__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

A history of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem in the last half century


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

A history of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem in the last half century

Office of the Grand Archivist & Historian - MHOSLJ Torri ta’ Lanzun, Malta

2014


Copyright Š 2014 by The Office of the Grand Archivist & Historian of the Military & Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means: electronic, electrostatic, magnetic, tape, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the Publisher. For permission to use material from this book please contact the publisher: Office of the Grand Archivist & Historian, Torri ta’ Lanzun, Mensija, San Gwann, Malta


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Contents

1. General history of the Order a. The historical developments in the last half century b. The properties of the Order c. The Schismatic Groups of the Order of Saint Lazarus – a background to their history d. Bid to acquire King George V Hospital in Malta e. The legal development of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus 2. National jurisdictions a. The Grand Priory of Australia b. The Grand Priory of Canada c. The Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands d. The Delegation of Norway e. La Grand Priore en Espaùa f.

The Grand Bailiwick of Luxembourg

g. The Order in Scotland 3. Hereditary & Grand Commandery jurisdictions a. The Grand Commandery of the Castello


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

1.

General History of the Order


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

The historical developments in the last half century Chev. Charles Savona-Ventura Grand Archivist & Historian

The turmoil of the Second World War necessitated a re-organization of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus managed since 1935 by H.R.H. Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de la Torre as 44th Grand Master helped by his son Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón as coadjutor.1 “Having considered the advantages which would accrue from the adaptation to the present times of rules, usages and customs which over the centuries have served to regulate the Order of St. Lazarus”, the Grand Master on the 26th May 1948 issued by decree a revision of the statutes of the Order.2 The statutes placed all power absolutely and irrevocably in the hands of the Grand Master who was to select the high dignitaries to constitute the Central Government or Grand Magistracy. Once the post of Grand Master was vacated, a new Grand Master was to be nominated by the knights convened as a Chapter General, though the coadjutor held primary rights of succession. The spiritual powers attached to the Grand Mastership were exercised by the Spiritual Grand Prior of the Order Maximos IV Sayegh, the Melkite Patriarch.3 The titular seat was identified to be in Madrid. Membership remained restricted to Roman Catholics.

H.R.H. Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de la Torre th 44 Grand Master 1935-1952

1

H.B. Maximos IV Sayegh Spiritual Grand Prior 1948-1967

The Green Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1962, 1(i):p.4-6 th An English translation of the fundamental constitution of the Order, as promulgated by the 44 Grand Master, the Duke of Seville, in 1948. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1972. Based on a translation made by Chev. Richard Flores Martin [abbreviated subsequently as: English translation, 1972]. 3 The 1948 Spanish statutes make no mention of a Spiritual Protector. The term was actually used for the first time by GM decree 4/1969. The 1972 translation of the 1948 statutes actually discussed the issue stating that the correct term should have been Spiritual Patron rather than protector, since it argues that protection truly lies with sovereignty. The Pope as head of the Vatican State can be considered as a Sovereign Protector, but the Melkite Patriarch can really only be considered a Spiritual Patron. The first individual to be titled “grand prieur au spirituel” within the Order was the Bishop of Cesarea Bonaventure Rousseau de Bazoches in 1664 appointed after an Extraordinary Chapter held at the Carmes des th Billettes on the 5 April 1664. See: H.M. de Langle & J.L. de Treourret de Kerstrat. Les Ordres de Saint Lazare de Jerusalem et de Notre-Dame du Mont-Carme aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siecles. Publications LTK, Paris, 1992, p.108-109. 2

1|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus The Grand Master Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de la Torre died on the 6th December 1952. In accordance with the 1948 statutes, the Grand Referendary Marquis de Cardenas de Montehermoso and the Grand Capitular Chev. Bertrand de la Gassière made representations to the coadjutor enquiring whether he would accept succession. On the 7th January 1953, H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón Duke of Seville accepted his nomination and assumed the management as Lieutenant General of the Grand Magistry. On the 17th December 1959, he was formally invested as the 45th Grand Master.4

H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón Duke of Seville th Lieutenant General of the Grand Magistry 1953-1959; 45 Grand Master 1959-1967 th Grand Master emeritus 1967-1970; 46 Grand Master 1973-1995

Because of his military commitments and Spanish residence, the new Grand Master was unable to dedicate himself completely to the Order. By Magistral Decree dated 30th June 1956, the Duke of Seville appointed H.E. Pierre Timoleon de Cossé-Brissac [b.1900, d.1993] as Administrator General of the Order in Paris. The other officials of the Supreme Council included: the Grand Referendary Marquis de Cardenas de Montehermoso [b.1887 d.1965], the Grand Capitular Chev. Paul Bertrand de la Grassiére [b.1895], the Grand Chancellor Chev. Guy Coutant de Saisseval [b.1913 d.2002], and the Grand Spiritual Prior S.Ex. Rev. Georges Hakin Archbishop of Acre, Nazareth, Bethlehem and all Galilee [b.1908 d.2001; eventually elected Patriarch as H.B. Maximos V in 1967].5

4 5

The Green Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1962, 1(i):p.4-6 The Green Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1962, 1(i):p.6-11; The Green

2|Page

Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1965, 1(iii-iv):p.7-9


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Pierre Timoleon de Cossé-Brissac Administrator General

Paul Bertrand de la Gassière Grand Capitular

Guy Coutant de Saisseval Grand Chancellor

S.Ex. Rev. Georges Hakin [H.B. Maximos V] Grand Spiritual Prior

In 1960, LtCol Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg, Baron of Lochoreshire was approached by the Paris administration of the Order with a request to undertake the redevelopment of the Order in the English-speaking world.6 The re-institution of the English Tongue was formally declared on the 25th November 1961 at a dinner held in the Caledonian Hotel in Edinburgh under the Presidency of the Commissioner General and Grand Bailiffiship General for the English Tongue LtCol Gayre. The Commissionerate was officially inaugurated on the 15th September 1962. This led to the establishment of various commanderies and delegations in the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries.7

6

R. Gayre. Gayre of Gayre & Nigg. An Autobiography. Edinburgh Impressions Ltd., Edinburgh, 1987, p.140. The Order had a branch in the United States extant since about 1936. R.E. Hartwell. The Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem Upon and Beyond the Seas. The Grand Priories of the United States of America. The Augustian Society Information Bulletin, 1965, 8(3):p.2-8 7 The Green Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1962, 1(i):p.18-28; The Green Cross – La Croix de Sinople, 1963, 1(ii):p.23-31

3|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

LtCol Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg Commissioner General for the English Tongue                         

Perpetual Commandery of the Island of Saint Lazarus of Venice Grand Priory of the Holy Land Grand Priory of Spain Grand Priory of France Grand Priory of the Low Countries Grand Priory of Poland Grand Priory of Bohemia Grand Priory of Switzerland & Liechtenstein Grand Priory of Portugal Grand Priory of Hungary Grand Priory of Germany Grand Priory of Sweden Grand Bailiwick of Greece Grand Bailiwick of Romania Grand Bailiwick of Bulgaria Bailiwick of Georgie Delegation of Belgium Grand Priory of Mexico Delegation of the Republic of Argentina Delegation of the Republic of Panama Delegation of the Republic of Venezuela Delegation of Columbia Delegation of the Equator Delegation of the Republic of Bolivia Delegation of Haiti

                

Grand Bailiwick of Scotland Grand Bailiwick of England Grand Bailiwick of Ireland Grand Bailiwick of Canada Grand Bailiwick of the United States Bailiwick of Wales Bailiwick of Australia Bailiwick of New Zealand Bailiwick of South Africa Bailiwick of Rhodesia Commandery of India Commandery of West Africa Commandery of Thailand Commandery of Ethiopia Commandery of Tanzania Commandery of Malawi Delegation of Malta

Jurisdictions within the Order: 19658

8

La Croix de Sinople – The Green Cross, 1965, 1(3/4), p.22-31; Green Cross Booklets, 1965, 6:p.11-12

4|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus After the death of the Marquis Cardenas de Montehermoso, the geographical administrative separation from Madrid engendered by the appointment of an Administrator General localised in Paris became a source of much friction and misunderstanding that was to punctate events right through the subsequent decades. In 1967, the Paris administration circulated correspondence claiming lack of interest by the Grand Master in the exercise of his duties because of his military duties in the Spanish Army. A Chapter General in Paris was announced for the 17th May 1967. The Chapter General attended mainly by French knights voted H.R.H. Prince Charles Philippe d ’Orleans, Duke of Nemours, Vendome and Alencon as the 46th Grand Master.9 The Magistral Seat of the Order was thus transferred from Madrid to Boigny, while the Administrative Seat was transferred to Paris. Not unexpectedly, the Spanish Grand Priory led by H.R.H. Francesco Enrique de Borbón withdrew from the Order and so initiated the first of the modern-day schisms between the Spanish and Paris groups.10

Meeting of the members of the Grand Magistry at Boigny in 1968 Guy Coutant de Saisseval, Grand Master Duke of Nemours, Pierre de Cossé de Brissac, Paul Betrand de la Gassière

The newly elected Duke of Nemours by decree dated 3rd June 1967 initiated administrative reforms by setting up a Commission to review the Statute and Regulations of the Order. The finalized statutes were signed at Boigny on the 30th January 1968 but were only formally published and circulated in 1969. The published statute was found to include statutory modifications which deprived the Grand Master and the knights of the Order of all fundamental rights placing all authority and appointment of successors in the hands of the Grand Chancellor [Guy Coutant de

99

LtCol Gayre reports that he was present at this meeting being “the only foreigner there”. He was misled as to the background of the issue, writing: “I found out afterwards that Prince Francesco had not, in fact, wished to resign because of his military duties, but I do not believe the Duke of Nemours knew that. Neither did I.” Vide: R. Gayre, 1987, op. cit., p.144145 10 A short résumé of the history of the Order including the events which led to the establishment of a rebel group in France. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1972, p.10 [abbreviated subsequently as: Short resumé, 1972].

5|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Saisseval], the Grand Administrator [Duke of Brissac] and the Grand Capitular [Paul Bertrand de la Grassiére].11 This brought the Duke of Nemours in direct confrontation with the Paris group. The Paris rebels led by Pierre de Cossé, Duke of Brissac and Administrator General of the Order on the 10th February 1969 circulated a notice calling for a Chapter General with the aim of replacing the Grand Master with the management being assumed by the Duke of Brissac.12 On the same day, the Grand Master the Duke of Nemours also circulated his view point to all heads of jurisdictions on the matter emphasising his planned organizational reforms. He further asked that they “will kindly signify to me at an early date, and not later by the end of February whether you and your officers are in favour of these reforms……if I have your considered views at this stage it will enable me to make progress in what I am sure are reforms which will be very much to your advantage and the members of your jurisdiction since for the first time they will give you all a participation in the government of the Order which you have not enjoyed in the past. If anyone disagrees with these proposals, I shall of course be willing to hear his reasons.”13 The Paris rebels called a “Chapter General” on the 15th April 1969 to initiate a ballot with the aim of deposing the Grand Master for alleged “faute grave”. The Grand Referendary and the Grand Master responded on the 22nd March stating that they considered the ballot and Chapter general “rigged”. They outlined the consequences of the actions stating that “the majority of the jurisdictions of the Order have already assured the Grand Master of their support, and the ‘rigged’ Chapter-General will be ignored, the Grand Master will issue new constitutional decrees of a representative character, all members and affiliates who send to him their loyalty will be placed on the active list, and the rest suspended. Disloyal jurisdictions will be disbanded, and new ones formed in those countries.”14 During Chapter-General, the Administrator General H.E. Pierre Timoleon de Cossé Duke of Brissac was elected the 47th Supreme Head of the Order with 265 votes in favour of the Duke of Brissac and 83 votes in favour of the Duke of Nemours. It was alleged that the voting was rigged with the ballot paper being sent late or not sent at all to known opponents to the Duke of Brissac and a preelectoral upgrade of the French affiliate members to knights to ensure their eligibility to vote to bias the result. This decision was considered “illegal” and was not supported by the majority of the other jurisdictions who continued to view the Duke of Nemours as the only legitimate Grand Master. The jurisdictions supporting the Duke of Nemours included Ireland, Switzerland, South Africa, Malta, USA, Australia, New Zealand, Holland, Spain, Sweden, and Armenia. Most of the Scottish members were considered to remain loyal. Those jurisdictions in favour of the Duke of Brissac included France, England and Canada, though the latter jurisdictions had members who still remained loyal. Bulgaria and Bohemia remained neutral.15 Legal proceedings were initiated by the Grand Master in France against the Duke of Brissac and Paul Bertrand de la Gassière who with Guy Countant de Saisseval 11

Short Resumé, 1972, op. cit., p.10-11; Régles, Statuts et Coutumes de l’Ordre de Saint-Lazare de Jérusalem. MHOSLJ, Paris, 1968. 12 th Ouverture du Chapitre Général de l’Ordre 1969 [with accompanying documents dated 10 February 1969]. Archives: Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands - MHOSLJ 13 th Circular: For the information of Members of the Order dated 10 February 1969. Archives: Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands - MHOSLJ 14 Personal Statement by the Grand Referendary concerning the present difficulties and rebellion against the Grand Master. nd Archives: Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands – MHOSLJ; Circular letter from the Grand Master dated 22 March 1969. Archives: Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands - MHOSLJ 15 nd Letter from Chev J. Amato Gauci to the Duke of Nemours dated 22 April 1969. MHOSLJ Archives B10:2; Letter from A.R. th Hughes Chancellor of the New Zealand Bailiwick to Lt.Col. Gayre dated 29 April 1969. MHOSLJ Archives B10:7

6|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus were suspended from the Offices they held previously.16 These actions led to a second schism within the structure of the Order with the majority of jurisdictions following the Duke of Nemours and others following the Duke of Brissac. The Spanish group continued to support the Duke of Seville.

