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VOLUME 1 - ISSUE 1 SPRING 2021

W I N G S PA N

TAKING BACK THE SKIES WEST VIRGINIA: HOME OF AEROSPACE INNOVATION AND EXPANSION

See how aerospace is blossoming in the Mountain State

HOW WILL THE 50-SEATER FIT INTO THE FUTURE?

Can the North American regional industry do without 50-seater aircraft?

THERE’S A NEW ENERGY ON BOARD

Visit us online and feel the energy


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

PREMIER ISSUE

W I N G S PA N MÉLANIE FILIATREAULT

WINGSPAN Publisher Manager, Marketing Communications and Branding MHI RJ Aviation ULC

HIRO YAMAMOTO

President MHI RJ Aviation ULC

Dear readers, Welcome to MHIRJ’s very first issue of WINGSPAN. It makes me incredibly proud to launch this magazine under the theme of ‘Taking Back the Skies’, launching us into 2021 with optimism and hope. 2020 was an extremely trying year for our industry, and even though we are still suffering through the devastating effects of a pandemic that will continue to affect our business for years to come, I feel that in 2021 we can start hoping, and this is what our ‘Taking Back the Skies’ theme is all about; how can we as an MRO and commercial aircraft service provider help our customers find their way back into the sky and into profitable and sustainable operations. Our CRJ Series customers will be familiar with a past publication called ISAR - In-Service Activity Report, in which we shared technical content as well as information and solutions with CRJ aircraft operators. With the launch of WINGSPAN, we continue in this tradition while elevating the content to include news, industry insights, analysis, and information about new products and services for our operators. This magazine is for you! We will provide relevant, interesting and entertaining written and dynamic content to our customers four times a year. As such, we welcome and value your feedback simply by writing to wingspan@MHIRJ.com.

WE’RE READY. WE’RE COMMITTED.

As you know, a new year is upon us and with the new year comes new beginnings. Our company, MHIRJ, was born in the middle of turmoil, swayed and shook by the unrest we saw in 2020. The events of the past year no doubt dictate the actions we take in this new one, but the choice remains ours; should we be swallowed by the wave or strive to rise above it. Already, 2021 is seeing change on a gigantic scale and the fear and uncertainty that gripped the world before is slowly washing away. Out of this crisis we came out more prepared, now ready for the earth to turn again. 2020 has helped us build foundations that are strong and can withstand anything the future holds, and with the vaccine’s arrival, hope is once again renewed. In that regard, WINGSPAN is not just a magazine. It’s proof of our willingness to grow and seek unexplored terrain. In the last seven months, MHIRJ has had time to develop and solidify. Under the damper of the pandemic, we have been looking at solutions and new ideas on how to regrow the market and work towards taking back the skies. We are ready to show the world what we can do. There is no greater pride than rising above the challenges of life, and there is no greater lesson than the challenges themselves. Our first real steps will be guided by the knowledge we acquired through hardship and dedication, navigating the troubled waters of this global crisis on a brand-new ship. The direction is set, and the goal is concrete, but there is still work to do. By promoting growth and strengthening our communities, MHIRJ is already proving a fair and reliable leader, driven by strong principle and the motivation to always move forward, for all. In the spirit of showcasing the forces that drive us, I would also like to extend my gratitude to WINGSPAN’s readers. Our business partners, customers, and now readers, give us purpose. Without you all, we wouldn’t be bearing the fruits of success that we do today. I look forward to this year’s unfolding, and to reading many issues of WINGSPAN. I hope you do too.

02 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

Table of Contents W I N G S PA N ON THE COVER

The CRJ1000 is the largest member of the CRJ series, seating up to 104 passengers. Leveraging commonality, it has been refined and optimized to deliver the lowest seat-mile cost of any regional jet. To learn more: https://mhirj.com/ en/products-and-services/crj-series

2

Introducing WINGSPAN

15

16

Reducing Occurrences of Over-The-Air-Transponder Ground Test Transmissions

17

Monitoring The CRJ Series Fleet

We’re ready. We’re committed

18

6

Taking Back the Skies

20

7

Mission, Vision, and Values

8

How Will the 50-seater Fit into the Future? Can the North American regional industry do without 50-seater aircraft?

11

A Market Looking for a New Set of Skills

In an environment where our customers constantly make long-term strategic and capitalintensive decisions, they need to rely on people who can help them see the full picture.

12

TECHNICAL

West Virginia: Home of Aerospace Innovation and Expansion

See how aerospace is blossoming in the mountain state

What does MHIRJ stand for

23

24 25

There is a New Energy on Board

Best Practices for Installing The HSTA Position Sensor

14

Keeping Operations Rolling with the Nose Landing Gear Wheel Spacer

Managing Editor Eugenia Sanchez Technical Editor Nathalie Chabot

MHIRJ 3655 Avenue des Grandes Tourelles, Suite 110 Boisbriand, Qc, J7H 0E2 wingspan@MHIRJ.com MHIRJ.COM WINGSPAN is produced by ATMOSPHERE Event Communications President Jason Katz

Visit us online and feel the energy

Associate Publisher Steve Robins

The Commitment Continues

Senior Project Manager Karine LaRocque

COVID-19 has not stopped the Technical Steering Committee

Contact information

Ongoing support to keep you flying

18

Technical best practices, solutions to issues reported by operators, general tips, and other noteworthy maintenance tips.

13

MHIRJ Publisher Mélanie Filiatreault

CONTACT INFORMATION

Recruiting in Our Service Centers

Meet Scott Stern, operations crew chief, MHIRJ

Get to know MHIRJ and the two brands from which it is born

VOLUME 1/ ISSUE 1 SPRING 2021

Copy Editor Cameron Miller

Highlights from the fleet

The Union of Two Important Heritages

4

Troubleshooting Mood Lighting in the New ATMOSPHÈRE Cabin

Artistic Director Wendy Bishop Dynamic Content Producer Israel Bonequi To subscribe to WINGSPAN, write WINGSPAN@MHIRJ.com and provide your contact information.

