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VOLUME 1 - ISSUE 3 AUTUMN 2021

W I N G S PA N

MAKING CONNECTIONS ONE RELATIONSHIP AT A TIME

CONNECTING WITH A WORLDWIDE ECOSYSTEM OF SUPPORT

How MHIRJ’s Customer Response Center connects customers with a global network of support, 24/7

ON A PATH TO GROWTH WITH GOJET

By flying the revolutionary CRJ550 aircraft for United Airlines, GoJet sets the stage for market growth

BROADENING HORIZONS IN WEST VIRGINIA

The expansion of MHIRJ’s West Virginia Service Center broadens opportunities for airlines, employees and the people of the Mountain State


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

ISSUE THREE

W I N G S PA N MÉLANIE FILIATREAULT

WINGSPAN Publisher Manager, Marketing Communications and Branding MHI RJ Aviation Group

NATHALIE SCOTT

WINGSPAN Managing Editor Manager, Corporate Communications and Media Relations MHI RJ Aviation Group

Making Connections

Welcome to the third issue of WINGSPAN!

When most of us think of being connected, our thoughts usually turn to the connectivity that technology allows or the global nature of business. But we are obviously all connected physically, as evidenced by the worldwide spread of the pandemic. However, the same event that has caused so much isolation for people everywhere and so many setbacks for the aviation industry, has shown us that being connected is actually the path forward. Through partnerships, alliances and collaboration, air travel is making its way back to profitability.

It’s with great excitement and pride that I introduce myself as the new Managing Editor of WINGSPAN. Like the theme of this issue, my career in aviation has shown me the importance of connecting with people and building relationships. The past 18 months have highlighted this more than anything I have ever experienced. As Managing Editor, I’m thrilled to be part of the WINGSPAN team and the opportunity to connect with you, our readers, with content that is relevant, meaningful, enlightening, and fun.

The actions taken over the past 18 months by our industry are testament to how we can pull together for the greater good. As a proud member of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, at MHIRJ, we understand explicitly that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Already, the synergies we have begun to explore with our parent organization are showing that the possibilities for the future are infinite.

I believe WINGSPAN plays a unique role in our industry as a “connector” – the social equivalent of a computer network hub as defined by author Malcolm Gladwell in his widely acclaimed book, The Tipping Point. Put simply, WINGSPAN is a two-way street and a dialogue between industry colleagues. We’re about catering to your needs and creating bonds that last – one reader at a time.

I will conclude with these words written 400 years ago by John Donne that remind us that we are all part of something greater than ourselves and that every success or failure reflects on every member of this industry - No Man is an Island.

Let’s continue the conversation. Let us know your thoughts and share your feedback.

No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as any manner of thy friends or of thine own were; any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.

MAKING CONNECTIONS ONE RELATIONSHIP AT A TIME

02 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

On a final note, I’d like to thank our contributors for their efforts and the entire WINGSPAN staff for their creativity and expertise. I’m looking forward to collaborating with the team on many more issues. If you have any topic suggestions, please write to us at: wingspan@MHIRJ.com. Enjoy the read!


MAKING CONNECTIONS

Table of Contents ON THE COVER*

Under the theme of Making Connections – One Relationship at a Time, this issue of WINGSPAN speaks to the relationships MHIRJ is forging around the world with customers, employees, governments, and suppliers.

2

Welcome to Issue 3 of WINGSPAN

16

How the installation of the IOC cards without the correct software can cause multiple engine-indicating and crewalerting system (EICAS) messages and inoperable systems

17

Letter from the Publisher and Managing Editor

4

Shaping the Future

An insightful interview with Elio Ruggi, Senior Vice-President, Head of Aircraft Development and Quality, MHIRJ

5

Making Connections

6

On a Path to Growth with GoJet

As the current sole operator of the revolutionary CRJ550 aircraft, GoJet is at the forefront of redefining the passenger experience with United Airlines

8

How Industry Collaboration Can Kickstart Green Hydrogen Partnering to convert the site of a former coal-fired power plant into a 100MW hydrogen project in Europe

10

Connecting with a Worldwide Ecosystem of Support

A look inside MHIRJ’s 24/7 Customer Response Center

12

13

Technical Pages

Helpful articles on technical best practices, solutions to issues reported by operators, general tips, plus more

Input Output Concentrator PN 822-2065-001

Aircraft Winterization and Cold Weather Recommended Practices The hazards involved when operating in winter weather conditions and suggested precautions to take

18

Successfully Navigating the Recovery

Month after month, the CRJ Series fleet has delivered a superior Schedule Completion Rate (SCR) and a steadily climbing utilization recovery

20

Broadening Horizons in West Virginia

MHIRJ’s $20M investment in its WV facility presents new opportunities for airlines, facility employees and the people of the Mountain State

23

In Brief

23

Introducing STC & RDA Capabilities for CRJ Operators & Beyond

24

Up and Coming Events

25

Contact Information

A snapshot of the latest news, awards and movements at MHIRJ

Ongoing support to keep you flying

6

GPS and Radio Altimeter Interference and Impacts on Aircraft Systems

Operating the CRJ550 aircraft, GoJet has emerged from the downturn stronger and equipped to grow market share.

How to monitor the effects of interference, ways to mitigate the effects, and recommended practices to follow

14

Alternate On-Wing Software Upload Tool

Looking at an alternate procedure and tool to upload Input Output Table and TSS4100 software

15

Using the Right Tool to Reduce Aircraft Ground Time

Reviewing the two specific tools required to conduct wiring continuity and insulation checks

W I N G S PA N

AUTUMN 2021 MHIRJ Publisher Mélanie Filiatreault Managing Editor Nathalie Scott Senior Editor Cameron Miller Technical Editor Nathalie Chabot Copy Editor Stephanie Bento Picture Editor Stella Weiler CONTACT INFORMATION MHIRJ 3655, Avenue des Grandes Tourelles, Suite 110 Boisbriand, Qc, J7H 0E2 wingspan@MHIRJ.com MHIRJ.COM WINGSPAN is produced by ATMOSPHERE Event Communications President Jason Katz Associate Publisher Steve Robins Senior Project Manager Karine LaRocque Artistic Director Wendy Bishop Dynamic Content Producer Israel Bonequi

To subscribe to WINGSPAN, write to WINGSPAN@MHIRJ.com

WINGSPAN is published quarterly and can be found at mhirj.com and www.issuu.com

8

Green hydrogen hubs are sprouting up in Europe, creating a hydrogen future for the region and beyond.

