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YEAR 55, NO. 28 JULY 12-18, 2017

SERVING MARIN COUNTY

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Bright Stars

SINGING, AND UNDERSTANDING, AMERICA’S NATIONAL ANTHEM P6

Larkspur Licks P10

Comedy Under the Stars P12

African Rhythms P13


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North Bay Food, Drink & Music Listings

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Movie Page Editor Matt Stafford Copy Editor Lily O’Brien CONTRIBUTORS Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Charles Brousse, Tanya Henry, Howard Rachelson, Nikki Silverstein, Charlie Swanson, David Templeton, Richard von Busack

Jay Yamada

ADVERTISING Advertising Account Managers Danielle McCoy x311, Marianne Misz x336 Classified and Legal Advertising x331 legals@pacificsun.com ART AND PRODUCTION Design Director Kara Brown Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal Production Operations Manager Sean George Graphic Designers Jimmy Arceneaux Alfred Collazo ADMINISTRATION Operations Manager Allison Williams x331 CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano PACIFIC SUN (USPS 454-630) Published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc. Distributed free at more than 500 locations throughout Marin County. Adjudicated a newspaper of General Circulation. First class mailed delivery in Marin available by subscriptions (per year): Marin County $75; out-of-county $90, via credit card, cash or check. No person may, without the permission of the Pacific Sun, take more than one copy of each Pacific Sun weekly issue. Entire contents of this publication Copyright ©Metrosa, Inc., ISSN; 0048-2641. All rights reserved. Unsolicited manuscripts must be submitted with a stamped self-addressed envelope. ON THE COVER Design by Tabi Zarrinnaal

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Letters

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Trivia/Hero & Zero

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Food & Drink

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Letters

NorBays Strike Back

Vote for your favorite bands—and more—now A North Bay tradition more than a decade in the making, the annual NorBay Music Awards are now open for our 2017 write-in voting. This year, we’ve expanded our voting to include several new genres and musical categories to better represent the broad and diverse array of music in our region. In addition to longtime categories such as reggae and jazz, our online poll is zeroing in on some of our favorite, though often overlooked genres. So, this year, we’ve got punk in its own league, as well as spots for metal and indie rock. We’re also splicing up the blues and R&B departments, as well as the country and folk listings, hip-hop and electronica groupings to better represent these sounds. Readers will also find new categories to honor local radio disc jockeys, local venues or clubs, open mic events, music festivals and music promoters, because those who support the scene deserve some love, too. Anyone can write in for their favorite North Bay bands, though we ask that you only vote once. If you’re a band, tell your fans; if you’re a fan, tell your friends. Voting will be available through Monday, August 7, and we’ll announce winners in our Aug. 9 issue. Look for the NorBay icon at pacificsun.com, and cast your votes today. —Charlie Swanson

Unfathomable

So conservative Republicans have proposed to repeal the current health law and come up with a replacement later. Brilliant! What happens if I get sick in between? I find it unfathomable that men that stupid still have the wherewithal to get themselves elected to Congress. —Martin Blinder, M.D.


By Howard Rachelson

1 What three major earthquake fault lines run through the Bay Area?

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2 What’s the most popular website with a wet name? 3 What kind of tree and grasshopper have the same name?

4 Identify this 1992 legal-drama film and the three main stars shown. 5 Gold is the traditional gift for

wedding anniversary number what?

6 Supply a two-word alliterative phrase (for example, Sweet snack spot: Dunkin’ Donuts).

a. Hamburger sidekick b. Yellow kid fan fave c. Nightclub habitué 7 Was it Mark Twain, William

Shakespeare or Greek philosopher Plato who coined the phrase, ‘Necessity is the mother of invention’?

8 In the early 1970s, America’s most successful retail business built America’s tallest building in Chicago. What was it?

9 Which French king and queen were executed in 1793 by rebellious citizens during the French Revolution?

10 Nevada, Missouri, Oklahoma and Utah are the only states whose capital cities do what? BONUS QUESTION: Stephen Curry made Warriors fans (and his family) so very happy when he recently signed the NBA’s largest contract in history— for how many years, and up to how many dollars?

Whales are making a splash this summer. Whether watching a pod breach near the Golden Gate Bridge, spotting them feeding inside the Bay or viewing them off our coastline as they migrate north, Marinites are enjoying the increased activity of these magnificent animals. Experts attribute the large number of sightings to humpback whales coming close to the shoreline to feed on anchovies and krill. You can learn about getting involved in whale watching and citizen science at a fascinating presentation by the American Cetacean Society-San Francisco Bay Area (ACS-SF Bay), a vital nonprofit that protects whales and their habitats through public education, research grants and conservation action. Join the ACS-SF Bay at the Bay Model in Sausalito on Tuesday, July 25 at 7pm. For more info, visit acs-sfbay.org.

Answers on page

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Zero

Hero

Howard thanks you for enjoying the Trivia Café website, and invites you to upcoming team trivia contests: Tuesday, August 15 at Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael, and Wednesday, August 23 at Restaurant Taste in San Rafael, inside Copperfield’s Books. Contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com, and visit triviacafe.com.

▼ Novato police are asking for your help to find the zeros responsible for a gasoline theft at the Novato Unified School District bus yard last Wednesday at about 11:15pm. A custodian observed two thieves siphoning gas from underground storage tanks used to fill school buses. Although they skedaddled before police could nab them, the custodian snapped photos of a white Ford Econoline box van or similar vehicle. A California license plate reading 7BQK347 was on the rear of the van; however, police believe it may have been stolen. The driver is described as a bald Hispanic male, in his 30s, with a medium build, and the passenger is described as a white female, blonde and heavy-set. Please call the Novato police at 415/897-4361 with any info.Y

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

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Trivia Café


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David Templeton

Singer/actor Phillip Percy Williams was asked to sing the national anthem at last Friday’s baseball game between the Giants and the Marlins.

Surreal Stage

Phillip Percy Williams checks an item off his bucket list By David Templeton

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t’s three days after the Fourth of July, and the pre-game audience at San Francisco’s AT&T Park is being treated to a voice-over description of the safety procedures should an earthquake or hurricane hit the waterfront baseball stadium. The massive jumbotron flashes a constant barrage of images, announcements, reminders and facts. A tech crew hustles about, assembling various pieces of audio and video equipment while thousands of loud, excited, snack-bearing people fill the vast rows of seats. Singer/actor Phillip Percy Williams—just moments after doing a quick microphone check at the edge of the baseball diamond, and after a long trafficsnaggled drive from Marin—is valiantly ignoring all of that,

purposefully avoiding glancing up at the crowd, and otherwise working hard to stay calm. After all, Williams has a job to do, and it’s an important one. In just three or four minutes, he’ll be stepping out onto the impeccably groomed baseball field and taking his place—roughly halfway between home plate and the pitcher’s mound—to sing the national anthem. It’s an iconic and surprisingly weighty little piece of modern American culture, the singing of the anthem, both celebrated and taken-for-granted, and occasionally hotly debated. Williams is about to do it before an estimated crowd of 40,000 people, including several friends and colleagues from the Bay Area theater community and his job at

the Mt. Tam Orthopedics and Spine Center, along with the entire San Francisco Giants and Miami Marlins baseball teams. “This is something that’s been on my bucket list for a while,” he calmly but happily notes, cautiously allowing himself to wave at a few thumbs-upping friends who’ve just made their presence known up in the seats. For additional support, his husband Mike and his motherin-law Karol are nearby, ready to offer support, administer hugs and join Williams in prayer just before taking the field. Being asked to sing the anthem at a Major League Baseball game, notes Williams, is a very big thing. “It’s just one of those experiences,” he says, “that, as a singer, you always know is out

there as a possible thing to do, if you are ever lucky enough to be asked to do it. And when it happens, it just seems so surreal you almost can’t believe you’re doing it.” Williams is waiting near the audio station, directly in front of the media dugout, which is adjacent to the visiting team’s dugout. Hovering helpfully nearby is Amanda Suzuki, from the Marketing and Entertainment department of the San Francisco Giants. The main contact for all visiting performers selected to sing the national anthem during Giants’ home games, Suzuki coordinates those performers— one for every home game, including pre-season and postseason games. She is good at


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Phillip Percy Williams and his husband Mike read emails from friends at San Francisco’s AT&T Park.

Key saw that the flag flying over the fort was left surprisingly intact the next morning, despite incessant artillery rained down on the fort through the night. Though some criticize the American national anthem for being a glorification of war, a careful reading of the text reveals it more accurately to be a celebration of the survival of war—and one of the few national anthems of any country that is focused on the dangerous adventures of an inanimate object. Beyond that, the most frequent criticism of the American national anthem is that it is much too hard to sing. The irony of this is that the melody of the anthem was never intended for professional vocalists, but was specifically composed to be sung by deeply inebriated amateur musicians. The Anacreontic Society was an 18th century English men’s club devoted to, and named for, the ancient Greek poet and celebrated inebriate Anacreon. The club’s anthem, “The Anacreontic Song,” set to a tune composed by John Stafford Smith, is a celebration of music, singing and the consumption of wine. The tune became fairly well-known outside of the exclusive club—which faded away in the 1790s—and was often used as the melody of other poems, usually

intended to be sung in taverns. Which leads to the conclusion that, for all of its notorious musical difficulty, the secret to singing the national anthem might be, if not getting somewhat bombed to sing it, simply relaxing a bit and not trying so hard. Once paired together, “The Anacreontic Song” and “The StarSpangled Banner”—originally named “Defense of Fort McHenry”—took a very long while to be officially instated as America’s national anthem. Believe it or not, it wasn’t until 1931, following a derisive newspaper cartoon by Santa Rosa’s Robert Ripley in his syndicated “Believe It or Not” series, that Congress finally passed a bill that named “The Star-Spangled Banner” the country’s national anthem. By then, it had already become common for the song to be performed at the beginning of baseball games, a tradition that supposedly began at the 1918 World Series in Chicago, when it was played by a military band during the seventh inning. The tradition took a while to spread to every single game, in part because of the cost of hiring a full military band. Today, the singing of the national anthem is as much a part of the baseball experience as are the consumption of hot dogs »8

David Templeton

takes another breath and waits. “Ladies and gentlemen,” comes Brooks-Moon’s voice again, “please remove your hats, as we honor America with our national anthem. Performing the ‘[The] Star-Spangled Banner,’ please welcome Bay Area performer Phillip Percy Williams.” Williams waits until the applause has just begun to fade, and then begins. Williams’ performance, done a cappella, is graceful and moving, hitting all of the marks and nailing the high note on “land of the free” with a soaring falsetto that brings spontaneous cheers from the crowd—a huge assemblage of human beings that Williams will later note is easily the largest audience he’s ever had in his life. As he walks back to where Mike and Karol are waiting with enormous hugs, Williams acknowledges the applause, finally allowing himself to show his emotions with a joyful laugh and a massive grin that is part, “I’m glad that’s over” and part, “I can’t believe that just happened!” Suzuki offers her farewells, makes sure Williams and his group have their tickets for the game, and departs. Out on the field, the sound equipment is quickly cleared, the ceremonial first pitch is tossed, the Giants and the Marlins trot one-byone out onto the field and the game begins. On his way up into the seats, Williams is stopped every few feet, greeted over and over by dozens of new fans and a few old friends, all stepping over from their own seats to shake his hand, offer highfives, lean in for an earnest ‘thank you’ and generally share their appreciation of his performance. “I feel like it’s still happening,” Williams says with a sigh, after settling into his seat. “I think it might take me a while to calm down. But, you know, I feel pretty good. I’m really happy. “That said,” he adds, with a laugh, “I might not be able to eat again for days.” The national anthem has not always been a part of Major League Baseball games. For that matter, the song known to many as “The Star-Spangled Banner”—and the melody that the lyrics are sung to—have not always been our national anthem. The words, of course, originated as a poem by lawyer Francis Scott Key, reflecting on his observations of the British attack on Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812.