WINGSPAN is published quarterly and can be found at www.mhirj.com and www.issuu.com CRJ, RJ, CRJ Series, CRJ200, CRJ700, CRJ900, CRJ1000, MHIRJ, MHIRJ Aero Advisory Services, ​and Move The World Forward  are trademarks of ​MHI RJ Aviation ULC or its affiliates. The information in this document is proprietary to MHI RJ Aviation ULC or its affiliates. This document does not constitute an offer, commitment, representation, guarantee or warranty of any kind. This document must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, w ​ ithout the prior written consent of MHI RJ Aviation ULC. All rights reserved © 2021 MHI RJ Aviation ULC.  What Does it Mean to Work at MHIRJ?

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 03


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

FROM TOP LEFT: The engineering department in Montreal; the unveiling of the CRJ100 on May 6, 1991, with Robert Wohl, Bob Brown, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, Laurent Beaudoin and Premier Robert Bourassa; the CRJ700 wind tunnel test article; the 1500th delivery to Northwest Airlines of the first NextGen CRJ900 a variant with larger windows and refreshed interior; the first CRJ100 fuse from Belfast in July 1990; first flight of the CRJ1000; the first CRJ900.

04 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

MHIRJ: THE UNION OF

TWO IMPORTANT HERITAGES

The union of these two important heritages began on June 1st, 2020, when MHI acquired the CRJ Series program, marking the opening chapter of MHIRJ’s story. Built on the solid foundations already in place, and with the strong support of the MHI group of companies, the MHIRJ team is committed to serving the regional aviation market and becoming a platform for growth in the industry. MHIRJ brings together thirty years of groundbreaking Canadian aviation experience and more than a hundred years of big thinking Japanese innovation, giving this new company very solid legs to stand on.

MHI:

Mitsubishi/Nagasaki Shipyard, 1910

While MHIRJ is not a globally recognized brand yet, the two brands that united to create it have been acclaimed for decades. The CRJ Series is the world’s leading regional aircraft program and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is one of the world’s leading industrial firms.

A JAPANESE INDUSTRIAL GIANT The origin of MHI can be traced all the way back to 1884 when Yataro Iwasaki, the founder of Mitsubishi, leased a government-owned Nagasaki Shipyard. He named it Nagasaki Shipyard & Machinery Works and started the shipbuilding business on a full scale. This shipbuilding business was later turned into Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. In 1934, it was launched as Mitsubishi Heavy-Industries, Ltd., establishing its position as the largest private firm in Japan and a multinational company manufacturing ships, heavy machinery, airplanes, and railroad cars for the world. By integrating each company’s management and technical expertise and enhancing competitiveness in domestic and international markets, MHI has come a long way since its origins.

DID YOU KNOW? • MHIRJ has the largest installed base of regional aircraft in the world, with over 1,300 aircraft flying with more than 140 operators. • We have been commended by the FAA for 15 consecutive years for outstanding customer support. • We hold a world-class safety record and possess the most extensive regional aircraft maintenance network in the world. • We support customers worldwide, counting 25 Support Locations ranging from Training Centers to Regional Support Offices, including the Customer Response Center headquartered in Montreal, offering 24/7 customer support.

CRJ SERIES:

A CANADIAN SUCCESS STORY The 50-seat Canadair Regional Jet made its first flight in 1991 and received Canadian Type Certification in 1992. The program that revolutionized regional aviation was later expanded with the launch of the 70-seat CRJ700 in 1997, the 86-seat CRJ900 in 2000, and the 100-seat CRJ1000 in 2007. For three decades, the CRJ Series has been the world’s most successful regional family of aircraft. Known for their reliability, CRJ Series aircraft are the backbone of the world’s air fleets, connecting people and communities around the world.

Finally MHIRJ is not only the world’s biggest regional aviation MRO, we have a few more cards up our sleeves, like a world-class Engineering Center, offering a full end-to-end service for complex or simple product development needs; a dedicated asset management group that supports aircraft remarketing as well as technical and commercial operations and finally; an unparalleled advisory team with a 360° view of commercial aviation that provides decision-making perspective to leaders across the industry. FROM THE LEFT: The first CRJ100 in flight; the first CRJ delivery to Lufthansa on October 19, 1992; the 500th delivery to Atlantic Coast Airlines April 26, 2001; a CRJ700 being modified to become the first CRJ900 prototype.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 05


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

TAKING BACK THE SKIES Ismail Mokabel shares his thoughts on responding to unprecedented times in “Taking Back the Skies” Since the onset of COVID-19, airlines have seen the demand for flights drastically diminish with many aircraft sent to storage for both short and longer periods. To help airlines emerge strong from the crisis, MHIRJ has created action-oriented initiatives aimed at preserving the safety and airworthiness of fleet aircraft.

06 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

Creating Transformational Solutions In “Taking Back the Skies,” Ismail Mokabel, speaks on how MHRJ has responded to the pandemic as a unified team with new solutions aimed at delivering unprecedented value to our customer base. You’ll hear how MHIRJ brought the best minds together to solve supply chain challenges, what plans are in place to ensure aircraft components are readily available, and how we will support customers as they come out of the pandemic. MHIRJ is a new, nimble company whose contribution can be felt around the globe, day-in, day-out. We take to heart that the power of the whole is bigger than the sum of our products and work tirelessly to support our customer base throughout the toughest challenges our industry has ever faced. When you need to get back in the air, we’ll be there, with an unwavering commitment to world-class support for your fleet.


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

MISSION, VISION, AND VALUES ABOUT

ISMAIL MOKABEL Senior Vice-President and Head of Aftermarket MHIRJ

Ismail currently leads MHIRJ Aviation Group’s Aftermarket business unit, which is the largest regional MRO in the United States, with over 30 lines of Maintenance, supporting more than 1300 CRJ Series aircraft in service. Having more than 15 years of experience in the aviation industry, Ismail leads over 1200 employees covering an executive scope inclusive of Customer Support, Product Support, Program Management, Commercial Services, MRO Service Centers, Material Services, and Supply Chain Management. He is a thought leader who uses his strategic leadership, strong communication skills and high emotional energy to inspire and influence his teams. Prior to joining MHIRJ, he has held positions of increasing responsibilities in Pratt & Whitney Canada and Bombardier Commercial Aircraft. Ismail holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Industrial Engineering from Concordia University and executive education accreditation from HELIOS Executive Institute, INSEAD and the Darden School of Business. He is an alumnus of the Concordia Institute of Aerospace Design and Innovation (CIADI) and a member of the Golden Key International Honour Society. Ismail is located in Mirabel.