H.R.H. Prince Charles Philippe d’Orleans, Duke of Nemours th 46 Grand Master 1967-1970

Boosted by the support of the majority of the jurisdictions making up the Order, the Duke of Nemours continued throughout 1969 with his constitutional reforms aimed at abolishing sectarian differences thus making the Order ecumenical and re-establishing the fundamental rights previously defined by the 1948 Statutes. In addition, amendments to the Statute were made to define the administrative structure and workings of the Order. The Grand Master was confirmed as the Supreme Head of the Order and the only one empowered to amend the Statutes and Regulations. The role of the Spiritual Protector was further defined and confirmed to reside in the person of His Beatitude Maximos V, the Greek Melkite Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, of Jerusalem and Alexandria. The post of Spiritual Grand Prior of the whole Order, previously occupied by the Patriarch, was filled by the Greek Melkite Archbishop of St Jean d’Acre, Nazareth and Galilee. A number of Vice-Chanceries were further authorised to deal with the jurisdictions within their competence. 17 By Decree dated 15th April 1969, H.R.H. Prince Michael of France was nominated as Coadjutor with rights of succession subject to confirmation.18 The previous 45th Grand Master Francois de Borbón y de Borbón was invited to assume the title of Grand Master Emeritus, Grand Commander, Lieutenant General and Grand Prior of Spain ensuring the return of the Spanish members to the mainline Order.19 The Titular Seat of the Order was established in Boigny; while the seat of the Chancery and administration of the Order were transferred from Paris to Malta.20

16

An Introduction to the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. MHOSLJ, Malta, n.d. (¬1971), p.7 [abbreviated subsequently th as: Introduction, 1971]; Letter dated 5 May 1969 from the Grand Referendary to J. Amato Gauci. Archives: Grand Priory of th the Maltese Islands – MHOSLJ; Letter dated 5 May 1969 from Grand Referendary to M. Le Comte Rene de Chabrun. MHOSLH Archives B10:6 17 th Constitutional Decrees – 46 Grand Master H.R.H. Prince Charles Philip of Orleans, Duke of Nemours, Vendome, and Alencon. MHOSLJ, Netherlands, 1969, +32p. [abbreviated subsequently as: Constitutional decrees, 1969] 18 GM Decree No.15/1969. 19 th Letter from Chev E. Zammit Secretary General to Chev Maitre Dr. D. Pannef and others dated 4 September 1969. MHOSLJ Archives B10:26 20 Introduction, 1971, op. cit., p.7-8

7|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Transmarinus or Overseas Territories sited in Edinburgh incorporating English-speaking countries except North America

North American Tongue in Canada

French Tongue in Paris with a Delegation in Geneva German Tongue in Zurich

 

  

Italian and Maltese Tongue in Malta with a Vice-Chancery in Italian Switzerland Spanish Tongue in Madrid

Portuguese Tongue in Lisbon Tongue of the Low Countries in The Netherlands Scandinavian Tongue in Stockholm

Central and Eastern Europe (in exile) in Paris

Titular Hereditary Commanderies

         

Delegation of Australia Grand Priory of England Grand Priory of Ireland Grand Bailiwick of New Zealand Commandery of Rhodesia Grand Priory of Scotland Grand Bailiwick of South Africa Grand Priory of America Commandery of the Holy Trinity (Canada) Commandery of Boigny (France)

   

Delegation of Germany Grand Priory of Switzerland Priory of Malta Delegation of Gozo

    

Grand Priory of Spain Delegation of Nicaragua Delegation of Venezuela Delegation of the Portuguese tongue Delegation of Belgium

        

Delegation of Finland Priory of Denmark & Greenland Grand Priory of Sweden Delegation of Iceland Grand Priory of Armenia in Exile Grand Priory of Bulgaria in Exile Grand Priory of Hungary in Exile Grand Priory of Rumania in Exile Hereditary Commandery of De la Motte de Courtils (France) Hereditary Commandery of Burton Lazar (England) Hereditary Commandery of St. Mary of Magdalene of Linlithgow (Scotland) Hereditary Commandery of Lochore (Scotland)

  

List of Vice-Chanceries and Jurisdictions of the Order under the Duke of Nemours, 1969-197221

21

Constitutional Decrees, 1969, op. cit., p.5-6; Introduction, 1971, op. cit., p.9; Report of the Grand Magisterial Council held rd th in Liège 3 and 4 June 1972. Continuation of list of members, amendments and audited accounts. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1972, p.7 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report - Liège, 1972]

8|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus In 1969, the Maltese Sir Hannibal Publius Scicluna was appointed Grand Chancellor and the seat of the Chancery and administration of the Order was transferred from Paris to Malta [Decree No.3/1969].22 Efforts were made to find a suitable locality to house the Grand Chancery. The members of the Priory of Malta quickly took the initiative to propose that suitable sites for housing the Grand Chancellery and suggested the soon-to-vacate Admiralty House and the St. John Counterguard. Other buildings, schedule to be vacated by the British Services, were discussed with the Malta Government Lands Department.23 However, none of these initiatives gave the desired positive results. Efforts were also made towards seeking a re-unification with the Duke of Brissac fraction, in spite of the statement issued by the French group in response to the Magistral Council held in Malta by the Duke of Nemours fraction on the 3-5th October 1969.24 In the midst of these reforms and re-organization, the Grand Master suddenly died on the 10th March 1970. In accordance with the Statute, the Coadjutor H.R.H. Michel de Orleans assumed the interim Grand Magistry with the full support of all the jurisdictions writing: “Pendant la passé de temps que duréra notre interim et Durant lequel Nous promettons de servire l’Ordre de Notre mieux, Nous demandons á nos confréres de Nous garder la fidélité et le dévouement dont ils ont fait preuve á l’égard du Duke of Nemours et Nous éspérons qu’ils aideront de même le futur Grand’Maître Général." He was however not willing to assume the Grand Mastership because of his personal commitments. A decision was therefore made to offer the Grand Mastership to H.R.H. Francisco de Borbón y Borbón.25 In the interim, Michel de Orleans continued with the administrative reforms initiated by the Duke of Nemours. This included the move to transfer the administrative headquarters from Paris to Malta. In 1971, LtCol Gayre undertook the purchase of a dilapidated fortified farmhouse in Malta locally known as Torri ta’ Lanzun with the aim of adapting this as the Grand Chancery of the Order. The restoration was made possible through donation made by various members of the Order.26 On the 34th June 1972, a Grand Magistral Council Meeting was held in Liège to discuss primarily the proposals for the election of the new Grand Master, and review the Statutes of the Order. The GMC Meeting was presided by the Grand Referandary Lt.Col. Gayre due to the absence of the coadjutor H.R.H. Prince Michael de Orleans and the Grand Commander H.R.H. Prince Francois de Borbón.27 The fraction under the jurisdiction of Michel de Orleans amounted to a total of 664 members by June 1971, increasing to 707 members by June 1972.28

22

Constitutional decrees, 1969, op. cit., p.3,30 th th Archives of the Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands: 1966-1971. Minute notes dated 5 March 1969 and 27 February th 1971; Letter from the Grand Master to Hon. Dr. Tommaso Caruana Demajo M.P. dated 12 March 1969. MHOSLJ Archives B10:39 24 th Statement from the Grand Magistracy and the Constitutional Council of the Order in Paris dated 25 February 1970 & Response to statement by the Grand Chancery in Malta. MHOSLJ Archives B10:201A; Letter from Chev. J. Amato Gauci to th Prof. Dr. W. Michel dated 20 April 1970. MHOSLJ Archives B10:200; Response to Paris statement 25 A suggestion to appoint Francisco de Borbón y Borbón had been made as early as April 1970. Vide: Letter from Chev Y. th der Hagopian de Nederli to Chev Gayre dated 25 April 1970. MHOSLJ Archives B10:191 26 Inauguration of the Grand Chancery, Malta; Report on Chapter General held on 11th and 12th May 1973. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1973, p.3-4, 10-11 [abbreviated subsequently as: Inauguration - Malta, 1973] 27 White Paper concerning Act of Recognition. MHOSLJ, Malta, n.d. [¬1971], p.11-13 [abbreviated subsequently as: White Paper, 1971]; Report – Liège, 1972, op. cit. 28 th Letter from Chev. J.V. Abela and Chev J. Amato Gauci to the President of the International Orders’ Commission dated 30 April 1970. MHOSL:J Archives B10:204; Report – Liège, 1972, op.cit., p.7. Members: GCLJ/DGCLJ – 37, KCLJ – 8, KLJ/DLJ – 328; Affiliates: CLJ – 179; OLJ – 97, MLJ – 58. 23

9|Page


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Following several representations, on the 27th January 1973 the Grand Chancellor circulated a confidential circular stating that “H.R.H. Prince Francesco de Borbón y Borbón, 45th Grand Master Emeritus, Grand Commander, has intimated that he would be prepared to consider being confirmed as the 47th Grand Master of the Order. Kindly let me know as early as possible in the STRICTEST CONFIDENCE what would be your reaction to the confirmation of H.R.H. as 47th Grand Master.”29 The general response for this proposal from the various jurisdictions was favourable and on the 22nd March 1973, H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón was re-established as the Grand Master. H.R.H. Michel de Orleans retained his post of coadjutor, LtCol Robert Gayre was appointed Grand Commander, the Marquis de Haro as Grand Referendary, and Chev. Joseph Amato Gauci was appointed Grand Chancellor and Custodian of the Treasury.

Chev. LtCol Robert Gayre Grand Commander

Chev. Joseph Amato Gauci Grand Chancellor

Marquis de Haro Grand Referendary

The Chapter General was held in Malta on the 11-15th May 1973 under the chairmanship of the newly elected Grand Master. On the 12th May 1973, the 47th Grand Master formally inaugurated Torri ta’ Lanzun (Castello Lanzun) in Malta as the official headquarters and Administrative Seat of the Order. The Titular Seat was established in Madrid, while the Titular Commandery in Boigny.30 A limited edition of 300 commemorative bronze 33 mm diameter medals were struck for the occasion initiating a renewal of the 17-18th century tradition of issuing commemorative jetons. The obverse side shows Castelo Lanzun in semi relief in the centre with the word “MALTA” above and below “12 V 1973”. The reverse depicts the eight-pointed cross in the centre surrounded by a scroll reading “ORDO MILIT ET HOSPIT SANCTI LAZARI HIEROSOLYMITANI”. This was hung on a 33 mm wide ribbon of purple edged with green.31

29

th

Confidential Circular from J. Amato Gauci Grand Chancellor dated 27 January 1973. MHOSLJ Archives, Torri ta’ Lanzun, Malta 30 th Inauguration – Malta, 1973, op. cit.; Order of St Lazarus headquarters to be inaugurated. Times of Malta, 12 May, p.20. 31 Stuart G. Morris of Balgonie, The Insignia and Decorations of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. MHOSLJ: Perthshire, Scotland, 1986; International Lazarite 1975, 1(3):79-80

10 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Commemorative Medal - 1973

th

Inauguration of Castello Lanzun, 12 May 1973

The subsequent Grand Magistral Meeting was held in Edinburgh in August 1974. A decision was taken to review the constitution consolidating all the rules and regulations governing the Order. This was entrusted to Chev. Paneff, Cdr. Mitchell L. Lanthrop, and A. Russel Murray. The draft constitution was presented during the Grand Magistral Meeting was held in Malta on the 24-25th September 1977.32 These statutes were published by GM decree 55/ 79 dated the 15th May 1979.33 32

rd

th

Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Malta 23 – 24 September 1977. MHOSLJ, Netherlands, 1977 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report – Malta, 1977] 33 th Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. 47 Grand Master H.R.H. Prince Francesco Enrique de Bortbon y de Borbon – Constitutional decrees. MHOSLJ, The Netherlands, 1979.