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what she does, juggling complex logistics with a bit of confidenceboosting cheerleading and on-thespot relaxation therapy. “If I could sing, this would be on my bucket list, too,” she tells Williams, generously adding, “But I can’t sing—so it’s a really good thing that you can.” Yes he can. Originally from Mobile, Alabama, Williams worked for several years as a singer with Carnival Cruise Line, and spent more than 10 years as part of the cast of San Francisco’s Beach Blanket Babylon. Currently, he works as MRI Liaison at the Spine Center, a flexible “day job” that allows him to pursue an array of musical and theatrical projects. Williams performs weekly at San Rafael Joe’s in downtown San Rafael, with the Percy Williams Trio. In recent years, he’s been appearing almost constantly on stage in plays and musicals, and in 2014, he won the San Francisco Bay Area Theater Critics Circle award for Principal Actor in a Musical, for his role in Return to the Forbidden Planet, produced by Curtain Theater and Marin Onstage. Most recently, he played Mrs. White in Clue: The Musical, at Napa’s Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, where he will be appearing again this September in Chicago. But first, there’s a certain song to sing. “Let’s go over your introduction,” Suzuki tells Williams, showing him her clipboard with the words about to be spoken by Giants announcer Renel Brooks-Moon. Williams reads through it and nods. “In just a minute,” Suzuki says, “we’ll walk out and get in place.” She points to where a monitor and microphone are waiting for him. The video and audio crews are already getting into position. “The camera will be on you as you walk out and get into position, so feel free to wave, smile, whatever you’re comfortable with. And have fun.” “That’s good,” Williams says, taking a deep breath. “‘Have fun’ is good.” On the P.A. system, BrooksMoon’s recognizable voice has just run through another series of reminders, and concludes with, “And now, sit back, get ready for the Giants, and enjoy the game!” “OK! Ready?” asks Suzuki. “Let’s go.” Williams is led out onto the field, where he is given the microphone, and told to wait for his cue. Standing in the shadowy late-afternoon light, he finally allows himself to look up and around, bows his head briefly,


Surreal Stage «7

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and a willing overpayment for beer. The Giants, as do all other baseball franchises, annually receive thousands of offers to perform the anthem. Through a process of online application and the sending of performance videos, those thousands are whittled down to a select group of chosen choruses, ensembles and solo singers. As of Friday, July 7, that group now includes Phillip Percy Williams. Two days after the game (the Giants lost to the Marlins, 6 to 1), having fielded an overwhelming number of congratulations and positive reviews from friends, Williams is finally calm enough to look back at the once-in-a-lifetime experience. “You know what was great, in a way, for me?” he asks. “It was getting stuck in traffic. “For me, I’m the kind of performer who can get myself stressed, so it’s better to focus on something else,” Williams continues. “So I ended up stuck in traffic, and I was later to the park than I wanted to be, but that was good. I was able to walk in, do the soundcheck, pray a little and never have time to get nervous. That’s when I soar. If I sit too long waiting, the nervousness can snowball. And who needs that?” Williams notes that, for him personally, the most powerful moment of the whole experience was during those few seconds that

he spent out on the field, waiting for the cue to begin singing. “My mom passed away a long time ago,” he says. “But she was a singer. She owned places where people sang. And she’s always been a part of my journey as a performer, even though she died when I was young, and she never got to see me do all of the things I’ve done.” Even after acknowledging the cultural significance of singing the anthem at a Major League game, performing for such a large audience and everything else, Williams says it was that moment that he will always treasure the most. “I took a moment to bring her in, to bring her there with me onto the field,” he says. “She was definitely there with me. I needed her to be there. And she was.” So what’s next on Williams’ bucket list? “I’d like to do Shakespeare, and I’d like to write a play,” he says. “One where I can sing and tell stories. I have a few really good ideas. Those are next for me, I think.” Asked if he might one day write a show about his long journey from Mobile, Alabama, to San Francisco, from dreaming of performing to doing it on one of the largest stages in America, Williams laughs. “Maybe,” he says. “Maybe. I mean, I did just sing the national anthem at AT&T Park. So anything is definitely possible.”Y

“The StarSpangled Banner”

“The Anacreontic Song”

O say can you see, by the dawn’s early light, What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming, Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight O’er the ramparts we watch’d were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket’s red glare, the bomb bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there, O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O’er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

To Anacreon in Heav’n, where he sat in full Glee, A few Sons of Harmony sent a Petition, That He their Inspirer and Patron wou’d be; When this Answer arriv’d from the Jolly Old Grecian. “Voice, Fiddle, and Flute, “no longer be mute, “I’ll lend you my Name and inspire you to boot, “And, besides, I’ll instruct you like me, to intwine “The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus’s Vine.”


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Posie, Larkspur’s hip ice cream shop, uses all organic ingredients and even accommodates gluten-, dairy- and nut-free diets.

FOOD & DRINK

Creative Cones

Larkspur’s Posie offers wildly inventive ice cream flavors By Tanya Henry

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his week, Posie, the uber hip, chef-owned ice cream parlor in downtown Larkspur, will mark its first year in business. With flavors like Grass Fed and Rose & Rhubarb, Posie is not your mother’s ice cream shoppe. Black chalkboards with chunky, Scrabble-like lettering denote the store’s offerings, and the sleek open space boasts both a counter with stools and a communal table. Plenty of glass windows, high ceilings and white wainscoting give the room a modern, stylish vibe. Owner Kyle Caporicci, San Anselmo resident and pastry chef, brings his considerable culinary acumen to his new gig. His résumé includes stints at San Francisco’s Campton Place and Michelin-starred Commis in Oakland. He knows his way around the kitchen—and it should be noted that along with cones, Posie’s menu also includes several baked sweets and a couple of sandwich and salad options, including a grilled cheese sandwich for kids. But it’s summertime and it’s the ice cream that steals the show here.

Twelve different flavors are offered daily, and customers can opt for house-made, gluten-free cones or compostable cups. The Grass Fed flavor includes wheat grass and olive oil. I know—those do not sound like ingredients that should be anywhere near an ice cream cone, but quite remarkably they work. The Pink Panther combined marshmallow, raspberry and strawberry, and was a bit cloying for my taste. Two other flavors stood out as unusual and tasty: A Blueberry Magnolia and a #1 Dad that boasted steel-cut oats. Along with wildly inventive flavors, Caporicci prepares his ice cream base and pasteurizes it inhouse. He says that this gives him creative control to adjust the base for every unique flavor. Since the range of ingredients can vary from rhubarb and fresh mint to violets and olive oil, I imagine that there is a fair amount of tweaking involved. Prices are high, but then again, not all ice cream is created equal. And quite often these cones boast fresh-fromthe-farmers’-market ingredients.Y Posie, 250B Magnolia Ave., Larkspur; 415/891-8395.


TALKING PICTURES

Gory Fun Talking blood and guts with Butcher Brother Mitch Altieri By David Templeton

‘‘I

like darkness,” says Mitch Altieri. “Darkness is fun.” I’ve met writer/director Altieri—one half of the cultmovie filmmaking duo known as The Butcher Brothers—to talk about the nuts and bolts of filling the screen with blood and guts. His office is filled with posters and props from his various efforts: 2010’s The Violent Kind, about demonically possessed bikers; 2013’s snakehandling thriller Holy Ghost People; the recent The Night Watchmen, its poster fusing a frightening image of an enormous clown with a group of uniformed guards and the tagline, “Let’s go kill some dead people!” “Have you seen the trailer for The Night Watchmen?” Altieri asks.

“Not yet,” I admit. “Though I did watch the trailer for A Beginner’s Guide to Snuff,” I add, pointing to the poster over Altieri’s desk. “We were going for a ’90s kind of vibe with Snuff,” he says. “With Night Watchmen, we went super-1980s.” Altieri turns to his computer to call up the trailer. “Making this one was really fun. The movie’s got a lot of goof ball antics, monsters, blood, gore and gratuitous nudity. We wanted to make something with the tone of a Ghostbusters movie—only really, really bloody. And with clowns.” Based on what I witness, The Night Watchmen appears to be the story of some hapless guards at a large office building, attempting to survive one long night when their

building is invaded by a voracious vampire clown and his ravenous evil-clown minions. In the trailer’s fast-paced 90 seconds, there are bites to the face, pencils to the chest and gunshots to the head, plus plenty of clowns—clowns in coffins, clowns on the ceiling and clowns on fire. “And there’s the gratuitous nudity,” I note as a fleeting moment of spontaneous toplessness takes place in the middle of a terrifying chase scene. “I wasn’t on set when they filmed that, where the woman’s top is torn off by the dead guys,” Altieri says. “I was in another part of the building filming a different scene. They sort of came up with that and did it. It’s pretty great, though. Very 1980s.”

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“With ‘Night Watchmen,’ we went super-1980s,” says writer/director Mitch Altieri.

In the final seconds of the trailer is a snippet of a scene where a dead guy is shot through the eye, and immediately spouts a gusher of blood all over the recoiling night watchmen. “That’s thoroughly gross, and totally hilarious,” I say. “Nice blood effects.” “We had awesome FX on this movie,” Altieri says with a grin. After a promising start with the 2006 comedy Lurking in Suburbia, Altieri and his filmmaking partner Phil Flores took to heart some advice about how investors prefer to put their money into genre films, particularly horror films. Altieri and Flores donned their bloody fraternal moniker and created The Hamiltons, a horrifically entertaining splatter flick about a family of young adult vampires. The film premiered at Sundance, and has since become a kind of underground hit, eventually spawning a London-set sequel, The Thompsons. Based on The Hamiltons, the Butcher Brothers were offered the remake of the classic 1986 serial killer movie, April Fool’s Day. The rest is history. Really, really bloody history. Altieri now sometimes directs outside the Butcher Brothers brand. “I did Beginner’s Guide to Snuff in November of 2015, and as we were wrapping Snuff, I was suddenly hired to do The Night Watchmen,” he explains. “So, there I was, locationscouting in Baltimore in January, and we went into production in February. “After wrapping it, I was in postproduction with Night Watchmen while also doing post on Beginner’s Guide to Snuff. During that period, my father passed away. It was such a crazy time in my life, man. I was really close to my father. So that was rough—and at the same time, I was posting two movies at once. By the end of the year, I was exhausted. Absolutely exhausted.” “I suppose there are worse things than being overworked doing your all-time dream job, right?” I point out. “Exactly,” Altieri replies. “I’m definitely not complaining. I’ve gone through it all, starting with being completely independent, making a movie for no money in my own hometown, to making studio films where Sony executives are yelling at me all the time, to being at Sundance and premiering at SXSW [South by Southwest]. “I’ve had this amazing decadeand-a-half-long experience, and I wouldn’t trade a minute of it,” he continues. “I mean, I get to scare people and get paid for it. I’m having a whole lot of fun.”Y


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Jay Yamada

Marin Shakespeare Company opens its 28th season with ‘Much Ado About Nothing,’ one of the Bard’s most popular comedies.

THEATER

Slap-Happy ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ a colorful comedy By Charles Brousse

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ee haw! Pass the moonshine! Each weekend through July 23, Marin Shakespeare Company (MSC) is transporting audiences on a journey to small-town Appalachia for a two-hour romp through one of the Bard’s most popular comedies, Much Ado About Nothing. It’s Shakespeare, country style—a bowl of grits seasoned with lumps of corny, thighslapping humor and toe-tapping musical interludes. Unless you’re a literary purist or genetically averse to an evening of wonderful theatrical entertainment performed “under the stars” in the company’s Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, you won’t

want to miss it. Such opportunities don’t come around every day. In their unceasing quest to find ways of freshening 16th century plays for audiences that may have become jaded by too many repetitions of the inner circle of favorites, producers have often turned to “concepts” that alter their setting and time frame, while retaining as much as possible of the original dialogue. Sadly, of the many I’ve attended, few have been successful. The Wild West Taming of the Shrew that was developed in the late 1960s at the College of Marin (COM) drama department is an exception, and now comes a similarly themed Much Ado.

Both broad comedies were originally set in southern Europe (Italy and Sicily, respectively) during the Renaissance. The colorful characters who inhabit them are timeless archetypes whose absurd antics are easily transposed across the centuries. For MSC adapter/ director Robert Currier in Much Ado, it is mythical Appalachia (Pikeville, Kentucky, to be precise), home to the feuding Hatfield and McCoy clans. Currier is also helped by the fact that, as the title suggests, Shakespeare didn’t intend his comedy to be more than an entertainment. Unlike the dramas and history plays, there are no power struggles or moral dilemmas to resolve.