* Elements of cover image furnished by NASA

CRJ, RJ, CRJ Series, CRJ200, CRJ550, CRJ700, CRJ900, CRJ1000, MHIRJ, MHIRJ ATMOSPHÈRE, Aero Advisory Services, MHIRJ Aerospace Engineering Center, MHIRJ WINGSPAN and Move The World Forward are trademarks of MHI RJ Aviation ULC or its affiliates. The information in this document is proprietary to MHI RJ Aviation ULC or its affiliates. This document does not constitute an offer, commitment, representation, guarantee or warranty of any kind. This document must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of MHI RJ Aviation ULC. All rights reserved © 2021 MHI RJ Aviation ULC.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 03


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

AN INSIGHTFUL INTERVIEW WITH

ELIO RUGGI

SHAPING THE FUTURE

Elio has over 25 years of Aerospace experience in Engineering, Operational, and Executive Strategic Leadership roles. Currently at MHIRJ as Senior Vice-President, Head of Aircraft Development and Quality, he holds the strategic and technical responsibility for Product Safety, Engineering, Product Strategy, Design, Repair, Certification, Testing, Quality, Flight Ops and Technical Publications. A strategic leader responsible for end-to-end Product Strategy, Elio is recognized for building strong team networks, for bringing continuous strategic improvements to meet evolving business requirements, and for implementing step-change evolutions to adapt team culture and mind-sets. He is results-driven and known for his accountability and for consistently achieving or exceeding results year after year. In an industry that is known for being tough but rewarding, Elio shares a passion with his colleagues in continually seeking to find ways to make regional air travel safe and accessible with the purpose of bringing people together worldwide. Elio leads the Product Development Team that collaborates closely with the MHIRJ Aftermarket Team and CRJ Series operators, developing solutions that help operators improve their business, reduce costs from their operations and remain competitive. “I think that the most important thing that MHIRJ brings to the CRJ platform is continuity. It’s so important that our customers understand that we were here before, we’re here now and we’re going to be here tomorrow.” In addition, he leads the Aerospace Engineering Center, which takes the expertise, knowledge and methodology developed over the last 30 years and for the first time, offers full product lifecycle capabilities as a service. Born in Montreal, Canada, Elio is a proud husband and a father of two girls. His passions include aviation, music, running, swimming, travel and cooking. He holds an Engineering degree, speaks five languages, and is known for bringing leadership, commitment, innovation, professionalism and expertise to issues, roundtable discussions and conferences. He was part of the Industry Advisory Board at Concordia University, and has been the Campaign Director of the annual Centraide fundraising campaign for many years.

04 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

MAKING CONNECTIONS ONE RELATIONSHIP AT A TIME Every day the world is becoming increasingly more connected through travel, technology and communications. Global relationships

are being refined and redefined as the pace of change and opportunity accelerate. This volume of WINGSPAN celebrates the connections MHIRJ is making with our customers, employees, governments, suppliers and communities where we operate in our mission to move the world forward.

With over 1,300 CRJ aircraft flying and more than 140 operators, we connect people with communities. We connect with suppliers to enable powerful collaboration and work together with integrity, fairness, respect and excellence. And, we connect our customers to the support they need to keep flying through our Global Service Network, Training Centers, Regional Support Offices, a 24/7 Customer Response Center and Parts Depot located in key aviation hubs. This holistic, interconnected support ecosystem links expertise across various critical disciplines like no other. We are also committed to connecting with you, our readers. We are here for you with valuable industry insights, technical content and solutions, and new information about products and services. At MHIRJ we never see anything in isolation, but in connection with someone or something else. Today and tomorrow, we will continue to build and nurture relationships that connect people, places and communities on a global scale. Please send us your comments at: wingspan@mhirj.com

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 05


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

ON A PATH TO GROWTH WITH

GoJet Contributed by: Pierre Gagnon, Director, Business Development, Aftermarket Commercial Services

The world of aviation is undergoing unprecedented change. But with change comes opportunity. No regional airline illustrates the benefits of embracing change like GoJet Airlines, which has reinvented itself through its association with United Airlines and MHIRJ. Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, GoJet flies to over 50 destinations in the U.S. throughout the East Coast and Midwest, proudly flying for United Express. As the current sole operator of the revolutionary CRJ550 aircraft, GoJet is at the forefront of redefining the passenger experience by offering the world’s only two-cabin 50-seat regional aircraft, specifically designed for business and leisure travelers who want true first-class seating. This new aircraft version elevates the travel experience for passengers, providing GoJet with an exciting path forward to growth in partnership with United Airlines. Established in late 2004 by Trans States Holdings, GoJet initially flew United Express branded flights out of United Airlines’s Chicago O’Hare hub to replace departing United Express carrier Atlantic Coast 06 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

Airlines. In 2005, GoJet took delivery of their first CRJ700 aircraft and began scheduled passenger services. When the CRJ550 concept was developed in 2018, United Airlines quickly recognized the potential of

this aircraft for their regional network and gave GoJet the go-ahead for 54 aircraft. GoJet will acquire an additional 20 aircraft bringing the total fleet to 74 CRJ550 aircraft flying for United Airlines by fall of 2022.