OUR MISSION As a global leader in aviation, our world-class services are the backbone of airline fleets worldwide. We enable, grow, and sustain powerful connections between our customers, our people and our communities, delivering the resources and insights they need to take flight.

OUR VISION Deliver maximum value to all our partners by connecting communities with a commitment to excellence and efficiency, helping move the world forward.

OUR VALUES WE BUILD ENDURING PARTNERSHIPS with our

customers, our people, our global network, and our communities to enable powerful collaboration and make a sustainable impact.

OUR PRINCIPLES DRIVE US

to operate with a relentless commitment to purpose, integrity, fairness, respect and excellence.

WE CELEBRATE COURAGE, CREATIVITY AND DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES to enable

ingenuity and innovation as we challenge the status quo with big, bold ideas that deliver value to our partners and advance our industry.

WE ARE FLEXIBLE AND ACCOUNTABLE, balancing

nimbleness with a dedication to delivering strong results to all our partners and our global network.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 07


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

MARKET PERSPECTIVES

HOW WILL THE 50-SEATER FIT INTO THE FUTURE? What is the future of the 50-seater market in the US post-COVID and can the Big 3 afford to lose $1B in annual revenue? - Produced by MHIRJ Aero Advisory Services AN AGING FLEET A snapshot of today’s situation clearly shows that the US 50-seater fleet is aging and is facing immediate risk of retirement. The COVID crisis might just precipitate things and accelerate the retirement rate. This raises the question of can we replace these aircraft, and how?

Pre-COVID-19, the Big 3 (Delta, American, and United) flew a fleet of over 650 50-seater regional jets. This massive fleet has played the critical role of feeding hubs in their respective networks. During the current crisis, many of these aircraft have been parked and the question of their return to service is top of mind for many people in the industry. So, what does the future of the 50-seater market look like in the US post-COVID?

Bombardier and Embraer both have stopped production of their 50-seater regional jets a long time ago and no new program has been launched since then. The only aircraft still currently manufactured that 200 would match the cabin size of these aircraft is the ATR42. 180 But turboprop aircraft do not 160 seem to be a desired solution 140 Retired for any of the Big 3. There is In Storage practically no appetite in the 120 In Service US market for turbo-propellers. 100 Because of this lack of solution to replace the aging the 50-seater fleet, couldn’t the Big 3 simply drop these markets? The short answer is no. FIGURE 1 - Status of the US 50-seaters fleet as of September 2020 (Source: CIRIUM Diio)

THE COSTS OF REMOVING THE 50-SEATER MARKET Regional aviation and the 50-seater segment in particular is often misjudged when it comes to its revenue generation potential. The revenue allocated to the leg flown by regional aircraft is just the tip of an iceberg made of a substantial feed which supports the entire airline network. When considering the upstream revenue

DELTA

80 60 40 20 0

15

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

enabled by the feed, no less than 30% of the Big 3 revenue is dependent on regional aircraft operations (see figure 2). Simply pulling the plug of regional aviation is unrealistic. The exact same principles apply to the 50-seater market, removing them from the picture would mean ~$1B loss of revenue per year for Delta, American and United together.

AMERICAN

UNITED

100%

100%

90%

90%

90%

80%

80%

80%

70%

70%

70%

60%

60%

60%

50%

50%

50%

40%

40%

26%

16

AGE

100%

30%

14

36%

Widebody Aircraft

40%

31%

Narrow-body Aircraft

30%

30%

Large Regional Jet

20%

20%

20%

50-Seater

10%

10%

10%

0

0

Aircraft count

Revenue

Dep Rev

0

Aircraft count

Revenue

Dep Rev

Aircraft count

FIGURE 2 - Big 3 Fleet composition, revenue, and dependent revenue (Source: CIRIUM Diio, September 2019 data)

08 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

Revenue

Dep Rev


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

Not all three Majors are impacted in the same way, but a more in-depth analysis of their networks and bases again emphasize the contribution 50-seaters bring at a network level (See figure 3 for examples). Removing them would lead to a snowball effect where other parts of the network (long-haul for instance) will suddenly not look as profitable as before. FIGURE 3 - Network Contribution of 50-Seaters aircraft by base (Source: CIRIUM Diio, year 2018)

70 60 50

50-Seater Network Number of routes

DELTA Triple Daily or more

40

Double Daily

30

50-seat CRJ200 in flight

Daily Less than Daily

20 10 0

160

Current

Replacement by large RJ

140

50-Seater Network

120

Number of routes

100

AMERICAN Triple Daily or more Double Daily

80

Daily

60

Less than Daily

40 20 0

160

Current

Replacement by large RJ

140

50-Seater Network

120

Number of routes

100

United Triple Daily or more Double Daily

80

Daily

60

Less than Daily

40 20 0

Current

Replacement by large RJ

FIGURE 4 - 50-Seaters route sorted by frequency of operation (left = current status, right = realistic view if replaced by 76-seaters at iso-capacity)

REPLACING 50-SEATERS WITH 76-SEATERS For all the reasons explained above, and because no imminent replacement solution exists, it is very likely that the Big 3 will try to operate their 50-seater as long as possible. Eventually they will try to address this denser part of the network by replacing retired aircraft with available 76-seats regional jets. The new question which arises is, can the entire 50-seater market be taken over by 76-seater aircraft? To answer this question, we must look to the current frequency offering on the 50-seater network (see figure 4 on the left). As explained above, the feed is a huge component (70% or more) of the traffic carried by 50-seater aircraft (see figure 5). It comes as no surprise that the average frequency on routes operated by small regional jets is high, which is done to optimize connections at the hubs. In order to preserve load factors, replacing 50-seater aircraft by 76-seater aircraft maintaining overall capacity will logically lead to frequency reductions. We can realistically assess that the routes maintaining at least a daily frequency after switching to large RJ operation will remain viable and as a result fall in the “Can be MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 09