Currier has assembled an excellent cast to bring his vision to life. Much of the pre-opening buzz was around his casting of Dameion Brown, a “graduate” of MSC’s theater program at Solano State Prison, in the key role of Benedick. He’s the confirmed bachelor whose prickly relationship with the equally stubborn Beatrice forms Much Ado’s core. Brown excelled as the Moor in last season's Othello, but people wondered whether someone with so little training and experience would know what to do with comedy. Within five minutes of his appearance on stage, all doubts vanished. Brown is a natural, pure and simple. I doubt that anything— comedy, drama or farce—lies beyond his range. Elena Wright’s Beatrice is a worthy competitor as she and Brown jockey for position in what turns out to be an unusual courtship dance. Steely when it counts, meltingly romantic when events finally topple her resistance, Wright makes the transitions without skipping a beat. A subplot involves the on-again, off-again relationship between Hero (Nicole Apostol Bruno), daughter of Leonato (Steve Price), a wealthy property owner, and her suitor Claudio (Joshua Hollister), who has just returned from one of the frequent clan skirmishes. Both actors give it their all, but their underwritten story—which begins on a strong note—gradually fades in the shadow cast by Beatrice and Benedick until it is resurrected in the play’s final minutes. Space limitations prevent consideration of everyone’s work, except to say that there isn’t a weak link among them. Likewise, I can only note the impact of Billie Cox’s country-western songs, especially the lament hauntingly sung by Claudio as he realizes that the serious error he has made may cost him his chance to win Hero’s affection. Jackson Currier’s rustic set and Abra Berman’s spot-on costumes greatly enhance the atmosphere. All in all, it’s a fine evening of outdoor summer theater. One can almost taste that flavorful Kentucky moonshine!Y NOW PLAYING: Much Ado About Nothing runs through July 23 in Dominican University’s Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave., San Rafael; 415/499-4488; marinshakespeare.org.


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MUSIC

Master Mix Onye Onyemaechi spreads African rhythms By Charlie Swanson

W

hen master percussionist and mentor Onye Onyemaechi isn’t leading mystical journeys in the deserts of Morocco or presenting weeklong sessions on the spirituality of drumming in Munich, Germany, he leads the dynamic afrobeat band Onye & the Messengers in the North Bay, where he’s lived for the last 25 years. Known for a dance-inducing repertoire of African rhythms blended with jazz, funk and splashes of reggae, Onye & the Messengers will be getting the crowd moving at the San Rafael Downtown Farmers’ Market on Thursday, July 13. Born in Nigeria, Onyemaechi studied business in Boston, but ultimately chose the musical life over the corporate one in the early 1980s. “Now, my business is to make people happy, to help them be joyful in what they do so they can excel in their own development,” he says.

Onyemaechi moved to the North Bay in 1989 and founded Village Rhythms as a way to present drumming and music in a multitude of educational programs. A celebrated performing and recording artist, he takes the rich tradition of afrobeat from his native Nigeria and spreads peaceful, positive values with a worldly rhythm. “Music is a gift to humanity,” Onyemaechi says. “Music is a way to share storytelling, culture and rites of passage.” Made up of several seasoned Bay Area musicians, Onye & the Messengers excel at showcasing the technicality of afrobeat’s polyrhythmic sound, as well as the music’s intuitive flair. “What I do with the band is to allow them to be free, to be available within their own creative means,” Onyemaechi says. “To let the music speak for itself.”Y Onye & the Messengers, Thursday, July 13, San Rafael Downtown Farmers’ Market, 1000 Fourth St., San Rafael; 6pm; sanrafaelmarket.org.

The film ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ includes multiple borrowings from the original sequence of five ‘Planet of the Apes’ movies.

FILM

Ape-Opera New ‘Apes’ film honors originals By Richard von Busack

C

omparing movies to food is the hack’s crutch, but Matt Reeves’ excellent War for the Planet of the Apes is like a parfait made of several delicious levels. In their redwoods hideout, Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes hold out against an attack by the humans. Gorilla scouts lead the way for the humans, in a skirmish of spears and arrows versus gun-power. After winning the battle, Caesar gets word of a possible homeland in the desert. What starts as a war movie becomes a Western, complete with Caesar as a grim Chimp Eastwood on horseback. Caesar even acquires a Walter Brennan sidekick in the form of the piebald, cracked Bad Ape (Steve Zahn, demonstrating boggling synthespian skills). As they ride out to find a new homeland, they adopt Nova (Amiah Miller), a helpless mute girl; it’s like the version of The Searchers that film fans always dream about, told from the Comanches’ point of view.

Then to Spartacus as Caesar harrows a slave-labor camp. Woody Harrelson brilliantly apes Brando, as a bald, beyond-the-beyond Colonel in charge. Finally, War resolves itself as a hairier version of The Ten Commandments, complete with a twist on the Red Sea inundation. Rather than looking like a dogeared swipe-file, this terrific apeopera honors the originals. It has the freshness of a story that you’re hearing for the first time. The apes have dignity and innocence, and are the kind of noble savages that few film viewers could possibly enjoy in human form. The political satire in this Apes movie is as timely as this film is, likely, timeless. War sets the stage for the astronaut Taylor’s arrival from the skies in the 1968 Planet of the Apes, and the shocking news he will bring—news as unbelievable as the theory of evolution is to the religious—of the apes’ long-ago subordination to humanity.Y

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Courtesy of Onye & the Messengers

Onye & the Messengers mix African rhythms with jazz, funk and reggae.


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14

Movies

• New Movies This Week By Matthew Stafford

Fri. July 14 - Thu. July 20 • American Valhalla (1:21) Documentary follows rockers Iggy Pop and Joshua Homme as they conceive, record, release and perform their groundbreaking album, Post Pop Depression. • Auntie Mame (2:23) Rosalind Russell re-creates her legendary stage role as a freespirited grande dame raising her nephew to be as life-embracing as she is. • Baby Driver (1:55) Wall-to-wall chase flick fueled by a righteously rockin’ soundtrack; Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx and Jon Hamm star. • Beatriz at Dinner (1:23) Comedy about the odd coupling of a sweet-tempered émigré health practitioner (Salma Hayek) and a bombastic billionaire (John Lithgow). • The Beguiled (1:32) Sofia Coppola’s remake of the Clint Eastwood classic stars Colin Farrell as an injured Union soldier seeking refuge in a Southern girl’s boarding school and arousing sexual tension aplenty in the process. • The Big Sick (2:00) True-life romantic dramedy about the fraught courtship between a Pakistani comic and a perky grad student; Holly Hunter and Ray Romano play the in-laws. • Churchill (1:45) Brian Cox stars as the embattled PM in the tense hours leading up to D-Day; Miranda Richardson costars as Clemmie. • Deconstructing The Beatles: Revolver (1:35) Musicologist Scott Freiman discusses the conception and creation of the Fab Four’s finest album. • Dunkirk (1:46) WWII epic about the evacuation of British troops from the Nazibesieged French city stars Kenneth Branagh and Tom Hardy; Christopher Nolan writes and directs. • Exhibition Onscreen: Michelangelo: Love and Death (1:30) Get up close and personal with the Manchester Madonna, the Sistine Chapel ceiling and other masterworks in this dazzling tribute to the Renaissance artist. • Falsettos (2:30) Direct from Lincoln Center it’s the acclaimed Broadway musical satire about gay pride and family dynamics among the American bourgeoisie. • 47 Meters Down (1:29) Mandy Moore’s and Claire Holt’s vacation to Mexico is more than they bargained for when they find themselves in a subaquatic cage surrounded by hungry sharks! • Funny Bones (1:30) Comedian Dan Kamin presents Charlie Chaplin’s 1916 classic The Pawnshop and demonstrates the many reasons this 101-year-old flicker still makes us laugh. • Girls Trip (2:02) Four BFFs head to New Orleans’ Essence Festival and set aside time for dancing, drinking, lovemaking and sisterhood; Queen Latifah stars. • The Hero (1:36) An aging Western movie star reconnects with his estranged daughter and hooks up with a standup comic while searching for that final career-defining role; Sam Elliott stars.

• The House (1:28) Amy Poehler and Will Ferrell star as doofus parents who raise funds for their daughter’s education by running an illegal casino in their basement. • The Last Dalai Lama? (1:21) Insightful portrait of His Holiness focuses on his influential work in education, politics, science and spirituality. • Letters from Baghdad (1:35) Documentary focuses on Gertrude Bell, explorer, archaeologist and WWI spy who helped define the parameters of the modern Middle East. • The Little Hours (1:30) Riotous cuttingedge comedy about a group of medieval nuns roused to pansexual abandon by their hunky new handyman. • Lost in Paris (1:23) Whimsical French comedy about the unlikely friendship between a frantic Canadian librarian and an affable Parisian tramp; Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel write, direct and star. • Maudie (1:57) True tale of Maud Lewis, a Canadian housekeeper who overcame crippling arthritis to become a beloved folk artist; Sally Hawkins stars. • Megan Leavey (1:56) True story of a Marine colonel, her dog Rex and their 100 remarkable rescue missions in war-torn Iraq. • The Metropolitan Opera: Carmen (3:40) Bizet’s sexy saga of a saucy, spirited señorita, not quite live from New York in glorious big-screen high definition. • The Metropolitan Opera: Macbeth (2:50) Direct from New York it’s Verdi’s terrifying yet tuneful take on the Bard’s timeless tragedy; Anna Netrebko stars as Lady Macbeth. • Moka (1:29) French thriller about a grieving mother on a convoluted journey to avenge the death of her son; Emmanuelle Devos and Nathalie Baye star. • My Cousin Rachel (1:46) Daphne du Maurier’s gothic romance hits the big screen with Rachel Weisz as a mystery woman who may be a murderess. • National Theatre London: Angels in America Part 1 (3:45) Acclaimed new production of Tony Kushner’s envelopepushing drama about the specter of AIDS over 1980s New York stars Andrew Garfield, James McArdle and Nathan Lane. • Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2:09) Luc Besson sci-fi adventure about a peaceful multicultural metropolis beset by an evil menace; Clive Owen and Rihanna star. • War for the Planet of the Apes (2:20) Caesar the simian is back, leading an ape army against a ruthless human generalissimo; Andy Serkis and Woody Harrelson star. • Wish Upon (1:30) A modern-day Aladdin’s lamp turns out to have more on its mind than granting wishes; horrific mayhem ensues.

• •

American Valhalla (Not Rated) Auntie Mame (Not Rated) Baby Driver (R)

Lark: Fri 7:30 Lark: Tue 8; Wed 11; Thu 4 Fairfax: Fri-Wed 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 7:30, 10:15; Sat-Sun 11:15, 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Regency: Fri-Sat 11, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10; Sun-Wed 11, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30; Thu 11, 1:50, 4:40 Beatriz at Dinner (R) Lark: Fri 5:40; Sun 8:30; Tue noon; Wed 4:15 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:45, 1, 3:20, 5:40, 7:55, 10:05; Sun-Tue 10:45, 1, 3:20, 5:40, 7:55; Wed 10:45, 1, 3:20; Wed-Thu 10:45, 1, 3:20, 5:40 The Beguiled (R) Regency: Fri-Sat 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; Sun-Wed 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20; Thu 11:50, 2:20, 4:50 Sequoia: Fri-Sat 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 9:35; Sun 1:55, 4:35, 7:20; Mon-Thu 4:35, 7:20 The Big Sick (R) Fairfax: Fri-Wed 1:15, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:20, 11:30, 1:10, 2:30, 4:05, 5:30, 7, 8:25, 9:55; Sun-Wed 10:20, 11:30, 1:10, 2:30, 4:05, 5:30, 7; Thu 10:20, 11:30, 1:10, 2:30, 4:05, 5:30 Sequoia: Fri-Sat 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:45; Sun 1:40, 4:20, 7; Mon-Thu 4:20, 7 Cars 3 (G) Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:35, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 Churchill (PG) Lark: Fri 3:15; Sat 6:15; Wed 2 Deconstructing the Beatles: Revolver (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri-Sun 1 Cinema: Thu 7, 9:40 Regency: Thu 7 • Dunkirk (PG-13) Exhibition Onscreen: Michelangelo: Love and Death (Not Rated) Lark: Tue 6:15 Lark: Sat-Sun 1 • Falsettos (Not Rated) 47 Meters Down (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:45, 3:10, 5:25, 7:40, 10 Rafael: Thu 7:15 (with Dan Kamin in performance) • Funny Bones (Not Rated) Northgate: Thu 7:10, 10:05 • Girls Trip (R) The Hero (R) Rafael: Fri-Wed 7:30; Thu 8:15 The House (R) Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:35, 3, 5:15, 7:35, 9:50 The Last Dalai Lama? (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri-Sun 2, 6; Mon-Thu 6 Letters from Baghdad (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri-Sun 1:30 Rafael: 4, 8 daily • The Little Hours (R) Rafael: Fri-Wed 3:30, 5:30; Thu 3:30 • Lost in Paris (Not Rated) Maudie (PG-13) Rafael: Fri-Wed 3:15, 5:45, 8:15; Thu 3:15, 5:45 Megan Leavey (PG-13) Lark: Fri 12:45; Mon 6:30 • The Metropolitan Opera: Carmen (Not Rated) Regency: Wed 7 The Metropolitan Opera: Macbeth (Not Rated) Lark: Wed 6:30 Lark: Sat 8:30; Mon 8:30 • Moka (Not Rated) My Cousin Rachel (PG-13) Lark: Sat 4; Sun 6:15; Mon noon; Tue 3:50 • National Theatre London: Angels in America Part 1 (Not Rated) Lark: Thu 11, 7:30 Regency: Thu 7 Paris Can Wait (PG) Lark: Mon 4:30; Tue 1:50 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Wed 9:55 Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Wed 12:40, 3:45, 6:50, 9:55 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 7, 3D showtime at 10:05; Sat-Sun 12:30, 7, 3D showtimes at 3:45, 10:05 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11, 11:45, 1:15, 2, 2:45, 4:15, 5, 5:45, 7:15, 8, 8:45, 10:25; 3D showtimes at 12:25, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Playhouse: Fri-Sat 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45; Sun-Wed 12:30, 3:30, 6:45 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10, 1, 4, 7; 3D showtime at 10:15pm Transformers: The Last Knight (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:15, 6:55, 10:10; 3D showtime at 3:40 • Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (PG-13) Northgate: Thu 6:35, 9:45; 3D showtimes at 5:05, 8:20 Cinema: Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:45, 10:15, 3D showtimes at 9:25am, • War for the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 7; Mon-Wed 12:30, 3:45, 10:15, 3D showtime at 7 Fairfax: Fri-Wed 12:20, 1:05, 3:30, 4:30, 6:45, 7:50, 9:55 Northgate: FriWed 12:30, 1:35, 3:45, 4:50, 7, 8:10, 10:20; 3D showtimes at 11:05, 2:15, 5:50, 9:10 Playhouse: Fri-Sat 12:45, 3:45, 6:50, 9:45; Sun-Wed 12:45, 3:45, 6:50 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:25, 1:40, 8; 3D showtime at 4:45 Northgate: Fri-Wed 1250, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:05 • Wish Upon (PG-13) The Women’s Balcony (Not Rated) Lark: Sun 4; Mon 2:20 Wonder Woman (PG-13) Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:45, 9:55; Sat-Sun 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 9:55 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:40, 3:55, 7:05, 10:15 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:10, 1:20, 4:35, 7:45

Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm. CinéArts at Sequoia 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley, 388-4862 Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, 924-6505 Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax, 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur, 924-5111 Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur, 461-4849 Northgate 7000 Northgate Dr., San Rafael, 800-326-3264 Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon, 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael, 454-1222 Regency 80 Smith Ranch Rd., Terra Linda, 479-5050 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato, 800-326-3264


Concerts

tickets recommended. Jul 16, 2pm. $25. Napa Design Center, 605 Coombs St, Napa. 707.252.8671.

MARIN COUNTY

The Revivalists New Orleans-based big band gets the venue dancing with support from Jamestown Revival. Jul 15, 5pm. $75-$205. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Chicken, Chitlins & Caviar Symphony Enterprises presents a musical soul food feast featuring jazz, classical and gospel celebrations of music in the AfricanAmerican culture. Jul 15, 8pm. $20-$30. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Steve Poltz Prolific punk-folk songwriter plays a barbecue cookout concert with support from folk duo Rain & Left. Jul 16, 5pm. $20 and up. HopMonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Tracorum Eclectic ensemble blends pop, soul and rootsrock with elements of funk and gospel. Jul 16, 8pm. $12-$15. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

SONOMA COUNTY Sabrina Carpenter Singer, songwriter and actress takes the stage and performs her teen-centric hit singles, with special guests Alex Aiono and New Hope Club. Jul 16, 7pm. $35-$49. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600. Trebuchet Petaluma pop-folk band headlines an acoustic-minded dinner show that also features the Honey Toads and DdW. Jul 14, 6:30pm. $5. The Big Easy, 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163. Valley of the Moon Music Festival Annual festival entirely devoted to Romantic music this year celebrates German composer Robert Schumann and features the nation’s best performers playing on period instruments. Jul 16-30. $20-$40. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, valleyofthemoonmusicfestival.org.

NAPA COUNTY Aimee Mann Soft-spoken and emotionally powerful songwriter plays off her new melancholic album, “Mental Illness,” in an intimate concert setting. Jul 13, 8pm. $40-$60. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123. Music of Japan Napa Valley Music Associates presents guest musicians Masayuki Koga and Michiyo Koga in an intimate concert setting. Advance

Up the Soul Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Jul 12, Howling Coyote Tour. Jul 19, Todos Santos. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005. Marin Art & Garden Center Jul 13, 5pm, Zydeco Flames. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Clubs & Venues

Marin Country Mart Jul 15, 2pm, Howling Coyote Tour. Jul 16, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Pacific Standard. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

MARIN

Nick’s Cove Jul 18, 6pm, Bray. 23240 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

The Belrose Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422. Belvedere Community Park Jul 16, 3:45pm, Jonathan Poretz with Matthew Linaman. 450 San Rafael Ave, Belvedere. City Green Jul 15, 5pm, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. 901 Sherman Ave, Novato, novato.org. Creek Park Jul 15, 6pm, Beatles in the Park tribute concert. Sir Francis Drake Blvd and Center Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.258.4640. Don Antonio’s Thurs, 6pm, dinner music with pianist Ricardo Scales. 114 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.0400. Don Antonio’s Trattoria Tues, 6pm, star night jam with pianist Ricardo Scales. 455 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.3332. Fenix Jul 12, pro blues jam with the Dave Matthews Blues Band. Jul 13, JJ Thames & the Violet Revolt. Jul 14, the Bloodstones. Jul 15, Top Shelf. Jul 16, 11:30am, Sunday brunch with Midnight Watch. Jul 19, Pro Blues Jam with the Bobby Young Project. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. Gabrielson Park Jul 14, 6:30pm, Curtis Lawson and friends. Anchor St, Sausalito. 415.289.4152. George’s Nightclub Jul 15, DJ party. Jul 16, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. HopMonk Novato Jul 13, Country Line Dancing. Jul 14, Notorious. Jul 15, DW Edwards & Lighting

19 Broadway Club Jul 12, PB & the Jam. Jul 13, Hunter & the Dirty Jacks. Jul 14, 5:30pm, Damir & Derek. Jul 14, 9pm, Pepa & Edgar with Pasto Seco. Jul 15, 5:30pm, Bayou Noir. Jul 15, 9pm, the Grain with Jason Daniels Band. Jul 16, 4pm, Dave Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Jul 16, 8pm, Void Where Prohibited. Jul 17, open mic. Jul 19, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. No Name Bar Jul 12, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. Jul 13, the Humdinger Band. Jul 14, Michael Aragon Quartet. Jul 15, Chris Saunders Band. Jul 16, 3pm, Flowtilla. Jul 16, 8:30pm, Migrant Pickers and friends. Jul 17, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Jul 18, open mic. Jul 19, Parts & Labor. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392. Oak Plaza at Northgate Jul 14, 6pm, Petty Theft. 5800 Northgate Mall, San Rafael. Osher Marin JCC Jul 15, 7pm, Summer Nights Outdoor Music Festival with Thomas Mapfumo & the Blacks Unlimited. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000. Osteria Divino Jul 12, Pedro Rosales Con Quimba. Jul 13, Passion Habanera. Jul 14, Walter Earl Trio. Jul 15, Ian McArdle Trio. Jul 16, Gabrielle Cavassa. Jul 18, Suzanna Smith. Jul 19, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355. Panama Hotel Restaurant Jul 12, Bob Gordon & the UFOs. Jul 13, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Jul 18, Wanda Stafford. Jul 19, Vardo. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993. Peri’s Silver Dollar Jul 12, the New Sneakers. Jul 13, Mark’s Jam

CALENDAR Sammich. Jul 14, PSDSP. Jul 15, the Sam Chase. Jul 16, Grateful Sundays. Jul 17, open mic. Jul 18, the Bad Hombres. Jul 19, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910. Piccolo Pavilio at Menke Park Jul 16, 5pm, Barbara Nesbitt. Redwood and Corte Madera avenues, Corte Madera. 415.302.1160. Rancho Nicasio Jul 14, Jerry Hannan. Jul 16, 4pm, BBQ on the lawn with Ruthie Foster Family Band and Volker Strifler. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219. San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Jul 14, 6pm, John Hoy Trio. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800. Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Jul 13, the Merlins. Jul 14, Reed Fromer Band. Jul 15, Andre Thierry. Jul 16, 5pm, Mazacote. Jul 17, open mic with Judy Hall and Andy Dudnick. Jul 18, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899. Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Jul 13, Kanekoa and ukulele workshop. Jul 14, Vandella and Angelica Rockne. Jul 15, Essence. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311. Spitfire Lounge Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551. Sweetwater Music Hall Jul 12, Kanekoa. Jul 13, Hot Club of Cowtown. Jul 14, Super Diamond. Jul 15, the Band of Heathens with Mendonesia. Jul 17, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Tennessee Valley Cabin Jul 14, 6:30pm, Rewind. 60 Tennessee Valley Rd, Mill Valley. Terrapin Crossroads Jul 12, Jeremy D’Antonio & the Papermill Gang. Jul 13, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Jul 14, Top 40 Friday with Mark Karan and friends. Jul 16, 2pm, Electric BBQ with Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band and Achilles Wheel. Jul 17, Grateful Mondays with Scott Law, Grahame Lesh and friends. Jul 18, Stu Allen and friends. Jul 19, the Casual Coalition with Scott Law. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Throckmorton Theatre Jul 12, 12pm, noon concert with the Bradeitch-Grove Duo. Jul 14, tribute to Roger Silver with Eric Martin, Miles Schon and friends. Jul 17,

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Sundial

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Summer Singing Workshop. Jul 19, 12pm, noon concert with Tom Rose and Miles Graber. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Trek Winery Jul 15, Amy Wigton. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Dance

the Messengers. Jul 16, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Jul 17, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Jul 19, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. The Reel Fish Shop & Grill Jul 13, Howling Coyote Tour. Jul 14, Miracle Mule. Jul 15, Trainwreck Junction. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

SONOMA

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jul 15, the Pulsators. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

A’Roma Roasters Jul 14, Ricky Alan Ray Band. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Jul 15, Hot Club Swing. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Aqus Cafe Jul 12, the Aqus Jazz Project. Jul 14, Bastille Day concert with Gypsy Kisses. Jul 15, the Buzz. Jul 16, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. Jul 19, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Simi Winery Jul 19, Broke in Stereo. 16275 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3686. Sonoma Cider Jul 14, Oddjob Ensemble. 44F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Arlene Francis Center Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. The Big Easy Jul 12, Wednesday Night Big Band. Jul 13, B & the Hive with Ariana. Jul 15, Jinx Jones & the KingTones. Jul 16, Total Rex. Jul 18, Mojo Green. Jul 19, Domenic Bianco and comedy open mic. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163. Brewsters Beer Garden Jul 13, Bluegrass & Bourbon with the Hossettes. Jul 14, T Luke & the Tight Suits. Jul 15, 3pm, Elephant. Jul 16, 3pm, Codi Binkley and friends. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330. Brixx Pizzeria Jul 15, Rhythm Drivers. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162. Cellars of Sonoma Jul 15, 5pm, Greg Yoder. Jul 16, 2pm, Simply Lyrical. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826. Coffee Catz Jul 13, 3pm, Randall Collen & Todd Smith Jazz Duet. Jul 15, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Jul 14, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600. Dry Creek Vineyard Jul 16, the Dixie Giants and the Russian River Ramblers. 3770 Lambert Bridge Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.1000. Flamingo Lounge Jul 14, Poyntlyss Sistars. Jul 15, Midnight Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Forestville Club Jul 15, Luvplanet. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594. Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Jul 15, Derek Irving & His Combo. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036. Graffiti Jul 14, the Peter Welker Sextet. Jul 16, Tracy Rose and friends. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567. Guerneville Community Church Jul 16, 2pm, Curtis James. 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.2514. Hawkes Tasting Room Jul 15, 4pm, summer nights with B & the Hive. 6738 Hwy 128, Healdsburg. 707.433.HAWK.