WHY CUSTOMERS LOV EF LY IN G

MAKING CONNECTIONS

ore legroom per seat t han 50: M 5 any RJ C oth E er H T 50 -se at

“Our customers are telling us they love flying the CRJ550 and we’re excited to continue growing our fleet and our long-standing relationship with GoJet.” Sarah Murphy, United’s Senior Vice-President of United Express

A WHOLE NEW WAY TO

Go

A first-of-its-kind, the CRJ550 is the only premium 50-seater in the regional market with first-class seating. The CRJ550 offers passengers many enhancements not available on larger regional jets flying in the marketplace today. For example, it has more overall legroom per seat than any other 50-seat aircraft flown by a U.S. airline as well as more overall legroom for premium customers than any regional aircraft in the market today, space for every customer to bring a roller bag on board, a self-serve refreshment center, and the ability to stay connected while in flight with United Wi-Fi.

air cr aft

•P as se ng er s

ca nb rin ht go flig ne n i roll ble er b aila v a i ag onb F oard • United Wi

This new direction in fleet strategy has been incredibly positive for GoJet and United Airlines. “Feedback from customers has been fantastic,” said Rick Leach, President and Chief Executive Officer of GoJet Airlines. “United’s decision to add more of these aircraft so quickly after the initial product launch is indicative of their long-term commitment to both the CRJ550 platform and to GoJet. We look forward to growing this exciting program with United.” ACCOLADES FROM PASSENGERS AND PARTNERS As a testament to its growth potential for GoJet, the CRJ550 has one of the highest passenger acceptance ratings in United Airlines’ entire fleet. “Our customers are telling us they love flying the CRJ550 and we’re excited to continue growing our

fleet and our long-standing relationship with GoJet,” said Sarah Murphy, United’s Senior Vice-President of United Express. “We congratulate GoJet on the success of the CRJ550 program and we look forward to offering travelers more opportunities to experience this aircraft.” A WIN/WIN/WIN SITUATION With its unique market position as the only operator of CRJ550 aircraft, GoJet is coming out of the downturn stronger and equipped to grow market share. It is truly a win/ win/win situation for GoJet, United Airlines and MHIRJ. Together, GoJet, United and MHIRJ are connecting passengers to their destinations via a new class of regional travel that customers value, putting all three partners on a path to growth. MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 07


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

Europe has long been a leader in pioneering sustainable energy sources like wind and solar, and the rise of clean hydrogen is no exception. Several green – generated from renewables – hydrogen hubs have sprung up across Europe, forming the green shoots of a hydrogen future for the region and beyond. But, while these pioneering projects could kickstart clean hydrogen adoption at scale, collaboration between industry, policymakers, utilities, engineers and many other partners is key to their success. 

HAMBURG GREEN HYDROGEN HUB

As green hydrogen is emissions-free when produced, and emits only water when combusted, it is seen as a vital part of efforts to decarbonize areas of the economy that cannot be simply electrified. And while the idea of a hydrogen economy is nothing new, with production costs tumbling, a favorable EU policy framework and a growing imperative to switch to sustainable energy, the race to scale up collaborative green hydrogen infrastructure projects is on. 

LIKE MINDS

COLLABORATION AT WORK

One such collaboration opportunity is the Green Hydrogen Hub in Hamburg, which Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) Group, the parent company of MHIRJ, is looking to develop in partnership with Shell, wind energy major Vattenfall and local municipal company Wärme Hamburg. The four partners have signed a letter of intent to explore the feasibility of converting the site of a former coal-fired power plant into a 100MW hydrogen project that could begin producing clean hydrogen by 2025.

While there is work still to do before green hydrogen can compete on price with other fuels, things are changing fast. Production costs have fallen by 40% since 2015, according to an IHS Markit report, and carbon-free hydrogen could be costcompetitive by 2030. But it is the potential to decarbonize an entire industrial cluster on a single site that is driving the agenda of projects like Hamburg, bringing together partners from different sectors working toward a common goal. 

At the heart of the site in Hamburg’s Moorburg district, an electrolyzer would produce green hydrogen with an initial output of 100MW powered by renewable energy from solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and wind farms in the North Sea. Once completed, the electrolyzer would be one of the largest plants in Europe and a medium-to-long-term increase of its capacity to 500MW and beyond is already under consideration. A feasibility study will look into the smart integration of a hydrogen production facility with the site’s former coal-fired power plant; it will also look at storage possibilities and connections with future transportation infrastructure under 08 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

development by local gas grid operator Gasnetz Hamburg. A future green hydrogen hub on the site could eventually supply hydrogen and heat to the city of Hamburg and help decarbonize the region’s industry and transport systems. The study will explore ways to utilize all forms of waste heat from the electrolyzer project – such as using surplus thermal energy for the city’s heat supply – to maximize energy efficiency. “The establishment of a green hydrogen hub that is fully integrated into Hamburg’s industrial infrastructure would show Europe, and the world, that the hydrogen economy is real and that it can make a significant contribution to the decarbonization of the energy system and heavy industry,” said Kentaro Hosomi, Executive Vice-President, Chief Regional Officer, Europe, Middle East & Africa at MHI.

The Hamburg Hydrogen Network (Wasserstoff-Verbund Hamburg) brings together twelve partners, including those involved in the Hamburg Green Hydrogen Hub, with the unique aim of mapping the entire hydrogen value chain, from the renewable energy that will power the electrolysis process to consumption of hydrogen by consumers. This would see onshore and offshore wind farms to the city’s north ensure a secure supply of clean energy to generate hydrogen, which can be transported using some existing infrastructure to connect the area’s high density of large off-takers. Global steelmaker ArcelorMittal has its sights set on developing the world’s first industrial-


MAKING CONNECTIONS

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER

HOW INDUSTRY COLLABORATION CAN KICKSTART

GREEN HYDROGEN Above left: Hamburg Green Hydrogen Hub, four partners aim to convert a former coal-fired power plant site into a 100MW hydrogen project (https://spectra.mhi.com/how-industry-collaboration-can-kickstart-green-hydrogen)

scale production of hydrogen-based steel in Hamburg, for example. Hydrogen’s potential to help decarbonize hard-to-electrify sectors means heavy industry, aviation and the port cluster look set to play a prominent role in the hub’s development. Clusters located near multiple potential hydrogen customers can realize economies of scale and reduce the costs of hydrogen production, according to McKinsey’s Hydrogen Insights report. By collaborating on the Hamburg project, the companies involved can also share the risk and make it easier to attract investment across the hydrogen value chain. By working together across this value chain − from first production to final use − the companies involved in the Hamburg hub hope to answer several key questions: how much of the existing infrastructure from the Moorburg site can be used to produce energy from renewables? Are the necessary logistics chains and storage options for hydrogen feasible? What policy decisions will provide a suitable environment to scale up Hamburg’s green hydrogen hub?