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

saved” bucket. On the other hand, a route that will fall below the critical threshold of a daily service can be considered lost (red column). Not only will the point-to-point traffic from these routes be lost, but the revenue generated on other legs thanks to the feed they bring to the network will be lost as well. This is the first effect of the transfer of the 50-seater market to large RJ, but it is not the only one. Indeed, the average drop of frequency will also impact the quality and quantity of passenger connections and negatively impact the feeding traffic. THE VALUE OF FEEDING THE NETWORK If we look at the ratio of feed versus pointto-point traffic, we see that the higher the frequency, the more feed. This makes sense as more frequencies mean more possibilities to connect with more flights at the airline hub. Note the extremely high ratio of feed, beyond 80% on triple daily routes for Delta, hence the concept of iceberg we were referring to earlier: the value of the 50-seaters network resides in the feed they bring to the network. Sadly, switching from a 50-seater operation to a 76-seater will lead to a reduction of frequencies, as we saw in figure 4. Consequently, we can also expect a degradation of the feed. Our estimates are losses of ~2% of the feed revenue for Delta, and 4% to 5% for American and United. Those estimates are calculated combining the loss of frequency detailed in figure 4 with the degradation of connection quality as seen in figure 5.

TOO IMPORTANT TO LET GO NOW In conclusion, the 50-seater market is just too big for Delta, American, and United to simply pull the plug. It is too big, especially because of the importance of the feed it brings to the respective airline networks. As no replacement solution is currently to be found from the OEM side, and because a switch to larger RJ will have a negative impact on the revenue generation, the Big 3 will have no other choice than to fly the current 50-seater fleet as long as possible. Eventually they will try to switch this part of their network to 76-seater operations. While for most of the routes this seems feasible (see figure 4), many markets will have to be dropped. All-in-all, three streams of income loss have to be expected when this switch happens: loss of point-to-point traffic on dropped routes, loss of the feed originally generated by these dropped routes, and loss of feed because of degraded frequencies on remaining routes. The estimated loss of revenue due to these 3 factors were evaluated at respectively 5%, 10% and 6% of the 50-seater dependent revenue for Delta, American and United. Considering 2019 results, that would represent ~$130M per year for Delta, $380M for American, and $350M for United: a near billion US dollars of lost revenue per year! Most likely the only way to preserve this revenue opportunity would be to replace the current 50-seaters with aircraft of similar or smaller cabin size. Could there be an electric solution? That’s a discussion for another day.

% Feed in 50-Seaters Network 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

DL

Double daily routes Daily daily routes

AA

Double daily routes Daily routes

UA

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

Triple daily routes

Triple daily routes

Triple daily routes Double daily routes Daily routes

FIGURE 5 - Ratio of Feed versus Point-to-Point passenger - 50-Seater Network (Source: CIRUIM Diio, September 2019)

10 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

In conclusion, the 50-seater market is just too big for Delta, American, and United to simply pull the plug. It is too big, especially because of the importance of the feed it brings to the respective airline networks.


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

A MARKET LOOKING FOR A NEW SET OF SKILLS:

MHIRJ AERO ADVISORY SERVICES

The creation of MHIRJ Aero Advisory Services comes at a time when so many aviation players need deep knowledge and expertise to reset and strengthen their businesses. Our team is no stranger to these types of challenges, from successfully relaunching the C Series, now A220, to repositioning the Q400 and CRJ Series with record sales years. With 400 years of combined commercial aviation experience both from the “buy-side” and the “sell-side “our team has already helped airports, airlines and service providers successfully navigate the current turmoil. Our unique position offers us the luxury of an unbiased perspective, and because we know how to create success in this industry, we can immediately bring value in many strategic and commercial areas: optimizing airline networks and fleets, defining business plans for start-up airlines, identifying growth opportunities for airports, assessing market opportunities for financiers and lessors, developing successful commercial relationships for service providers, and much more.

Find out more by downloading our BROCHURE or by visiting our website at www.mhirj-aero-advisory-services.com

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 11


TECHNICAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

WELCOME TO THE TECHNICAL PAGES OF WINGSPAN In WINGSPAN, every quarter we will publish helpful articles on technical best

practices, solutions to issues reported by operators, general tips, and other noteworthy maintenance tips. These solutions are available to registered owners and operators of CRJ Series aircraft. To access the full article, click on the links below each abstract. You will require access to the Ifly customer portal. Important Note: Material appearing in the Technical Section is to be considered valid as of the date of publication. Operators concerned with the current validity and possible implications of a specific article should contact the Technical Helpdesk.

CUSTOMER RESPONSE CENTER: The CRC can be reached 24/7/365 North America (toll-free): +1 844 CRC CRC0 +1 844 272 2720; or direct: +1 514 855 8500 Europe: +44 (0) 2890 468899 International: +1 514 855 8500 Fax: +1 514 956 2888

* This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is Proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation ULC (MHIRJ). 12 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

BEST PRACTICES FOR INSTALLING THE HSTA POSITION SENSOR SUMMARY Horizontal stabilizer trim actuators (HSTA) offer a safe and reliable means to control the position of the aircraft horizontal stabilizer surface to attain commanded pitch position during take-off, cruise, and landing of CRJ aircraft. However, difficulties have been reported during troubleshooting of a “STAB FAULT and PITCH FEEL FAULT status” on the HSTA system and when faced with the installation of the position sensor unit, the current AMM task did include specific instructions on the handling and inspection of the unit.

To help correct any issues regarding the HSTA position sensor, new notes and caution have also been added to the AMM task. This includes an optional step to remove the HSTA Motor and increase the access space to perform the position sensor removal/installation task.

ATA: 2742 APPLICABILITY: CRJ550/700/900/1000 Contributed by Marc Bureau, Avionics & Electrical specialist, In-Service Engineering

CRJ550/700/900/1000

The position sensor arm and pin located on the bottom of the unit are very delicate and must be handled and installed carefully to prevent damage that would cause the system to show a fault. As a result, it’s important that best practices are always

followed when installing the HSTA Position Sensor. In the article, “Best Practices for Installing the HSTA Position Sensor”, a step-by-step guide for installing the HSTA Position Sensor is provided to assure proper handling of the position sensor while avoiding possible damage to the position sensor arm pins.