11 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus After publication of the revised statutes of the Malta Obedience, a response was sent by Cdr. Lanthrop at the request of the Grand Prior of America Chev Hans von Leden stating that while “the document was clearly based in substantial part upon the work which Mr. Murray and I did” …… the new document makes some fundamental, sweeping changes in the entire structure of the Order and radically alters certain traditions which have been in existence since the very founding of the Order. ….. There are two major changes which have been made in what I shall refer to as the ‘LathropMurray’ version, these being: (1) the method of election the Grand Master; and (2) The method of amending the constitution. ….. Instead of following the traditional approach which has always existed in the Order, the new constitution eliminates the mandate that a Chapter General must be called almost immediately upon the death of the Grand Master. Rather the Supreme Council (which is, of course, appointed by the Grand Master) may decree that the Coadjutor may succeed the Grand Master, thereby becoming Head of the Order and eliminating the right of the Chapter General to elect the Grand Master. …… The new version of the constitution again shifts the fundamental power structure from the members to the Grand Master and Supreme Council and virtually eliminates the right of the members to have a voice in the alteration or amendment of the constitution.”34 In 1975, the members of the Association d’Alsace des Chevaliers de Saint Lazare, previously under the Duke of Crossé-Brissac fraction, declared their allegiance to the Grand Master and in December 1975 a new Priory of Alsace was inaugurated. The coadjutor H.R.H. Prince Michael de Orleans resigned his post and he was replaced by H.R.H. Francisco de Paula de Borbón y Escasany, 5th Duke of Seville. The Order continued to expand its membership. By 1977, the effective membership of the Order under H.R.H. Francesco de Borbón numbered 1416 including 725 members [DLJ/KLJ, DCLJ/KCLJ, DGCLJ.GCLJ], 619 affiliates [MLJ, OLJ, CLJ], and 72 clergy. During the Grand Magistral Meeting held in Malta in September 1977, Chev. De Beaugour Bailiff of Boigny suggested that the Order should consider acquiring the farm and tower of the Chateau of Boigny. This was achieved in the subsequent months and an association composed of French citizens was set up in February 1981 under the Grand Priory of Alsace to ensure the proper management and maintenance of the property.35

Torri ta’ Lanzun, San Gwann, Malta 34

Chateau de Boigny, France th

Letter from Cdr. Mitchell L. Lathrop to Grand Master H.R.H. Prince Francesco Enrique de Borbón de Borbón dated 26 August 1979. MHOSLJ Archives 35 rd th Report – Malta, 1977, op. cit.; Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Edinburgh, Scotland, 23 – 24 June 1980. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1980 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report – Edinburgh, 1980]; Report of the Grand Magistral Council held th th in Helsinki, Finland, 7 – 8 September 1982. MHOSLJ, Finland, 1982 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report – Finland, 1982]; Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 12, May 1998, p.9-10

12 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus The Order remained split into two fractions: those loyal to the Spanish de Borbón Grand Master and the other loyal to the French Duke of Brissac. While each branch followed its own course, many knights from both sides became even more concerned about the situation which was prejudicial to its prestige, diluted its good work and gave ammunition to its detractors.36 Partisans of reunification from both sides of the Order attempted to negotiate the reunification conditions with prudence and determination. In 1979, representatives of the Grand Priory of Canada (de Brissac fraction) and the Grand Priory of America (de Borbón fraction) met in Canada to discuss the potential for reunification. Recommendations made from both sides led to an agreement signed in 1979 by both Grand Masters and most of the Heads of Jurisdictions of both branches. In a spirit of knightly confraternity, it was decided that each side would give up its vain quarrels and would work to achieve reunification. Each side would retain its structure and identity – the branch governed by the Duke of Seville would be known as the "Malta Obedience", while that governed by the Duke of Brissac would be known as the "Paris Obedience". The spiritual unity of the Order was to be assured by the Spiritual Protector H.B. Maximos V. Hakim. 37 Official and non-official contacts between officials of the two obediences continued to be made to discuss and arbitrate a reunification. In 1981, the members of the two obediences in Canada organised a joint meeting and investiture under the auspices of the Spiritual Protector, His Beatitude Maximos V Hakim. They subsequently elected a common Grand Prior of Canada effectively joining together in a single unified Grand Priory. This step was positively viewed by the American jurisdictions who were viewing the European divisions with distaste. The adoption of this solution by the two American obediences would have effectively resulted in the creation of a third 1200member strong North American “obedience” under the patronage of H.B. the Patriarch. Representations continued to be made in attempts to achieve reunification. A meeting was held in Paris in the Spring of 1983 between Vice-Chancellor James Algrant and Chev. Jean de Beaugour of the Malta Obedience and Chancellor Guy Coutant de Saisseval of the Paris Obedience. This led to the proposal of establishing an “Alliance of Saint Lazarus” under the patronage of H.B. Maximos V presiding over an executive council made up of members appointed by each respective grand master. While aiming to promote fraternity between the members of the two obediences, the Alliance would be careful not to infringe upon the autonomy of either obedience. The concept of such an alliance as proposed appeared to be acceptable to the two fractions.38

36

Anon. (1970). The legitimacy of the Order. Malta: MHOSLJ. Report – Finland, 1980, op. cit., p.69-70 38 Annex 1 – Proposal for an Alliance of Saint Lazarus. In: James J. Algrant y Canete. An up-date to the History of the Order 1984-1987 published privately for the Historical Study Group. The author, 2004 [abbreviated subsequently as: Update 19841987, 2004] 37

13 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón Grand Master – Malta Obedience

H.E. Pierre Timoleon de Cossé-Brissac Grand Master – Paris Obedience

A Grand Magistral Council Meeting of the Malta Obedience was scheduled to be held in Washington on the 12-14th July 1984. The host jurisdiction, who had been urging a reunification for some time, suggested inviting a guest delegation from the Paris Obedience. These were to include the coadjutor Marquis de Brissac, son of the Grand Master of the Paris Obedience, and Chev. Guy Coutant de Saisseval. The meeting was very well attended with many jurisdictions sending representatives. It was further attended by the Grand Master of the Malta Obedience.39 A document outlining proposals for the terms of unification was presented during the meeting. The proposal created a Committee under H.B. the Patriarch whose aim was to investigate, consider, supervise and resolve the practical problems which will arise as a result of the reunification process. The six members to serve on this committee, preferably reflecting equal representation from both obediences, were to be chosen by the Patriarch. This effectively made this committee the supreme body with the Patriarch being de facto Head of the Order. Both Obediences would continue to function independently under the two reigning grand masters. It however envisaged that upon the demise of one grand master, the surviving grand master will become emeritus and a Chapter General of both Obediences will be convened to elect a new grand master who could only be a person “of direct issue of such royal, princely, or noble family from which Grand Masters have come in the past.” All officials within the hierarchy of the two Obediences were however to remain in office for their life-time. The listed officers included the two Grand Masters, the elected coadjutor of the Paris Obedience, the Grand Commander of the Malta Obedience, and the two Grand Chancellors.40 This memorandum was viewed very positively by the delegates of the Paris Obedience who envisaged that on the death of a grand master, their coadjutor would rule the Order until a Chapter General of both Obediences is convened. An election then was most likely to swing in favour of the Paris Obedience coadjutor since he enjoyed the support of the members of the Paris Obedience and 39

th

th

Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Washington, D.C., U.S.A., 12 – 15 July 1984. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1984 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report – Washington, 1984] 40 Memorandum - Unification of the Two Obediences of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem th dated 13 July 1984. Annex 5 in: Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit.

14 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus the members of both obediences in Canada and America. On the other hand, the blatant and obvious exclusion of the coadjutor of the Malta Obedience from the list of officials was unacceptable and viewed with suspicion by the Grand Master of the Malta Obedience. He argued that the succession issue should state that “upon the demise of one Grand Master, the surviving Grand Master shall become sole Grand Master of the unified Order, and only after the death of the surviving one shall a Chapter General be convened to elect the new Grand Master.” This led to a breakdown in the reunification negotiations.41 Notwithstanding the disagreement voiced by the Grand Master of the Malta Obedience, the Patriarch set about establishing the Reunification Committee appointing Chev de la Pradelle, Dr Ferdinand Mencik and Chev Col Frank McEachren to represent the Paris Obedience. Since the Grand Master of the Malta Obedience refused to accept the validity of the Reunification Committee, finding representatives of the Malta Obedience proved more difficulty. Eventually Chev Salgo, Chev. LtCom Gayre and the Prince of Lippe accepted to serve on the committee.42 The Malta Obedience Grand Master proposed that direct negotiations with the Paris Obedience representatives should be made without recourse to the Patriarch Reunification Committee. He identified Chev Algrant and Chev de Beaugour to represent him in these discussions.43 During a meeting of the Supreme Council held in Madrid on the 12th October 1985, LtCol Gayre was suspended from the Order and relieved of his administrative duties.44

Commemorative Medal Washington, U.S.A. Meeting, 1984

Commemorative Medal Oxford, England Meeting, 1986

Various representations were made by the two appointed representatives of the Grand Master with the Patriarch Reunification Committee. In spite of these efforts, no consensus was reached to enable breaking the impasse. In spite of the lack of preliminary agreement, the Spiritual Protector in 1986 called a Joint Chapter General for both Obediences in Oxford with the aim of finalizing the reunification and elect a new Grand Master. Three individuals were nominated for the election – H.E. François Marquis de Brissac previous coadjutor of the Paris Obedience, H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón Grand Master of the Malta Obedience, and the German Prince Ernst-August zur Lippe. Francesco Enrique de Borbón withdrew his nomination threatening legal action and advised the members of his Obedience to boycott the meeting and shortly before the meeting, 41

Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit. These three individuals had all expressed their viewpoint that the Order should be reunified but under no circumstances that it should be reunified under the present legitimate Grand Master. Vide Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit., p.21 43 Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit. 44 Circular letter to all Heads of Jurisdictions and Members of the Supreme Council sent by the Grand Master Francesco E. th Borbón y de Borbón dated 18 March 1986. MHOSLJ Archives 42

15 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus called a counter-meeting in Luxembourg. According to the terms of the 1984 Washington Agreement, the Prince zur Lippe was ineligible for nomination since he was not a member of a “family from which Grand Masters have come in the past.” The Oxford meeting was attended by 440 delegates representing the Paris Obedience and the American and Canadian Grand Priories. Overall, a 1229 votes were cast in person or by proxy – 1034 favouring H.E. François Marquis de Brissac, 138 for the Prince zur Lippe, and 57 for H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón. The Marquis de Brissac was acclaimed as the 48th Grand Master of what was termed the "United Order". The past Grand Master of the Paris Obedience H.E. Pierre de Brissac was elected Grand Master emeritus.45 The Malta Obedience went ahead with the scheduled meeting in Luxembourg on the 12-14th November 1986. Attended by only about fifty delegates representing various jurisdictions, the Grand Master refused to acknowledge the validity of the Oxford election and resolved to carry on as before. Instead of the desired reunification, the Patriarch Reunification Committee resulted only in a realignment of allegiances. The Paris Obedience became the stronger branch having acquired the comparatively large American jurisdiction as well as those of England, Lochore, Holland and others. The Malta Obedience continued to be supported by several jurisdictions in Europe, including Spain, Malta, Italy, Finland-Norway-Sweden, Luxembourg, Hungary-in-exile, Germany, Austria, Alsace, and Boigny.46 The Spiritual Protector H.B. Maximos V. Hakim withdrew his support from the Malta Obedience continuing to prefer the Paris Obedience until his retirement in 2000. He was replaced as Spiritual Grand Prior of the Malta Obedience by Cardinal Silvio Oddi.47 Following the significant loss of membership and jurisdictions following the 1986 Oxford Meeting, the Malta Obedience initiated a reorganization programme to increase its influence. By 1990, the membership was augmented to a total of 2103 individuals.48 Attempts to reorganise itself in America were met by strong opposition by the American Jurisdiction of the Paris Obedience which initiated legal action to prevent a renewed presence of the Malta Obedience in the United States of America.49 By 1994, the Malta Obedience was made up of 41 jurisdictions in 27 countries.50 These included: 

the 16 Grand Priories/Bailiwicks of Alsace, Austria, England, Finland, France-Boigny, Hungary, Italy, Luxemburg, Malta, New Zealand, Panama, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United States, and Venezuela; the 15 Priories/Bailiwicks/Commanderies of Belgium, St. Hubertus (Austria), St. RupertusSalzburg (Austria), Berlin-Brandenburg, Castello, The Netherlands, Poland, Alba (Scotland), Fintan Munnu (Scotland), St. Erik (Sweden), St. Hallvard (Sweden), Alabama (U.S.A.), California (U.S.A.), Florida (U.S.A.), and Minnesota (U.S.A.);

45

Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit., p.56 Update1984-1987, 2004, op. cit. 47 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 19, November 2001 48 th th Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Salzburg, 26 – 29 July 1990. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1990 [abbreviated subsequently as: Report – Salzburg, 1990] 49 Sherman, Roger Carlton. MHOSLJ Archives B:94 - Archives of the Grand Bailiwick of the United States: 1961-1989 including the actions against the Order by and the chivalric history of Hans von Leden & other documents relative to the Grand Bailiwick of the United States. Office of the Grand Archivist & Historian, MHOSLJ, 1990 50 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 1, January 1994 46

16 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus 

the 7 Hereditary Commanderies of Rhineland (Germany), Holy Trinity (Canada), Fanad (Eire), St. Stephen (N. Ireland), Sigarthstein (Austria), Albatarrec (Spain), and Lochore (Scotland); and the 3 Delegations of Andorra, Australia, and St. Olav (Norway).

th

H.E. 48 Grand Master – Malta Obedience with officers of the Order at his installation th Milano, Italy 5 October 1996