“The establishment of a green hydrogen hub that is fully integrated into Hamburg’s industrial infrastructure would show Europe, and the world, that the hydrogen economy is real and that it can make a significant contribution to the decarbonization of the energy system and heavy industry,” Kentaro Hosomi, Executive Vice-President, Chief Regional Officer, Europe, Middle East & Africa at MHI

It is no coincidence that the project is located in an industrial heartland with no end of power-hungry consumers, and there are plans to extend hydrogen infrastructure to the nearby port within 10 years, linking it to international shipping markets and potentially connecting to air transport routes. The sea link could see both the Moorburg site and the wider port area receiving hydrogen imports by sea in future. Hamburg’s hub could become a gateway to extend the supply network to other parts of Germany and beyond, helping to lay the foundations of the country’s hydrogen future. And other similar clusters are dotted across Europe. Hubs from Hamburg to the UK’s Humber region are best placed to overcome the challenges associated with launching a green hydrogen economy, such as current high costs, low density and a propensity to leak when transported, demonstrating hydrogen’s potential as well as its business case. The European Commission plans to halve EU greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, leaving a hydrogen-shaped hole for more sustainable fuels. Hydrogen could account for more than 13% of Europe’s energy mix by mid-century, according to the European Commission’s strategy, up from around 2% today. With hydrogen high on the energy sector’s agenda, the International Energy Agency will release The World’s Roadmap to Net Zero by 2050 report this month, a call to action guiding governments, companies, investors and citizens on urgent action needed to decarbonize the energy sector by mid-century. With collaboration from policymakers, energy companies and numerous other stakeholders, the journey to a clean energy future has already started, turning talk of a hydrogen economy into reality. As a division of MHI, we are very proud to be part of a company that has such a forward-thinking vision toward sustainability and the environment. Throughout the year, we will share more initiatives taken by MHI to make the world a better place. This article was previously published in SPECTRA @ https://spectra.mhi.com/howindustry-collaboration-can-kickstart-greenhydrogen

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 09


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

At MHIRJ, supporting more than

CONNECTING WITH A WORLDWIDE ECOSYSTEM OF SUPPORT Contributed by: Daniel Parente, Manager, Customer Response Center and Mobile Repair Team

10 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

1,300 aircraft that carry over 100 million passengers annually is not a responsibility we take lightly.

To help ensure that airlines operating CRJ aircraft keep flying reliably and safely, MHIRJ has built a worldwide ecosystem of support with our Customer Response Center (CRC) at its core. The point of entry of all technical and parts-related issues regarding the CRJ Fleet, the CRC stands ready 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to provide comprehensive, live support. A customer support “command center,” the CRC is comprised of two main groups – the Technical Help Desk and Material Services. The Technical Help Desk is the first line of action for any technical request, handling some 400 emails/calls per day and 15,000 technical cases per year.


MAKING CONNECTIONS

OEM SPECIALISTS Comprised of seasoned aviation professionals averaging 25 years of experience, CRC personnel come from a variety of backgrounds. This includes mechanic and avionics professionals who have worked on the CRJ Series production line, to people with backgrounds in Heavy Checks, MRO and general aviation. These experts specialize in urgent AOG (Aircraft on Ground) situations as well as routine queries and provide immediate support that extends from troubleshooting aircraft to diagnosing and remedying technical issues, dispatching on-the-ground engineering assistance or shipping a much-needed component. These specialists are also backed by representatives from MHIRJ warranty, operations, engineering support and material logistics to ensure a truly comprehensive approach to solving AOGs.

Technical Publication

Field Service Representative

Training

Mobile Repair Team

Service Center Network

In-Service Engineering System

TECHNICAL HELP DESK

Customer Request

Maintenance Engineering Airworthiness

Flight Ops

In-Service Engineering Structures

Program Office

Material Logistics

EXPERTS WORKING IN COLLABORATION

MOBILE RESPONSE TEAM

Once a call enters the CRC, our agent relies on the MHIRJ network of in-house experts to provide the assistance required and at the level of urgency requested. Due to the nature of the requests, the most significant interaction will reside with In-Service Engineering, which mainly consists of ATA Specialists in Systems and Structural Design and Stress Engineers. MHIRJ In-Service Engineering is part of the DAO 20-Q-01 under Transport Canada, which allows issuing of engineering repairs under the delegation of Transport Canada.

When the unexpected happens, the Mobile Response Team is ready and equipped to provide immediate solutions. Supported by a Parts Services Team, they ensure that all repairs are executed correctly and immediately. The CRC Technical Help Desk interacts directly with Mobile Response Team Project Managers to coordinate and dispatch an onsite team to support the structural repair of the aircraft wherever assistance is needed. Through this collaboration, highly trained teams that are tailored to a customer’s repair needs are deployed anywhere in the world. All MHIRJ Mobile Repair Project Managers have accumulated years of experience in various CRJ Structural Modification programs, giving customers total confidence that their aircraft will be repaired to the highest OEM standards.

Using advanced 3D designs, the In-Service team will develop the most efficient repair including stress, static analysis and DTA, using proprietary design from production drawings and stress certification reports, assuring the optimal solution for the customer’s needs.

MHIRJ’s global ecosystem of support network leverages 30 years of OEM CRJ expertise, data and knowledge, to help customers optimize their operations and keep flying. IT TAKES A TEAM In addition to this staff of experts, the MHIRJ customer response ecosystem includes dedicated Field Service Representatives, Materials Services and Mobile Response Teams who work hand-in-hand with the CRC to resolve AOG issues. For example, when the CRC receives a call for repair assistance, it will contact MHIRJ Material Services to see if a replacement part is available for the engineering team to complete the job. Or, an MHIRJ Field Service Representative, who is either onsite or has access to the customer, will be called on to facilitate the communication and expedite the return to service of an aircraft. For field support to be effective, each team needs to be close to the customer. MHIRJ has created teams of field support specialists near our customers. Each team includes a Field Service Representative who is ready and qualified to assist in managing any technical issues with the aircraft. LINKED TO GLOBAL MATERIALS SUPPORT Fast, reliable and cost-effective delivery of aircraft parts is essential to a fleet’s performance and long-term success For that reason, the MHIRJ support ecosystem includes a global network of 12 strategically located parts facilities. The parts team also works around the clock every day of the year through the CRC, using sophisticated inventory management to ensure availability, rapid shipping and traceable deliveries.