Reference: AMM task 27-42-05 Installation of the Position Sensor Assembly (HSTA)

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

* This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is Proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation ULC (MHIRJ). MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 13


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

KEEPING OPERATIONS ROLLING WITH THE NOSE LANDING GEAR WHEEL SPACER SUMMARY

ATA: 3242 APPLICABILITY: CRJ550/700/900/1000 Contributed by Brian Baldwin, In-Service Engineering

Recently, several operators reported damage to the nose landing gear following a nosewheel assembly replacement. In the first case, the axle bearing, piston/axle assembly, and torque links were damaged after the aircraft’s first flight of the day. Maintenance records indicate that the nosewheel assemblies had been replaced just the previous night. In the second case, after the nosewheel assemblies had been replaced during a service check, the nose landing gear tire was seen to be wobbling during taxi. The torque links were removed after damage was found. Missing Axle Spacer

CRJ550/700/900/1000

In both cases where damage was reported to the nose landing gear, after removing the nosewheel assembly, maintenance staff discovered that the axle spacer was missing. MHIRJ has reviewed

the AMM task for nose landing gear wheel assembly installation and has identified that the task correctly calls for the axle spacer installation. Inadvertent Removal of the Spacer To avoid the problem of the missing axle spacer, it’s important to understand how it can occur. During the NLG wheel replacement, when the wheel is pulled outwards, the Bearing-Seal lip engages in the Spacer erosion groove. This causes the spacer to inadvertently be removed from the axle with the wheel. If the technician does not detect this and the new wheel is installed without the spacer, bearings failure will occur. In this article, we will explain how the spacer can be inadvertently removed with the wheel assembly and how to avoid this problem.

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

* This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is Proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation ULC (MHIRJ). 14 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

TROUBLESHOOTING MOOD LIGHTING IN THE NEW ATMOSPHÈRE CABIN SUMMARY descriptions of the ceiling LED strip assemblies installed throughout the cabin area that are split into four (4) different zones and exceptions to the ceiling lights. More importantly, you will learn how to troubleshoot mood lighting in the new ATMOSPHÈRE cabin through helpful troubleshooting guidance and a detailed guide step-by-step guide.

ATA: 33-21 / APPLICABILITY: CRJ 900 A/C 15449, 15451−15499 Contributed by Geneviève Dumontier & Dominic Benoit, Technical Help Desk

CRJ 900 A/C 15449, 15451−15499

Designed to significantly improve passenger comfort, the new Atmosphère cabin features larger passenger living space, wheel-first roller bag capability, more spacious lavatory, increased cabin connectivity options, and LED Mood Lighting - all integrated in a contemporary design. The design of the new Light Emitting Diode (LED) “MOOD” lighting is not typical to previous cabin lighting systems and several reports from operators have been received regarding the inability to turn “OFF” the cabin ceiling lights using the rotary switch on the First Attendant (FA) control panel. In the article, “Troubleshooting Mood Lighting in the New Atmosphère Cabin”, we provide background on how the lighting system works including detail

Reference: WM 25-28-01/02/03, AIPC 33-21-01

To access the complete document, click on the navigation bar in the Customer Portal and follow: Publications > Document Libraries > Newsletters CLICK ON THE LINK

Login access required

* This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is Proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation ULC (MHIRJ). MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 15


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

REDUCING OCCURRENCES OF OVER-THE-AIRTRANSPONDER GROUND TEST TRANSMISSIONS SUMMARY

ATA: 3454 APPLICABILITY: ALL CRJ SERIES Contributed by Marc Bureau, Avionics & Electrical specialist, In-Service Engineering

Last year, the FAA ATC implemented new software in the US National Airspace (NAS) and created an ADS-B focus team as part of AFS-360 for Performance monitoring of ADS-B Out for the entire NAS. The new Avionics Performance Monitoring tool enables monitoring of non-compliant ADS-B Out to DO 260B level and the software will flag various Transponder non-compliance issues such as, incorrect/invalid ICAO codes, non-protected aircraft under transponder ground testing and other noncompliance issues. Moreover, it will also flag aircraft shown at high altitudes with no Lat/Long position or no position change.

ALL CRJ SERIES

To address new aircraft designs and equipment, MHIRJ held a teleconference call with operators to understand the situation and attempt to find solutions. All North American operators were invited, and several FAA Certification Maintenance personnel also participated in the session on the

new monitoring tool process. The objective of the meeting was to understand the over-the-air transmission problem and find solutions to reduce these transponder over-the-air-transmissions during ground testing of transponders. In the article, “Reducing Occurrences of OverThe-Air-Transponder Ground Test Transmissions” we highlight the recommended transponder best practices and recent aircraft maintenance manual (AMM) changes to reduce occurrences of Over-TheAir-Transponder ground test transmissions. The article also discusses the changes that were made and released in the CRJ AMM. This includes adding New Ground Support Equipment (GSE) tools that can be used to both shield the transponder antenna and test the transponder as well as the addition of an optional AMM task so that all aircraft mod- S, Mod-C and ADS-B out test can be performed at ground elevation altitude.

References: A\ SAFO 17002 Improper Transponder and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) OUT Equipment Testing B\ AC No: 43-6D Altitude Reporting Equipment and Transponder System Maintenance and Inspection Practices

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* This document is for information purposes only and is not part of any proposal and creates no contractual commitment. Information in this report is Proprietary to MHIRJ and MHI. This report must not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part to a third party without prior express permission in writing from MHI RJ Aviation ULC (MHIRJ). 16 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

MONITORING

THE CRJ SERIES FLEET

As part of our maintenance services, our team keeps an eye on all CRJ fleet statistics to ensure superior levels of aircraft economics, reliability, and availability.

To deliver additional support, our team offers optimized maintenance programs and tailored planning as well as economic enhancement recommendations.

Through innovative tools such as our Aircraft Performance Analytics web tool, our quarterly FRACAS report, and our 24/7 live dashboard, we provide customers with access to aircraft-level and fleet-wide metrics in real-time, so they can make the best possible decisions.