Because of ill-health, the Malta Obedience Grand Master H.R.H. Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón on the 10th April 1995 delegated the management of the Order to his sons Francisco de Paula de Borbón y Escasany as coadjutor and Enrique Ignacio de Borbón y Garcia-Lobes as Lieutenant-General.51 The 47th Grand Master subsequently died on 18th November 1995.52 He was succeeded to the post by the serving Coadjutor, H.H. Francisco de Paula de Borbón y Escasany, 5th Duke of Seville, who was declared according to the Order’s Constitution 48th Grand Master-elect of the Malta Obedience in January 1996 by the Supreme Council. With the consent of the Supreme Council the new 48th Grand Master-elect appointed H.H. Enrique Ignacio de Borbón y Garcia-Lobez, Marquis de Vallcarlos as new Coadjutor. The new Grand Chancellor was Chev. Reginald Attard.53 During the Grand Magistral Meeting of the Malta Obedience held in Bristol, England in September 1995, a Reunification Commission was set up for the purpose of studying ways and means for an eventual re-unification of both branches of the Order. This was followed by a meeting with representatives of the Paris Obedience who agreed to bring peace by ceasing all hostile acts, and then to begin to work together locally and nationally in charitable endeavours and to develop a Christian attitude of mutual respect by personal contacts such as attendance as guests at each other’s social functions and ceremonies.54 This was endorsed in written decrees by both Grand Masters. In 1996, the Grand Chancellor of the Malta Obedience visited the United States and met 51

Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 6, September 1995, p.2-4 th The Grand Master’s death on the 18 November 1995 preceded the death of two other major players in the administration of the Malta Obedience fraction of the Order: Chev. Joseph Amato Gauci Serving as Grand Commander th th [died 9 December 1995] and Chev. Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg [died 10 February 1996]. Vide: Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 8, May 1996, p.2-4,13 53 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 8, May 1996, p.5-6 54 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 10, May 1997, p.2 52

17 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus with the Grand Prior of America to re-open discussions on reunification. This was followed by a follow-up meeting between the new Malta Obedience Grand Master and the Grand Prior of America in Madrid. By February 1998, these discussions enabled the administrative reunification of the two fractions in the United States, emulating the Canadian model. In 1998, the Grand Priory of America organized and hosted the 900th Anniversary Pilgrimage by the Order to the Holy Land. This served as a powerful catalyst for reunification allowing the Grand Masters of the two jurisdictions to meet and shake hands at the Tomb of our Lord in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. A bilateral commission was appointed to further the work of reunification.55

The Grand Master Malta Obedience in Jerusalem - 1998

The Duke of Brissac with the Duke of Westminister Grand Prior of England & Wales Investiture Eaton Hall, May 1999 55

The Duke and Duchess of Brissac with Brig. Thomas and Ms. Yarington of the Grand Priory of America in September 1999

Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 14, April 1999, p.10,12-13

18 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

In a spirit of reconciliation, the Duke of Brissac on the 5th September 2002 announced his intention to retire on reaching his 75th birthday in 2004 proposing the Duke of Seville to be appointed Grand Master of the reunited Order while pledging to do all in his power to effect the complete unification of the Order within the subsequent two years.56 Consequently the International Chapter General of the Paris Obedience held in Dublin on the 5th September 2002 agreed to the proposal of the Duke of Brissac. A Joint Constitutional and Reconciliation Committee was formed to guide the reunification process of the Paris and Malta Obediences under the co-chairmanship of Chev Reginald S. Attard [Malta Obedience] and Chev Bruce Harrington [Paris Obedience]. In the subsequent year, the work of this committee progressed smoothly and a memorandum of understanding was agreed upon by all participants opening the way forward for reconciliation.57 These agreements were fully endorsed by the Grand Magistral Council of the Malta Obedience held in Vaals, Netherlands on the 7-12th May 2003.58 In the summer of 2003, a group within the Paris Obedience refused to accept the Duke de Seville’s nomination and appointed Prince Charles Philippe d’Orléans as the new Grand Master of the Paris Obedience, thereby resulting in a schism within the Paris Obedience giving rise to the Orléans Obedience. The Duke of Brissac retired as Grand Master of the Paris Obedience in February 2004. In the following Chapter General of the Paris Obedience held in Toronto 2004, the Duke of Seville was confirmed by election by a vote of 542 Knights and Dames for the Duke versus 47 votes for the Prince Charles Philippe d’ Orléans to be the next Grand Master of the united Order. It was agreed that the Duke of Brissac would assume the role of Acting Grand Master until the Duke of Seville could be installed by the Spiritual Protector His Beatitude Patriarch Gregory III. Meanwhile, a disaffected group of European members, led by the jurisdictions of Ireland and Switzerland, refused to accept the result of the Toronto election and in the autumn of 2004 elect Prince Charles Philippe d’Orléans as their 49th Grand Master. In the meantime in September 2003, an attempt at reorganizing the management of the Malta Obedience resulted in a move by the previous Grand Chancellor Chev. R.S. Attard to break off relations with the Duke of Seville and seek an alliance with the d’Orléans group signing a convention about an “Alliance of Branches of the Order of Saint Lazarus”. These schisms in the two Obediences resulted in a number of Lazarite alliances:  

The de Brissac – de Seville reunited Group including the old Malta and Paris Obediences; and The Alliance of Branches of the Order of Saint Lazarus including the 2003-04 schismic groups from the Paris Obedience with Prince Charles Philippe d’Orléans as Grand Master and from the Malta Obedience with Chev. Reginald S. Attard as Vicar General.

56

th

Declaration by Francoise de Cossé, Duke de Brissac dated 5 September 2002 witnessed by H.B. Gregory III Laham. st MHOSLJ Archives. See also: Email from Francoise de Cossé, Duke de Brissac to HRH Francico de Borbón y Escasany dated 1 July 2002. MHOSLJ Archives B32a, Malta 57 th Agreement of Understanding of the Joint Reconciliation Commission dated 19 January 2003. MHOSLJ Archives B32a, Malta 58 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 22, January 2004, p.3-5; Letter from Chev. David James to Chev. Bruce Harrington dated th 17 May 2003. MHOSLJ Archives B32a, Malta

19 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus In spite of these setbacks, the reunification process of the de Brissac – de Seville group continued of its track. A common Constitution was agreed by the Joint Reunification Commission on the 18th February 2006 with bye-laws being agreed upon on the 24th September 2006. In 2006, the Duke of Brissac was formally asked to accept the position as Grand Master Emeritus to which he agreed. Thus, some 1500 members of the Paris Obedience finally moved towards reunification with the 4000 members of the Malta Obedience.59

H.R.H Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de Escasany Grand Master – Malta Obedience 1996-2008

H.E. François de Cossé Marquis de Brissac Grand Master – Paris Obedience 1986-2004

In January 2008, the Duke of Seville Francisco de Borbón y de Escasany announced that because of personal reasons he had decided that he would step down as Grand Master of the Order and would call a Chapter General later in the year. A Chapter General of the Order in Manchester, England was called for September 2008 by the Grand Commander Chevalier David James GCLJ. The primary purpose of the Chapter General was to introduce, elect and install a new Grand Master and Constitutional Head of the Order. The Chapter General, attended by over 300 delegates from Jurisdictions from all over the world, was opened with prayers by the Spiritual Protector. H.E. Carlos Gereda y de Borbón, Marquis de Almazan was confirmed as the 49th Grand Master of the reunited Order. H.H. Francisco de Borbón y Escasany was appointed by a unanimous decision of the Chapter General Grand Master Emeritus. The Melkite Patriarch His Beatitude Gregory III remained the Spiritual Protector of the united Order. Another important matter considered in the Manchester meeting was the reunification with the socalled "Norwich Group" (including the previous Paris Obedience splinter groups in Austria, England & Wales, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Liechtenstein, New Zealand, and Romania). Prior to the meeting, the "Norwich-Group" met in a Chapter General in Vienna. It was there decided to re-unite the Norwich-Group with the main branch of the Order (former Obedience Malta & Paris) as the “United Order” and to support the nomination of Carlos Gereda de Borbón as Grand Master of the "United 59

The Ceremony of Reunification with the signing and witnessing of the Agreement of Reunification document took place th on the 12 October 2006 in Houston, USA. The signatories to the Agreement included: H.E. Major Chev David James, H.E. Chev Joaquin Cayuala, H.E. Chrv Ron Hendriks, and Chev. Krenneth Monitugo for the Malta Obedience; and H.E. Chev Bruce Harrington, H.E. Lady Primrose Potter, and H.E. Chev Robert Vanderwater for the Paris Obedience. H.R.H. Francoise de Borbon y Escasany witnessed the document.

20 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Order". Following this decision, a delegation from the Norwich-Group was present at the Manchester Chapter General and participated in the election procedure. The United Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem today enjoys a presence in 35 countries. 60

th

H.E. Carlos Gereda de BorbĂłn 49 Grand Master of the United Order and H.B. Gregory III Laham Spiritual Protector of the Order signing the Kevelaer Declaration

60

Ross Michael [ed.]. Arms of the Jurisdictions - International: Updated list of the Arms of all Independent Legitimate Jurisdictions of the Order of Saint Lazarus. Grand Chancery & PRC, MHOSLJ, 2013 – Arms drawn by Mathieu Chaine

21 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus A: National jurisdictions

Priory of the Kingdom of Belgium & the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

Grand Priory of America

Grand Priory of Australia

Grand Bailiwick of Austria

Grand Priory of Brazil

Grand Priory of Canada

Grand Bailiwick of the Czech Republic

Delegation of Denmark

Grand Priory of England & Wales

Grand Priory of Finland

Grand Priory of France

Grand Bailiwick of Germany

Grand Priory of Hungary

Delegation of Singapore and Indonesia

Grand Priory of Ireland

Delegation of Japan

Priory of Liechtenstein

Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands

Grand Priory of Greece

Grand Priory of Italy

22 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Priory of Macedonia (FYROM)

Delegation of Mexico

Grand Bailiwick of the Netherlands

Grand Priory of New Zealand

Delegation of Norway

Grand Priory of Poland

Grand Priory of Portugal

Grand Priory of Romania

Grand Bailiwick of Scotland

Delegation of Siam (Thailand) and Indochina

Grand Priory of Slovakia

Grand Bailiwick of South Africa

Grand Priory of Spain

Grand Priory of Sweden

Grand Bailiwick of Switzerland

Priory of Zimbabwe

23 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

B: Hereditary jurisdictions

Hereditary Commandery of Castle Sighartstein [Austria]

Hereditary Commandery of Villa Wallendorf [Germany]

Hereditary Commandery of Sande [Portugal]

Hereditary Commandery of "El Acebuchar" [Spain]

Hereditary Commandery of Fanad

C: Jurisdictions directly under the Grand Master or the Grand Chancellery

Grand Commandery of Boigny [France]

24 | P a g e

Grand Commandery of the Castello [Malta]

Humanitarian Grand Priory Europe


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

The properties of the Order Chev. Charles Savona-Ventura Grand Archivist & Historian

In the opening speech of the Magistral Council Meeting held in Washington, U.S.A in July 1984, the Grand Commander H.E. Col. Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg commented on the expansion of the Order he had witnessed over his near quarter century membership further stating that “we have the Church of St. Vincent in Edinburgh, the Ambulance Corps Buildings1, Castello Lanzun in Malta, and the Tower of Boigny.”2 These holdings were all the fruit of the efforts and generosity of Chev Gayre.

The Church of St. Vincent in Edinburgh In 1967, LtCol Gayre [b.1907; d.1996] established the Hereditary Commandery of Lochoreshyre or Inchgall. The letters patent confirming the establishment of the Hereditary Commandery of Lochore were signed by the Grand Master on the 15th April 1969. Accordingly, the letters patents established that LtCol Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg would enjoy the title of Commander of Lochore throughout his life and after him the title will pass to his hereditary successor who will have the chieftainship of the Clan of Gayre and Nigg.3 The provisions associated with the setting up of this Hereditary Commandery included the obligation that certain fiefs and trusts belonging to Col. Gayre will be held by him for the remainder of his life as Trustee for and on behalf of the Order. The associated fiefs and assets included: 

The Castle of Lochore or Inchgall in the County of Fife in Scotland and the Avocation of Ballingry and all the rights of sovereignty and titles attached to the said Lordship, including the use by the Hereditary Commander of Lochoreshire or Inchgall of the title of Baron of Lochore;

The Lordship of the Manor of Moulton Bewsolas in England in the County of Lincoln and all the rights of sovereignty and titles attached to the said Lordship especially the use by the Hereditary Commander of Lochoreshhyre or Inchgall of the title of Lord of the Manor of Moulton Bewsolas;

1

The Order of St Lazarus Emergengy Ambulance Corps project was initiated by LtCol Gayre in Scotland under the management of the Commandery of Lochore to attempt establish active ambulance units in Scotland in cooperation with the local government. The function of the Corps was to provide supplementary ambulance facilities in special circumstances, co-operating closely wth the police and the Scottish Ambulance Service in undertaking the rescue, first aid and transport of casualities arising from major incidents and to cover public events. The Emergency Corps of the Commandery mantained five ambulances sited in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Galashields, Stirling and Ayr. See: Order of St Lazarus Emergency Ambulance Corps. In: The Hereditary Commandery of Lockore. MHOSLJ, Edinburgh, [1971], p.19-20 2 th th Report of the Magistral Council held in Washington, D.C., USA 12 to 15 July, 1984. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1985, p.10 3 The Hereditary Commandery of Lockore. MHOSLJ, Edinburgh, [1971].

25 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus 

The use and the ownership of the Church of St. Vincent situated in Edinburgh (Scotland) as the Commandery Church, comprising the Chapel, the buildings and annexes; which Church will be established as the headquarters of the Vice-Chancery of the overseas Territories. 4

The hereditary jurisdiction survived until the death of LtCol Chev Robert Gayre in 1996 as the Grand Hereditary Commandery of Lochore.5 Chev Gayre’s hereditary successor was not particularly keen to maintain the Hereditary Commandery resulting in its abolition. All the associated fiefs and assets of the jurisdiction were assumed by the Gayre family.