Julia Adam Dance presents SOLIS, a marriage of open-air ballet and a gourmet culinary experience, at Big Mesa Farmstead in Bolinas, July 14-16. Hood Mansion Lawn Jul 14, 7pm, Funky Fridays with Gator Nation. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays.info. HopMonk Sebastopol Jul 13, eNegative with the Drought Cult and Jimmy Cramer. Jul 14, Highway Poets and John Courage Trio. Jul 15, the Stone Foxes. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. HopMonk Sonoma Jul 14, 5pm, Shelby, Texas. Jul 14, 8pm, Wendy DeWitt. Jul 15, 1pm, Jimbo Scott. Jul 15, 8pm, Akarsha Kumar. Jul 16, 1pm, Craig Corona. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100. Hotel Healdsburg Jul 15, Greg Hester Trio with Rob Wright and Lee Charlton. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. Ives Park Jul 12, 5pm, Tempest and Greenhouse. Jul 19, 5pm, SonoMusette with Nina Gerber and Chris Webster. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol, peacetown.org. Jamison’s Roaring Donkey Wed, open mic night. Jul 14, the Grain with Jason Daniels Band. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478. Juilliard Park Jul 16, 5pm, Soul Fuse. 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa, srcity.org. KRSH Jul 13, 6pm, Hillstomp and Mudbone. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707. Lagunitas Amphitheaterette Jul 18, 4:20pm, BADBADNOTGOOD. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 12, the Rhythm Drivers. Jul 13, the Royal Deuces. Jul 14, the Pulsators. Jul 15, Talley Up. Jul 16, David Correa Group. Jul 19, Dirty Bourbon River Show. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro Jul 12, Geoff White Jazz Duo. Jul 13, Blue Alley Cats. Jul 14, Greg Hester and Vernelle Anders. Jul 15, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Blues Band. Jul 16, Cazadero Jazz Project. Jul 18, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. Montgomery Village Shopping Center Jul 13, 5:30pm, Kalimba. Jul 15, 12pm, Funky Dozen. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844. Murphy’s Irish Pub Jul 14, Andrew Freeman and Doug Adamz. Jul 15, Ten Foot Tone. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Steven Smith

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Sonoma Speakeasy Jul 12, the Acrosonics. Jul 13, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Jul 14, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Jul 14, 8pm, New Copasetics. Jul 15, 5:30pm, Full Circle. Jul 15, 8pm, Iko Ya Ya. Jul 16, 5pm, the Fabulous 45s. Jul 16, 8:30pm, acoustic blues jam. Jul 18, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. Jul 19, the Acrosonics. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364. Theatre Square Jul 16, 3:30pm, Dan Martin. 151 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma, theatre-district.com. Toad in the Hole Pub Jul 15, John Courage Trio. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623. Twin Oaks Roadhouse Jul 13, Levi’s Workshop. Jul 14, Well Known Strangers. Jul 15, the Fabulous BioTones. Jul 16, 3pm, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. Jul 18, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room Jul 15, 5:30pm, the Bee Rays. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Viansa Winery Jul 15, 12pm, Ken Teel. Jul 16, 12pm, Justin Brown. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700.

Mystic Theatre Jul 14, Saved by the 90s. Jul 15, Ozomatli. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Whiskey Tip Jul 14, Casa Rasta with DJ Sizzlak & Dinga. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

New Vintage Jul 15, 2 and 7pm, the Santa Rosa Redwood Chordsmen barbershop chorus. 3300 Sonoma Ave, Santa Rosa, redwoodchordsmen.org.

Windsor Town Green Jul 13, 6pm, Urban Outlaws. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor.com.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jul 15, 8pm, Bastille Day concert with Un Deux Trois and La Guinguette. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Blue Note Napa Jul 12, Charged Particles. Jul 13-15, Edwin McCain Acoustic Trio. Jul 19, Orgone. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Phoenix Theater Jul 15, Predation with Aethere and Sepulchre. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Ca’ Momi Osteria Jul 14, Roots Man Project. Jul 15, Jamie Clark Band. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Jul 13, 6:30pm, Craig Corona. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Far Niente Jul 15, Joshua Bell’s Seasons of Cuba. 1350 Acacia Dr, Napa, festivalnapavalley.org.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern Wed, 6pm, open mic session with Levi Lloyd and Donny Mederos. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Goose & Gander Jul 16, 1pm, the Good Bad. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Redwood Cafe Jul 13, Awesome Hotcakes. Jul 15, Onye &

NAPA

JaM Cellars Jul 13, Amber Snider. Jul 14, Serf & James. 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.


Lyman Park Jul 13, 6pm, musical picnics with Gretchen Jenzen & the Jenzen Earls Band. 1498 Main St, St Helena, sthelena.com. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater Jul 19, 6pm, André Watts with the Festival Orchestra NAPA and the Volti Chorus. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900. Napa Valley Roasting Company Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233. Napkins Bar & Grill Jul 14, DJ Carl J. Jul 15, DJ Tamayo. Jul 16, 12pm, acoustic brunch with Doug Houser. Jul 18, 6pm, Gentlemen of Jazz. 1001 Second St, Napa. 707.927.5333. Pacifico Restaurante Mexicano Fri, live mariachi music. 1237 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4400. Pioneer Park Jul 13, 6:30pm, Fog City Swampers. 1308 Cedar St, Calistoga. 707.942.2838. River Terrace Inn Jul 13, Timothy O’Neil. Jul 14, Nate Lopez. Jul 15, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000. Silo’s Jul 12, Wesla Whitfield & Mike Greensill. Jul 13, Scott Starr. Jul 14, Bastille Day party with SonoMusette. Jul 15, Tribe of the Red Horse. Jul 16, 4pm, tribute to Joe Pass with Frank Potenza. Jul 19, the Young Fables with JourneyDay. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833. Susie’s Bar Wed, Open Mic Night with Randy Foisy. 1365 Lincoln St, Calistoga. 707.942.6710. Uncorked at Oxbow Jul 13, open mic. Jul 15, Salty Dawgs. 605 First St, Napa. 707.927.5864. Veterans Memorial Park Jul 14, 6:30pm, Vincent Costanza with the Deadlies and the Hots. 850 Main St, Napa, napacitynights.com.

Art OPENING MARIN College of Marin Fine Art Gallery Jul 15-Aug 5, “Breathless,” photographer Polly Steinmetz celebrates life through portraits of ordinary animals in death. Reception, Jul 15 at 5pm. 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494. Marin Society of Artists Jul 13-Aug 5, “Something Old, Something New,” show celebrates the relationship between the old and new, beginnings and endings and youth and age. Reception, Jul 14 at 5pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

SONOMA Graton Gallery Jul 12-Aug 20, “Stormy Weather,” politically charged paintings by Mylette Welch and sculptures by the late Richard Benbrook resist and protest against today’s toxic political climate. Reception, Jul 15 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

NAPA Caldwell Snyder Gallery Jul 14-Aug 16, “Melissa Chandon & Matt Rogers,” two California artists display in a joint exhibition of recent paintings. Reception, Jul 14 at 5pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

CONTINUING THIS WEEK MARIN Bolinas Museum Through Aug 13, “Art We Wear,” exhibit shows decorated clothing of the counterculture expression from the 1960s to now. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330. Cavallo Point Lodge Through Oct 30, “Wonder & Awe,” renowned artist and award-winning filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg shows his 2D and 3D moving images, created as fine art for digital screens. 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito. 415.339.4700. Corte Madera Library Through Jul 13, “Mountain Inspiration,” group show from the Artists of Mount Tamalpais, a group of experienced visual artists who work in a variety of media and methods. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444. Gallery Route One Through Aug 6, “In the Mix,” Gallery Route One’s annual members’ exhibit features a dynamic array of art and media. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347. Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 22, “Rising Stars,” exhibit includes seven artists who have been awarded an annual grant from the Pirkle Jones Fund. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. MarinMOCA Through Aug 13, “Light,” artist member group show explores light in several mediums, while “Intertwined” exhibits woven glass by Artists-In-Residence Demetra Theofanous and Dean Bensen. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jul 20, “Abstract Figurative,” group show is juried by Susan Snyder. Through Jul 21, “s+toryprobl=m :: x = blue,” mixed-media artist CK Itamura’s ongoing exploration with defying categorization features an installation of alternative theories of grouping. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Aug 25, “This Is Bay Area Jewry,” photo essay exhibition shows the diverse local community through intimate portraits. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000. Robert Allen Fine Art Through Jul 28, “Abstract Works on Canvas & Paper,” group show features Beryl Miller, Michael Moon, Carol Lefkowitz and Jeffrey Long. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800. Town Books Through Aug 30, “Painting Explorations,” group show of acrylic and oil paintings by local artists. 411 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Tues-Sat, 10am to 4pm 415.526.3791. Villa Marin Through Aug 30, “Waterworks,” Marin County Watercolor Society’s group show interprets water through visuals and textures. 100 Thorndale Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.2408.

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Brian Regan Popular comedian returns with a new batch of family-friendly jokes. Jul 14, 7pm. $47 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600. Comedy at the Fenix See standup stars Kirby Shabazz, Ellis Rodriguez, Amy Rodgers and Michael Calvin. Jul 16, 7pm. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.813.5600. Cult Meeting Monthly show features touring and popular Bay Area comedians. Jul 14, 8pm. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7868. The Divorce Monologues Headlining standup Mark Pitta brings his new show to the North Bay. Jul 15, 8pm. $10$15. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, 707.665.0260. Jim Jefferies Outspoken Australian comedian performs as part of his new Unusual Punishment Tour. Jul 15, 7pm. $39 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600. Mort Sahl Sahl takes the stage every week to deliver his legendary, take-no-prisoners wit. Thurs, 7pm. $20. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Professor Hoffman’s Hump-day Comedy Circus Variety show boasts high-energy comedy with several splashes of something extra. Wed, Jul 19, 8pm. $10-$15. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, profhoffcomedy.com. Tuesday Night Live See standup comedians Jimmy Walker, Sammy Obeid, Kirk McHenry and others. Jul 18, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Will Durst Veteran standup star presents his new show, “Durst Case Scenario,”

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Jarvis Conservatory Jul 18, 11am, Bouchaine Young Artist Concert with Havana Chamber Orchestra. Jul 19, 11am, Bouchaine Young Artist Concert with Jiji on classical guitar. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.


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Events

Freezeout Canyon, Freezeout Rd, Duncans Mills, civilwardays.net. Festival Napa Valley Ten days of fine wine, gourmet food, extravagant galas and all-star performances takes over the valley with over 60 individual events. Jul 14-23. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa, festivalnapavalley.org. Flynn Creek Circus Acrobats, aerialists and daredevils perform in the classic big-top tradition. Jul 13-16. $12-$27. Marinship Park, Marinship Way, Sausalito, 415.331.3757. Food for Thought Volunteer Orientation Tour the food bank, get information and apply to help provide weekly groceries to men, women and children living with HIV and other illnesses in Sonoma County. Tues, Jul 18, 5:30pm. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville, 707.887.1647.

On July 15, artists will display their quilts, wearable arts and other handmade items for the Marin Quilt & Craft Fair at San Rafael’s Aldersgate Methodist Church. that mixes the silly and serious with biting satire and perfect comic timing. Jul 15, 7:30pm. $30. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale, cloverdaleperformingarts.com.

Dance Big Mesa Farmstead Jul 14-16, 5pm, SOLIS, Julia Adam Dance presents the fourth installment of the renowned elemental series that immerses the audience in an experience for all the senses. $200, juliaadamdance.com. 280 Mesa Rd, Bolinas. Hermann Sons Hall Mondays, 7pm. through Aug 7, Summer Folk Dancing, folk dances from all over the world, including Serbia, Turkey and Greece. All ages and skills welcome. 860 Western Ave, Petaluma 707.762.9962. Knights of Columbus Hall Tuesdays, 6pm, Learn How to Swing Dance!, monthly series is for beginners looking to Lindy Hop. jasmineworrelldance.com. 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo. Monroe Dance Hall Jul 14, 7pm, Motown & Disco Dance, with DJ Steve Luther. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa 707.529.5450. Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jul 15-16, SoCo Dance Theater, sculpture, poetry and movement mix together in a two-part performance. 282 S High St, Sebastopol 707.829.4797.

Events The Art is Medicine Show Kickoff Fundraiser The Imaginists celebrate nine years of free,

bilingual and bicycle-powered theater. All proceeds from this fundraiser kick-off party support the 2017 summer tour. Jul 14, 7pm. The Imaginists, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.528.7554. Bastille Day in the Wine Country Tenth annual Francophile celebration includes delicious foods, croissant-making and cookie-decorating activities and live music by Due Zighi Bachi. Jul 14. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Bike Expo Local bike shops, clubs, and community groups will display their wares and field questions about their programs and events at the Wednesday Night Market. Jul 12, 5pm. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and E streets, Santa Rosa, www.roseparadefestival.com. The Body Passion Project Women’s weekend retreat combines art making, movement, drum circle, journaling and sharing in an intimate circle of women. Jul 15-16. Congregation Ner Shalom, 85 La Plaza, Cotati, 707.664.8622. Breastfest Sample beer from some of the best California breweries, eat BBQ, listen to live music, win prizes and enjoy an afternoon in the sun while raising money to help low-income women with cancer. Jul 15, 1pm. $40-$65. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. Church Rummage Sale Find household goods and furnishings. Jul 15, 9am. Free admission. Guerneville Community Church, 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.1990. Civil War Days Living history reenactment gives visitors the opportunity to interact with soldiers and civilians of the Civil War. Jul 15. $6-$12.