We’ll share key data about the CRJ fleet every quarter here in WINGSPAN, but operators can also access the tools through the customers portal.

CUSTOMER PORTAL

WHAT IS THE DATA TELLING US AT THIS TIME?

#OF CANCELLATIONS PER 100 DEPARTURES

CRJ Series - Schedule Completion Rate 100.00% 99.90%

99.98% 99.86%

99.98%

99.97%

99.98%

99.96%

99.98%

99.95%

99.97%

99.97%

99.98%

99.97%

99.95%

99.96%

99.95%

99.95%

99.80% 99.75%

99.60% Jan-20

Feb-20

Mar-20

Apr-20

May-20

Jun-20

SCR-C

UTILIZATION RECOVERY (%)

99.98%

99.96%

99.88%

99.80% 99.70%

99.99%

99.93%

99.89%

1. Despite the pandemic, our CRJ Series operators have reported an outstanding schedule completion rate.

100.00% 90.00% 80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

Jul-20

Aug-20

Sep-20

Oct-20

Nov-20

Dec-20

SCR-CnC

CRJ SERIES UTILIZATION RECOVERY Impact of COVID-19

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

2021 N-AMR

Europe

APAC

Africa/ME

Russia-Cis

2. We observed a great Utilization Recovery during COVID-19 Pandemic *Note: SCR (Schedule Completion Rate) – Number of Total Cancellations per 100 Departures SCR-C – Schedule Completion Rate Chargeable SCR-CnC – Schedule Completion Rate Chargeable and Non-Chargeable

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ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

RECRUITMENT AND SERVICE CENTERS By Jamie Huggins

What Does it Mean to Work at MHIRJ? Scott Stern, Operations Crew Chief at MHIRJ

Working at MHI RJ Aviation Inc (MHIRJ) provides you with an experience like no other. You will learn valuable, in-demand skills and build a long-lasting career to be proud of. The employees of MHIRJ are driven, passionate, skilled and dedicated. Each one of them is vital to our company’s collective success. Read on to learn more about one of our employees, Scott Stern, and what it means to him to work at MHIRJ.

MEET SCOTT STERN, OPERATIONS CREW CHIEF, MHIRJ For almost 30 years, Scott Stern has built a fulfilling career in the aviation industry. Currently, he works as an Operations Crew Chief at MHIRJ. Scott takes pride in the quality of work that he and his team achieve at MHIRJ, as safety is their ultimate goal. “The most satisfying thing for me in my position is when we get an airplane in, and we start the inspection and tear it all down. We evaluate what is wrong, fix it all and then put it back together. Our success and our quality of work directly impacts our customers’ success. To me, that’s what it’s all about.” said Scott. If he had to describe working at MHIRJ in one word, Scott believes that word would be “satisfaction.” His fulfillment comes from the high quality of work done by him and his co-workers and the positive reports from MHIRJ’s customers about completed products. “The most rewarding part of my job is getting that completed product out safely and at the highest quality possible. I know the traveling public will be on board, and I take the attitude that my family and friends will be on that airplane at some given point. ” said Scott. 18 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

SCOTT’S INTEREST IN AVIATION BEGAN EARLY IN LIFE. VERY EARLY.

WHY SCOTT RECOMMENDS BUILDING A CAREER AT MHIRJ

Scott’s interest in aviation began when he was a boy and would go to work with his father in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

At MHIRJ, we provide our entry-level employees with the essential training and education they need to excel at their jobs. Additionally, we offer a variety of opportunities for long-term career growth within our management and technical roles. Scott agrees that there are many different training opportunities at MHIRJ.

“My father was in the National Guard. Years ago, I would go to work with him. We were out on the tarmac, and I could see the commercial airplanes landing. We were close to the runway, and I could see the aircraft movement. At a young age, I got interested in that,” explained Scott. Scott shared that it was his mechanical inclination that first drew him into the field of aviation. As a child, he remembered feeling awed and intrigued by the giant machines. He still experiences those same feelings today at MHIRJ. “Every time we deliver an airplane at MHIRJ, I still kind of get chills. When we see an airplane that we have had for a month — and had it completely torn apart and put back together, and it takes off, and we deliver it — it is rewarding to see that. It still gets me even after 30 years of doing it,” said Scott.

“I try to get as much as I can of the training that is offered. A lot of that is making yourself available if you want to get those qualifications — and if you want that, MHIRJ will give it to you,” said Scott. We want our employees to be able to build their careers at MHIRJ. We invest in our employees and want them to find long-term success within our company. Scott shared that he would recommend building a career at MHIRJ because there is an expectation to succeed, and the tools are there to do so. “I would recommend a career as an aviation technician at MHIRJ. They provide the tools, the knowledge and the know-how to accomplish your goals and build a career that you want,” explained Scott.


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

We also place a high value on collaboration at MHIRJ. It is ingrained into the processes of how our employees do their work and the attitudes about their work. We believe that we collectively work better together. For Scott, what he enjoys most about working at MHIRJ is the people he gets to work alongside each day. “What I enjoy most about working at MHIRJ

is the people that I work with. It is challenging and we have a lot of obstacles — but at the end of the day, we band together, and we all help each other out with our different expertise. We get the job done, and that is the ultimate goal,” stated Scott. Finally, we seek to promote a healthy balance of personal and professional development at MHIRJ. Scott went on to share that he greatly

Inspired by Scott’s Story?

Join our Team at MHIRJ Scott Stern’s childhood interest in airplanes has grown into a 30-year career in the aviation industry. His passion and drive as an Operations Crew Chief make a valuable contribution to the work we do at MHIRJ each day. If you are looking to join a team that inspires growth and forward-thinking, we invite you to browse our current positions here and apply for a chance to work with us today!

CAREERS

enjoys the culture at MHIRJ, and he has made many lifelong friends from his career in the aviation industry. “I have made a lot of friends here at MHIRJ — both friends at work and friends outside of work. It is a close-knit group. If I need help personally, I can call on people at work to help me,” said Scott.

We’re hiring! MHI RJ Aviation Inc. is actively recruiting Aircraft Technicians in Structures, Maintenance and Avionics for its Bridgeport (WV) and Tucson (AZ) Service Centers.