© Google Maps, 2014

Church of St Vincent

The Church of Saint Vincent is a neo-Gothic chapel designed by J.W.H. & J.M. Hay of Liverpool in 1856. It formerly served as the parish church of the Scottish Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Edinburgh. It ceased parish functions in the 1960s and was acquired by Chev Gayre on the 15th June 1971. Steps were soon taken to renovate the chapel and transform this into a suitable Commandery 4

th

Confirmation of the erection of the Commandery of Lochore. Deed executed at Biarritz on the 18 August 1969 [Register No. 1/1969]. In: The Hereditary Commandery of Lochore, 1971, op. cit., p.6-9 5 Saint Lazarus Newsletter. December 1997, 11:p.3.

26 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Chapel creating a Knights’ Chapel in the chancel and nave with stalls for knights and commanders; and a Chapter House in the north aisle for meetings of the Order. The Crypt was to be converted into a museum and library of the Order, while the Church Hall was to be used as the headquarters of the St. Lazarus Emergency Ambulance Corps. Provisions were to be made for the Chaplain’s Lodgings and quarters for the custodian. In 1992, the Chapel of Saint Vincent reverted completely to parish use as part of the Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Edinburgh, a member of the Anglican Communion. The Church was decorated with heraldic decorations relevant to the Order and included sixty large wooded panel shields in the roof of the Chancel depicting those of the Order and the Commandery of Lochore, the shields of the officials of the Order including the Grand Master H.R.H. Charles Philip of Orléans, the Co-adjutor Prince Michael of France, the Grand Commander H.R.H. Francoise de Borbón y de Borbón, the Grand Referendary and Commander of Lochore Chev LtCol Gayre, and those of other individual members of the Order. A fund was set up to finalize the project by offering a subscription of £175 from interested members that ensured the inclusion and costs of carving, painting and enamelling the respective heraldic arms. Further heraldic shields were placed in the west end panels of the Nave’s Gallery, Vestibule, and Chapter House. Further arms were installed on the walls, stalls and even in the stained glass windows. Jurisdiction banners were also erected.

View of interior of church showing jurisdiction flags 6

6

Photographs by Ms Elaine Robson: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pathlost/tags/stvincentschapel/

27 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

28 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus The Torri ta’ Lanzun In 1967, the 46th Grand Master H.R.H. Prince Charles Philippe d ’Orleans, Duke of Nemours, Vendome and Alencon LtCol Gayre initiated administrative reforms by setting up a Commission to review the Statute and Regulations of the Order that in 1969 led to the transfer of the Chancery and administration of the Order from Paris to Malta.7 The Maltese national jurisdiction quickly took the initiative to propose suitable sites for housing the Grand Chancellary and suggested the soon-tovacate Admiralty House and the St. John Counterguard. Other buildings, schedule to be vacated by the British Services, were discussed with the Malta Government Lands Department.8 None of these discussions led to any concrete acquisitions. In August 1971, LtCol Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg, Laird of Lochore who then was serving as Grand Commander and Grand Almoner of the Order proposed the purchase of Torri ta’ Lanzun at Mensija, San Gwann in Malta by his company Lochore Enterprises Ltd. to be restored and to serve as the HQ for the Grand Chancery and the Grand Priory of Malta.9 At the time of purchase, the Tower was structurally in a good condition but the three sides of the courtyard were falling down. The total purchase price was a little over £7000. Restoration costs were estimated at £5000. The purchase was subject to an annual ground rent of about £100 payable to Borggrech Estates Limited, Malta. A 12-foot frontage area was given by the Government Lands Department.10 In February 1972, permission was given by the Public Works Department “to carry out additions and alterations as per plan PAPB 961/70/12 provided that the façade is approved by the Aesthetics Board. All external walls are to be erected in franka stone also no colours are to be used on the façade. The pseudo embrasures and the biforae should preferably be removed; also as per attached proviso re clearance of material – Provided that on completion of works discarded building materials and other debris deposited in a public place or a place abutting on a place of public passage will have to be removed to an authorized or approved dump at the expense of the applicant”.11 The buildings were then passed on to the Order for use as its Administrative Headquarters—the Grand Chancery. The contract of the “Precarium”, i.e. loan of use, was made on the 19th April 1972 with Dr. Joseph Raymond Grech as Notary who gratuitously gave his professional services.12 Torri ta’ Lanzun was inaugurated by Grandmaster H.R.H. Francesco de Borbón y de Borbón as the official headquarters of the Order of St. Lazarus on the 12th May 1973. Torri ta’ Lanzun was originally a 15th century farmhouse that by the 17th century had transferred ownership to Wenzu Lanzun from Cittá Vittoriosa, thus accounting for its present name. Wenzu Lanzun transferred residence to the farmhouse during the 1676 plague epidemic in an attempt towards avoiding the dreaded infection—in a way placing himself and his family in virtual isolation and quarantine. The San Gwann region was in the 17th century very poorly inhabited; though the locality had long housed a number of wayside chapels. Close to Torri ta’ Lanzun stands the cave7

An Introduction to the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. MHOSLJ, Malta, n.d. (¬1971), p.7-8 th th Archives of the Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands: 1966-1971. Minute notes dated 5 March 1969 and 27 February 1971 9 LtCol Gayre actually purchased the Torri ta’ Lanzun to eventually serve as his residence. Vide: Robert Gayre. Gayre of Gayre & Nigg – An Autobiography. Edinburgh Impressions td., Edinburgh, 1987, p.149 [subsequently referred to as R. Gayre. Autobiography, 1987] 10 th Letter from LtCol Robert Gayre to Chev. J. Amato Gauci dated 15 August 1971. MHOSLJ Archives B14: docs.313 11 rd th Planning Area Permit Board dated 3 February 1972 responding to application dated 20 March 1970. MHOSLJ Archives B14: docs.313 12 Precarium Contract made between Harold Farrugia for Lochore Enterprises (Malta) Ltd subsidiary to Lochore Enterprises Ltd, of Edinburgh, Scotland and Chev. Joseph Amato Gauci, Chancellor and Acting Receiver-General of the Military and th Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem dated 19 April 1972. Not. Joseph Raymond Grech Reg. No. 12/73 8

29 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus chapel dedicated to San Leonardo. Known today as the Chapel of the Annunciation [Lunziata Chapel], this cave-chapel is associated with a popular medieval legend and was extant in 1575 when the Apostolic Visitor Mgr Petrus Dusina wrote his report. The locality during this period fell under the jurisdiction of the Birkirkara Parish. Other chapels recorded in the Birkirkara parish included the old parochial church of St. Helena, and the chapels dedicated to Santa Margarita, Sant Andrea, San Bartholomew and of course the cave-chapel of San Leonardo.13

Š Google Map, 2014 San Gwann Area: 17 century map and present time Torri ta’ Lanzun locality marked by arrow in both maps. th

13

G. Aquilina, S. Fiorini [eds.]. Documentary Sources of Maltese History. Part IV. Documents at the Vatica. No.1 Archivio Segreto Vaticano. Congregazione Vescovi e Regolari. Mata: Vista Apostolica no.51 Mgs Petrus Dusina, 1575. University Press, Malta, 2001

30 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus The original farmhouse building included large hall on the ground floor which served as a stable for cattle. The owner and his family lived in the upper chambers approached by an external staircase, the flat roof of which being reached by a turret staircase. In time, new stables were built in the north side of the quadrangle while a courtyard was built to enclose the north side. The outside staircase now ascended within the safety of this enclosure. Another room was built adjoining the doorway into the quadrangle; while above the doorway a small chamber with a fireplace was further constructed. In 1713, structural modifications were further made to the edifice thus enlarging and strengthening to serve as a fortified building to serve as a haven for local inhabitants during pirate raids. Its situation commanding panoramic views over St George’s, Spinola and St Julian’s Bays and towards the city of Valletta ensured an early warning for raids. The building is believed to have also served as a hunting station for the Grandmaster of the Order of St. John. It subsequently passed into the hands of the Attard family. During World War II, it was used as an observation post for enemy planes, and was rather severely damaged during enemy action. After the war it had several owners.14 The fortified farmhouse was in the 1960s in a very depilitated state and partly demolished.

Torri Lanzun prior to its restoration - 1971 Š MHOSLJ Archives 14

International Lazarite, 1975, 1(2):p.43; Saint Lazarus Newsletter, May 1996, 8:p.12

31 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus An effort was made to restore the buildings and carry out improvements. The work was undertaken under the direct supervision of architect and civil engineer Chev. Maurice Captur, a member of the Priory of Malta. Then began the fitting and furnishing of the Grand Chancery carried out through the generosity of the various members of the Order including substantial monetary donations including Lt.Col Gayre [equivalent to €6900] and Chev J. Brown Cook [equivalent to €1510]. The other members of the Order between them donated the sum equivalent to €6950. Various items were also donated with the aim of embellishing the building.15

             

Chev. J. Tabone—a large carpet Chev. A. Zammit—two lanterns Mrs B. Zammit—draperies and curtains, lace altar cloths and holy water stoop, and an antique crucifix The Delegation of Gozo headed by Dr. Joseph Pace—a statue of Saint Lazarus LtCol Chev J.V. Abela—kneeling stool with cushion for investiture Chev J. Amato Gauci—an antique piece of tapestry Mgr. Sciberras-Psaila—a Papal blessing on parchment Chev. C.N. Packett – silk banner of the Order The Lady of Gayre – Armour Chev. R. Morris – Shield of the Order Ms. H.J. Morris OLJ – cushion for insignia Ms. Mann – cushion and chalice Delegation of Finland – pair of brass candlesticks The Grand Master and his entourage including Chev. R. Gresham – gifts of furniture.

On the 12th May 1973, the 47th Grand Master formally inaugurated Torri ta’ Lanzun (Castello Lanzun) in Malta as the official headquarters and Administrative Seat of the Order.16

15

Inauguration of the Grand Chancery, Malta; Report on Chapter General held on 11th and 12th May 1973. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1973. [subsequently refered to as: Inauguration – Malta, 1973]. During the 1973 Chapter General, it was reported [p.5] that “the Grand Commander announced the gift to the Order of Lochore House, with five flats, next to Villa Lochore. The method of handing over the property would be left to Notary Dr. J. Grech CLJ and Mr. Harold Farrugia OLJ to work out in the best interest of the Order.” The address to Villa Lochore was: 115 The Strand, Gzira, Malta. LtCol Gayre owned three properties in Malta – Torri ta’ Lanzun, the flats at 114 The Strand, Gzria and Villa Lochore. Legal enactments in Malta promulgated in the early 1970s allowed foreigners to own only one property. This led to LtCol Gayre to pass the ownership of Torri ta’ Lanzun and the flats to his company Lochore Enterprises (Malta) Limited and retain Villa Lochore for his personal use. The latter was also eventually sold in 1975. Vide: R. Gayre. Autobiography, 1987, op. cit., p.149-150. The original plan was to use the five flats for the use of members and other recommended persons as places for recuperation after illness, etc. The property was to be rented at a nominal rent of about £1 per annum while the occupiers would pay a nominal charge of £10 deposit and £10 monthly. The overall plan was to have such houses around the world. Vide: Letter th from LtCol Robert Gayre to various interested individuals – Subject 114, The Strand, Gzira dated 28 April 1973. MHOSLJ Archives B:36a, Malta 16 th Inauguration – Malta, 1973, op. cit.; Order of St Lazarus headquarters to be inaugurated. Times of Malta, 12 May, p.20.

32 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

rancisco de orb n lanked by Prince Irakly de Bagration and LtCol Robert Gayre y Gayre: 1973

In May 1974, in accordance with the provisions of the original transfer contract, the Priory of Malta requested the Grand Chancellor Chev J. Amato Gauci to consider the drawing up of “an agreement of lease in respect to the inner room at an annual rent based on the original suggested rental of £M25 per annum for the two rooms”. The Grand Chancellor proposed that no charge was to be made for the rental of the mentioned rooms; a proposal seconded by Lt.Col. Gayre. It was therefore decided that “it is not the intention of the Grand Chancery to lease any rooms of the Castello Lanzun to the Malta Priory and, hence, the need of drawing up an agreement does not arise. The inner room on the first floor of the Castello will, however, be reserved for the sole use of the Priory and, whenever necessary, the Priory will be allowed to make use of the outer room on the same floor.”17 In October 1980, the Order formally purchased Torri ta’ Lanzun from Col. Gayre.18 The ground rent was redeemed in 1984. Restoration and upgrading works were still being carried out in 1997. That year saw the relaying of the garden to assist in the retention of water, while old and unsuitable plants were replaced. The walls required annual resealing to prevent their deterioration, while the flats roofs were scheduled for re-attention. It was planned to install gates at the main entrance.19 These gates were installed the subsequent year and fencing was also installed above the

17

th

Letter from F.E. Critien Secretary General of the Priory of Malta to Chev. J. Amato Gauci dated 6 May 1974 with th endorsement by Lt.Col. Gayre and response of Grand Chancellor dated 10 May 1974. MHOSLJ Archives B14: docs.313 18 th Letter from Chev. J. Amato Gauci to H.R.H. the Grand Master dated 27 May 1987. MHOSLJ Archives B:206a. The notary involved may have been Notary J. Micallef Trigona. Vide: Letter from advocate Dr. Alb. Ganado to Chev. J. Amato Gauci th dated 8 April 1980. MHOSLJ Archives: B36a, Malta 19 Saint Lazarus Newsletter, May 1998, 12:p.11-12

33 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus street wall for about half its length. The well tank had sprung a leak and needed repair works.20 By the beginning of 2003, all restoration work had been completed.