Harmony Farm Supply Customer Appreciation Day The store expresses gratitude to its customers and patrons with a celebratory day that includes vendor booths, classes, live music, raffle prizes and more. Jul 15, 9am. Free. Harmony Farm Supply, 3244 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol, 707.823.9125. Healdsburg Water Carnival Spend a day on the river with floating wine barrel races, water slides, rubber duck dash, live music by Rosetown Soul and R&B Revue and more. Jul 15, 11am. Free admission. Veterans Memorial Beach, 13839 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. Locals’ Day at the Barlow Jam-packed with discounts, two-for-onetastings, freebies and other offerings from nearly 30 makers and merchants. Thurs. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.824.5600. Marin Quilt & Craft Fair Marin Needle Arts Guild’s local artists show quilts, wearable arts and other textilerelated handmade items for sale. Jul 15, 9am. Aldersgate Methodist Church, #1 Wellbrock Heights, San Rafael, 415.453.5393. OAEC Nursery Tours Tour the gardens and check out the center’s variety of food crops, herbs and plants. Third Sun of every month, 1pm. Through Oct 15. Free. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental, 707.874.1557. Obon Observance & Odori Celebration Obon is the special occasion when Buddhists honor their loved ones and express their appreciation with odori, or traditional Japanese dancing. Jul 16, 2pm. Free. Buddhist Temple of Marin, 390 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. Permaculture Design Course Two-week certificate course in land-use design based on the sustainable living philosophy of permaculture. Jul 15. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental, 707.874.1557. Poetry Reflections California poet laureate Dana Gioia and Sonoma County poet laureate Iris Jahmal Dunkle read and perform their works at “The Curtain” sculpture in Marijke’s Grove with student poets. Jul 16, 1pm. Free. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.528.9463.

San Rafael Gem Faire Over 70 vendors offer fine jewelry, precious gemstones, millions of beads, crystals, minerals and much more at manufacturer’s prices. Jul 14-16. 503.252.8300. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.473.6400. Second Fridays Art Walk Anchored by Art Works Downtown galleries and artist studios, the art walk links venues throughout downtown San Rafael with receptions and entertainment. Second Fri of every month, 5pm. Art Works Downtown, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.451.8119. Sun Run Walk or run the 5K and 10K races happening as part of Festival Napa Valley. Jul 15, 8am. $40-$45. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, festivalnapavalley.org.

Field Trips Alcatraz Island Tour Narrated tours by local experts cruise around Alcatraz Island and the Golden Gate Bridge. Sat, 2:30pm. through Sep 30. Angel Island Tiburon Ferry, 21 Main St, Tiburon, 415.435.2131. Pug Sundays A gathering of pugs, pug owners and pug lovers. Third Sun of every month, 9am. Mill Valley Dog Park, Bayfront Park, Mill Valley. Salt Point Trail Run Run along the coastline amid gorgeous views. Space is limited. Jul 15-16, 7:30am. Salt Point State Park, Highway 1, Jenner, pctrailruns. com. Sunset and Bay Cruises Pack a picnic dinner and bring the whole family for a summer evening on the waters of the Bay. Fri-Sat, 6:30pm. through Oct 28. Angel Island Tiburon Ferry, 21 Main St, Tiburon, 415.435.2131. Trekking the Model Join a ranger-guided tour of the Bay Model, a 1.5-acre hydraulic model of San Francisco Bay and Delta. Jul 15, 3pm. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito, 415.332.3871. Watershed Perspectives Natural History walk in Shady Creek is led by Laguna Foundation guides. Pre-registration required. Jul 15, 9am. $20. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.527.9277. Weaving Earth Day Build a relationship to nature and support a nature-connected community. Jul 15, 10am. $20. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Hwy 1, Stinson Beach, 415.868.9244. Willow Creek & Goat Rock Bird Walk Meet at the junction of Highway 1 and 116, and carpool to two birdwatching spots with Madrone Audubon. Jul 15, 7:30am. Russian River Bridge, Hwy 1 and 116, Duncan’s Mills, madroneaudubon.org. Yoga Hike & Picnic Practice yoga while taking in gorgeous views. Pre-registration required. Jul 13, 5pm. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, landpaths.org.


Film

Cinema & Psyche Six-week film class covers neo-noir crime fiction masterworks through a psychological, mythological and philosophical lens. Mon, 2pm. through Jul 24. $125. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael, 415.479.4131. Cities of Light Tiburon Film Society presents the documentary that takes viewers on a journey into the cultural enlightenment that took place in Europe 1,000 years ago. Jul 13, 6:30pm. Free. Belvedere-Tiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon, 415.789.2665. David Lynch: The Art Life New documentary peeks under the surface of the famed arthouse director’s life and works. Jul 13, 4:15 and 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222. Deconstructing the Beatles Scott Freiman explores the creation and impact of the classic album “Revolver” by the Beatles. Jul 14-16, 1pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222. He Named Me Malala Inspiring doc on 15-year-old Pakistani Malala Yousafzai who was shot by fundamentalists and campaigned for women after she recovered. Jul 13, 7pm. By donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.575.8902.

Restless Creature Documentary on American ballerina Wendy Whelan screens twice. Jul 15, 4 and 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445. Stars Under the Stars Outdoor Film Festival Bring a blanket and enjoy wine, food trucks, live music and a screening of “Grease.” Jul 13, 7pm. St. Francis Winery & Vineyards, 100 Pythian Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.538.9463. Stop Making Sense Seminal concert film from director Jonathan Demme features the Talking Heads in their prime. Jul 19, 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840. Wait Until Dark Audrey Hepburn stars as a blind woman caught in a suspenseful game of cat-andmouse in this 1967 thriller, screening as part of the Vintage Film Series. Jul 17, 7pm. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma, 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink The All American BBQ Class teaches you the tricks to making great

Bastille Day Celebration at Left Bank It’s Bastille Day all week, with menu specials, traditional French garb, festive decorations and live music on the weekend. Through Jul 16. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331. Bastille Day Dinner at Jordan Winery An evening of all things France includes wine reception and full dinner party. Jul 14, 6:30pm. $200. Jordan Vineyard & Winery, 1474 Alexander Valley Rd, Healdsburg, 800.654.1213. Flavors of Vietnam: Pho & Beyond Class touches base on all the Vietnamese cuisine you love to order so you can make it at home. Jul 15, 11am. $85. Cooking School at Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito. Gay Wine Weekend Three-day Pride celebration features new winemaker dinners, winery tours and events benefiting Face to Face, Sonoma County’s AIDS Network. Jul 14-16. Sonoma Valley wineries, various locations, Kenwood, outinthevineyard.com. Larkspur Wine Stroll Sixth annual event pairs local wineries and stores for an evening of winetasting, socializing and shopping. Jul 15, 5pm. $20. Downtown Larkspur, Magnolia Avenue between King and Ward streets, Larkspur. Magical Mystery Tours Mysterious tours to magical wineries along the Wine Road includes food pairings and other goodies. Sat, Jul 15. $125. Alexander, Dry Creek and Russian River valleys, various locations, Healdsburg, wineroad.com. Olive Odyssey Learn about the history of the olive in California and how to make olives edible without lye, then enjoy an olive-inspired lunch and tasting. Pre-registration required. Jul 16, 10am. $90. The Olive Oasis, 7820 Apple Blossom Lane, Sebastopol, olivedon@ hotmail.com. Pitbulls & Cocktails Have a cocktail and support the Tiny Pitbull dog rescue, with adoptable dogs and a whole lot of fun on hand. Jul 15, 2pm. Jamison’s Roaring Donkey, 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma, 707.772.5478. Singles Wine Tasting Party Meet other professional singles while tasting wines and enjoying appetizers. Jul 18, 7pm. $10. Mantra Wines, 881 Grant Ave, Novato, 415.892.5151. Taste of Napa The region’s diverse culinary and vintner community comes together with 70 wineries, restaurants and food artisans converging for this signature day of food and drinks, happening as part of Festival Napa Valley. Jul 15, 11am. $99 and up. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa, festivalnapavalley.org.

Wines & Sunsets in Paradise Enjoy fine wines and spectacular summer sunsets, with live music and gourmet food trucks. Wed, 5:30pm. through Oct 25. $10-$15. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.528.9463. Zealous About Zinfandel Wine writer Esther Mobley moderates a panel of winemakers in conversation on Zinfandel in Dry Creek Valley. Jul 15, 10am. $125. Quivira Vineyards, 4900 W Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg, 707.431.8333.

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Kanekoa

Ukelele Powered Hawaiian Reggae Folk Rock

Thu 7/13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages

Hot Club of Cowtown

Fri 7/14 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30–$32 • 21+

Super Diamond

The Neil Diamond Tribute

Sat 7/15 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $17–$19 • All Ages

The Band of Heathens

with Mendonesia Sun 7/16 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15 • All Ages

Tracorum

For Kids

with The Allmond Brothers Clan

A-Maze-Ing Tales with Joe Wos Cartoonist performs live storytelling throughout the day. Jul 15. Free with admission. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452. The Bubble Lady See some crazy bubbles. Jul 19, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.9004.

Thu 7/20 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$18 • All Ages The Expanders with Ridgeway Fri 7/21 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32 • 21+

Wonder Bread 5

Sat 7/22 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $20–$25 • All Ages

Lyrics Born with his Full Band

with The Crooked Stuff Mon 7/24 • Doors 6pm ⁄ $15–$17 • All Ages

Campfire at the Barracks Gather around the campfire with a short talk, songs and marshmallow roast. Jul 15, 7pm. Free. Sonoma State Historic Park, 20 East Spain St, Sonoma, 707.938.9547. MAGC Family Program Learn about the edible leaves, stems and flowers in your backyard. Jul 15, 9:30am. $10 per family. Marin Art & Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.455.5260. MidSummer MusiCamp Napa Valley Music Associates presents a stringed instrument music class for ages 11-17. Jul 17-21. $300. Hillside Christian Center, 100 Anderson Rd, Napa, napavalleymusicassociates.org. Music Together Summer Sessions Music classes for the little ones runs weekly. Wed-Thurs through Jul 19. Ellington Hall, 3535 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.545.6150. Summer Photography Camp for Kids Challenging and creative class is designed for kids ages 11 to 14. Through Jul 14. $350. The Image Flow, 401 Miller Ave, Ste A, Mill Valley, 415.388.3569.

Lectures The Creative & Abundant Artist Shelley Rugg leads discussion about the business-end of being an artist of any kind. Jul 17, 6pm. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060. Family Bike Workshop Learn to safely navigate the streets through fun, skill-building activities and instructional neighborhood ride. Registration required. Jul 15, 10am. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, bikesonoma.org. Gourd Craft with Sarah Voorhies Learn to make ceremonial vessels, dippers, storage containers and even jewelry or bird houses. Through Jul 13. $125.

»20

The Goodbye Girls feat Molly Tuttle + Ismay feat Jan Purat from Steep Ravine Wed 7/26 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32 • 21+

Marcia Griffiths of Bob Marley & The Wailers with Sly & Robbie and the Taxi Gang

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

25th

ANNUAL

SUMMER NIGHTS stars outdoors

2017

Jaws The original blockbuster plays on the big screen. Jul 15, 7:30pm. $8. Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio, 707.865.0913.

AVV Estate Garden Luncheon A relaxing afternoon on the patio includes a gourmet luncheon accompanied by your favorite AVV wines. Jul 15, 12pm. $55. Alexander Valley Vineyards, 8644 Hwy 128, Healdsburg, 707.433.7209.

Wine & Dine Wednesdays Weekly three-course offering showcases local wines and music by Michael Hantman. Wed. $36. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.433.7222.

under the

• MUSIC • DINNER • KIDZONE •

KIDS 17 & under FRee 7/15 @ 7pm African:

THOMAS MAPFUMO

& THE BLACKS UNLIMITED

7/22 @ 7pm Latin Big Band: PACIFIC MAMBO ORCHESTRA 7/29 @ 7pm Afro-Cuban: RICARDO LEMVO & MAKINA LOCA 8/5 @ 7pm Summer of Love: MELVIN SEALS & JGB

MARINJCC.ORG/SUMMERNIGHTS 200 N. SAN PEDRO RD. SAN RAFAEL, CA

PA CI FI C S U N | JU LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CSUN.CO M

Alice Waters & Her Delicious Revolution Summer film and discussion series presents the mouthwatering documentary about the celebrated chef. Jul 19, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.785.8177.

burgers and hot dogs that will keep friends coming back for more. Jul 16, 10:30am. $85. Cooking School at Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito.