A NETWORK TO KEEP AIRLINES FLYING LIKE CLOCKWORK Taking to the skies requires a strong team on the ground. MHIRJ’s global support network leverages 30 years of OEM CRJ expertise, data and knowledge, to help customers optimize their operations and keep flying. Through our network of interconnected disciplines, customers benefit from a total team effort to support their schedules, resolve technical issues and deliver the vital products they require. Find out more about MHIRJ’s Customer Support network here: CUSTOMER SUPPORT NETWORK

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 11


TECHNICAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT ISSUE THREE/ THREE /AUTUMN AUTUMN2021 2021

WELCOME TO THE TECHNICAL PAGES OF WINGSPAN In WINGSPAN, every quarter we publish helpful articles on technical best practices, solutions to issues reported by operators, general tips and other noteworthy maintenance recommendations.

These solutions are available to registered owners and operators of CRJ Series aircraft. To access the full article, click on the links below each abstract. You will require access to the Ifly customer portal. Important Note: Material appearing in the Technical section is to be considered valid as of the date of publication. Operators concerned with the current validity and possible implications of a specific article should contact the Technical Helpdesk.

MHIRJ CUSTOMER RESPONSE CENTER: The CRC can be reached 24/7/365 Direct: +1 450-990-7CRC (450-990-7272) Toll free for North America: +1 833-990-7CRC (1-833-990-7272) International: +1 450-990-7CRC (+1-450-990-7272)

*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). 12 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

GPS AND RADIO ALTIMETER INTERFERENCE AND IMPACTS ON AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS ABSTRACT Aviation GPS and Radio altimeter receivers currently have limited capability to mitigate signal interference. The standards community is exploring different methods to improve situational awareness of these types of events, but these capabilities may not be available in the current generation of aviation GPS and radio altimeter receivers. The most important tool is communication and ensuring that additional NOTAMS are published.

Interference events can occur with little to no warning. Typically, a pilot is not even aware of the occurrence of these events and is unaware of an issue until a secondary aircraft system announces a caution/warning. Some examples might be a loss of RNP, warning flags from FMS, annunciations from the enhanced ground proximity systems, a notification from ATC that the aircraft is not providing and showing ADS-B Out, or the inability to perform a GPS approach such as Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance (LPV) and Erratic Radio altimeter indications.

MHIRJ recommends taking the following steps. First, revert to another navigation aid. This is typically automatically managed by the FMS for area navigation. If any of the monitoring methods previously described occur and results in a missed approach, the pilot should report to ATC that GPS or radio altimeter interference/outage was believed to be at play and request an alternate approach. Alternatively, the pilot may elect to sequence to an ILS approach if an alternate runway is not available. While ILS is known to be vulnerable to other RF interference and multipath, it is not affected by GPS interference.

ATA: 22&34 APPLICABILITY: CRJ100/200/550/700/ 900/1000 Contributed by Marc Bureau, Avionics & Electrical Specialist, In-Service Engineering

CRJ100/200/550/700/900/1000

GPS and Radio Altimeter interference can have a significant impact on flight operations and reports of GPS interference are growing on a daily basis. Contributed by Marc Bureau, Avionics & Electrical Specialist, In-Service Engineering, this article looks at the different types of interference commonly encountered in the aviation world as well as how to monitor the effects of interference, ways to mitigate the effects, and recommended practices to follow.

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 13


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

ALTERNATE ON-WING SOFTWARE UPLOAD TOOL

ATA: 22&34 APPLICABILITY: CRJ550/700/900/1000

CRJ550/700/900/1000

Contributed by Marc Bureau, Avionics & Electrical Specialist, In-Service Engineering

Throughout the years, CRJ avionics systems have evolved and have been upgraded to include on-wing software uploads for aircraft system configuration/ option changes. For example, aircraft equipped with Input Output Concentrator (IOC) P/N 822−2065−001 are designed to support an on-wing upload of the Input Output Table (IOT). On older IOCs (P/N 822-1362-xxx), the IOT is factory-loaded by Rockwell Collins, so the IOC P/N effectively controls the aircraft effectivity configuration on which it is designed and approved for installation, whereas on the new IOC, an on-wing software upload can be performed with different IOT p/n to change the aircraft configuration.

ALTERNATE PROCEDURE AND TOOL TO UPLOAD INPUT OUTPUT TABLE AND TSS4100 SOFTWARE On customer request, Rockwell Collins can load the IOT on an IOC before sending the IOC cards back to the Operator. To provide options to Operators, the MHIRJ Aircraft Maintenance Manual has a procedure to carry out an on-wing load of the IOT. It may be beneficial to Operators with a mixed fleet of older and more recent aircraft to consider using the tool and procedure to help reduce inventory of IOC p/n 822−2065−001. The AMM currently lists a preferred Avionica ARINC 615-3 data loader tool to perform on-wing software load, but this may be an issue for airlines with small mixed aircraft model type fleets such as Boeing, Airbus and Embraer. A tool that is commonly used throughout the industry by many aircraft OEM for software uploads and downloads is the Portable Maintenance Access Terminal (PMAT2000). The PMAT2000 can be used as an alternate to the Avionica tool listed in the AMM. Operators can contact MHIRJ and request a specific RIL, which will provide instructions to build an adapter cable as well as complete instructions to upload software using a PMAT2000.

References: Collins FIELD LOADABLE SOFTWARE INSTALLATION MANUAL (CPN 523-0806267) RIL# 5840, 5564, 6572

*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). 14 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

USING THE RIGHT TOOL TO REDUCE AIRCRAFT GROUND TIME ABSTRACT Critical to maintaining aircraft airworthiness, wiring checks are performed to verify the integrity of electrical wires and connectors. When troubleshooting an aircraft system, MHIRJ recommends conducting wiring continuity and insulation checks using a Technical Action Plan (TAP). Contributed by Serge Rosa, Area Field Service Representative, Europe, this article reviews the two specific tools required to conduct wiring continuity and insulation checks.

Recently, it was noted that insulation resistance checks on Technical Action Plans provided by MHIRJ were not always fully observed. This has led to unnecessary and extensive aircraft unavailability. The megohmmeter is the solution to this problem. By using the right tool for the job, you will reduce ground time and help avoid potential electrical issues.