Arial & Frontal elevation view o Torri ta’ Lanzum © Google Map, 2014 & C. Savona-Ventura

The Torri Ta’ Lanzun is now the International Headquarters of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St Lazarus of Jerusalem and has been fully restored. Its maintenance is the responsibility of the Keeper of the Torri and the Grand Commandery of the Castello. The Grand Archivist & Historian is responsible for maintaining the Archives housed within the Torri. The entrance of the building holds the symbolic key of the Castello presented to the Grand Master on assuming ownership. It also has a cabinet with the uniform of Grand Master Francesco Enrique de Borbón.

20

Saint Lazarus Newsletter, April 1999, 14:p.11

34 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

View of the Tower elevation, the Symbolic Key of the Torri & Grand Master’s uni orm

The entrance underlying the tower on the left side leads to the east end of the farmhouse now serving as a small ecumenical Chapel dedicated to Our Lady. The Chapel is decorated by various jurisdictional flags. The rooms above the chapel and the tower, comprising the original living quarters, now serve as a Council Meeting room decorated with a large number of heraldic adornments, pictures and photos. The adjoining room serves as an office housing the Archives of the Order.

Chapel and Alter piece

35 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

Council Meeting Room

The west side of the farmhouse at the opposite end of the courtyard from the Chapel, comprising the later added stables, have been converted into a large meeting hall (now called the Knights' Hall)

Knights Hall

The Tower building and the Knights Hall are connected by another building comprising a small kitchen, cloakroom and toilet, and ‘keep’ style store room. The large inner court yard is set and adorned with abundant shrubs, flower beds, and bougainvillea. A commemorative plaque in a niche in the courtyard wall marks the official handover from Robert Gayre into the hands of the then 36 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Commandery as Custodians for the Order of St Lazarus. A second commemorative plaque records the 40th anniversary of the handover. It is in this courtyard that formal and social functions take place throughout the year.

Courtyard & 1973 commemorative plaque

37 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

th

Unveiling of the 40 anniversary commemorative plaque by the Grand Master th 5 November 2013 Š Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands Archives

38 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus The Chateau de Boigny The Chateau de Boigny had a very long history of association with the Order of Saint Lazarus, the property having been donated to the Order by King Louis VII in 1154 as a perpetual fief with the right of superior and inferior justice making the Order in France a feudal vassal of the French King. Prior to its donation, the building had served as a Royal residence. After being ousted from Acre and the Holy Land in 1291, the Order established its Grand Magisterial See at Boigny.

Low-relief based on an old engraving showing Louis VII donating the property at Boigny to the Hospitallers of Saint Lazarus

The religious wars in France of the sixteenth century led to the building passing in the hands of the Calvinists who came to occupy Orléans under the command of the Prince of Condé. The destroyed building was eventually restored to the Order and was in 1578 rebuilt by Grand Master François Salviati changing the old feudal fortress structure to a 16th century manor. The building was again sacked by the Catholics leaving the manor uninhabited and in disrepair for over a century until April 1699 when Huguet de Semonville, appointed Commander of Boigny, took possession and built a new home. The Order lost its ownership with the confiscation of all its properties during the 18th century French Revolution.

The old Boigny château and the arms of Huguet de Semonville

39 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus During the early twentieth century re-organization of the Order, the magisterial seat of the Order was identified with Boigny even though the administrative seat in the form of the Chancery was located in Paris. On the 30th May 1964, a pilgrimage was organized for the members of the Order initiating an annual June tradition whereby members of the Order from all over the world reconnect with the historical roots in Boigny.

Aerial view of the château and grounds of Boigny

The château of Boigny – exterior and interior views

40 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

The château of Boigny – gate and towers

During the Grand Magistral Meeting held in Malta in September 1977, the Bailiff of Boigny Chev De Beaugour suggested that the Order should consider acquiring the farm and tower of the Chateau of Boigny. The property had been acquired and repaired by the Grand Commander Lt.Col. Gayre, who was ready to pass the property to the Order. It was suggested that the ideal way of obtaining the property was to have the property vested to various interested judisdictions, rather to individual members. The transfer was achieved in the subsequent months. In the General Assembly of the Grand Priory of Alsace on the 28th March 1980, it was reported that “le statut à donner à cette propriété a fait l'objet de longues études juridiques pour concilier les impératifs du droit français et le caractère international de l'Ordre, grâce au chevalier Marc Leyenberger que je tiens à féliciter et à remercier. L'affaire est maintenant au point et je pense pouvoir vous annoncer prochainement sa conclusion. Très prochainement maintenant l'Ordre sera de nouveau dans ses murs, grâce au GrandCommander et à la générosité des juridictions qui, à traverse le monde entier, ont répondu à l'appel qui leur était lancé pour le rachat et la remise en état de la Tour de Boigny.”21 Over the subsequent months by February 1981 a management association of French citizen members of the Order was set up under the jurisdiction of the Grand Priory of Alsace and the Grand Bailiwick of Boigny to ensure the proper management and maintenance of the property.22

21

Assemblee Generale 28 mars198. Grand Prieure d’Alsace – Ordre Militaire et Hospitalier de Saint-Lazare de Jérusalem. MHOSLJ, Alsace, 1980, p.9 22 rd th Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Malta 23 – 24 September 1977. MHOSLJ, Netherlands, 1977, p.17-18; rd th Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Edinburgh, Scotland, 23 – 24 June 1980. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1980, p.11-12,46; th th Report of the Grand Magistral Council held in Washington D.C., USA, 12 to 15 July 1984. MHOSLJ, Malta, 1984, p.21-22; Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 12, May 1998, p.9-10

41 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus On the 7th January 1998, about a quarter of the Tower of the Château of Boigny collapsed as a consequence of three years of draught and the sandy soil of the region. Another quarter had to be demolished leaving only half of the tower suitable for utilization in any attempt at restoration. The restoration project was estimated to cost about 700,000 French francs. An urgent plea was made by the Chancellor of the Grand Priory of Alsace for financial support from the Grand Chancery and other jurisdictions to undertake the restoration project.23 However, the tower was taken over by the French Government who rebuilt is as a museum. The Order retained a piece of land in Boigny which remained under the care of the Grand Bailiwick of Boigny.24 The château over the last twenty years has served as the headquarters of the Commanderie de l ' Orléans holding the French archives of the Order. The Hall of Flags contains 28 flags representing the European Commanderies. In June 2000, a memorial was set up depicting the simple green Latin cross used as an emblem by the Order in the Medieval period and the later green eight-pointed cross.

23 24

Saint Lazarus Newsletter, No. 12, May 1998, p.9-10 st Letter from Grand Chancellor Chev. R.S. Attard to the GM dated 21 November 2001. MHOSLJ Archives, Malta

42 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

The Schismatic Groups of the Order of Saint Lazarus – a background to their history Chev. Charles Savona-Ventura Grand Archivist & Historian

The Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem during the latter part of the twentieth century saw divisions being generated by conflict of thought and personalities. These divisions were sometimes taken to extremes which led individual members to become disillusioned with the central government of the Order.1 The Reunification Agreement signed in October 2008 ended four decades of turmoil and conflict between the two major groups. However, disagreement and dissention during the period has seen other splinter groups setting up their own independent organisational structure. These have unfortunately still not opted to return to the main fold. The main schismatic groups still functioning to date include: 1. The Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem – United Grand Priories a. United Grand Priories under Master General Frà John Baron Dudley von Sydow von Hoff b. United Grand Priories under Supreme Grand Prior H. E. Chevalier Richard Comyns of Ludston 2. The Military and Hospitaller Oreder of St Lazarus of Jerusalem a. Orléans Obedience previously under the temporal protection of the Royal House of France under Grand Master Jan Count Dobrzenský z Dobrzenicz b. Saint Lazare International under Administrator General Bishop Richard Garrad 3. Military & Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem – Malta Obedience under Grand Master H.R.H. Prince Pieter Cantacuzino 4. Constitutional Jurisdictions of Carpanthia of the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem led by Col. Andrew T. Adam von Rhédey

1

In 1910, Johan José Moser from Berlin founded a short-lived group with the name “Hospitallers of Saint Lazarus”. Moser was never a member of the mainline Order. In 1930, Paul Wartin who previously served as Chancellor of the Order resigned and founded an institution called the Noble Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem with himself as Grand Master. It disappeared after the Second World War. See: Guy Coutant de Saisseval. The knights and hospitallers of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem from 1789 to 1930. English translation by M. Ustick published by the MHOSLJ, Paris, n.d.

43 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

MHOSLJ - reunited th

49 GM H.E. Carlos Gereda de Borbon, Marquis of Almazan – elected 2008 Reunited 2008

MHOSLJ – Malta Obedience 50th GM HRH Pieter Cantacuzino Elected 2013 49 GM HRH Charles-Philippe d’Orléans Elected 2004 Branch established 2004 managed by a series of Vicar Generals th

MHOSLJ – Saint Lazare International

United Grand Priories of the HOSLJ

Administrator General Bishop Richard Garrad Est. 2010

Superior Grand Prior Chev. Richard Comyns Est. 2008

MHOSLJ–Orléans Obedience

Constitutional Jurisdictions of Carpanthia – OSLJ Est. 2008 led by Col. Andrew T. Adam von Rhédey

50th GM H.E. Jan Dobrzensky z Dobrzenic elected 2010 49th GM Charles-Philippe de Orleans elected 2004

Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem Master General John Baron Dudley von Sydow von Hoff Established 1995

MHOSLJ – Malta Obedience

MHOSLJ – Paris Obedience

48 GM Francisco de Borbón y Escasany Duke of Seville Elected 1996; GM Emeritus 2008 th 47 GM Francisco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón Elected 1973

48 Grand Master François de Cossé Duke of Brissac Elected 1986; GM Emeritus 2006 th 47 Grand Master Pierre de Cossé Duke of Brissac Elected 1969; GM Emeritus 1986

th

th

MHOSLJ

MHOSLJ - Spain

46 GM Charles Philippe de Orleans Elected 1967

45 GM Francesco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón th Elected GM Emeritus 1969; re-elected 47 GM 1973

th

th

Noble Order of SLJ GM Paul Wartin 1930-1940

Military & Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem th

45 Grand Master Francesco Enrique de Borbón y de Borbón – elected 1959 th 44 Grand Master Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de la Torre – elected 1935 Previously managed by Council of Officers under the Melkite Patriarch Est. c.1848/1911

44 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem – The United Grand Priories On the 1st January 1995, a group of British past members and officials of the Paris Obedience H.E. François de Cossé Marquis de Brissac broke off from that Obedience and formally established the Grand Priory of England, Wales, Isle of Man and Channel Islands (with the Commanderies of Richmond, of Buckingham, and of Westminster) and the Grand Priory of Scotland of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem as a British ‘confraternity of hospitallers’ who apply themselves to the relief of those in need of hospice care. The management was led by a Master-General Frà John Baron Dudley von Sydow von Hoff OStJ GCTS GCLJ GCMLJ SCLJ KV CMV. The original scope of the association was to direct its activities mainly in the United Kingdom but continued discord within the original Order of Saint Lazarus led to further expansion and the formation of a single umbrella body known as The United Grand Priories of the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem, established on the 13th May 1999. Frá von Hoff served as chairman of the Grand Council of the United Grand Priories. Frà John Baron Dudley von Sydow

In the early 2000s, a number of members with an aggressive von Hoff expansionist mentality joined the Order. These drove a very active and aggressive expansionist programme so that from 2007 onwards, the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem expanded greatly in various countries and regions. In 2008, the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus abolished the self-appointed position of ‘Master General’ of the Order and a Supreme Grand Priory to govern all the united Grand Priories within the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus was established. This is led by a Supreme Grand Prior, duly elected by the Grand Officers of the Supreme Grand Priories to preside on the work carried out by the Supreme Grand Priory. The original British group led by Frá von Hoff broke off from the 2008 newly re-structured UGP and continue to function as the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus under the direction of Master General Frá von Hoff.2 They are represented by the Grand Priory of England, Wales, Isle of Man and Channel Islands; The Hereditary Grand Commandery of St Sopia; the Grand Priory of Denmark; and the Commandery of Pafos. Chev. Richard Comyns of Ludston

2

The newly-structured 2008 group elected H. E. Chevalier Richard Comyns of Ludston GCLJ GCMLJ as the Supreme Grand Prior so that the Supreme Grand Priory became based in Edinburgh, Scotland. The international operations are directed from the office of the th

Website of the United Grand Priories of the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. Retrieved 28 March 2014 from http://www.saintlazarus.co.uk