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Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

Kathy Evans & Molly Giles. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Habitat Gardening Learn how to use plants, feeders, water and other features in your garden to provide a haven for wildlife. Jul 18, 7pm. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444.

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center Jul 13, 7pm, Books on Stage with Carolyn Cooke and Randall Babtkis. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale 707.829.2214.

The Journal as Source of Prose, Poetry & Performance Free-write using prompts and sensory details to capture a moment, then expand those passages to publication-worthy works in a three-session workshop. Through Jul 14. $72. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield, marincommunityed.com. Matrix Experience Experiential workshop serves as an introduction to developing and maintaining a Matrix of person-to-person communication. Jul 14-16. $285. 33 Arts, 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa, 707.634.4943. Medicinal Plants: From Our Ancestors to Ourselves Explore the uses for native Californian plants and different aspects of our relationships to plants, land and our ancestors. Jul 16, 1pm. $30. Commonweal, 451 Mesa Rd, Bolinas. Petaluma Folk Tales A storytelling evening moderated by Melissa Abercrombie. Jul 13, 7pm. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060. Evening of stories is moderated by former mayor Pamela Torliatt. Jul 13, 7pm. $10. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma, 707.762.5600. A Selection of Intriguing, Early, Petaluma Portraits Visual lecture from Paula Freund offers intimate details about Petaluma pioneers, in accompaniment with the museum’s current exhibit. Jul 15, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Historical Library & Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma, 707.778.4398. Sunlight Chair Yoga Learn yoga at all ages and levels of health and mobility. Wed, 12:15pm. BodyVibe Studio, 999 Anderson Dr, Ste 170, San Rafael, 415.689.6428.

Readings Book Passage Jul 12, 12pm, “A House Among the Trees” with Julia Glass. Jul 12, 7pm, “A Paris All Your Own” with Eleanor Brown. Jul 14, 7pm, “The Last Laugh” with Lynn Freed. Jul 15, 11am, “When the Sun Goes Dark” with Andrew Fraknoi. Jul 15, 1pm, “How to Become a Published Author” with Mark Shaw. Jul 15, 4pm, “The Fifth Reflection” with Ellen Kirschman. Jul 15, 4pm, “In an Artist’s Shoes” with Suzanne Siminger. Jul 15, 7pm, “Elena” with Duncan Lloyd. Jul 16, 1pm, “Hum If You Don’t Know the Words” with Bianca Marais. Jul 16, 4pm, “Ordinary Mystic” with Curran Galway. Jul 18, 7pm, “Cravings” with Judy Collins. Jul 19, 7pm, “Quiet Until the Thaw” with Alexandra Fuller. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960. Book Passage By-the-Bay Jul 12, 6pm, “Life on the Dock” with Michael Konrad. Jul 18, 6pm, “The Driver in the Driverless Car” with Alex Salkever. Jul 19, 6pm, literary evening with Tom Centolella,

Events

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Jul 17, 7pm, “Hum If You Don’t Know the Words” with Bianca Marais. 106 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jul 14, 7pm, “A House Among the Trees” with Julia Glass. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563. Readers’ Books Jul 13, 7pm, “The Last Laugh” with Lynn Freed. Jul 15, 2pm, Colette Gauthier Myles in conversation with Vanessa Yava. Jul 19, 7pm, “Straight Up Food” with Cathy Fisher. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jul 14, 7pm, “She Sheds” with Erika Kotite. Jul 18, 7pm, Hot Summer Nights with Redwood Writers. Jul 19, 7pm, “Watch Me Disappear” with Janelle Brown. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938. Studio 333 Jul 13, 7pm, Why There Are Words, seven authors read on the theme of Portents. $10. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272. Yo el Rey Roasting Third Tuesday of every month, poetry night. 1217 Washington St, Calistoga 707.942.1180.

Theater The Art Is Medicine Show The Imaginists’ ninth annual bilingual, bicycle-powered summer tour visits several local parks with the new “Stop That Show!” production that takes the current political moment head-on. Jul 15-23. Free. Santa Rosa parks, various locations, Santa Rosa, theimaginists.org. Chicago SRJC’s Summer Rep Theatre Festival presents the jazzed-up, show-stopping musical sensation. Through Jul 18. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, summerrep.com. Fantastical Family Night Transcendence Theatre’s “Broadway Under the Stars” presents this family show filled with Broadway, Disney and everything in between. Jul 14-15. $32 and up. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 877.424.1414. A Fish Story Pegasus Theater Company presents a staged reading of the literate comedy written by Richard Manley on an outdoor stage. Jul 16, 6pm. By donation. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido, 707.869.0821. Gypsy Sonoma Arts Live continues its season of “women who dare” with the classic vaudevillian musical about the ultimate stage mother. Jul 14-30. $22 and up. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomaartslive.org. In the Mood The musical adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” opens an

More than 70 vendors will offer fine jewelry, precious gemstones, beads, crystals, minerals and more at the San Rafael Gem Faire, July 14-16 at the Marin Center.

experimental summer of works in the ruins of a former cannery. Jul 13-Aug 5. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa, shakespeareinthecannery.com. Katie Ketchum Solo Show National Endowment recipient performs excerpts from three of her one-womanmusicals about historical figures Mary Cassatt, Clara Schumann and Mary Magdalene. Fri, 7:30pm. through Aug 11. $20. Dream Portal Studio & Gallery, 500 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.827.3288. The Kut-Ups The 45th annual Razzle Dazzle Music Revue will offer a song-and-dance blast from the past that acts as the Kut-Ups’ final summer season. Through Jul 15. $20. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400. Lovers, Liars & Thieves Raven Players present an exciting collection of the best of Shakespeare’s famous wordplay and swordplay. Jul 13-Aug 5. $10-$25. Bear Republic Brewing Company, 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.433.6335. Much Ado About Nothing Marin Shakespeare Company’s 28th annual summer festival series opens with Shakespeare’s all-ages-appropriate romantic comedy. Through Jul 23. $10-$37. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael, marinshakespeare.org. Once Upon a Magic! Fairfax Theatre Company presents an interactive adventure in a world of magic and sorcery. Through Jul 22. $10-$20. Fairfax Pavilion, 142 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax, fairfaxtheatrecompany.com.

The Pajama Game Marin Musical Theatre Company presents the timeless musical brimming with song and dance classics. Jul 13-23. The Playhouse, 27 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo, 415.258.4640. A Raisin in the Sun SRJC’s Summer Rep Theatre Festival takes on the inspiring, multi-generational American drama. Through Jul 18. $15-$25. Newman Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, summerrep.com. Rhinoceros Birdbath Theatres presents the absurdist play by Eugene Ionesco about people turning into the titular animal as a metaphor for society, ideology, crowd mentality and resistance. Through Jul 22. $20-$24. The Belrose, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael, birdbaththeatres.com. Sing Me a Murder See and sing in the newest dinner show from Get a Clue Productions, a fully functioning karaoke bar with deadly competition. Reservations required. Sat, Jul 15, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions.com. The Wedding Singer Musical comedy is performed by Roustabout Theater’s award-winning apprentice program. Jul 14-16. $16-$26. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.


Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415.485.6700.

SINGLES WANTED! Single & Dissatisfied? Tired of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join with other singles to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships. NINE-WEEK SINGLE’S GROUP. Advance sign-up required; space limited. Also offering: ongoing coed (emotional) INTIMACY GROUPS (married/partnered or single), WOMEN’S GROUP and INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY & COUPLES THERAPY. Central San Rafael. Possible financial assistance (health/flex savings accounts or insurance). Call (415) 453-8117 for more information. Renée Owen, LMFT#35255. https://therapists.psychologytoday.com

Seminars & Workshops CALL TODAY TO ADVERTISE • 415.485.6700

Community

SERVICES

FREE Consultation Guaranteed Results Mr. Smith. 415-637-6603

Mind&Body

Real Estate

Thea Donnelly, M.A. Hypnosis, Counseling, All Issues. 25 yrs. experience. 415-459-0449. Gina Vance, CCHT Move Forward Quickly Overcome & Resolve MindBodyJourneys.com 415-275-4221

Home Services CLEANING SERVICES All Marin House Cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Will do Windows. O’felia 415-717-7157.

FURNITURE REPAIR/REFINISH FURNITURE DOCTOR Ph/Fax: 415-383-2697

ED’S PAINTING 30 Years Experience Free Estimates • References Interior • Exterior •Texture Wall Paper Removal 415-492-1910 cell: 415-902-6329 Bonded & Insured State Lic. 809512

HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 50 homes under $500,000. Call Cindy @ 415-902-2729. Christine Champion, Broker.

GARDENING/LANDSCAPING GARDEN MAINTENANCE OSCAR - 415-505-3606

YARDWORK LANDSCAPING

❖ General Yard & Firebreak Clean Up ❖ Complete Landscaping ❖ Irrigation Systems ❖ Commercial & Residential Maintenance ❖ Patios, Retaining Walls, Fences For Free Estimate Call Titus

415-380-8362

or visit our website www.yardworklandscaping.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142328. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: TAKE A HIKE, 17 MAIN DOCK, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: CAROLINE MCFADDEN, 17 MAIN DOCK, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 6, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 21, June 28, July 5, July 12 of 2017)

HANDYMAN/REPAIRS

IRS TAX AMNESTY

Spanish Language Learning Center In Downtown San Rafael www.spanishindowntown sanrafael.com

HYPNOTHERAPY

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

CA LIC # 898385

Handy•Tech•Man Instruction, problemsolving: Apple, PC, iPad, iPhone, printers, TV, electronics. Serving Marin since 2013

Landscape & Gardening Services Yard Work Tree Trimming Maintenance & Hauling Concrete, Brick & Stonework Fencing & Decking Irrigation & Drainage

View Video on YouTube: “Landscaper in Marin County” youtu.be/ukzGo0iLwXg 415-927-3510

ENGLISH HOUSESITTER Will love your pets, pamper your plants, ease your mind, while you’re out of town. Rates negotiable. References available upon request. Pls Call Jill @ 415-927-1454

Catch the Buzz!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2017-142329. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: KATS K9S, 11 ISSSAQUAH DOCK, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: KATHLEEN “KATS” FRANCES HUNTER, 11 ISSSAQUAH DOCK, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 6, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 21, June 28, July 5, July 12 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142329. The fol-

lowing individual(s) is (are) doing business: HEART AND MIND EQUINE, 17 LAUREL AVE, WOODACRE, CA 94973: ALANE FREUND, LICENSED MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPIST, INC., 17 LAUREL AVE, WOODACRE, CA 94973. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on May 26, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 21, June 28, July 5, July 12 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142374. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: BLACK COD LIVES MATTER BODEGA BAY BLACK COD, 103 GREENBRAE BOARDWALK, GREENBRAE, CA 94904: HOGAN KANIA, 103 GREENBRAE BOARDWALK, GREENBRAE, CA 94904. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 13, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142455. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: GOLD RUSH, 926B

DIABLO AVENUE, NOVATO, CA 94947: RICK LEWIS, 831 4TH STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registration expired more than 40 days ago and is renewing business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142452. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FELIX LANDSCAPE, 205 ALBION COURT, NOVATO, CA 94947: EMILIO MURILLO, 205 ALBION COURT, NOVATO, CA 94947. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant is renewing filing with changes and is transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on June 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142404. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 01 PACIFIC JACK, 600 GATE 5 ROAD, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: EDINGER DESIGN SERVICES INC, 1 LINDA VISTA, TIBURON, CA 94920.

Trivia answers «5 1 San Andreas, Hayward and Calaveras 2 Amazon.com 3 Locust 4 A Few Good Men; Tom Cruise,

Jack Nicholson, Demi Moore (plus Kevin Bacon and Kiefer Sutherland)

5 Fifty 6a. French fries b. SpongeBob SquarePants

c.

Lounge Lizard

Thanks for the question to Stanton Klose from Terra Linda.

7 Plato 8 The Sears Tower (1,450 feet

tall), built by Sears, Roebuck and Company

9 Louis XVI; Marie Antoinette 10 End with ‘City’ BONUS ANSWER: A five-year, $201 million contract

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TO PLACE AN AD: Call our Classifieds and Legals Sales Department at 415.485.6700.Text ads must be placed by Friday, 5pm to make it into the Wednesday print edition.