ATA: 2012 APPLICABILITY: ALL CRJ SERIES Contributed by Serge Rosa, Area Field Service Representative, Europe

ALL CRJ SERIES

An ohmmeter should be used to perform a wiring continuity check and a megohmmeter should be used to perform a wiring insulation check. The ohmmeter should never be used to perform a wiring insulation check. As specified in TAPs, when testing wire insulation, we usually

recommend setting the megohmmeter at 1000 Volts. An obtained value greater than 50 MΩ is considered as a good insulation resistance. While measuring, we recommend wiggling wires at the back of connectors. In-flight vibrations and/or pressurization may have a very small effect on the wires and wiggling them on the ground may help detect possible intermittent short circuits.

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

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*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 15


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

REPLACING IOC (INPUT OUTPUT CONCENTRATOR) PN 822-2065-001 ABSTRACT

ATA: 22212 APPLICABILITY: CRJ550/700/900/1000 Contributed by Michael Robinson, Field Service Representative

New IOC cards PN 822−2065−001 were installed during production or via various Service Bulletins to accommodate several new functions, including ADS-B Out. These IOC cards require Input Output Table (IOT) software to be loaded on them. Contributed by Michael Robinson, Field Service Representative, this article looks at how the installation of the IOC cards without the correct software can cause multiple EICAS messages and inoperable systems.

CRJ550/700/900/1000

During a recent event where an IAPS card cage was swapped between two different configuration aircraft, it was determined that AMM TASK 22−12−04−400−801 (Config A01) Installation of the

Input/Output Concentrator incorrectly identified the Operational task to perform the IOT verification. In order to increase awareness, a note has been added regarding the IOT software requirement. AMM TR 22-100 has been released to document this change. AMM TASK 22−12−04−970−801 (Config A01) Upload of the Input/Output Concentrator table in the IOC provides the instructions and tooling needed to upload the IOT tables on wing. AMM TR 22-0101 revises AMM TASK 22−12−00−710−801 (ConfigA02) Operational Test of the IAPS (Integrated Avionics Processor System) provides instructions on how to verify which IOT software is installed and a CRC number to verify the validity of the software load.

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). 16 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

THE COLD TRUTH: AIRCRAFT WINTERIZATION AND COLD WEATHER RECOMMENDED PRACTICES ABSTRACT During winter, flight crew, operations, and maintenance personnel must pay attention to the hazards imposed by this season. Written by Santiago Martinez, In-Service Engineering, this article focuses on the hazards involved when operating in winter weather conditions, and includes suggested precautions and best practices to take. COLD WEATHER GENERAL OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES General Operational Guidelines

General Operational Guidelines – Flight Crew When operating in winter conditions, respecting the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) Limitations and recommended practices minimizes the hazard to the aircraft.

ATA: 0500 APPLICABILITY: CRJ100/200/550/700/ 900/1000 Contributed by Santiago Martinez, In-Service Engineering

WINTERIZATION GUIDELINES MHIRJ suggests that optional items be considered for implementation into an operator’s own winter preparation program prior to the winter season. Operators are encouraged to review the list in conjunction with their own reliability data to determine the appropriate action.

C R J 1 0 0 / 2 0 0 / 5 5 0 / 7 0 0 / 9 0 0 / 1 0 0 0

If frost, ice, snow or slush is present or anticipated, personnel should take the appropriate actions to de-ice or anti-ice the affected area. If the condition has not been identified by the flight crew, it must be reported to the flight crew. To prevent any delays or

flight hazards, MHIRJ recommends that operators follow these guidelines.

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

*This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation Group (MHIRJ). MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 17


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

SUCCESSFULLY NAVIGATING

THE RECOVERY

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the CRJ Series fleet has significantly outperformed many other aircraft, in particular wide-body aircraft that are dependent on international air travel. While more passengers returned to airports and more planes took to the skies, month after month, the CRJ Series fleet has delivered a superior Schedule Completion Rate (SCR) and a steadily climbing utilization recovery.

rise with the CRJ fleet ultimately turning in an SCR of 99.97% in May of 2021. Utilization recovery over the same timeframe was also outstanding with departures that followed the initial 18-month forecast set by MHIRJ as shown in the graph below. Around the world, dedicated MHIRJ professionals who utilize competitive strategies to ensure superior levels of aircraft economics, reliability, and availability back the CRJ fleet. The regional jet series that changed the way the world flies will continue to satisfy the evolving needs of airlines as it connects people with places everywhere.

When COVID-19 first struck in early 2020, the CRJ Series had a Schedule Completion Rate of 99.89%, revealing a low number of total cancellations per 100 departures. That number continued to

99.99% 99.98%

99.98%

100.00% 99.90%

99.86%

99.93%

99.89%

99.97% 99.98%

99.96%

99.98% 99.97% 99.97%

99.96%

99.98%

99.95%

99.95% 99.96%

99.98%

99.97% 99.95%

99.96% 99.96%

99.95%

99.95% 99.96%

99.94%

99.80%

99.99%

99.98%

99.95%

99.80% 99.75%

99.70%

SCR-C: Schedule Completion Rate – Chargeable.

18 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

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SCR-CnC: Schedule Completion Rate – Chargeable and non Chargeable

2020

2021 N-AMR

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SCR-CnC

Impact of COVID-19 100.00% 90.00% 80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

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#OF CANCELLATIONS PER 100 DEPARTURES

CRJ Series - Schedule Completion Rate

Europe

APAC

Africa/ME

Russia-Cis


MAKING CONNECTIONS

Join our world class team

WE’RE HIRING! MHI RJ Aviation Inc. is actively recruiting Aircraft Technicians in Structures, Maintenance and Avionics for its Bridgeport (WV) and Tucson (AZ) Service Centers.

Apply now at mhirj.com

MHIRJ, and Move the World Forward are trademarks of MHI RJ Aviation ULC or its affiliates. All rights reserved. © 2021 MHI RJ Aviation ULC

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 19


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

The aerospace industry in West Virginia is estimated to provide more than $1 billion in economic impact annually and over 10,000 jobs. The North Central West Virginia Airport is the largest contributor to this success, accounting for more than 2,345 of those jobs and over $775 million in business revenue. Now, with the expansion of the MHIRJ West Virginia Service Center at the North Central Regional Airport Aerotech Business Park in Bridgeport, horizons are being broadened for airlines, employees at the facility and the people of the Mountain State itself.