Apply now at mhirj.com

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 19


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

WEST VIRGINIA:

HOME OF AEROSPACE INNOVATION AND EXPANSION WEST VIRGINIA has a proud

West Virginia facility

history of contributing excellence to the aerospace industry. Katherine Johnson, the late NASA mathematician who calculated and analyzed the flight paths of spacecraft during her tenure, and the late General Chuck Yeager, an Air Force aircraft mechanic who later became a test pilot and the first human to break the sound barrier, are just two examples of how West Virginians have always played a role in shaping the future of aerospace and aviation. Today, those contributions continue through over 4,000 jobs at 22 companies and the $1.3 billion of total economic output that the aerospace industry supports in the Mountain State. MHIRJ alone has 500 employees at its West Virginia facility, with plans to hire 240 more by March 2021.

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The state recognizes this thriving industry as an opportunity for its story in aerospace to continue, with new generations of highlyskilled West Virginians preparing to get to work. High-tech innovators and established industry titans alike have found a home among the hills of West Virginia because they recognize the tremendous advantages of locating there. Geographically, the state sits in the middle of the east coast flight path and places companies within a day’s drive of 34% of the top domestic purchasing sectors of aerospace products, defense contractors, corporations,


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

and federal agencies. Additionally, the state has proximity to original equipment manufacturers based in the South, including Boeing, Airbus, Lockheed Martin and Gulfstream. West Virginia also happens to be the 6th best state in the country for overall cost of doing business. These advantages, plus access to raw materials, development assistance, and a workforce boasting the lowest manufacturing turnover rate in the nation, make West Virginia a major player in aerospace activity. Logistical support from long term partners has been crucial for North Central West Virginia Airport (CKB) to have MHIRJ, the largest MRO Regional network in the world, by making sure that there is room to grow now, and into the future. Enacting a regional approach to long term recruitment

for workforce development by creating an awareness of the aerospace industry and the opportunities it creates for all West Virginians has proven to be successful. The nearby education community takes the lead by implementing aerospace programs in high schools, giving students an opportunity to take classes as early as their junior year. The Robert C. Byrd National Aerospace Education Center, located on the CKB campus, offers an associate degree in aviation maintenance technology and bachelor’s degrees in aviation technology and aviation administration. Their programs

experienced the highest volume of enrollment numbers in its history in 2020. Enrollment numbers continue to climb as companies like MHIRJ expand their presence, offering careerpaths for more and more West Virginians. With a nationwide shortage of trained pilots and aviation technicians, development of aerospace education is surging as universities, colleges, and airports in West Virginia collaborate to expand its already robust workforce pipeline. Opportunities for growth have been identified in 21 certified AEROReady counties in southern West Virginia. In light of this,

MHIRJ Bridgeport: MHIRJ provides comprehensive maintenance, repair, overhaul and line station services for CRJ Series aircraft at their strategically located service center in Bridgeport, West Virginia. West Virginia Governor Jim Justice announces MHIRJ’s plans to hire an additional 240 workers in Bridgeport, WV.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 21


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

Marshall University is moving forward with a flight school breaking ground at Yeager Airport (CRW) in Charleston, while its planned aviation maintenance program will locate at the Tri-State Airport in Huntington (HTS), partnering with Mountwest Community & Technical College to offer diplomas from both schools. Companies also find it beneficial to locate their operations in close proximity to West Virginia’s airports, providing them a convenient access point to the world. That’s why CKB has a five year plan to build

a new terminal building that will result in 100 additional acres for development adjacent to a 7,800-foot runway. Southern West Virginia airports plan to follow suit with Raleigh County Memorial Airport developing more than 100 acres of site-ready pads for business to locate, and Yeager Airport exploring the possibility of a runway extension, potentially opening up more than 50 acres of land for development. The key to the successful relationship between West Virginia’s aerospace resources and companies like MHIRJ is

understanding each other’s goals and objectives. It begins with the end in mind, then looking for ways to create win-win relationships for both parties. MHIRJ and CKB appreciate the work of each other, and it shows in the results. The Mountain State stands to build upon the already booming impact of CKB’s aerospace cluster and is prepared to welcome new companies into its growing aerospace ecosystem across the state.

West Virginia Governor Jim Justice announces MHIRJ’s plans to hire an additional 240 workers in Bridgeport, WV as Harrison County Commissioner and Airport Authority President David Hinkle looks on.

DEVELOPMENT OFFICE AEROSPACE | DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

22 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

THERE’S

A NEW ENERGY ON BOARD

The wind is shifting, and there’s something in the air. It’s the rebirth, the renewal of something that knows no boundaries except the sky itself. It’s the CRJ Series, under new banners and moving in a whole new direction. It’s a revolution in how we view MRO operations and the legacy of a pioneering aircraft. It’s putting Aftermarket Services at the forefront of our activities, providing a wide spectrum of possibilities beyond initial acquisition.

It’s the answer to the question “What now?” Here’s why we’re so pumped: in COVID and Post-COVID eras, there’s no choice but to turn to the digital, and that opens up so many possibilities. Building on the momentum of the birth of MHIRJ just eight months ago, we’ve come up with a fully comprehensive platform adapted to the needs of today. MHIRJ.COM is first and foremost an identity, but it’s also a database and a tool.

Looking to pad your fleet with previously owned aircraft? We’ve just made that easy for you. In need of support?

We’re here 24/7. Quick solutions and information are only a click away. Come and see for yourself at

MHIRJ.COM

We aspire to make things simple, efficient and forward-thinking. Accessibility and ease-of-use are our main priorities when interacting with others. For example, you can browse through our Products & Services section to see how MHIRJ can provide tailor-made solutions and have you covered on all sides.

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 23


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

THE COMMITMENT CONTINUES

THE NEW CERTIFICATION SC

By Nathalie Chabot

While we’ve stopped holding face-to-face conferences due to COVID-19, we haven’t stopped working with operators and suppliers on Top Reliability Issues. From October 2020 to January 2021, we’ve hosted Technical Steering Committee (TSC) presentations twice a month. These meetings replaced the Orlando All Operators Conference that was scheduled for May 2020 and our fall presentation that was to take place in Saint-Sauveur last October. We’re pleased to say that at each TSC meeting, over 50 people joined us, demonstrating that CRJ operators and suppliers are still active and engaged even though Bombardier manufacturing will soon come to a close. Moving forward, we will continue to hold regular monthly calls to address Top Reliability Issues on all CRJ aircraft and to review recent Airworthiness Directives. If you are an owner or operator of a CRJ aircraft and would like to be added to our monthly Technical Steering Committee call list, please contact me via email at Nathalie.Chabot@mhirj.com I look forward to hearing from you!

