS DCMA’S FIRST HAITIAN AMERICAN PRESIDENT

The Dade County Medical Association elected Dr. Rudolph “Rudy” Moise as its first Haitian American to serve as president. Moise said he would strive to maintain the ethics of the medical profession by promoting Moise the public health and welfare. “I shall dedicate myself and my office to improve the health standards of the people of Florida, particularly in this COVID-19 pandemic,” Moise said. The Dade County Medical Association was founded in 1903 and is the largest association representing physicians in MiamiDade County.

MDC SELECTS MCCOLLUM AS NEW ONLINE VICE PRESIDENT

Dr. Walter McCollum, a Fulbright Scholar, has been appointed vice president of Online Learning at Miami Dade College. McCollum will manage MDC’s daily online operations and McCollum students, as well as report to Wolfson Campus President Beatriz González. Prior to MDC, McCollum spent 14 years at Walden University, where he most recently served as Dean of Student Affairs for nearly four years. He has also taught business and research courses at New York University, University of the District of Columbia and Northcentral University and others.

DR. MARC WILLIAMS LEADS NEW FMU PROGRAM

Dr. Marc Williams has been named Global Scholar Practitioner at Florida Memorial University in Miami Gardens. Williams will create an Innovative STEM program that focuses on coding Williams and technology while blending business and entrepreneurship to provide students with exposure and career opportunities in e-sports, sports, music, film, and fashion industries. Over the past 25 years, Williams has been widely regarded as a sports marketing pioneer and worked for three of the largest sports brands in the world: Champs Sports, Footaction, and Reebok. Williams earned his bachelor’s in sociology from William Paterson University,

a master’s in sport management from the University of Massachusetts and a doctorate in Education Leadership & Curriculum from West Virginia University.

SOUTH FLORIDA MOURNS DEATH OF JOHN W. RUFFIN JR.

Entrepreneur and philanthropist John W. Ruffin died July 24 at his Coral Springs home following a long bout with prostate cancer. He was 79. As a businessman and entrepreneur, Ruffin established several Ruffin ventures including purchasing WRBD in 1986, becoming South Florida’s first Black radio station owner. As a philanthropist, he helped raise millions of dollars in scholarships for minority students. He served on the board of trustees at Florida Memorial University for nearly two decades and created the John and Dorothy Ruffin Endowed Scholarship Fund at FMU. Ruffin is survived by his wife, Dorothy, two children, Jonathan and Jehan, as well as three grandchildren.

JACQUELINE HILL JOINS FMU AS SCHOOL OF EDUCATION DEAN

Dr. Jacqueline Hill has been named dean of the School of Education and associate provost for Continuing Education and Professional Studies at Florida Memorial University. Hill has served in academic leadership roles in higher education Hill since 1990, including associate provost for Academic Affairs, dean of Education, associate dean for Outcome Assessments and Compliance, associate professor of education, science district director, and public health educator. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Public Health Administration and Masters of Arts in Teaching from the University of Memphis; and a doctorate degree in Curriculum and Instructional Leadership from Vanderbilt University.

ELIZEE MILHOMME JOINS COASTAL WEALTH Elizee Milhomme has been hired as a financial services professional at Coastal Wealth, a Mass Mutual firm in Fort Lauderdale. In this position, Milhomme helps business owners Milhomme create, build, and preserve wealth through personalized retirement, insurance, and

financial advice. Previously, he was a registered representative for New York Life Insurance Company. He’s currently the chapter president of the National Black MBA Association’s South Florida chapter.

SPIVEY NAMED SPECIAL ADVISER TO UM PRESIDENT Dr. Donald Spivey has been appointed special adviser on racial justice to University of Miami President Julio Frenk. Spivey is a distinguished professor of History at UM. He has been a member of UM’s faculty since 1993. He has frequently appeared in the media Spivey as an expert to discuss the Black experience and the Civil Rights Movement .

CHRISTOPHER ADELEKE LEADS ADELEKE ACADEMICS

Christopher Adeleke has been named president of Adeleke Academics. The Miami learning group was founded by his parents, Patrick and Mary Adeleke in 1994 with Children’s Academy Preschool. The family’s early education portfolio has since expanded to Heritage School, Creative Minds Learning Center, and Smart Start Adeleke Preschool with the help and direction of Christopher. Adeleke was appointed president after his father’s retirement earlier this year. Before becoming the second generation to join the family’s business, Adeleke led a successful career in real estate, holding the title of Top Producing realtor for Douglas Elliman’s Miami Beach office.

FIU COLLEGE OF MEDICINE APPOINTS INTERIM DEAN OF DIVERSITY

Dr. Cheryl Holder has been named interim associate dean of Diversity, Equity, Inclusivity, and Community Initiatives for the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University. Holder is a highly respected clinician, educator and Holder community leader who has dedicated her medical career to serving underserved and vulnerable populations. As an associate professor in the Green Family Foundation Neighborhood

HELP program, Holder was one of the first physicians to sound the alarm about the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on the African-American community. She has advocated for more testing sites in Black neighborhoods and better messaging to educate African Americans about the virus. Holder is the president of the Florida State Medical Association, a regional arm of the National Medical Association, the largest and oldest organization representing AfricanAmerican physicians and their patients in the United States. She also serves as co-chair of Florida Clinicians for Climate Action, working to increase climate literacy and enhance awareness of the impact of climate change on vulnerable populations.

ROYAL CARIBBEAN HIRES CALVIN JOHNSON AS CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER

Royal Caribbean Group has named Dr. Calvin Johnson as global head, public health and chief medical officer. In this new role, Johnson will lead the Group’s global health and wellness policy, manage its public health and clinical practice, and determine the strategic Johnson plans and operations of its global healthcare organization. Johnson will also collaborate with the Healthy Sail Panel to ensure the company establishes and implements its protocols and recommendations. Johnson was most recently principal at Altre Strategic Solutions Group. He is the former chief medical officer for Corizon Health, then the largest provider of correctional health care in the United States, and for Temple University Health System He served as Secretary of Health for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from 20032008 and was medical director for the New York City Department of Health from 19981999. Johnson earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Morehouse College. n

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