20 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

DIVERSIFYING AND EXPLORING OPPORTUNITIES


MAKING CONNECTIONS

GROW AND DIVERSIFY

A $20 MILLION INVESTMENT A $20 million investment from MHIRJ, the expansion will increase the current facility space by 100,000 square feet, which includes two new hangars while also updating the existing hangars. With the expansion, the facility will boast a total of over 279,000 square feet. Expected to be fully operational in roughly eighteen months, the project will create more than 300 new jobs, bringing the total number of employees at the Bridgeport Service Center to 800.

This exciting venture establishes a new state-of-the-art infrastructure for both regional airline customers while providing MHIRJ a platform on which to grow and diversify. To that point, the new hangars at the Bridgeport Service Center will be 41 feet high and as such, will be able to handle any type of single-aisle aircraft. “The CRJ Series fleet is the backbone of regional flying in the U.S., and we are proud to be the custodians of that,” said Ismail Mokabel, Senior Vice-President, Head of Aftermarket. “As the largest MRO serving the CRJ Series platform, we aim at creating continued value for our customers by exploring opportunities that will allow us to elevate our service offering, diversify our capabilities and expand our infrastructure.” COLLABORATING WITH GOVERNMENT & EDUCATION With deep roots already established in West Virginia, the expansion marks another milestone in a strong partnership with local and state government that will drive economic growth for years to come. “Mitsubishi’s expansion at the North Central

Left: MHIRJ Senior Vice President Ismail Mokabel, Gov. Jim Justice, state Sen. Mike Romano, D-Harrison, and Anthony Hinton, Head of Service Centers participate in a mock groundbreaking ceremony to mark MHIRJ’s planned expansion at NCWV Airport. Above: MHIRJ Senior Vice President Ismail Mokabel and Rick Rock, Director of North Central West Virginia Airport at cake cutting ceremony.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 21


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

Regional Airport Aerotech Business Park is another round of fantastic news for the North Central Regional Airport and our entire state,” said U.S. Senator Joe Manchin. “When a company is able to keep growing as MHIRJ has done over the past couple years – adding hundreds of new jobs, expanding its operations, and building out its facilities – it’s the sign of great company leadership and puts a spotlight on the profitable business environment we have built in West Virginia.” – U.S. Governor Jim Justice To meet the growing demand for aftermarket services and continue to offer world-class customer service, the MHIRJ Quality Assurance Team created an Apprenticeship Journal, which is the first registered apprenticeship program for aviation in the State of West Virginia. Upon completion,

budding maintenance technicians receive their Airframe Certification and are ready to join the workforce. The Bridgeport Service Center is also a long-term pipeline to employment for aviation professionals via relationships with many universities and colleges in West Virginia.

the Marion County Board of Education recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Fairmont State University to start a dual credit aviation program for the county’s high school seniors. These courses would count as credits for both the student’s high school and with Fairmont State’s aviation program. AN EYE TO THE FUTURE

With the aerospace industry expected to grow significantly over the next decade, the West Virginia Department of Education has also jumped at the opportunity to explore aerospace education. For example,

Currently, MHIRJ’s combined Service Centers can offer maintenance for up to thirty aircraft simultaneously, making MHIRJ’s Regional MRO infrastructure the biggest in the world. Part of a larger outreach strategy, this expansion comes in concert with other initiatives such as expanding MHIRJ’s Component Repair Capabilities, diversifying MRO activities to other aircraft types and launching a consulting service, MHIRJ Aero Advisory Services as well as projects to expand MRO activities once again to other aircraft types after 2023.  With the expanded facility, MHIRJ is creating an even stronger bond with customers, employees, suppliers, the local community and the State of West Virginia that will last far into the future.

Above: Chad Prather, Huntington Bank Rep; Rick Rock, Airport Director; WV Senator Mike Romano; Ismail Mokabel; WV Governor Jim Justice; Dave Hinkle, NCWV Airport Board; Randy Elliott, NCWV Airport Board & Marion County Commissioner, Anthony Hinton, Head of Service Centers. Left: The expansion cements MHIRJ’s commitment to West Virginia and positions the North Central West Virginia Airport as paramount in the regional aviation infrastructure.

22 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

IN BRIEF NEW CUSTOMER PORTAL We’re pleased to announce that our MHIRJ Operators portal is getting a much-needed facelift! We’re working very hard to have it ready for you in early 2022. More details to come.

UPDATE: NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER TO REACH THE CRC We have recently changed our phone number. To reach MHIRJ’s Technical Help Desk, Material Services, Customer Response Center or Parts Ordering Department, please note that we can now be reached at the following numbers: +1-450-990-7272 for international callers. +1-833-990-7272 toll free for North America.

FIRST EVER CRJ SERIES OPERATORS CONFERENCE IN SAN DIEGO California, here we come! From May 3rd to 5th, 2022, MHIRJ will hold its very first CRJ Operators Symposium in beautiful San Diego. More details to come later, but be sure to save the date.

NEW ‘IN THE LOUNGE’ WEB SERIES

Want to know what leading aviation executives are saying about the aviation industry? Tune into “In the Lounge” the new web series created by the MHIRJ Aero Advisory team. In the Lounge explores industry paths and perspectives through casual conversations with leading aviation executives in airport lounges. Catch the first instalment with guest Subashini Silvadas, CEO of AirAsia Consulting and host, François Cognard, VP Asia/Pacific at MHI RJ Aviation Group. Stay tuned for more!

INTRODUCING STC & RDA CAPABILITIES FOR CRJ OPERATORS & BEYOND Marking a major milestone for our engineering organization, MHIRJ is pleased to announce our ability to perform Supplemental Type Certificates (STCs) and Repair Design Approvals (RDAs) for all Part 523 and Part 525 type certified aircraft having a Canadian Type Certificate (TC). With this capability, we now have the authorization to work on aircraft outside our traditional CRJ scope and offer STCs and RDAs to current customers, and nonCRJ operators, with other fleet types. As the OEM of CRJ Series aircraft and an STC provider that can apply its Design Approval Organization (DAO) standards to any type certified aircraft worldwide, MHIRJ is unique within the industry. This introduction underlines not only our technical ability, but also our commitment to connecting with more airlines to provide greater operational value.