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PublicNotices The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on June 15, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142450. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 01 CODE REDD, 02 STAND FOR TREES, 242 REDWOOD HWY, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: 01 CODE REDD, 242 REDWOOD HWY, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017)7) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142369. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: CIVIC KNIT, 40 ARROYO RD, FOREST KNOLLS, CA 94933: BREEZE KINSEY, 55 EAST CINTURA AVE., LAGUINITAS, CA 94938. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 12, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142472. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: MOLIVER LANDSCAPE, 82 SIDNEY CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: BARUCH COHEN, 82 SIDNEY CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registration expired more than 40 days ago and is renewing business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 26, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142456. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: PUSHPASKINCARE PERFECTION, 302 CALEDONIA ST #2, SAUASALITO, CA 94965: PUSHPA WATI RAM, 121 KENT AVE #13, KENTFIELD, CA 94904. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142447. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: WALTER AND RAY, 1261 ANDERSON DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: WALTER AND RAY LLC, 101 MADRONE AVENUE, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 22, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142423. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: VINH LE WATCH REPAIR, 9000 SEARS NORTHGATE MALL, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: VINH LE, 815 O’FARRELL STREET #505, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 20, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142492. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ANGEL COMPANY, 721 LINCOLN AVENUE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: KAREN MARIE PELLOLIO,

167 BUTTERFIELD ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registration expired more than 40 days ago and is renewing business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on June 29, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142533. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: PIPELINE DIGITAL, 28 CENTER STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: PIPELINE DIGITAL INC., 2100 4TH STREET #155, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on July 6, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142539. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: POND FARM BREWING COMPANY, 1848 4TH ST, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: MARTENS BREWING COMPANY, LLC, 139 PICNIC AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on July 6, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142483. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: NORTH BAY DETAILING, 2227 5TH AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: GEBHARDT, CHRISTOPHER, 2227 5TH AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of

Marin County on June 28, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017)

OTHER NOTICES STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT FROM USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME—File No: 304771. The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the Marin County Clerk-Recorder’s Office on Dec 06, 2016, Under File No: 201514143. Fictitious Business name(s) JIM HAUSHERR DBA GOOSEHEAD INSURANCE, 3030 BRIDGEWAY, SUITE 240, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: JAMES HAUSHERR, 200 JOHNSON ST SLIP #1, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on June 08, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 21, June 28, July 5, July 12 of 2017) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1702282. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANA RUTH BARRERA filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: ANA RUTH BARRERA to ANA RUTH RIVERA BARRERA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 08/18/2017 AT 08:30 AM, DEPT B, ROOM: B, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive Room 113, San

Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: June 22, 2017. (Publication Dates: June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19 of 2017) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1702363. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANIEL EVERARDO LANG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: DANIEL EVERARDO LANG to DANIEL EVERARDO OROZCO. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 08/11/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT C, ROOM: C, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive Room 113, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: June 28, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26 of 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT FROM USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME—File No: 304772. The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it

appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the Marin County Clerk-Recorder’s Office on Sep 01, 2016, Under File No: 2016-140581. Fictitious Business name(s) RICHARDSON BAY PROPERTY WATCH, 28 MADERA BLVD, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925: MICHAEL LANE, 28 MADERA BLVD, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on June 30, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1702422. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICIA DENNEHY COLLINS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: PATRICIA DENNEHY COLLINS to PATRICIA DENNEHY.THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 08/18/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT B, ROOM: B, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive Room 113, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: July 06, 2017. (Publication Dates: July 12, July 19, July 26, August 2 of 2017)


By Amy Alkon

Q:

I’m a woman looking for a new boyfriend and considering various online dating sites. Some have long questionnaires, and they factor your answers into an “algorithm” to match you with the best possible partner. Are these sites significantly better than the others?—Site Seeker

A:

Most people will tell you that they want to be accepted for who they really are—yet those doing online dating rarely post profiles with stuff like, “I like long walks on the beach, fine dining, and obscenely large breasts.” In light of this, sites using these compatibility “algorithms” would seem to have some added value. However, according to a massive online dating analysis by social psychologist Eli Finkel and his colleagues, this algorithm stuff mainly seems to be a “science!”-flavored marketing ploy. The researchers explain that it’s “virtually impossible” for sites to do what they promise with these algorithms: “Match people who are uniquely suited to one another” and who are likely to have a “satisfying and lasting long-term relationship” together. As the Finkel team notes about the “uniquely suited” business: The evidence suggests that these algorithms are really no better at rooting out compatible partners than the matching most people already do themselves with sites’ search parameters—culling the herd of breathing, profile-posting humans down to, say, fellow Ph.D.s who are also weekend Satan worshippers. Even more outrageous is the sites’ claim that this mathematical alchemy can identify two people who can have a lasting, happy relationship together who have yet to even meet. The researchers point out that the algorithms only measure the “individual characteristics of partners” (personality, attitudes, values, background). They note that this is just one of three essential variables that determine whether relationships sink or swim. The other two are elements that can’t really be sussed out before two people are in a relationship. One is the “circumstances surrounding (a) couple”—like how they fit into each other’s family and whether one loses their job or goes through other major stressors. The other factor is the “interactions between the partners”—how partners communicate, solve problems and support each other. I would add an essential fourth factor that needs to be assessed face to face— physical attraction. So, regarding those “29 dimensions of compatibility!” that one site advertises, consider, if you will, 30 and 31: Discovering “this must be what dead bodies smell like when the detectives cover their nose with a hanky on TV,” and “I’m as sexually attracted to you as I am to a stalk of wheat.” There’s also the “garbage in, garbage out” problem (statisticians’ shorthand for how poor-quality input leads to poor-quality output). It’s unlikely that people are any more honest and accurate in filling out these questionnaires than they are in their online dating profiles. Typically, deception in online dating profiles is intentional; sometimes we can’t quite see ourselves as we really are. For example, take an item on one of these sites’ compatibility surveys: “I try to accommodate the other person’s position.” There are seven little circles on a scale to blacken in, from “not at all” to “very well.” Well, OK, but do control freaks always understand that they’re control freaks? Sometimes somebody seriously controlling might fill in “very well” on “I try to accommodate … ” simply because they see themselves in the best light—instead of the actual light: “I’m Stalin—though I’ve never been able to grow much of a mustache.” Probably the best that can be said about these personality questionnaires is that they might lead you into a little helpful introspection. But otherwise, these tests seem as pointless as they are grueling. This isn’t to knock online dating itself, which offers really rapid, easy access to a lot of potential partners whom you’d probably never meet otherwise. However, it helps to have a smart strategy vis-a-vis the potential pitfalls, and that’s meeting any person you think might be a possibility ASAP (before you have any long, bond-y text-athons). Meeting pronto gives you the best shot at seeing whether you click, as well as spotting any vast differences between profile and reality. And as I always advise about first dates, keep it cheap, short and local. Less investment means less disappointment if you find out a guy’s lying—or, maybe worse, if he’s being honest: He really is looking for his “partner in crime”—because one of the guys on his robbery crew got arrested last week.Y Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at adviceamy@aol.com.

Astrology

For the week of July 12

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s not your birthday, but I feel like you need to get presents. The astrological omens agree with me. In fact, they suggest that you should show people this horoscope to motivate them to do the right thing and shower you with practical blessings. And why exactly do you need these rewards? Here’s one reason: Now is a pivotal moment in the development of your own ability to give the unique gifts you have to give. If you receive tangible demonstrations that your contributions are appreciated, you’ll be better able to rise to the next level of your generosity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Other astrologers and fortunetellers may enjoy scaring the hell out of you, but not me. My job is to keep you apprised of the ways that life aims to help you, educate you and lead you out of your suffering. The truth is, Taurus, that if you look hard enough, there are always seemingly legitimate reasons to be afraid of pretty much everything. But that’s a stupid way to live, especially since there are also always legitimate reasons to be excited about pretty much everything. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to work on retraining yourself to make the latter approach your default tendency. I have rarely seen a better phase than now to replace chronic anxiety with shrewd hope. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): At least for the short-range future, benign neglect can be an effective game plan for you. In other words, Gemini, allow inaction to do the job that can’t be accomplished through strenuous action. Stay put. Be patient and cagey and observant. Seek strength in silence and restraint. Let problems heal through the passage of time. Give yourself permission to watch and wait, to reserve judgment and withhold criticism. Why do I suggest this approach? Here’s a secret: Forces that are currently working in the dark and behind the scenes will generate the best possible outcome.

By Rob Brezsny

evocative image that my marketing department had determined would give you a visceral thrill (like maybe a photoshopped image of you wearing a crown and holding a scepter). In the next part, I would describe various wonderful and beautiful things about you. Then I’d tactfully describe an aspect of your life that’s underdeveloped and could use some work. I’d say, “I’d love for you to be more strategic in promoting your good ideas. I’d love for you to have a well-crafted master plan that will attract the contacts and resources necessary to lift your dream to the next level.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I advise you against snorting cocaine, MDMA, heroin or bath salts. But if you do, don’t lay out your lines of powder on a kitchen table or a baby’s diaper-changing counter in a public restroom. Places like those are not exactly sparkly clean, and you could end up propelling contaminants close to your brain. Please observe similar care with any other activity that involves altering your consciousness or changing the way you see the world. Do it in a nurturing location that ensures healthy results. P.S. The coming weeks will be a great time to expand your mind if you do it in all-natural ways such as through conversations with interesting people, travel to places that excite your awe and encounters with provocative teachings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In late 1811 and early 1812, parts of the mighty Mississippi River flowed backwards several times. Earthquakes were the cause. Now, more than two centuries later, you Sagittarians have a chance—maybe even a mandate—to accomplish a more modest rendition of what nature did way back then. Do you dare to shift the course of a great, flowing, vital force? I think you should at least consider it. In my opinion, that great, flowing, vital force could benefit from an adjustment that you have the wisdom and luck to understand and accomplish.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions,” wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson. “All life is an experiment.” I’d love to see you make that your operative strategy in the coming weeks, Cancerian. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now is a favorable time to overthrow your habits, rebel against your certainties and cruise through a series of freewheeling escapades that will change your mind in a hundred different ways. Do you love life enough to ask more questions than you’ve ever asked before?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’re entering into the Uncanny Zone, Capricorn. During your brief journey through this alternate reality, the wind and the dew will be your teachers. Animals will provide special favors. You may experience true fantasies, like being able to sense people’s thoughts and hear the sound of leaves converting sunlight into nourishment. It’s possible that you’ll feel the moon tugging at the waters of your body and glimpse visions of the best possible future. Will any of this be of practical use? Yes! More than you can imagine. And not in ways you can imagine yet.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Thank you for contacting the Center for Epicurean Education. If you need advice on how to help your imagination lose its inhibitions, please press 1. If you’d like guidance on how to run wild in the woods or in the streets without losing your friends or your job, press 2. If you want to learn more about spiritual sex or sensual wisdom, press 3. If you’d like assistance in initiating a rowdy yet focused search for fresh inspiration, press 4. For information about dancing lessons or flying lessons or dancing-while-flying lessons, press 5. For advice on how to stop making so much sense, press 6.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): This is one of those rare grace periods when you can slip into a smooth groove without worrying that it will degenerate into a repetitive rut. You’ll feel natural and comfortable as you attend to your duties, not blank or numb. You’ll be entertained and educated by exacting details, not bored by them. I conclude, therefore, that this will be an excellent time to lay the gritty foundation for expansive and productive adventures later this year. If you’ve been hoping to get an advantage over your competitors and diminish the negative influences of people who don’t empathize with you, now is the time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The cereus cactus grows in the deserts of the southwestern U.S. Most of the time it’s scraggly and brittle-looking. But one night of the year, in June or July, it blooms with a fragrant, trumpet-shaped flower. By dawn the creamy white petals close and start to wither. During that brief celebration, the plant’s main pollinator, the sphinx moth, has to discover the marvelous event and come to gather the cactus flower’s pollen. I suspect this scenario has metaphorical resemblances to a task you could benefit from carrying out in the days ahead. Be alert for a sudden, spectacular and rare eruption of beauty that you can feed from and propagate. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If I had more room here, I would offer an inspirational PowerPoint presentation designed just for you. In the beginning, I would seize your attention with an

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “There is a direct

correlation between playfulness and intelligence, since the most intelligent animals engage in the greatest amount of playful activities.” So reports National Geographic. “The reason is simple: Intelligence is the capacity for learning, and to play is to learn.” I suggest that you make these thoughts the centerpiece of your life in the coming weeks. You’re in a phase when you have an enhanced capacity to master new tricks. That’s fortunate, because you’re also in a phase when it’s especially crucial for you to learn new tricks. The best way to ensure it all unfolds with maximum grace is to play as much as possible.Y

Homework: Do you let your imagination indulge in fantasies that are wasteful, damaging or dumb? Stop it! Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

23 PA CI FI C S U N | JU LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CSUN.CO M

Advice Goddess

FREE WILL


Sun1728  

July 12-18, 2017