On December 2nd 2020, MHIRJ received its AS9100D and ISO9001: 2015 certifications.

This meant a shift for something bigger: the widening of its world-class MRO operations to a more diversified clientele. From now on, MHIRJ is able to deliver on utmost quality and safety to customerexclusive parts unlike any other in the industry today. Surely, MHIRJ isn’t the only manufacturer to have obtained this certification, which is of the most recent iteration. What makes it stand out, though, is the fact that the certification is coupled with MHIRJ’s standard-shattering Aftermarket services which have consistently brought clients satisfaction. What’s more, the certification process was achieved in little over five months after the company’s entry into the market. Behind this achievement, the manufacturing department had started work before MHIRJ was even born. The astounding commitment of its employees is really what makes a company. Faced with unprecedented challenges in 2020, MHIRJ was able to come as a whole, supported by the talent and hardworking dedication of its people. As operations are set to begin in early 2021, MHIRJ is now well on its way to become a fully autonomous parts and engineering supplier to the aviation market. Next in line is for MHIRJ to be able to manufacture structural and mechanical components tailored to customers’ requirements.

24 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN


TAKING BACK THE SKIES

ONGOING SUPPORT TO KEEP YOU FLYING 24/7 access to the largest regional aircraft maintenance network in the world. HEAD OFFICE 3655 Avenue des Grandes Tourelles, Suite 110 Boisbriand, Qc, J7H 0E2 Tel.: +1 450 497 0555

CONTACT US CUSTOMER RESPONSE CENTER The CRC can be reached 24/7/365 North America (toll-free): +1 844 CRC CRC0 (+1 844 272 2720); or direct: +1 514 855 8500 Europe: +44 (0) 2890 468899 International: +1 514 855 8500 Fax: +1 514 956 2888 PARTS ORDERING North America (toll-free): +1 844 CRC CRC0 (+1 844 272 2720) International: +1 514 855 8500 AOG Parts Services: aog.parts@MHIRJ.com Routine and Critical Parts Services: parts@MHIRJ.com

PARTS AND SERVICES SALES TEAM The Sales Team is available to support all your parts and services requirements, throughout the life of your aircraft. Contact us for everything from ‘Entry-into-Service provisioning’ thru ‘Heavy Maintenance spares planning’. MICHAEL DESCENT Manager, Parts and Services Sales michael.descent@mhirj.com Tel. +1 416 373 5505 Mobile. +1 416 902 6775 COLIN TRUEMAN Regional Sales Manager - International colin.trueman@mhirj.com Tel. / Mobile +44 7841 630781 YVON HACHE Regional Sales Manager – Americas yvon.hache@mhirj.com Tel. +1 416 373 5197 Mobile. +1 416 902 5983

TIM MOORE Regional Sales Manager – Americas tim.moore@mhirj.com Tel. +1 304 997 5548 Mobile. +1 304 531 633

SERVICE CENTERS TUCSON SERVICE CENTER 1555 East Aero Park Blvd. Tucson, AZ 85765 USA WEST VIRGINIA AIR CENTER 2400 Aviation Way Bridgeport, WV 26330 USA DON NOLAN Director, Sales and Business Development don.nolan@mhirj.com Tel.: 520 991 6155

MHIRJ AUTHORIZED SERVICE FACILITIES ADRIA TEHNIKA Zgornji Brnik 130h 4210 Brnik-Aerodrom Slovenia Tel.: +386 4 259 4348 sales@aateh.si Aircraft Authorized Types CRJ Series 100/200/700/900/1000 WEB

JAZZ TECHNICAL SERVICES Halifax Stanfield International Airport 310 Goudey Drive Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada, B2T 1E4 Contact: Cesar Longeri, Director MRO Operations + 1 902 873 5414 jts.mro@flyjazz.ca Aircraft Authorized Types CRJ Series 100/200/700/900/1000 WEB

TRAINING CENTERS CAE CAE has decades of experience providing training to airlines and operators around the world. Headquartered in Montreal, CAE offers CRJ Series flight training worldwide, with the lead ATP Training Center based in Toronto. Other CRJ simulators are based in Charlotte, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Madrid and Copenhagen. CAE Toronto Training Center 2025 Logistics Drive Mississauga, Ontario L5S 1Z9 Canada Tel.: +1 905 672-8650 Fax: +1 905 672 0211 toronto-Center@cae.com WEB

Other CRJ simulators are based in Charlotte, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Madrid and Copenhagen. FLIGHTPATH INTERNATIONAL (FPI) FlightPath International (FPI) has years of experience delivering CRJ technical training. They currently hold EASA, Transport Canada and CAAC approvals, as well as those from other regulatory authorities. Headquartered in Toronto, FPI has partnerships with numerous other organizations and is capable of delivering many aspects of CRJ Technical training on-site, at the operator’s location FlightPath International Corporate Office 7828-1 Hwy 89 Alliston, Ontario, L9R 1V1 Tel.: +1 705 434 0058 Fax.: +1 705 434 0063 info@flightpathinternational.com WEB

WINGSPAN wingspan@MHIRJ.com

MHIRJ WINGSPAN | 25


ISSUE ONE / SPRING 2021

26 | MHIRJ WINGSPAN

Profile for MHIRJ

MHIRJ WINGSPAN - Volume 1, Issue 1 - Spring 2021  

WINGSPAN is a quarterly digital publication published by MHIRJ and dedicated to the CRJ aircraft series, featuring technical content and sol...

MHIRJ WINGSPAN - Volume 1, Issue 1 - Spring 2021  

WINGSPAN is a quarterly digital publication published by MHIRJ and dedicated to the CRJ aircraft series, featuring technical content and sol...

Profile for mhirj