45 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Grand Chancellery, which is based in Malta, under the auspices of the Grand Chancellor, Chev. Massimo J Ellul GCLJ GCMLJ. Its administrative and legal operations are also based in Edinburgh, Scotland and administered by the Grand Secretary of the United Grand Priories, Chevalier Robin Slack KCLJ KMLJ. From that time onwards, the expansion of the Order on an international level was encouraged and properly overseen by means of a pro-active Grand Chancellery fully authorized to ensure a Global Lazarite presence. In 2009, the United Grand Priories entered into a synergic, collaboration agreement with the Union Corps San Lazare International, based in Vienna, Austria. The latter are a registered nongovernmental organization also spread around the world with an impressive amount of Hospitaller work world wide to their credit. In 2011, the international operations of the Saint Lazarus Corps – Special Rescue Group also entered into a strategic alliance with the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem and is indeed operating from within the offices of the Grand Chancellery of the Order. By 2012, both these Lazarite organisations worldwide had officially joined the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus and both organisations have voting rights within the Supreme Grand Priory of the Order in much the same manner as other Grand Priories of the Order have this right of vote. The year 2012 also saw the Sacred Medical Order of the Knights of Hope unanimously voting to join the United Grand Priories of the Order during the International Lazarite Symposium held in April in the ancient Sacra Infermeria of the Knights of Saint John. The Sacred Medical Order of the Knights of Hope is registered in Ecuador and works world-wide in direct, hands-on medical and Hospitaller work with the needy. 3 The United Grand Priories claims that it has 71 jurisdictions in 58 countries, while its affiliated organizations are represented in a further 16 countries. Many of these are still listed as under formation. The Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem clearly states that it makes no claims, nor has it any pretensions, to be an order of chivalry descended directly from the original Order of Saint Lazarus, but that it has modelled itself upon the traditions and ideals of the ancient, chivalric and hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. It has a number of affiliates. The Special Rescue Group was founded by Maltese first aider David J. Zammit in Malta on the 16th June 1991. The aims of the group were give help to all people without any discrimination; to protect human life and health; and to ensure respect for the human being thus developing the Body, the Mind and the Spirit. It is a voluntary relief movement and not prompted in any way by any desire for any material or any other form of personal gain. Volunteers are given the necessary training to do there job with the section they belong. Members are expected to abide by the rules and regulations of the Special Rescue Group. On the 19th November 2004, the SRG became affiliated with the Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands of the 2004 schismatic group of the Malta Obedience led by Chev. Reginald Attard [vide infra]. The SRG changed its name and insignia to adopt the St. Lazarus Corps designation. In 2007, together with the Grand Priory to which it was affiliated to, joined the Military & Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem under the management of H.R.H Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de Escasany. However, In May 2011, Chev Zammit opted to participate in an investiture of the Grand Priory of Malta of the United Grand Priories during which occasion a Document of Alliance was signed. This led to the expulsion of the SRG-SLC from the MHOSLJ. In April 2012, the Special Rescue Group – Saint Lazarus Corps became an official member of 3

th

Website of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. Retrieved 28 March 2014 from http://www.saintlazarus.org

46 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus and thus gained voting rights within the Supreme Grand Priory of the Order in much the same manner as other Grand Priories of the Order. The Corps is presently operating from within the offices of the Grand Chancellery of the Order. The group started to expand by opening branches in the United States of America, Brazil, Denmark and Germany.4 In February 2007, ten members of the “Delegation Osterrichi” led by Cdr J.C. Steiner and Wolfgang Steinhardt made serious accusations against both principle officers of the Grand Bailiwick of the Military & Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem and requested transfer to the “International Grand Bailiwick”. In spite of attempts to negotiate and settle the issue, the group founded their own Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem by act of notary on the th 12 March in Waidhoven and Thaya. This led to the expulsion of these individuals from the mother Order in August 2007, which also instituted legal proceedings to protect its rights. In response to the Austrian law court verdict, the group changed their name in 2007 to “Corps Saint Lazare Ostarrichi (Sankt Lazarus Korps Ostarrichi) - CSLO”. In March 2008, the CSLO joined the Grand Priory of Austria of the Norwich group on the MHOSLJ, which dissolved the group in September 2008. Mr. Steinhardt left the group and founded on the 16th September 2008 the CORPS SAINT LAZARE INTERNATIONAL (Sankt Lazarus Korps International) with its own insignia. In 2009, the Union Corps San Lazare International, based in Vienna, Austria entered into a synergic, collaboration agreement with the United Grand Priories. By 2012, the CSLJ had officially joined the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus and gained full voting rights within the Supreme Grand Priory of the Order. The LAZARUS UNION is a registered and accredited NGO (Non Governmental Organization, Reg.no. (=Profile Code) 632158) and has been awarded “SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE STATUS” with the United Nations ECOSOC (Economic and Social Council).5 The Sacred Medical Order of the Knights of Hope, a specialised medical chivalric organisation operating in various regions in need throughout the world, unanimously voting to join the United Grand Priories of the Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem during the International Lazarite Symposium held in April 2012 in the ancient Sacra Infermeria of the Knights of Saint John. The Sacred Medical Order of the Knights of Hope is registered in Ecuador and works world-wide in direct, hands-on medical and Hospitaller work with the needy.6 The year 2012, the charitable organization Humanity Healing International, a 501C3 charitable organisation registered in the US and operating mainly in Africa and the Indian sub-continent, initiated a close synergy with the United Grand Priories. In January 2014, Humanity Healing International formally joined the United Grand Priories.7

4

http://www.srgmalta.org/ http://www.lazarus-union.org/ 6 http://smoch.org/ 7 http://humanityhealing.org/ 5

47 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus MHOSLJ – Orléans Obedience previously under the temporal protection of the Royal House of France Another splinter group from the Paris Obedience resulted when a number of jurisdictions refused the candidature of the Duke of Seville during the Chapter General held in Toronto in March 2004. This group on 20th September 2004 sought the Temporal Protection of the Order of the Head of the Royal House of Orleans adopting originally the name of the Orléans Obedience. Confirmation of the Temporal Protection of Henry Comte de Paris was given in the Cathedral of Orléans, during the investiture of his nephew Charles-Philippe d’Orléans as head of this splinter group. In May 2005, His Eminence Cardinal László Paska was officially installed as Spiritual Protector. The group is governed by a Constitutional Charter which was adopted in Prague on 21st day of September, in the year of our Lord 2006. In 2010, Charles-Philippe retired his post and replaced as the 50th Grand Master on the 20th November by Jan Count Dobrzenský z Dobrzenicz. While this group on its website still claims to be under the temporal protection of the Royal House of France [cf.], this protection was withdrawn in 2014.8

Dignitaries of the group GM emeritus Charles-Philippe d’Orleans - General Chaplain Cardinal Dominik Duka - GM Jan Count Dobrzenský z Dobrzenicz

The group is made up of a number of jurisdictions who are represented on the Governing Council: these include: the Grand Prior of France; the Grand Prior of Great Britain; the Grand Prior of Bohemia; the Grand Prior of Hungary; the Grand Prior of Italy; the Grand Priory of Monaco; the Grand Prior of the Netherlands; the Grand Prior of Spain; and the Grand Bailiwick of the United States.

8

http://www.orderofsaintlazarus.com; Communiqué de Monseigneur le Comte de Paris. http://www.lacouronne.org/blog/actualite-royale/communique-de-monseigneur-le-comte-de-paris-12.html

48 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus MHOSLJ – Saint Lazare International There is also another group which calls itself the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem – Saint Lazare International that arose as a result of the 2004 split in the Paris Obedience led by Philippe Piccapietra who now serves as the Grand Chancellor of this branch. This break led to a legal battle in the Swiss Courts that was decided against the group.9 The group originally allied itself to the Orléans Obedience but split off when Charles-Philippe de Orléans was replaced as Grand Master by H.E. Jan Dobrzensky z Dobrzenic in 2010. It presently is under the management of Bishop Richard Garrad as Administrator General.10 It claims to conduct charitable and humanitarian activities in 45 countries and has representatives in 20 countries worldwide. At the international level the Order acts through the ‘Verein des Militärischen und Hospitalischen Ordens des Heiligen Lazarus von Jerusalem International’ (Association of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus International), with its seat in Seedorf, Canton Uri, Switzerland, as its operative legal body. The Association is registered in the commercial register. Military & Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem – Malta Obedience The Malta Obedience under the management of H.R.H Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de Escasany in 2003 initiated a series of organizational reforms. This re-organisation included the enforced retirement of the long-term Grand Chancellor Chev. Reginald S. Attard who had been expelled since he failed to give an account of the finances of the Malta Obedience. This move resulted in a number of jurisdictions declaring their autonomy from the government of the Duke of Seville, and in 2004 broke off and organised themselves under the direction of Chev. R.S. Attard as Vicar General and Dr. Freidrich Schuberth as Grand Chancellor. H.R.H. Prince Pieter Chev. Attard died in 2006 and his place was filled initially by Dr. th Cantacuzino Schuberth and eventually by H.S.H. Dr hc Vittorio Galoppini 37 Duca di Carpenedolo. The post of Grand Custodian is filled by Chev. Attard’s daughter Helen Meli Attard di Calcinato. In June 2013, H.R.H. Prince Pieter Cantacuzino was elected Grand Master at the GMCM in Göddöllö, Hungary with Chev Galoppini being appointed Grand Vicar and Chev Schuberth Grand Senechal. Dame Helen Meli Attard continues to serve as Grand Custodian. The branch claims to have jurisdictions in 25 countries or areas.11

9

nd

Decision in the matter Philippe Piccapietra vs. Walter Schappi dated 2 June 2004, Bern Judicial District, Switzerland, www.st-lazarus.cz/bern_eng.pdf 10 http://www.oslj.org/ 11 http://www.orderofsaintlazarus.org

49 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Constitutional Jurisdictions of Carpanthia of the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem The Grand Priory of Carpathia is an alliance of Jurisdictions of the Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem which are located within Carpathian Basin, or adjacent to it, or historically were part of the Kingdom of Hungary or the Austro-Hungarian Empire.12 Its leaders broke off from the Malta Obedience of the MHOSLJ led by H.R.H Francisco de Paula de Borbón y de Escasany after 2004 following Chev. R.S. Attard. It eventually returned to the mainline fold after 2006, and during the September 2008 Chapter General of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (MHOSLJ), held in the City of Manchester, England assumed the position that "The entire membership of the Commandery of Slovakia is in support of the reunification process and the election H.E. Col. Andrew T. Adam von Rhédey of the new Grandmaster, but we will not support the GCLJ-J, KStJ-J development of the Order into new organization that will be without the historical mandate of the Order, traditional organizational structure, knightly and noble virtues and Christian believes". However, after the publication of the new Constitution of the Malta-Paris United MHOSLJ, the Commandery of Slovakia, led by His Excellency Honorable Col. Andrew T. Adam von Rhédey GCLJ-J, KStJ-J, declared that in "no way" could it support the proposed Constitution, and together with the affiliate the International Green Cross Organization terminated all relations with the United Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem believing that the new Constitution of the United Order transformed the Order into another civic organization parallel to Lions Club, Rotary Club, etc. rather than maintaining its traditional Christian Chivalric Service structure.

12

http://www.lazarusorder.net

50 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Bid to acquire King George V Hospital in Malta Chev. Charles Savona-Ventura Grand Archivist & Historian

King George V Seamen’s Memorial Hospital sited in Floriana just outside the fortifications of Valletta, Malta was originally formally inaugurated by H.E. the Governor of Malta Field Marshal Lord Plumer on the 30th November 1922.1 This 32-bed hospital was build following an appeal by Governor Field Marshall Lord Methuen in August 1918 as a memorial to the men of the Merchant Navy who died in the First World War. 2 The Foundation Stone was laid by Lady Methuen C.B.E. on the 27 th March 1919. The hospital was built and administered by the “Seaman’s Christian Friends Society Hospital Trust” of London. The building site presented difficulties so that while works on the foundations started on the 4th August 1920, the building could only start on the 16 th May 1921 since 48 000 cubic feet of stone needed to be laid in the foundations before work on the superstructure could commence. The responsible architect was Bridgeford Pirie; the contractor Michael Camilleri. The cost for the building amounted to £16 000.3 The original hospital catered for both genders. The male services included one 12-bedded ward, two three-bedded wards, and three single-bedded rooms. For women, the hospital had one six-bedded ward and five single-bedded rooms, one catering for maternity cases. The second floor housed accommodation for the Medical Superintendent [Dr James Milne MB ChB Capt. RAMC], the Matron [Ms. M. Hamilton Watts RRC CMB] and four nurses [including Ms Stubbins CMB; Ms Esther Hamilton Watts; and Ms. Milne CMB]. A significant monetary contribution of £25 000 enabling an annual income of £1000 to cover running costs was made by Captain and Ms. Wisely.4 The building was eventually extended to a capacity of 48 beds. The King George V Seamen’s Memorial Hospital was very severely damaged in April 1942 by enemy action during the Second World War. It was subsequently reconstructed by funds obtained among others from the Scottish Branch of the British Red Cross who contributed over £160 000, the Silver Thimble Fund contributed £27 000, and the Nurse of Britain Gift. The rebuilt larger hospital was inaugurated by Lady Louis Mountbatten on the 30th November 1948. The hospital catered for sick and injured seamen of all nationalities and also many dependants of the service personnel. Maltese patients were admitted when beds were available.

1

The opening of King George V Merchant Seamen’s Memorial Hospital, Malta. Daily Malta Chronicle, 30th November 1922 2 The Times [of Malta], 12th September 1918 3 Malta Hospital opened – Merchant Seamen’s War Service. The Times [of Malta], 1st December 1922 4 Daily Malta Chronicle, 30th November 1922.