A COMPLETE BREADTH OF DISCIPLINES Our expanded scope means we now provide a breadth of disciplines in STCs that extend from interior completions and modifications to structural and mechanical systems installations, upgrades and alternates, and avionics systems installations. For RDAs, we offer operators structural and mechanical systems repairs for all categories of fixed and rotary wing aircraft and appliances. We look forward to connecting with more operators around the globe and provide certification services for design changes to all aircraft within the 523/525 certification boundaries.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 23


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

UP AND COMING

EVENTS

MHIRJ is back on the road! It feels like it has been forever, but we are happy to announce that we will be participating in the industry events below.

MRO Europe

OCTOBER 19-21

Aviation Week’s event is returning this fall in Amsterdam with both a conference and an exhibition. MHIRJ will be there, come see us at booth #8060

RAA Leaders Conference SEPTEMBER 27-28

For more information: mroeurope.aviationweek.com

This September, the MHIRJ team will attend RAA’s Leaders Conference in Washington DC, to reconnect in-person with America’s top movers and shakers. For more information: www.raa.org/2021-raa-leaders-conference/

Aeromart, Montreal

ACI World

This October, the Aeromart Suppliers Forum for the aerospace industry, will be held in our own backyard in Montreal. See you there!

In November, our Aero Advisory Services team will be at the Latin America ACI World Annual General Assembly in Cancun, Mexico. Meet us there at Booth #4.

For more information: montreal.bciaerospace.com

For more information: https://aci-lac.aero/conference2021/

OCTOBER 26-28

NOVEMBER 21-24

CRJ Series Operators Symposium and Trade Show MAY 3-5, 2022

Mark your calendar as MHIRJ will be hosting our first ever CRJ Series Operators Symposium in 2022! From May 3 to 5, 2022, MHIRJ will be hosting customers and partners in San Diego California for a week to share valuable information with CRJ Series Operators, suppliers and partners. It will be a great opportunity to reconnect and network with industry peers. More information to come soon, stay tuned.

24 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


MAKING CONNECTIONS

ONGOING SUPPORT TO KEEP YOU FLYING 24/7 access to the largest regional aircraft maintenance network in the world HEAD OFFICE 3655, Avenue des Grandes Tourelles, Suite 110 Boisbriand, Qc, J7H 0E2 Tel.: +1 450 497 0555

CONTACT US CUSTOMER RESPONSE CENTER Direct: +1 450-990-7CRC (450-990-7272) Toll free for North America: +1 833-990-7CRC (1-833-990-7272) International: +1 450-990-7CRC (+1-450-990-7272) PARTS ORDERING Direct: +1 450-990-7CRC (450-990-7272) Toll free for North America: +1 833-990-7CRC (1-833-990-7272) International: +1 450-990-7CRC (+1-450-990-7272) AOG Parts Services: aog.parts@MHIRJ.com Routine and Critical Parts Services: parts@MHIRJ.com

PARTS AND SERVICES SALES TEAM The Sales Team is available to support all your parts and services requirements, throughout the life of your aircraft. Contact us for everything from ‘Entry-into-Service provisioning’ thru ‘Heavy Maintenance spares planning’. MICHAEL DESCENT Manager, Parts and Services Sales michael.descent@mhirj.com Tel.: +1 416 373 5505 Mobile: +1 416 902 6775 COLIN TRUEMAN Regional Sales Manager - International colin.trueman@mhirj.com Tel.: +44 7841 630781 YVON HACHE Regional Sales Manager – Americas yvon.hache@mhirj.com Tel.: +1 416 373 5197 Mobile: +1 416 902 5983

TIM MOORE Regional Sales Manager – Americas tim.moore@mhirj.com Tel.: +1 304 997 5548 Mobile: +1 304 531 633

SERVICE CENTERS TUCSON SERVICE CENTER 1555 East Aero Park Blvd. Tucson, AZ 85765 USA WEST VIRGINIA AIR CENTER 2400 Aviation Way Bridgeport, WV 26330 USA DON NOLAN Director, Sales and Business Development don.nolan@mhirj.com Tel.: 520 991 6155

MHIRJ AUTHORIZED SERVICE FACILITIES ADRIA TEHNIKA Zgornji Brnik 130h 4210 Brnik-Aerodrom Slovenia Tel.: +386 4 259 4348 sales@aateh.si Aircraft Authorized Types CRJ Series 100/200/700/900/1000 WEB

JAZZ TECHNICAL SERVICES Halifax Stanfield International Airport 310 Goudey Drive Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada, B2T 1E4 Contact: Cesar Longeri, Director MRO Operations + 1 902 873 5414 jts.mro@flyjazz.ca Aircraft Authorized Types CRJ Series 100/200/700/900/1000 WEB

TRAINING CENTERS CAE CAE has decades of experience providing training to airlines and operators around the world. Headquartered in Montreal, CAE offers CRJ Series flight training worldwide, with the lead ATP Training Center based in Toronto. Other CRJ simulators are based in Charlotte, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Madrid and Copenhagen. CAE Toronto Training Center 2025 Logistics Drive Mississauga, Ontario L5S 1Z9 Canada Tel.: +1 905 672-8650 Fax: +1 905 672 0211 toronto-Center@cae.com WEB

Other CRJ simulators are based in Charlotte, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Madrid, and Copenhagen. FLIGHTPATH INTERNATIONAL (FPI) FlightPath International (FPI) has years of experience delivering CRJ technical training. They currently hold EASA, Transport Canada and CAAC approvals, as well as those from other regulatory authorities. Headquartered in Toronto, FPI has partnerships with numerous other organizations and is capable of delivering many aspects of CRJ Technical training on-site, at the operator’s location FlightPath International. Corporate Office 7828-1 Hwy 89 Alliston, Ontario, L9R 1V1 Tel.: +1 705 434 0058 Fax: +1 705 434 0063 info@flightpathinternational.com WEB

WINGSPAN WINGSPAN@MHIRJ.COM

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 25


ISSUE THREE / AUTUMN 2021

26 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

Profile for MHIRJ

MHIRJ WINGSPAN - Volume 1, Issue 3 – Autumn 2021  

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