51 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

King George V Seaman’s Memorial Hospital

In the early 1960s, financial constraints were being felt though the managing trust – the Seaman’s Christian Friend Society Hospital Trust – resisted the closure of the hospital in Malta since it was believed that it still had a functional role within the health care delivery system in Malta. A Maltese Council of Management was established under the presidency of H.E. the Governor Sir Maurice Dorman GCMG GCVO.4 Early in 1966, a memorandum was drawn up explaining the needs for the future and set up a Medical Management committee in London under the chairmanship of Sir Clement Price Thomas, then President of the British Medical Association. In spite of efforts to find financial support to maintain the hospital, the Trust decided that the hospital would have to be closed down or to be transferred to the Malta Government. On the 17 th November 1966, Sir Price Thomas sent a letter to the Maltese Minister of Health Dr. Alexander Cachia Zammit suggesting that the hospital would be taken over by the government indicating that the Trust were in concordance with this proposal. The trustees decided to close down the hospital on the 31 st January 1967. The Maltese Council of Management prepared a Memorandum for the future of the King George V Hospital where all the options were laid out.5 The closure of KGV Hospital was discussed during the third council meeting of the Commandery of Malta of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem on the 18 th May 1967.6 During 4

The Managing Committee included: Presdent – H.E. Sir Maurice Dorman; Chairman – Paul Sciberras; Secretary – Surgeon Major R.L. Casolani; Members: Dr. Eddie A. Agius; Rev. J.R.L. Ash; Mrs C. Coleiro; J.J. Conroy; Prof. A.J. Craig; Prof. J.E. Debono; Josephine Debono; Capt. M. Everard; J.A. Harding; RN Surg.Crd Dr. J. Kirkpatrick; J.A. Maitland; Rev. J.M. Milne; Rev. Fr. P. Serracino Inglott; Hon. Dr. Vincent Tabone, Rev. Carmelo Xuereb; and H.E. Sir John Martin; and ex-officio: Matron KGV – J.T. Purcell and Treasurer KGV – R.D. Fiddaman. 5 Letter from the Governor General Sir Maurice Dorman to Lt.Col. J.V. Abela OBE dated 19th July 1967 with several enclosures. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta 6 The Commandery of Malta of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem was set up th with ten founder members on the 30 September 1966. The founder members included: Col. Joseph Vincent Abela [b.1903; d.1975; ad.1964] – Commander of Malta; Elias Zammit KLJ [ad.1967 – GC No. 2] – Hon. Treasurer; Anthony Zammit CLJ [d.2009; ad.1967 – GC No. 3]; Anthony Miceli-Farrugia KLJ [b.1914; d.2002;

52 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus this meeting, it was suggested that the Commandery should endeavour to interest a number of industrialists to finance the running of the hospital under the auspices of the Order. Should the financial outlay outstrip the resources of the Commandery, an alternative proposal was to run the establishment as a clinic. A decision was taken to set up an investigative commission which will seek to make representations to the Governor General. The Commission made up of Sir Hannibal Scicluna, Prof. J.V. ZammitMaempel and Anthony Miceli Farrugia met to discuss the matter on the 13th June 1967, wherein A. Miceli-Farrugia reported on his representations made to J.A. Maitland representing the previous KGV Hospital Managing Committee and to the Hon. Minister of Health. Both had expressed themselves in favour of the project. 7 A delegation from the Commandery of Malta made up of Col. J.V. Abela, J. Amato-Gauci, A. Miceli-Farrugia, Prof. J.V. Zammit-Maempel and Sir Hannibal P. Scicluna met on the 19th June with the Governor General. The proposed plan for the management of KGV Hospital to be taken over by the Order of St Lazarus was warmly received. The outcome of the meeting was reported to LtCol Robert Gayre Grand Bailiff General and Commissioner General of the Order wherein a request was made for the support of other jurisdictions and individual members of the Order.8 In response to this meeting, on the 19th July, the Governor General sent a number of enclosures relating to the history and management of KGV Hospital.9 A further meeting was held by the Hospitaller Commission of the Commandery of Malta with the Governor General with LtCol Gayre and J.A. Maitland in attendance. On the 9 th August 1967, LtCol Gayre made several proposals as to future required actions, including the setting up by the Commandery of Malta of a Hospitaller Commission which would eventually serve as the Board of Directors for the Hospital and a Management Committee which would be eventually responsible to the day-to-day running of the hospital. A Board of Trustees would be responsible for the hospital funds. The latter was to be made up of: the Grand Master of the Order, the Commissioner-General, the Grand Bailiffs of England and Scotland, the Grand Administrator of the Order, and further members nominated by the Commandery of Malta, the Governor-General, the Malta Minister of Health, and the Scottish Red Cross. The scheduled timeline was to finalise discussion by September 1967, with a view of the Order assuming control of the hospital by the 1 st January 1968 and opening fully functional hospital by March 1968. The proposed funding was to come through the adoption of beds by various jurisdictions of the Order, the business community of Malta, paying patients, private trusts such as the Nuffield Foundation, and the British Government. 10

ad.1967- GC No. 54] – Referendary; Robert Biasini dei Conti Stagno Navarra KLJ [b.1904; d.1995; ad.1967 – GC No.55] – Chancellor; Prof. Canon Carmelo Muscat KLJ [b.1926; ad.1967] – Chaplain; Prof. J.V. ZammitMaempel KLJ [b.1912; d.2001; ad.1967 – GC No. 59] – Hospitaller; Ms. Evelyn Abela OLJ [ad.1967 – GC No. 56]; Major Albert Edward Abela OLJ [b.1932; d.2007; ad.1967 – GC No. 57]; Joseph Amato Gauci KLJ [b.1909; d.1995; ad.1967 – GC No. 150] – Hon. Secretary. They were supported by Chev. Sir Hannibal P. Scicluna [b.1880; d.1981; ad.1962 – GC No. 127] who was a member of the Scottish Grand Bailiwick. 7 Minutes of the Third Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 18 th May 1967. Minutes of an Unofficial Meeting held on the 13th June 1967. Grand Priory-MHOSLJ Archives, Malta 8 Letter from Sir Hannibal P. Scicluna to LtCol Gayre dated 20 th June 1967. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta 9 Vide footnote 6 above. 10 Letter from LtCol Gayre to Mr J. Amato Gauci dated 9th August 1967. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta

53 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus While the Malta Minister of Health was interested in the proposal and the offer to use the Order’s contacts and influence with the original Seaman’s Christian Friend Society Hospital Trust, he appeared reluctant to commit the Government as to what part the Order would play in the management of the reopened hospital. LtCol Gayre requested a Letter of Intent from the Government of Malta to be in a legally viable position to open negotiations with the original Trust. 11 The apparent impasse was discussed by the Council of the Commandery of Malta on the 28 th September. During that meeting, it was reported that the Archbishop had been informed and had given his approval for the Order’s plans for KGV Hospital. During the subsequent Council Meeting of 9th November, LtCol Gayre informed the Council that while the Order as a whole was ready to finance the running of the hospital, the Minister of Health had given a negative reply to the request for a Letter of Intent necessary for the Order to enter into negotiations.12 KGV Hospital reverted to the Malta Government on the 27th November 1967.13 In spite of a number of representations made to the Governor-General and the Minister of Health by representatives of the Order, no progress was registered in obtaining a Letter of Intent from the Malta Government. At the Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta on the 10th October 1968, a decision was made for a delegation to visit the Minister of Health. The meeting was held on the 21st October 1968. During this meeting, the Minister asked for a formal request from the Order to take over KGV Hospital stating clearly the purpose the hospital will be used for and who will be the intended beneficiaries. The Order was to provide proof of having sufficient funds to support the necessary restorations needed. It appeared that other organizations had shown an interest in acquiring the hospital as well. This formal application was sent to the Minister of Health on the 2 nd November 1968.14 No response was forthcoming from the Government to the formal application. During the Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta on the 6th February 1969, the general impression obtained after informal talks with the Secretary to the Minister of Health was that the Order’s application to take over the management of KGV Hospital had little chance of being considered. It was opinioned that the Sovereign Military Order of Malta may have also shown as interest in acquiring the property. A request was made to Chev. Surgeon Rear-Admiral D.P. Gurd to approach the Minister of Health to stress the continuing interest of the Order in acquiring KGV Hospital. Failing this, the Order would withdraw its formal application. 15

11

Letter from Ms. A. Morrison Private secretary to the Grand Bailiff General to Mr. J. Amato Gauci Private Secretary to H.E. Governor General dated 28th August 1967. Letter from Ms. A. Morrison to Mr J. Amato Gauci dated 12th October 1967. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. Chev. J. Amato-Gauci was also the Honorary Secretary of the Commandery of Malta. 12 Minutes of the Fourth Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 28 th September 1967. Minutes of the Fifth Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 9 th November 1967. Grand Priory-MHOSLJ Archives, Malta 13 PQ 3849: Hon. K. Agius MP to Hon. Minister of Health. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta 14 Minutes of the Ninth Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 21st October 1968. Grand PrioryMHOSLJ Archives, Malta; Letter from J.V. Abela to LtCol Gayre dated 21st October 1968. Letter signed by members of the Commandery of Malta to Hon. Dr. Alexander Cachia Zammit Minister of Health dated 2nd November 1968. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. 15 Minutes of the Tenth Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 6 th February 1969. Grand PrioryMHOSLJ Archives, Malta. In fact during the first General Chapter of SMOM held on the 19-21st June 1967, the Grand Master of SMOM stated “Des accords ont été conclus, et sont en train de se realiser, pour la

54 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus Rear-Admiral Gurd16 met with the Minister of Health Dr. Cachia Zammit on the 21 st February 1969. He was reassured that the Government was still positively disposed towards the application made by the Order of St. Lazarus though there were still some reservations that needed to be ironed out. The proposal had to be submitted to the Government Cabinet who had to decide whether the Malta Government was to assume full responsibility for KGV Hospital or devolve the responsibility to a managing organization.17 The report of that meeting was presented to the Council of the Commandery of Malta on the 5th March 1969 and forwarded to the Minister of Health on 7 th March 1969. During that Council Meeting, Col. J.V. Abela informed the members that Barclays Bank was prepared to authorize an advance of £10 000 – 25 000 provided suitable guarantors were available. It was stated that to date the Grand Master was ready to guarantee £500, LtCol Gayre £1000, Chev. Zammit £50 and Col. Abela £500. Further guarantors were to be found to make available the necessary funds.18 On the 31st May 1969, the Malta Government announced that a decision had been made to take over the management of KGV Hospital.19 On the 6th June 1969, the Commandery of Malta representing the Order informed the Minister of Health that the Order was withdrawing its offer to assume the management of King George V Hospital.20 The hospital renamed Sir Paul Boffa Hospital reopened in December 1970 under the management of the Department of Health.21 The hospital has a symmetrical façade consisting of a central colonnaded portico with an identical terrace at first floor. The wings are plain having five windows at both ground and first floor on each side. Built in the shape of the letter "H" with an additional block erected later, the building is practically surrounded with a veranda at ground floor and a terrace at first floor, all columned and having wrought iron railings. On the left side are a series of utility buildings, some of which are not as old as the hospital. Within the hospital are a number of inscriptions and Second World War relics, including a piece of sculpture from Parliament House in London. Of note are the stained glass windows in the chapel. The Government Regulatory body MEPA has scheduled King George V Seaman’s Memorial Hospital as a Grade 2 national monument as per Government Notice no. 628/08 in the Government Gazette dated July 21, 2008.

constitution de Dispensaires Anti-dibétiques, d’une banque de sang et pour assumer la gestion de l’Hôpital King George, (sex deux derniéres initiatives relevent de l’Association Maltaise”. Cf J.V. Zammit-Maelpel. Collected papers on Diabetes in Malta and its cardiovascular complications and some cardiological topics. University Press, Malta, 1979, p.ix. 16 Surgeon Rear Admiral Dudley P. Gurd QHS, MD, MCH, FRCS, FRACS[Oph], DOMS, Medical Officer-in-charge, Royal Naval Hospital, Malta. Admitted KLJ to the Order of St. Lazarus GC No. 129 17 Report of a meeting between Rear Admiral D.P. Gurd and the Hon. Minister of Health Dr. Cachia Zammit held on the 21st February 1969 presented to the Council of the Commandery of Malta on the 5 th March 1969 and forwarded to the Minister of Health on 7th March 1969. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. Dr Cachia Zammit denied ever having received any offer by the Order of St. Lazarus to manage King George V Hospital. Vide: PQ 5318 dated 7th April 1969. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. 18 Minutes of the Eleventh Council Meeting of the Commandery of Malta dated 5 th March 1969. Grand PrioryMHOSLJ Archives, Malta. Circular No. 4/69 to members of the Commandery of Malta and subsequent response letters. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. In the subsequent days, other members of the Commandery of Malta accepted to serve as guarantors: Prof. Canon C. Muscat £100; and Ant. Miceli-Farrugia £1000. 19 st Il-Haddiem, 31 May 1969. 20 th Letter from J. Amato-Gauci Commandery secretary to Hon. Dr. A. Cachia Zammit Minister of Health dated 4 June 1969. Torri ta’ Lanzun MHOSJ Archives, Malta. 21 Malta Year Book. De La Salle Brothers Publ., Malta, 1971, p.39

55 | P a g e


The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus

56 | P a g e


Profile for MHOSLJ_Library

The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus: Part 1  

General History of the Order

The Modern Order of Saint Lazarus: Part 1  

General History of the Order

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded