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CALLING FOR A SHUTDOWN The Willits Bypass project destroys wetlands, kills coho salmon and forever changes a valley— and may not even be neccessary.

RACHEL DOVEY REPORTS ON HOW A SMALL TOWN IS FIGHTING CALTRANS, MILE BY MILE P8


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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies SNAP Judgments Dispelling myths of food stamp recipients BY BIANCA MAY

T

he recent article “Uncovering the Secrets of Food Stamps” from the Los Angeles Times, and reprinted in the local daily, was both informative and disheartening. While the authors do not seem to hold a completely negative view of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients, they do little to dispel falsehoods or offer solutions to the supposed “problems” associated with food-stamp recipients.

The myth that food-stamp recipients are jobless poxes on the system taking advantage of it is just that, a myth. A simple Google search to locate the Cal Fresh website lists one of the requirements to be eligible for food stamps: “Work Requirements: All able-bodied persons (ages 18–49) without dependents must work 20 hours per week (monthly average 80 hours) or participate 20 hours per week in an approved work activity. . . .” Exceptions are only made for the aged or the disabled. The second question brought up—“How much of the SNAP budget is going for fruits and vegetables and how much for soft drinks and snack foods?”—implies that food-stamp recipients are spending on these things. This image is further pushed by the American Medical Association’s suggestion of a ban prohibiting recipients from buying these items. Of course, many who don’t use food stamps are overweight and have poor eating habits. This is an epidemic stretching across all classes. Instead of government restrictions on what drinks people can buy, we should instead ask what can we as a society do to help. Instead of criticizing those whose only option for feeding their families is at the local quick stop, encourage city planners to equitably distribute grocery-store chains around town. Create laws requiring retailers who accept SNAP to have healthy options. Farmers markets can be held year-round, and can easily be put together using local vendors who would likely be just as eager to promote their products. The benefits to this would not stop at the individual, but could help foster a sense of community in cities everywhere. SNAP recipients won’t be helped by more restrictions, but they can be helped by the solutions that we all, as a community, come up with. Bianca May is a graduate of Sonoma State University and self-described feather-ruffler living in Rohnert Park. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Permanent Shutdown, Now!

Workers of the world, rejoice! Reactionary elements in the federal government of the U.S.A. empire don’t know it, but they are showing us the way forward for humanity! Let’s take it to the next level! Let’s organize a global business shutdown! Among the demands for a strike, we should include: (1) keep the federal government shut down; expand the shutdown to all levels of government; (2) use the public power of eminent domain to seize all property and assets of the “1 percent” and reorganize all economic activity under workers’ control; (3) abolish all labor laws which obstruct the basic human right of all workers to full freedom of association and freedom of expression. Let us hold open public assemblies in all communities worldwide to decide how to dispose of government assets and how to reorganize services. Most of the more than 800,000 workers employed by the U.S. government are being subjected to what amounts to a lockout by their employer. Workers everywhere must show them solidarity. We can do that, and advance the collective interest of all of us, by permanently throwing the dead weight of the governments of the 1 percent into the dustbin of history.

MARTY KROOPKIN San Diego

The Weather Is Nice Because We Feed People Did you ever wonder why we of this county have such nice, easy weather, surely compared to Denver, Colo., or New Orleans? Why do we have such

nice weather year-round? My theory is simple: our county demonstrates feeding the hungry with the Redwood Empire Food Bank, and with many churches donating time, food and material goods for those who have no home, let alone a kitchen.

Our county is blessed with mild weather. Our county is great for seniors. Sonoma County is acting as a poster child for sharing, and having so many healthcare practitioners and facilities. Our great weather is a result of a generous and sharing county setting an example for other counties in California, and the rest of our great and generous nation.

MICHAEL BOBIER Santa Rosa

An Inspiration It is truly an honor to have studied with Mark Perlman at SSU (“The History of Thinking,” Sept. 4). His commitment to teaching, passion for painting and dedication to critical discourse made a lasting impact on me as a young student and inspired me to be the artist I am today.

FRANK RYAN Via online

Who Cares About Beautiful Fields, Anyway? A grant of tax money from the county is being sought by a citizens group to purchase an eight-acre parcel costing $1.5 million that lies adjacent to downtown Forestville to make it open space, meaning that it can never be built on or developed—ever. It’s a complete waste of your tax money. I am opposed to the Forestville open space grant for the following reasons: It eliminates a future tax base that would enable El Molino High and Forestville Elementary to stay in operation. Both are in danger of closing due to declining enrollment.


Rants

It’s out of scale for the town; the entire downtown commercial part of Forestville is less in acreage than this proposed “park� would be. If there is one thing Forestville has plenty of, it’s open space. Why spend your tax money to purchase what is already abundant? The county already owns a parcel in downtown Forestville right next to the eight acres that is under construction as a park at the entrance to the West County Trail. Forestville has more park space than the population utilizes: Forestville Youth Park, Steelhead Beach, Riverfront Regional Park, Sunset River Beach Park, Forestville River Access (formerly Mother’s Beach) West County Regional Trail, Wohler Bridge Park.

WENDY FLOWERS Forestville

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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THIS MODERN WORLD

7

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NIGHT WATCH Peggy Backup, from Redwood Valley, locked herself to a hauling trailer last month.

Bypass Mayhem A North Coast reporter faces eight years in jail. Was he being unethical, or simply doing his job? BY RACHEL DOVEY

I

t was 5:45am, and Will Parrish sat on a thin platform 30 feet above the ground. He was exhausted. His plywood perch rested partway up a piece of drilling equipment called a stitcher, which looks like a narrow cell phone tower jutting a hundred feet into the sky. He’d wanted to climb higher—

here, just above the Bobcat arm steadying the metal column, a cherry picker full of armed police could easily bring him down. But climbing even the stitcher’s base had been grueling enough t o make him vomit, mostly because of what the longhaired Ukiah resident carried. Along with his platform, he’d shouldered

a bucket, three gallons of water, a sleeping bag, a tarp, granola bars, an apple and a can of lentil soup. He planned to stay as long as he could. Parrish, a reporter for Mendocino’s Anderson Valley Advertiser, was occupying the stitcher to protest a $300 million extension of Highway 101 known as the Willits Bypass.

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8

By the time he decided to climb a vertical drill in June of 2013, he’d had been covering Caltrans’ proposed diversion through Little Lake’s wetland for months, his detailed, investigative prose growing harsher and more cynical with every new piece he wrote. He’d narrated the ecological devastation it would cause—filling a wetland, clear-cutting pine groves and drying a seasonal lake. He’d mapped out the politicians involved, traced their funding, found their regulators and uncovered multiple permit violations. He’d supported a twomonth tree sit and watched as 25 squad cars full of armed riot police rolled into the valley to bring three activists down. ByJune, bulldozers had arrived, pines were felled, and part of a hill had been scraped away. And Parrish rarely called the state agency by its name in his weekly installments, referring to it more often as Big Orange—each word bitterly capitalized to imply power that couldn’t be checked. So against a growing background of high-profile journalists who have done the same, Parrish decided to become part of the story he was covering. His resolution to break into a construction site and occupy a stitcher—like Bill McKibben trespassing at Chevron or Glenn Greenwald helping Edward Snowden escape—blurs the ethics of a profession where impartiality has long been the sanctified norm. And it throws what happened eight days later—when Parrish was arrested, charged with 16 misdemeanors and slapped with a maximum of eight years in jail— into two conflicting narratives. On the one hand, he crossed the sand-line from journalist to activist, knowingly trespassed and expected to be charged. On the other, he’d written about enough lawsuits, conflicting statistics and regulatory breaches to fill a book; he’d begun to feel that mounting a stitcher was the only option left. Like Greenwald and McKibben, he’d started to see direct action as the logical extension of his role. It was mid-summer, so even at this early hour, the sun hung


“No, we don’t got no gay people on the team. They gotta get up out of here if they do.” The words of 49ers cornerback Chris Culliver during a radio interview last year rightfully prompted media outrage and a stern reprimand from his coach. As a gay man and former NFL cornerback himself, Wade Davis might have some words for Culliver, who is out for the year with a torn ACL (karma?). After retiring, Davis came out and now travels the country speaking out for gay rights. Though the country has yet to see an openly gay athlete in the big four sports (NBA player Jason Collins came out this year, but the free agent hasn’t found a team willing to sign him), advocates like Davis remind us that, like gay marriage, it’s only a matter of time. Davis speaks at the Cooperage at Sonoma State University on Tuesday, Oct. 8. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7pm. Free. 707.664.2815.

Gourds!

CROSSING OVER After covering CalTrans’ offenses for months, reporter Will Parrish decided to join the battle himself.

over the hills. A dense white mist was thinning in the morning brightness, and Parrish could see the arid dirt patch that surrounded him. It looked like the surface of the moon. Months before, it had been a wetland where fissure-thin creeks cut through marshy reeds. Those waterways had been the source of the valley’s name, Little Lake, because every winter they would flood and pool together in silver sheets that reflected the sky. Now, thanks to the tower where Parrish sat, Little Lake would be just a name. Though resting at the moment, the giant blue column was drilling wick drains deep into the ground, where the synthetic channels pulled water from 80 feet of silt. Acres of them had already been installed, and their white tips poked out of the dug-up wetlands in neat rows, folded over black runners so they looked like hundreds of stitched-up wounds. Thirty feet up, Parrish waited to see if he’d be taken down.

T

he Willits Bypass is a response to the bottleneck that occurs on 101 at the town’s southern end. Local cars and semis carting loads up the coast stall in a long, smoggy line at the town entrance, where 101 has historically passed under a welcome sign that glows neon green at night. From there, the freeway becomes Willits’ main street, complete with intersections and crosswalks. The snarl is a problem, a fact that few dispute. It’s dangerous, and because the highway becomes a surface street lined with restaurants and stores, it can’t be widened. Activists generally say they don’t oppose an alternate route—just the six-mile, $300 million, four-lane one that Caltrans chose. So far, opponents to the project have filed two lawsuits and engaged in multiple direct actions that have resulted in dozens of arrests. Labeling their motivation with the blanket term “environmental” doesn’t go far enough. Certainly ecological

concern has been part of it; as Parrish wrote in an AVA article in January titled “The Insanity of the Willits Bypass,” the freeway’s construction will decimate—or, at the very least, displace—a litany of species. It will devour not only wetlands, he writes, “but oak forests, meadows, native plants, native bunchgrasses, Ponderosa pines groves, Oregon ash groves, habitat for northern spotted owls, habitat for coho salmon, habitat for steelhead trout, habitat for tidewater goby, habitat for Western pond turtles, habitat for peregrine falcons, habitat for yellow warblers, habitat for Point Arena mountain beavers, habitat for red tree voles, habitat for California red-legged frogs, habitat for foothill yellow-legged frogs, habitat for Western snowy plovers, habitat for pale bigeared bats and prime farmland.” Most troubling in a region where dwindling coho are sacred, the project’s environmental impact report states that the booms and blasts of pile driving

) 10

Food for Thought Sonoma County AIDS Food Bank is staffed by over 600 volunteers who serve 675 people living with HIV/AIDS in Sonoma County. Even with recent improvements in HIV/AIDS treatment, the disease continues to have significant health and economic impacts on patients’ lives. There are approximately 2,000 people in Sonoma County with HIV/AIDS; Food for Thought provides high-quality groceries, fresh produce and nutrition services to them free of charge. Calabash, in collaboration with the Occidental Art and Ecology Center, is the agency’s annual fundraising celebration of gourds, art and the garden. At the 13th annual benefit guests can enjoy food, wine, a silent auction, live music played on handmade gourd instruments and more—all for a good cause. Calabash gets underway on Sunday, Oct. 6, at Food for Thought. 6550 Railroad Ave., Forestville. 1pm-5pm. $45-$50. 707.887.1647.—Nicolas Grizzle & Tara Kevah

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Willits ( 8

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could cause the threatened species’ organs to hemorrhage and explode. But this makes the bypass controversy sound like it’s simply about conservation, which it’s not. If it were, Caltrans’ claim that building a freeway around town could cut carbon emissions by reducing stop-and-go traffic might hold more local weight (though Parrish reported that the construction of this mammoth project would generate 380,000 tons of CO2, “about 90 years’ worth of what Caltrans claims to be saving”). No, the bypass doesn’t threaten only those Mendocino dwellers with wings and gills; it will also massively upend the geography of the Little Lake Valley, which is only about two miles wide and four miles long, and not simply by drying out the wetlands northeast of Willits and aerating the inland region’s namesake; not just by scraping the top off of one hill and even possibly—if parts of the EIR are enacted—exploding a second to use for fill, and not just by leveling pine and oak and ash groves. No, because the freeway will displace all the plants and animals

mentioned above, Caltrans is bound to an enormous mitigation. The state agency has seized roughly 2,000 acres of valley property so it can attempt to move and replant some of the habitats listed—much of it historical cattle ranches and farms. This means that the state agency owns nearly one-third of the valley floor, and is Little Lake’s largest landowner. In 2012, the Farm Bureau made strange bedfellows with the Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity, Willits Environmental Center and Environmental Protection Information Center in a lawsuit against Caltrans, protesting its monolithic seizure (it accepted a settlement in early 2013). With Willits Economic Localization, a thriving Grange—a center of the California Grange revival—and dozens of generational farms, Little Lake valley is a hub of transitional, back-to-the-land philosophy and subsistence agriculture. For a transportation agency to not only fill the valley’s wetlands but to take away its food production land en masse for a freeway is beyond symbolic, and cuts deeply into regional identity. Amanda Senseman, the 24-yearold who first climbed a Ponderosa pine in January to protest under the title “Warbler” wasn’t a zeroSteve Eberhard

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10

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WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN OCT. 16 ISSUE! ANY MEANS NECCESSARY The scene of Will Parrish’s stitcher-sit in June.


W

hile protesters blocked Caltrans in March, State Sen. Noreen Evans sent a letter to the state agency’s director Michael Dougherty about the bypass. “[A]s facts about the selected project become more widely known, opposition is mounting,â€? she wrote. “It is disconcerting when, after all these years, many ranchers, farmers, local business, environmental groups and ordinary citizens agree that the Willits Bypass as it is presently conceived should not be built.â€? Her letter went on to question why the state transportation agency seemed to be putting fourth only two options: a fourlane bypass through the wetlands or nothing? Why not a cheaper two-lane freeway? After all, building those two extra lanes would cost another $80 million. Why not convert a surface street into a separate arterial for vehicles passing through? Dougherty’s answer was polite but ďŹ rm. No other alternative was possible, he explained, due to an interlocking chain of funding and design standards. Only a six-mile, four-lane diversion would work because only it could provide uninterrupted traffic ow, not just at the project’s completion, but 20 years in the future. If the project did not accomplish this, it would be considered “functionally obsolete,â€? which was not permitted by Caltrans regulator, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Evans backed off, but Willits residents did not. Just as the perception of regulatory collapse was causing Parrish to move toward action, it was also driving a handful of activists toward investigation. Local engineer Richard Estabrook wondered what the vague-sounding term “functionally obsoleteâ€? meant, so he turned to Caltrans

encyclopedic EIR. It referred, he found, to the highway’s “Level of Serviceâ€? or “LOS,â€? a term measuring traffic ow. Flying down 101 near Cloverdale at 2am would be LOS A, while sitting stalled on 580 behind a collision for hours would be LOS F. The marker that had been decided for the bypass was LOS C.

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sum conservationist—she was a farmer. When I interviewed her in August, she compared the bypass to another monstrosity that has as much to do with rural land rights as it does ecology. “This is our Keystone XL,� she said.

‘This is an agency that does whatever it wants without any regulation.’ In April, Estabrook sent a Freedom of Information Act Request to the FHWA to substantiate whether federal funding for the bypass did, in fact, rest on its Level of Service of designation. In May, he received the following reply: “LOS is not determinative of the eligibility for projects for Federalaid funding, given that local conditions may limit the ability of a particular project to achieve a given LOS.â€? In other words, no. “For years, Caltrans has claimed the reason they have to have a four-lane [bypass] is because Federal Highways said so,â€? Estabrook says. “It was a powerful statement, and it was completely false. There was no merit to it, nothing to support it. “This is an agency that does whatever it wants without any regulation,â€? he adds. “It’s completely out of control.â€? Caltrans representative Phil Frisbie Jr. says it’s not that simple. While the FHWA doesn’t bind each project to a particular Level of Service, it does bind state and local agencies to ďŹ gure out the most efficient throughway for a given area, and to ) 12

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12 Willits ( 11 work with that. And though that’s a bit less direct than the answer given to Evans, a trail of planning documents does back it up. Somewhat. The original LOS concept can be traced back to a regional transportation plan, which states that traffic flow in Mendocino County should have a baseline of LOS D, not C. The man who wrote this local plan is Phil Dow, the head of the Mendocino Council of Governments. “It means we don’t want traffic to get any worse than that,” Dow says, contesting opponents’ point that this further exemplifies mislabeling of facts. Dow and Frisbie Jr. both call the project’s opponents a vocal minority. Both point to the fact that Caltrans has planned a bypass for Willits since the 1950s, and an EIR—with an extensive public process—was certified in 2006. And Frisbie Jr. paints a picture of near-unanimous support for the four-lane freeway before construction began. He recalls a Caltrans open house in 2007, where, he says 210 people showed up and only two voiced any opposition at all. But public comments in the EIR show a community that’s much more deeply divided, split nearly down the middle between desire for a freeway and desire for a throughway less expensive and ruinous than the one proposed. More recently, a board of supervisors meeting on March 26 featured hours of public comment. Fifty-nine speakers voiced opposition to the bypass. Only one, Phil Dow, spoke up to defend it.

I

n the pages of the rabblerousing AVA, meanwhile, Parrish was connecting a constellation of dots. A large portion of the project’s funding—$136 million—comes from California’s Proposition 1B, which was passed by voters in 2006 to relieve congested streets. But in 2007, the $177 million that had been favored for Willits by the California Transportation

Commission was pulled to use for more urban areas across the state; the reason given was that Willits, with a population of roughly 5,000, was just too small to justify that much in funding. Planners scrambled for alternatives and came up with some less expensive options, including a two-lane bypass. A county supervisor, John Pinches, was quoted in the Ukiah Daily Journal at the time saying that although it wasn’t the “Cadillac” freeway everyone wanted, it would relieve congestion. The difference between 2007 and 2013, Parrish reported, was Congressman Mike Thompson, who until redistricting took effect in January 2013 represented the region. Thompson, backed heavily by Building Trades Union campaign money, announced in a 2011 press release: “Bringing the Willits Bypass to completion is a top priority.”

The project’s own EIR states that the blasts can cause the organs of Coho salmon to explode. To Parrish, the bypass exemplified a system bound to endless, senseless growth— motivated at its financial core to lay concrete, create jobs and pave the last green expanses of the American West. In the IWW-stamped pages of the AVA, his writing utilizes a sharp, macroscopic lens to show regional events in their global context. This was no different. “The Insanity of the Willits Bypass” winds a snaking narrative through history and philosophy, touching on the

B&W Flyers protesting the project recall Mendocino County’s activist heritage.

“freeway construction craze” of the Eisenhower administration, the mass suburbanization that ensued and its terrifying consequences. “Caltrans is a powerful bureaucracy,” he tells me when we speak. “Its bias is toward building the biggest, most expensive project it can.” Dow, mired in planning details for the freeway for decades, says accusations like this are downright conspiratorial. “They come up with all these bits and pieces like ‘Level of Service’ that are technical and they don’t understand,” Dow says of the project’s vocal opponents. “They can think whatever they want. It was all done out in the open.” But a look at the bypass’ core

numbers does reveal a project bound to outdated figures—figures that rely on unsubstantiated growth. In the late ’90s, Caltrans projected steady upticks for traffic in California’s northern counties, and used them to plan for the bypass. And yet, Estabrook points out, there’s little to support this. The populations of Mendocino and Humboldt counties have grown very little since this data was gathered—0.3 percent and 0.5 percent per year, respectively— and Willits’ population has actually declined. Meanwhile, traffic counts from Caltrans show that interregional traffic passing through Willits has either stayed flat or declined in the last 10 years. According to a study recorded


P

arrish has a long history of advocacy journalism, but his work with the bypass blends the two more directly than ever before—covering his wick drain sit in the paper and advocating for the facts he covered weekly. He’s aware that his actions may have harmed his credibility. “For some people, I’ve crossed a line and they have less respect for my written word,” he says.

“But when regulatory, electoral politics fail and special interests control politicians and you have all these alliances that have been dramatically at play with the bypass, then the system isn’t going to do the sane or reasonable thing. Then direct action is the only sane or reasonable thing to do. In this case, writing isn’t enough.”

Traffic counts from CalTrans show interregional traffic through Willits has stayed flat or declined in the last 10 years. So he did this instead: scaled a giant blue tower, hung a banner, drank some water, ate granola bars, retreated into a sleeping bag when it rained and fasted when his supplies ran low. All menial tasks, but as he would later write in the AVA, they were satisfying. Because of him, only one drill could be used. The valley was being stitched with half as many drains. When he was finally brought down after 11 days, he was charged with 16 misdemeanors. He requested a juried trial, to start in November. His maximum sentence is eight years. Still, he hasn’t given up. His strategy is bombastic and radical as his prose, putting himself at the center of conflict once again. “I want to use the trial as a way to bring more scrutiny to the project,” he says of Caltrans. “I want to be allowed to present evidence against them in court.”

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in 2000, roughly 70 percent of the traffic clogging 101 at Willits’ entrance is locally bound. The bypass will funnel some traffic off the street at its entrance south of this existing bottleneck, but much of it will remain. ABC’s KGO-TV did an in-depth report on this in August, viewing Caltrans traffic cams north of Willits to assess the number of cars traveling through, up the coast. The news team watched the cams for two months. Consistently, they showed cars and trucks speeding by on an almost empty road. In a farcical twist, Redwood Valley resident Julia Frech in July started searching for similar bypass propositions around the state. She found one four-lane diversion in the planning stages for Hinkley, the tiny town west of Barstow made famous by the movie Erin Brockovich. Caltrans projects a high growth rate for the region— which includes the surrounding county—and cites safety factors and delays associated with California State Route-58 passing through town. But the groundwater in Hinkley is contaminated with chromium6—a plume of toxic, cancerous waste dumped by PG&E spreading two and half miles wide. As part of a settlement, PG&E is buying the homes of residents who wish to leave. KQED’s California Report visited the two-street town earlier this year. Homes were boarded up, lawns were dead, and, due to the mass exodus, the local school was about to close. And yet a $100 million bypass is planned. Soon cars will fly down a four-lane freeway through the flat yellow desert, and Hinkley will be gone.


Dining Michael Amsler

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | O CTO BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

AT THE HELM Francesco Torre on the Canneti patio with his rosemary focaccia and pork sausage sandwich.

Torre’s Touch Canneti Roadhouse a delicious new stop on Gravenstein Highway BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

A

few years ago, chef Francesco Torre posted his résumé on Craigslist. He was living in his native Tuscany at the time, cooking for some of the most prestigious hotels and wineries in the region. One day he got a call from William Foss, owner of Fish Restaurant in Sausalito. “He told me he wanted to fly

out to Italy to meet me!” Torre, who opened Canneti Roadhouse Italiana in Forestville six months ago, recalls over the phone recently. “It was the funkiest thing that’s ever happened in my life.” His accent, rich as his food, throws me for a second. “Funniest thing?” “No,” he laughs, “funkiest.” Thrown by such an extravagant gesture, Torre offered to fly out to California instead. Though he wound up moving to Martinez a year later, it wasn’t to work for Foss—at least, not yet. After

commanding the kitchen at Tra Vigne Restaurant in Saint Helena, Torre became executive chef at Fish, where he deepened his commitment to sourcing local, sustainable ingredients. In fact, Torre is so serious about quality food that he almost left the industry years before because of the frozen mussels he’d been forced to serve at a touristy Italian hotel. “There were mussels right there on the beach!” he laments. When it came time to open his own restaurant, once again, Foss

set him on his path. “Bill and I were driving down Highway 116 one day,” he explains, “and we passed this ugly red building. It was literally falling apart.” But when he peered into the lovely back garden (site of the former Mosaic), Torre, who restores old motorcycles in his spare time, knew he’d found the right fixerupper. So he rewired the electrical, replaced the windows, exposed some of the original brick, and refinished the custom-made tables by local sculptor Jordy Morgan. The result is stunning. Named after the marshy weeds that grew on the road Torre used to walk to his elementary school, Canneti offers a host of different settings: there’s a bright front room with a giant fireplace and open kitchen, a cozy wine nook laden with bottles for sale, an outdoor deck overhung with wisteria and, for optimum privacy, a handful of two-tops tucked under the fig trees. Given all this, you’d be right to expect Healdsburg prices, a misconception that Torre is eager to correct. Given that it’s hard to describe his food without using superlatives, the prices are pleasantly surprising. In addition to lunch and dinner, Canneti offers a traditional Tuscan tasting menu and an Italian breakfast and brunch. The rosemary focaccia and pork sausage sandwich ($14) hits all the right notes. No dry mouthfuls here. The focaccia, dressed with braised red onions and Meyer lemon mayo, is soft and buttery, almost more like pastry than bread. The creamy, fresh shell pasta is adorned with a generous portion of smoked steelhead and sweet roasted shallots ($14). Bejeweled with fine sugar and served with a shot-glass of crème anglaise, even the usually pedestrian doughnut becomes a sublime dessert ($5). “My goal is not to become rich and famous,” Torre laughs, “even though that would be great. But what I do for a living is to keep my guests happy.” Canneti Roadhouse Italiana, 6675 Front. St., Forestville. 707.887.2232.


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16

Award Winning Wines - Exceptional Cuisine

Book your holiday event at Corks

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

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S O N O MA CO U N T Y Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Baci Cafe & Wine Bar Italian $$-$$$. Creative Italian and Mediterranean fare in casual setting, with thoughtful wine list featuring local and Italian wines. Lunch, ThursSat; dinner, Thurs-Mon. 336 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8111.

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French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

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Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Hopmonk Tavern Pub

Through October 18 707/ 546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Since 1961. Guerneville

Healdsburg

Napa

Sebastopol

Santa Rosa x2

fare. $$. More than serviceable bar food with a menu that hops the globe. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent

dining. Open 7 days a week. 3901 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa 707.528.7755.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

food–and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner, Fri-Sun; lunch, Wed-Thurs. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545. Ravenous Cafe & Lounge American. $$$$. Returning to its original small, five-table location next to the Raven Theater, this Healdsburg mainstay continues to have inventive menus in a cozy setting. Lunch and dinner; closed Mondays and Tuesdays. 117 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1302.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Speakeasy Tapas-Asian. $-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am! Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Thai Taste Restaurant Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

The Villa Italian. $-$$. Spectacular views, superb service. Seafood, steak, poultry, seasonal specialties, pizza from wood-burning oven, patio

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s


Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297. fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Compadres Rio Grille Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the

game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

17

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

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lunch & dinner every day brunch Sat & Sun

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Mon–Fri 3–6pm 4 for FOUR 4oz pours

local, organic, fresh

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

3120 Lakeville Hwy Petaluma, CA 94954 707.PUB.9090 www.pubrepublicusa.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 2–8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Finnegan’s Marin Pub

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | O CTO BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY DaVero Sonoma Get lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000. Gamba Vineyards & Winery On Sundays, the vintage vinyl spins and the old vine Zin flows at this highly regarded but off-thebeaten track little cellar. 2912 Woolsey Road, Windsor. By appointment. 707.542.5892.

Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Paul Mathew Vineyards Sunny, corner tasting room in downtown Graton offering a singular expression of Valdiguié, progressively deeper and more aromatic Pinot Noir, and cushioned benches to sink into should you become lost in reverie as a result. 9060 Graton Road, Graton. Thursday– Sunday, 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.865.2505.

in all the colors of the rainbow. 8339 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Daily 11am to 5pm. No fee. 707.433.4365.

Rued Winery Folks been

Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Cain Think you know about

farming grapes here since 1880s; the best bottomland Sauvignon Blanc and benchland Zinfandel and Cabernet skimmed from the family’s 160 acres of grapes is offered at comparatively farmstand prices. 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3261.

what food to pair with Napa Valley “mountain grown” Cabernet Sauvignon? How about sake-marinated poached cod in a light broth? Yeah, it is different up here. 3800 Langtry Road, St. Helena. Tour and tasting by appointment only, Monday– Friday, 10am and 11:30am; Saturday, 10am and noon. $35. 707.963.1616.

Selby Winery Regularly

Inglenook Vineyard

served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Spann Vineyards Ninety percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside for this off-thePlaza tasting room. Malbec, Mourvedre and Mayacamas Cab; the take-home bargain is a $20 blend. Photography gallery adds visual interest. 111 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, noon–6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.

Trione Vineyards & Winery One-time owners of Geyser Peak Winery now wear all the different hats that a small winery requires. A popular stop along a well-liked cycling route, where you’re likely to be greeted with a glass of crisp Sauvignon Blanc, or Bubba the bulldog. 19550 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$15. 707.814.8100.

N A PA CO U N TY

Raymond Burr Vineyards Unpretentious,

Beaulieu Vineyard

’70s-den-style room with loads of memorabilia, Emmies and miscellany that the late television great picked up in his travels. Weekends at 11am, greenhouse tour showcases hybridized orchids

History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy.,

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

RustRidge Ranch

Where the wines meet the equines BY JAMES KNIGHT

O

ne thousand feet above the Napa Valley floor, up past a parched landscape where digger pines scrabble for purchase on the crumbling, rocky slopes above Sage Canyon Road, and down a dusty ranch road in Chiles Valley, sits RustRidge Ranch, where horses graze in open pasture alongside the vineyards, now reddening in the autumn light. Inside the tasting room, a hay barn (furnished nicely enough, with rustic artifacts and a slice of tree over old barrels for a bar), a big yellow dog lies long and flat under a table and the air is still while winemaker Susan Meyer pours a taste of 2011 Sauvignon Blanc ($25) and tells her story in a manner some might like to call laconic. The barrelfermented Blanc is nutty, tingly, and lingers on the tongue for a long time.

Meyer’s family came up from the Peninsula in 1972 not principally to plant grapes—although that was something they did early on. As a child, she loved horses, and her mother, a racing enthusiast in the day, wanted to find land where Meyer could ride one. With the winery in 1985 came the idea to revive the ranch’s thoroughbred operation, and also came Jim Fresquez to train the horses. Affable, quick with a story, Fresquez has had a career so closely identified with California horseracing that he has personal memorabilia from Seabiscuit—and I’m talking about the horse, not the movie. Have the 2010 “Racehorse White” Chardonnay with a movie and with popcorn, herbed but not buttered, because this lean-finishing wine’s got wild, floral, peanut brittle and cream soda notes. There’s something different about Chiles Valley Cab. The 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon ($50) is savory, with something like a Chianti get-up-and-go to it. The 2008 Zinfandel ($35) floats cherries like lazy clouds over a palate of black fruit and red candy—fine drink for a winery that’s a slightly remodeled cattle feeding barn, run by just this couple plus an intrepid intern they wrangled all the way from one of the tonier wine bars in Dallas, Texas, all three of them worrying over the press on the day before harvest, followed around the crushpad by two dogs and a cat, as horses look on from their corral. RustRidge Ranch, 2910 Lower Chiles Valley Road, St., Helena. By appointment, 10am–4pm. Tasting fee, $20. Bed and breakfast stays available in a rambling ranch house with wall-to-wall horse decor. 707.965.9353.


19

Crush sh h R O H N E R T PA R K

Greased Lightning

John Adams once remarked about the title of his distinguished piece “Short Ride in a Fast Machine”: “You know how it is when someone asks you to ride in a terrific sports car, and then you wish you hadn’t?” This week, the celebratory opening of the Santa Rosa Symphony’s new season will showcase conductor Bruno Ferrandis clutching the steering wheel, stomping on the gas and white-knuckling Adams’ piece, taking that terrific hot rod out for a spin. Guest violinist Tedi Papavrami plays Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto no. 1, and Shostakovich’s Symphony no. 5 closes the program. Celebrate the Santa Rosa Symphony’s 86th year Saturday–Monday, Oct. 5–7, at the Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. Oct 5 and 7 at 8pm; Oct. 6 at 3pm. $20–$75. 707.546.8742.

Jenny Elwick

S A N TA R O S A

THESE ARE BEARDY TIMES The great Bill Soberanes Memorial Petaluma Whiskerino is at the Phoenix Theater on Oct. 5. See Events, p31.

udging, biodynamic garden garden tours, tours, chef judging, emonstrations, cooking competitions competitions and demonstrations, Frriday–Sunday, wine, wine, wine. Get juicy on Friday–Sunday, Fairgrounds. Oct. 4–6, at the Sonoma Countyy Fairgrounds. 350 Bennett Valley Valley Road, Santaa Rosa. Oct. 4 1350 Free admission; att 4:30pm;; Oct. 5–6, noon. Free 50–$90 tasting tickets. 707.545.4200. 7077..5445.4200. $50–$90

M I L L VA L L E Y

Looney T Tunes unes u Chris hris SStrachwitz trachwitz of Arhoolie Records Reccords doesn’t doesn’t produce” music ffor or his label— he captur es “produce” label—he captures eserver and a seller of itt as it is. A collector collector,, pr preserver uthentic music, SStrachwitz’s trachwitz’s label label offers offers a authentic atalogue of blues, Cajun, Cajun, wild hillbilly h countryy, catalogue country, ex-Mex and New Orleans R&B—and R&B— —and that ain’t ain’t Tex-Mex om Mickey noo mouse music. (mouse music (n): fr from Mouse; jazz term in the 1930s ffor or schmal tz schmaltz ndd pop.)) In I ‘This ‘Thi Ain’t Ai ’t No N Mou M use Music,’ M i ’ and Mouse lmmakers Chris Simon and Ma ureen Gosling filmmakers Maureen xplore the musical cul tures from from New Orleans explore cultures alling right into the lap of too Appalachia, ffalling Arhoolie Recor ds. With live perf o ormances by LLos os Records. performances enzontles, Eric and Suzy Thom pson and Cr eole Cenzontles, Thompson Creole Belles, the film screens screens on TTuesday, uuesddayy, Oct. 8, at weetwater Music Hall. 19 Cortee Mader ve, Sweetwater Maderaa A Ave, Mill Valley. Valley. 8:30pm. $32. 4415.388.3850. 15.388 8.3850.

P T. R E Y E S S TAT I O N

Stompin’ Time

Cooking It Up

Harvest time means something else entirely for our good buds in counties north, but in Sonoma and Napa, it’s grapestompin’ time. At this week’s Harvest Fair, attendees can roll up their blue jeans, throw off their boots and stain their calves purple in the World Champion Grape Stomp. Sonoma County’s food and wine culture flourishes with port and chocolate pairings, tasting pavilions, wine

Berkeley local Mollie K Katzen atzen is a pioneer in the arm-to-table movement. With years y of farm-to-table xperience in the gar den and th he kitchen, and experience garden the with over 6 million book nt, the author of bookss in prin print, he Moosewood Cookbookk helpe helped ed bring the the egetarian palate to the Americ can dinner plate. vegetarian American atzen’s latest book, The Heart of the Plate, Katzen’s ffers inventive vegetarian fare fare for for the new offers eneration. Her early rrecipes ecipes pa cked with rich generation. packed ngredients like butter, butter, cheese and a sour cr eam ingredients cream ave been rreplaced eplaced with heal thiier and tastier have healthier lternatives; learn some of Katzen’s Katzen’s techniques alternatives; talks about her new book b Saturday, when she talks on Saturday, Tooby’s Feed Barn. 11250 0 Hwy. Hwy. 1, Oct. 5,, at Toby’s Station. 10am. Free. Free. 415.663.1223. 415.663. 1 1223. Pt. Reyes Station.

—Tara — Tar a aK Kaveh a aveh

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CULTURE

The week’s k’s events: events: ve guid a selective guidee


Arts Ideas Carson Blume

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20

ON TOP OF THE WORLD Proceeds from this year’s Granfondo go to a variety of deserving charities.

Perpetual Motion Levi’s Granfondo continues despite Santa Rosa’s lack of bid for Tour of California BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

o me, a noncyclist, the idea of paying $100 to ride a bike in a crowded group on extremely steep hills and sharp curves for a hundred miles is my worst nightmare. But after five years of watching people scramble for the opportunity to ride Levi’s King Ridge Granfondo, I’ve come to understand it as a “thing” that people “like to do.” What nearly anyone can get behind is that the Granfondo

raises funds—an average of $60,000 per year—for Santa Rosa to host the Tour of California, the West Coast equivalent of the Tour de France. Since 2009, Levi’s Granfondo has grown to become a destination event for cyclists from around the country and a boost to local charities—even after a doping scandal rocked the sport and tarnished the legacy of the ride’s namesake, Santa Rosa resident Levi Leipheimer. “Levi is the host, his name is on it,” organizer Greg Fisher explains, “but he’d be the first one to tell you it’s about a great day on a bike, and

it’s really wonderful that it can’t be touched.” The initial King Ridge Granfondo had 3,500 participants paying to ride their bikes on an extremely difficult course that, 364 other days of the year, is free. Five years later, the Granfondo is a tourism beacon for the city. With its momentum and a celebrity at the helm, Fisher sees no reason the ride won’t continue, despite Santa Rosa’s decision not to host the Tour of California in 2014. “We have no plans to stop the party,” he says. “There’s no reason to.” Santa Rosa economic

development specialist Raissa de la Rosa explains that “because [the city] did not submit a bid to participate in the Tour for 2014, [it does] not expect to receive any funds from the 2013 Granfondo.” So where will all that cash go? Beneficiaries this year include VeloStreet’s Cycling Initiatives Program; Forget Me Not Farm; Community Giving (Rural Schools and Fire Departments); Dempsey Center For Cancer Hope and Healing; and the Pablove Foundation. But BikeMonkey has been doing some charity work of its own: paying to patch potholes on public roads. “The county is having a hard time keeping these roads maintained,” says Fisher, marketing director for Bike Monkey. “But if we have an opportunity to make the cycling in Sonoma County a little safer, we want to do it.” So far, they’ve patched up King Ridge, Sweetwater Springs and other roads, with more work planned. In this process, county and city officials have been more than just responsive, says Fisher: “They ask how they can help.” Fisher is somewhat modest about the charitable impact the Granfondo has had. “We anticipate fundraising to be on track this year,” he says, choosing not to boast about the fact that if his assumption holds true, the ride will have raised over $1 million in its five years of existence. No matter his past scandals, that’s one thing nobody can take away from Leipheimer. “He’ll ride this thing until his legs fall off,” says Fisher— unwittingly describing both Leipheimer’s dream and my own nightmare in one terrifying notion. Levi’s Granfondo kicks off the morning of Saturday, Oct. 5, at the corner of College Avenue and Stony Point Road, Santa Rosa. A festival with food and live music follows in the afternoon. www.levisgranfondo.com.


Linnea Mullins

SIGHTLINES JoAnn Amos plays a girl going blind in ‘Blur’ at SSU.

Class Act North Bay colleges launch ambitious shows for fall

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

rees have leaves. Leaves have a shelf life. Once a year, they drop to the lawn and are blown away by gusts of wind or neighbors’ noisy leaf-blowers. During this time of arboreal mayhem, schools open their doors and invite eager young scholars in from the leaf-covered world. When such students are scholars of theater, the boisterous, colorful drama of autumn gets a chance to play out on the stage, where the opportunity for life-changing theater can make for some sensational entertainment for us, the eager audience. This fall, at Sonoma State University, Santa Rosa Junior College, the College of Marin, and Napa Valley College, a vibrant blend of classic and original plays is planned for the next few months—and the yearly change of seasons appears as a character or background in several of these shows.

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Stage

At SSU, the theater department kicks things off with playwright Melanie Marnich’s moving and funny Blur (Oct. 17–21). Directed by Jennifer King (hopping over from Napa Valley College, where she’ll be directing Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone’s Christmas Carol in December), Blur is the comedic drama of a young woman in the summer of her life who discovers she is rapidly going blind. Then, beginning on Halloween, August Strindberg’s fanciful Ghost Sonata (Oct. 31–Nov. 9), directed by Judy Navas, gets the Tim Burton treatment in a production filled with eerie projections and shadow effects designed to surround and envelope the audience. In a fascinating collaboration between the theater, dance and science departments, SSU will present the succinctly titled Soundscape Project (Nov. 21–24), which uses dance, music and recorded sound to explore the inner world and changing seasons within SSU’s various Sonoma County nature preserves. Over at Santa Rosa Junior College, director John Shillington helms Lisa Loomer’s intensely insightful drama Distracted (Oct. 4–13), about parents coping with their son’s game-changing diagnosis of attention deficit disorder, and their attempts to tame his escalating outrageous behavior. Following it is the epic musical Les Miserables (Nov. 22–Dec. 8), directed by Laura Downing-Lee. It’s classic time at Kentfield’s College of Marin, where W. Allen Taylor leads students through Tennessee Williams’ primal exploration of emotional frailty and deception, A Streetcar Named Desire (Oct. 4–20), followed by director Lisa Morse’s summery staging of Oscar Wilde’s eversunny Importance of Being Earnest (Dec. 6–15). Whatever your artistic inclination, there’s plenty of action on the college stages of the North Bay this fall. Enough, even, to inspire one to take a break from raking leaves.

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by Lisa Loomer Directed by John Shillington

OCTOBER 4, 5, 10, 11, 12 at 8:00 PM OCTOBER 5, 6, 12, 13, at 2:00 PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College 1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$15 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 RECOMMENDED FOR AGE 14 AND ABOVE. CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE

Distracted is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.


Film

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | O CTO BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 Wed, Oct 2 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Oct 3 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Oct 4 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Oct 5 1–5pm 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise For the Love of Soul SINGLES & PAIRS HOEDOWN

Sun, Oct 6 5–9:25pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Mon, Oct 7 7–9:25pm

8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Tues, Oct 8 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

California Film Institute Presents

110/4 0 /4 – 10/10 10 /10

HHonorable onor able

Enough E nough Said Said PPG13 G13 (10:30-1:15-4:00)-7:00-9:15 (10 : 30-1:15- 4 : 00 ) -7: 00-9 :15

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Haute Ha ute Cuisine Cuisine PPG13 G13 ((11:00-4:15)-6:30 11: 00- 4 :15 ) -6 : 30

Populaire R (1(1:45)-8:45 Populaire : 45) -8 : 45 IIn naW World orld R (1(11:15-4:15)-9:15 1:15- 4 :15 ) - 9 :15 Sun 10/6 Sun 10 / 6 only: only: ((4:15)-9:15 4 :15) -9 :15 TTue ue 10/8 10 / 8 only: only: (11:15-4:15) (11:15-4 :15) WWed ed 110/9 0 / 9 oonly: nly : (1 (11:15am) 1:15am)

Short S hort T Term er e m1 12 2 R (1(1:45)-7:00 : 45 ) -7: 00 TTue ue 110/8 0 / 8 & WWed ed 110/9 0 / 9 oonly: nly : (1 (1:45) : 45)

MILL VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL October 3-13 Tickets on sale now 88 Features, 64 Shorts

GEOFFREY RUSH, BRUCE DERN, WILL FORTE, STEVE MCQUEEN, CHIWETEL EJIOFOR, SEAN PENN, DAKOTA FANNING, ANDY GARCIA, VERA FARMIGA, COSTA-GAVRAS, BEN STILLER, JARED LETO and many more scheduled to attend

(1:30)-6:45-9:00 (1: 30 ) -6 : 4 5- 9 : 0 0 Join Join uuss oonn SSunday unday 110/6 0 / 6 aatt 11pm pm aand nd TTuesday uesday 110/8 0 / 8 aatt 6:30pm 6 : 30pm ffor or sspecial pecial ppresentations r esen t a t ions ooff RRigoletto igole t t o ffrom r om Taormina, Taor mina, Italy! I t al y !

New! Just added since program went to press! Variety: Focus on Directors Saturday, October 12, 11:00 AM Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center ith J.C. CHANDOR - All is Panel discussion with YAN A COOGL Lost, Margin Call Call,l,, R RYAN COOGLER - Fruitv Fruitvale TT COOPER - Crazy Heart, O Station, SCOTT Out eearrs of the Furnace,, STEVE MCQUEEN - 12 Y Years N WELLS a Slave, Hunger, Shamee and JO JOHN any Men August: Osage County,, The Comp Company

Join Join uuss oonn WWednesday ednesday 10/9 10 / 9 at at 6pm 6pm for for the t he 4th 4t h Annual A nnual Human Human Dignity Dignit y Film Film Festival! Fes t ival ! Call Call 707.528.2745 707.528.2745 ffor or iinfo! nfo !

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ATMOSPHERE George Clooney stars in this year’s must-see film.

Lost in Space

‘Gravity’ astronomical in beauty, terror BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

t’s sometimes said of Steven Spielberg that he was the first director to compose without the thought of a proscenium arch. The exciting new film Gravity, by Alfonso Cuarón, seems like the first film composed without thought of the walls or ceiling. It’s clear that you’re watching a classic: lavish with effects, and yet brutally economical. Gravity begins far above earth, with some studious blandness; George Clooney’s crumbly, comforting voice droning happily as two assistants repair the Hubble telescope. While he’s sweetening up the physician Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock), a news flash: an unmanned Russian rocket has hit a satellite, knocking out communications. Like the first pieces of falling scree indicating the avalanche to come, a spray of debris comes toward them very fast. Very shortly—the film unfolds in real time, in 90 blessed minutes—the survivors are floating without a ride home and little oxygen. It’s frightening, this gradual building of trouble: the scrabbling at tools that have a mind of their own, with the sausage-fingered gloves of a space suit; the problem of trying to do something gymnastic when pulled in the wrong direction and while wearing a slippery, too-fragile suit. And then there’s the minor problem of reading a control panel written in Mandarin. What we see is solidly, masterfully composed, not the aimless whirling of hyperfast cutting. There always seems to be an axle on Cuarón’s spinning wheel. We see what infinity looks like—we see into it, straight through the skull of a martyred astronaut—so the mention of prayer to appease this horrible void seems particularly weak. Bullock—with her floating, beautifully made frame, graceful yet gawky—has a line about how “No one ever taught me to pray.” Her character is from a small Illinois town, too—where do you hide from people trying to teach you just that? But all that second-guessing comes later. Most viewers will be too busy kissing the ground when it’s over. ‘Gravity’ opens in wide release on Friday, Oct. 4.


Vote! Vote! Vote! Ŵŵ

Oct. 9 – Dec. 10 Go to www.bohemian.com The Bohemian’s Best Of The North Bay will be revealed March 2014!

WE SUPPORT ALL WEDDINGS

Roller Derby - Saturday, Oct. 5 North Bay Bruisers vs. Tulare Kings Derby Girls Sonoma State University - 7pm BUY TICKETS: Aubergine, Evolution Tattoo & Piercing, The Last Record Store, Liberal Loan & Jewelry Co., Brownpapertickets.com $10 General & $20 VIP in Advance $15 General & $25 VIP at the Door Kids 12 & under + Seniors $5

SONOMACOUNTYROLLERDERBY.COM

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For your favorite North Bay businesses!


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24

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Music

Incident” was probably 15 percent of the issues I worked out. Last month, on Twitter, you straight-up told someone to fuck off. Are you totally comfortable now with saying whatever’s on your mind?

DIN N E R & A SHOW

LEARNING CURVE Oct 4 Rock Fri

8:00

REVOLVER Oct 5 Songs from ‘66 Sat

On Twitter, for some reason, I feel very comfortable! Onstage, I would say I’m a little more gunshy. But I’m in a position where I’m just not going to take shit from strangers. These people that seek you out just to spread their venom, it’s hard for me to remain silent. I feel like tellin’ ’em to fuck off. And they need that. I’m doing them a public service.

8:30

Sun

Oct 6

WENDY FITZ’S TODOS SANTOS A Warm Breeze 5:00 / No Cover

EMILY BONN AND THE VIVANTS Oct 11 Old-Time Dance to Honky Tonk Fri

8:00 / No Cover

DAN HICKS AND BAYSIDE JAZZ Oct 18 Dance to Dan’s Favorite Standards Fri

8:00

Sat

Best Album of the Year FROBECK Original Funk, R&B and Rock 8:30 Sun Rancho Nicasio and KWMR present Oct 27 THE LEGENDARY LAURIE LEWIS

Oct 26

WITH

NINA GERBER ANND TOM ROZUM

“One of the pre-eminent Bluegrass and Americana artists of our time” 7:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

1030 Main Street in downtown Napa Tickets & Information

NVOH.ORG

707.226.7372

WORLD BLUES: TAJ MAHAL, VUSI MAHLASELA &

DEVA MAHAL WITH FREDERICKS BROWN Fri, Oct 4, 8 PM

CLASSICAL VIOLINIST:

JENNIFER KOH

Sat, Oct 5, 8 PM FILM:

SYMPHONY OF THE SOIL

Documentary film that explores the complexity and mystery of soil

Wed, Oct 2, 7 PM

Oct 11 to Oct 20 TUESDAY NIGHT FLICKS:

PSHCHO (1960)

Tue, Oct 29, 7 PM

It makes you wonder what things would have been like if Twitter was around 10 years ago. SORRY / NOT SORRY ‘I’m just not going to take shit from strangers,’ says Maines.

Still Not Making Nice Natalie Maines, 10 years after ‘the Incident’ BY GABE MELINE

T

en years ago, when Washington, D.C., Republicans weren’t shutting down the government but had instead led us into an illegal war based on misleading information, Natalie Maines changed her life forever. “We do not want this war, this violence,” she said onstage in London, “and we’re ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas.”

After Toby Keith said he’d “bury” her and the Nashville establishment spat her across the country to Southern California, we caught up with Maines, who has a new solo album, Mother, via phone. It’s been 10 years now since ‘the Incident,’ and the ensuing ridiculousness. Is that whole experience the reason we haven’t heard from you in so long?

Not entirely. The main reason is my two boys. I’ve just really tried to delve in to motherhood and do that 100 percent. Here in the Bay Area 10 years ago, people were buying your records without even having heard your music. Did you know there were these pockets of support out there? We felt both sides, for sure. People showed us more support than they ever had, and people showed us more hate than they ever had. But we were definitely aware of all the positives, and that helped a lot. You’ve mentioned that you went to therapy. Did you send Dick Cheney the bill? Ha! You know, it was less about that whole incident and more just about my needing to do some selfrealization and slow down. And you know, there was guilt about not wanting to do Dixie Chicks for a while. But I would say “the

Oh my God, I so wish it would have been around. It would have been different. I would have just said everything I had to say on Twitter. It’s better when you’re not edited and people can’t manipulate your words or what you’re trying to convey. You can start chasing your tail trying to explain yourself, and I just think things could have been shut down quicker. There was so much out there that we didn’t say. I don’t even think people knew what they were mad about! They were mad because I hate the troops, which was never said and was never a fact. When you ask people what I’d done, that’s what they’d say: I hate our country, and I hate the troops. After this solo tour, you’re going out again with the Dixie Chicks, who I know have wanted you to come out of seclusion. What made you decide to do it? I’ve always been open to touring. It’s recording a new Chicks album that I can’t carve the time out for. We live in different states, and also, it’s just . . . I don’t know, it’s hard to explain the place I’m at. But it just doesn’t feel right for me, musically, right now, as far as creating new music. Natalie Maines plays Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $40. 707.259.0123.


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Your visionâ&#x20AC;Ś my resources, dedication and integrityâ&#x20AC;Ś Together, we can catch your dream.

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Oct. 12

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26 Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG2FWĂŁSP

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Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY The English Beat Original skankers keep the beat alive. Irie Fuse opens. Oct 4, 8:30pm. $31. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jazz Forum Informal sessions and concerts with masters and rising stars. Oct 2, Matt Slocum Trio. 1pm. Free. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Oddjob Ensemble Benefit Raising funds for replacement instruments after a car accident on tour. Bands include Heather Marie Van Cleve, Hanalise (LA), Sally Haggard, John Brothers Piano Co (OAK), Lungs & Limbs, Manzanita Falls, Mr December, People Parade, the Basement Stares, Tiny Pyramids, Douche Illington, Starskate (OAK) and others. Oct 5, 3pm. $7. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

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New band features former members of New Orleans group the Radiators. Oct 3, 8:30pm. $25. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

everyday life. Oct 3, 7:30pm. $27. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY Bettye LaVette Singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice has aged like fine wine. With Earl Thomas. Oct 6, 8pm. $32. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Gordon Lightfoot Songwriter has recorded several No 1 hits, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;If You Could Read My Mindâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carefree Highway.â&#x20AC;? Oct 5, 8pm. $40-$70. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Okee Dokee Brothers Family folk group took home the Grammy for best childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album this year. Oct 4, 6:30pm. $8-$12. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Parker Quartet Grammy-winning quartet tackles pieces by Beethoven, Prokofiev and Shostakovich. Oct 6, 5pm. $15-$30. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley.

Bonnie Raitt Star broke through in the

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something to Talk About.â&#x20AC;? Marc Cohn opens. Oct 9, 8pm. $40-$100. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Raw Oyster Cult New band features former members of New Orleans group the Radiators. Oct 4-5, 9pm. $37. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY The Brothers Cazimero Hawaiian music legends appear with Amy Hanaialii. Oct 5, 7pm. $35-$45. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Jennifer Koh Violinist is recognized by her intense, commanding performances. Oct 5, 8pm. $30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Natalie Maines Member of the Dixie Chicks in a solo show. Oct 6, 7pm. $40. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Taj Mahal World blues evening also features Vusi Mahlasela and Fredericks Brown. Oct 4, 8pm. $65. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series Oct 5, Pride & Joy. Saturdays, 12pm. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Symphony Program includes John Adamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Short Ride in a Fast Machine,â&#x20AC;? Shostakovich concerto with violinist Tedi Papavrami and Shostakovichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fifth Symphony. Oct 5, 8pm, Oct 6, 3pm and Oct 7, 8pm. $20-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Spirit & Song of the Sixties Featuring William Florian of the New Christy Minstrels and Laura Benward. Oct 7, 7pm. $15. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Kevin Welch Poetic songwriter paints clear pictures of characters of

CHANCE ASKANCE Jennifer Koh performs at the Napa Valley Opera House Oct. 5. See Concerts, above.


CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center

COMICS ART â&#x20AC;˘ BOOKS SPECIAL GUESTS PANELS WORKSHOPS WRITERS & ARTISTS & MUCH MORE!

Glaser Center Oct 5, Fiddle & Guitar. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Oct 5, Jen Tucker Band. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Oct 2, Mose. Oct 3, Raw Oyster Cult. Oct 4, Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic. Oct 9, Love & Light. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Oct 5, Susan Sutton Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette Oct 7, Del McCoury Band (sold out). 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 9, Jen Tucker Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Mystic Theatre Oct 4, the English Beat, Irie Fuse. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Oct 3, Kevin Welch. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

CONCOURSE EXHIBITION CENTER

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635 8th ST., SAN FRANCISCO SAT.: 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 SUN.: 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

Oct 5, Oddjob Ensemble Benefit. Mon, Fire Spinning. Wed, Open Mic. First Thursday of every month, Jazz & Coffee. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

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Just go see Bettye Lavette You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to mess with Bettye Lavette. This is for a number of reasons, chief among them that if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re heckling her, as I saw a fan do a few years ago, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll walk right up and plant a huge kiss on your lips to shut you up. You know, come to think of it, maybe you do want to mess with Bettye Lavette. Live and in person at age 67, Lavette continues to erupt emotion from the very depths of her being, even while hip-shaking and leg-kicking her way through medleys of her 1960s hits. Now a dependable purveyor of well-selected coversâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;John Prineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Souveneirs,â&#x20AC;? Sinead Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Do Not What I Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Got,â&#x20AC;? the Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love, Reign Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;er Meâ&#x20AC;? to name a fewâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Lavette is a transfixing sight to behold on stage, and moreso in a small venue like the Sweetwater. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss it when a true soul legend appears with opener Earl Thomas on Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $32. 415.388.3850.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

PRESENTED BY

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Phoenix Theater Oct 5, French Girls, Down with May, Unruly Things. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 4, Equipto. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. Second Tuesday of every month, 9pm, Barnburners Poetry Slam.

8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

Russian River Brewing Co Oct 6, Blue Diamond Fillups. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub Oct 4, Rick Park. Oct 5, the Leftovers. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastiani Theatre Oct 7, Spirit and Song of the Sixties. 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Sebastopol Community Center Youth Annex Oct 5, Jethro Jeremiah, Rock Garden, Midnight Raid. 425 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.874.3571.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. Wed, North Bay Blues

) 28

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Clubs & Venues


Music ( 27

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28

Revue. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Music / Events

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics

Oct 4, Kisser, Fantasia. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room Oct 4, the Restless Sons, Emily Somple, Robert Herrera. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

3'8Ä&#x2C6;Ä&#x20AC;TQÄ&#x2C6;(SREXMSR Short Film with Director Mike Mease, Q &A, Stories & Live Native Soul Music

&YJJEPS*MIPH'EQTEMKR6SEH7LS[

The Sunflower Center

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Oct 5, Onye & the Messengers. Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

featuring live music by

+SSH7LMIPH%KYMPEV 1MKRSR+IPPM 3'8Ä&#x2C6;Ä&#x20AC;TQÄ&#x2C6;(SREXMSRWXS7SRSQE ;SQIRÄ&#x192;W7LIPXIVW Have fun, build trust & community

MARIN COUNTY

+SHHIWW4EVX]

Bolinas Museum Oct 5, El Radio Fantastique. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

*IQEPIW[MXLER9RWXSTTEFPI2EXYVI 3'8Ä&#x2C6;*VII(VYQ'MVGPITQ'SRGIVX TQÄ&#x2C6;EHYPXWYRHIV AfroBeat World Music Band

Dance Palace Oct 4, Okee Dokee Brothers. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

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Fenix Oct 3, Simon Costa. Oct 4, Volker Strifler Band. Oct 5, Shana Morrison. Oct 6, Farzad Arjmand. Oct 9, Drew Harrison John Lennon Birthday Tribute. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Roots, Massive Delicious. Oct 5, Everton Blender & the Yard Squad Band, Triniti. Oct 8, Jeb Brady Band. Oct 9, Mt Hammer, Message of Love, Riff Raff. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Terrapin Crossroads Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Oct 4, Lumanation. Oct 5, Slim Jenkins. Oct 9, Rockit Science. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Oct 4, Keith Crossan Band. Oct 5, Revolver. Oct 6, Todos Santos. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Oct 9, Marcelo Puig & Seth Asarnow. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Oct 3, Samauri Wolf. Oct 4, Honeydust. Oct 6, Tracy Blackman. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 2, Amendola vs Blades. Oct 4, Rozzi Crane. Oct 4-5, Raw Oyster Cult. Oct 6, Bettye LaVette with Earl Thomas. Oct 9, Mustache Harbor. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 3, Ralph Woodson. Oct 4, Charles Wheel Band. Oct 5, Walter Hand Band. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Lincoln Theater Oct 5, the Brothers Cazimero. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Napa Valley Opera House Oct 4, Taj Mahal, Vusi Mahlasela, Fredericks Brown. Oct 5, Jennifer Koh. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 3, Simon Russell. Oct 4, Joshua Paige. Oct 5, Daline Jones and Diego Ramirez. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Oct 4, Tainted Love. Oct 6, Natalie Maines. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

TAP ROOM

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER. Fri, Oct 4

Ghiringhelli Pizzeria and Wine Bar

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Oct 6, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstromâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Society. 1535 South Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.878.4977.

Father John Misty

Hopmonk Novato

Conor Oberst

Dirty Rice and the Mudcat

REBEL ROCK, BLUES & COUNTRY

top 40 djâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sun, Oct 6

7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm

Tim Hockenberry LIVE PIANO AND VOCALS

Happy Hour Daily 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:30pm

132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA

707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

Oct 3, the Incubators. Oct 4, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Oct 5, Midnight Sun Massive. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium

9:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30am

TOP 40, ROCK & POP FROM 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TO TODAY

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

& Beer Sanctuary

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

Sat, Oct 5

Oct 4, Eric Martin. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Oct 5, Gordon Lightfoot. Oct 6, Marin Symphony National Young Composers Challenge. Oct 9, Bonnie Raitt, Marc Cohn. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church Oct 6, Parker Quartet. 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley.

19 Broadway Club Oct 3, Red Rose. Oct 4, Clear Conscience, Arden Park

Dude who drummed for Fleet Foxes says screw it, goes solo, is more interesting than Fleet Foxes. Oct 3 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

The sensitive young teen, grittier now in his 20s, can still turn a phrase like a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 Dodge. Oct 5 at the Fillmore.

Dave Hollandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prism The master bassist leads group with adventurous drummer Eric Harland and TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kevin Eubanks. Oct 6 at SFJAZZ Center.

Pet Shop Boys Andrew Sullivanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite band sets dancefloor alive with hits old and new. Oct 5 and 7 at the Fox Theater.

Iceage Teenage Norwegians play methodical noise while frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt writhes. Oct 9 at Rickshaw Stop.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


29

Galleries RECEPTIONS Oct 4 Arts Guild of Sonoma, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Work,â&#x20AC;? by member artists. 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Seager Gray Gallery, Oct 2-Nov 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Form and Place,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 5pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288. Studio Blomster, works by David McGraw. 5pm. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Oct 5

Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Oct 2-28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Work,â&#x20AC;? by member artists. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. Through Mar 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;School Projects,â&#x20AC;? follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Artlife Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Are You Looking At?â&#x20AC;? works by Ken Berman and William C Cutler. 5pm. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

City Hall Council Chambers

Graton Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails Preview,â&#x20AC;? works by ARTrails participants. 3pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

First Friday of every month. through Dec 6, Meet artists featured in ARTrails and watch them work. Sep 6, ARTrails preview show; Oct 4, ARTrails kickoff; Nov 1, Abby Bard, Jane Garabaldi and Susan Greer; Dec 6, Tony Speirs, Lisa Beerntsen and Suki Diamond. Free. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2424.

MINE Art Gallery, Oct 5-Dec 1, BreathingLight,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Sandra Cohn. 6pm. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. RiskPress Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cuttings,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media constructions, drawings and artists books by Brooke Holve. 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Through Oct 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oil Paintings,â&#x20AC;? works by Mark Jacobson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Corrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through Nov 12, Paintings by Barbara Kelley. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm 707.827.3600.

Epicurean Connection

SONOMA COUNTY Agrella Art Gallery Through Oct 17, 12pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tradition of Mayhem,â&#x20AC;? themes of aggression and hostility in human nature. Gallery is free. Parking fees.. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat 12 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Artlife Gallery â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Are You Looking At?â&#x20AC;? works by Ken Berman and William C Cutler. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S,

Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bird & Flower,â&#x20AC;? poetic paintings by Wu Tianyu. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saints Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? Byzantine art of saints by Grant Greenwald. Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scrap Metal Art,â&#x20AC;? works by James Selby. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Oct 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Delicious,â&#x20AC;?

work by artists from Becoming Independent and Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Fri Oct 4 An evening with Tainted Love

Sun Oct 6

Natalie Maines of The Dixie Chicks Sat Oct 12

Peter Murphy Mr Moonlight Celebrates 35 yrs of Bauhaus

Gallery One Through Oct 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anniversary Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? works by Clark Mitchell and Olga Storms. Through Oct 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails 3D Showcase Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? sampling of 3D art by local artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails Preview,â&#x20AC;? works by ARTrails participants. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture and Works on Paper,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Jann Nunn. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Oct 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Dot 2013,â&#x20AC;? work by Laurent Davidson, Frieda Giolding and Michael Madzo. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Wed Oct 16 ^ŽůŽÄ?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?^Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ç Chris Cornell

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Halloween Spooktacular Weekend Double Feature/Halloween 1 and 2 bands, costume contest, creepy food & drink specials and more!

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The Deadlies, The Rebobs, Deluna bands, costume contest, creepy food & drink specials and more!

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An evening with Pride & Joy

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

I TA L I A N A Sun Oct 13, 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm Veterans Memorial Hall

Maple Ave at Brookwood, Santa Rosa

FOODsFAMILYsFUN FOLK MUSIC & DANCING OPERA ENSEMBLE CLASSIC CAR SHOW SILENT AUCTION & RAFFLE CHILDRENS ACTIVITIES 3(/00).'s"/##% TRAVEL INFO ENTERTAINMENT

VIVA OPERA DON GIOVANNIS ZIGHI BACI WITH MICHAEL VAN WHY BALLIAMO DANCERS CORO ALLEGRO & STEVE ALBINI ROMAN GLADIATORS $ 6 ADV / $10 DOOR UNDER 12 FREE, FREE PARKING for ticket outlets see: www.nbicf.org or call 707.591.9696 Benefit for Cultural Programs of the North Bay Italian Cultural Foundation

History Center Through Feb 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture Trail,â&#x20AC;? outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

ÂĄPuro Alma Apachicano! by Emmanuel Catarino Montoya, 2010

Hudson Street Wineries Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 Series,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Lori Mole. 423 Hudson St, Healdsburg.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earth, Wind and Fire,â&#x20AC;? gallery exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Nov 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Victorian Mourning Customs,â&#x20AC;? see how our predecessors honored their deceased. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

RiskPress Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Impressions

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Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Pampered Feet Reflexology Center BVhhV\ZI]ZgVen

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | O CTO BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Concerts

Ruth Moody

(of The Wailinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jennys) and her band Saturday, October 19, 8:00 pm

Quinn Deveaux and the Blue Beat Review and The Sam Chase Friday, October 25, 8:30 pm Dance Concert costumes encouraged

INCISION â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cuttings,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; an exhibit of mixed-media constructions by Brooke Holve exploring the changing role of the book, opens with a reception Oct. 5 at Riskpress Gallery. See Receptions, p29.

Holly Near

and the Peace Becomes You Band Friday, November 8, 8:00 pm Also Coming Soon

Sebastopol

Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nov. 15 Community Alasdair Fraser & Natlalie Haas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 7 Cultural Center Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

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of India,â&#x20AC;? photos by Patrick Brinton. Oct 4-27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cuttings,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media constructions, drawings and artists books by Brooke Holve. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Sea Pictures Saturday, Oct 12, 8pm Sunday, Oct 13, 2pm Bonnie Brooks, mezzo-soprano Norman Gamboa, Conductor t.FOEFMTTPIO$BMN4FB and Prosperous Voyage t&MHBS4FB1JDUVSFT t#BSCFS%PWFS#FBDI t%FCVTTZ-B.FS

$

15 Premium Seating; $10 General Admission 5 Student (18 and under)

$

Celebrating our 15th Season

SRHS Performing Arts Auditorium 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa www.apsonoma.org 1.800.838.3006

Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired in France,â&#x20AC;? paintings and photos by Karen Spratt. Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Need a Little Love,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christine Kierstead. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ABZ Etcetera,â&#x20AC;? using letters numbers symbols and characters. Through Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Landscape Impressions: En Plein Air,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Donna DeLaBriandais, and sculptures by Aaron Poovey. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artistry in Wood,â&#x20AC;? Showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. Through Jan 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photography in Mexico,â&#x20AC;? from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma State University Library Art Gallery Through Oct 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Death to Life in Ancient Bahrain,â&#x20AC;? close-up view of ancient burial grounds. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Delicious Images: Art About Food,â&#x20AC;? paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Goldyne in conversation, Oct 24, 7pm. Through Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kitchen Memories,â&#x20AC;? culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. Gadget demonstration, Oct 12, Nov 9, Nov 22, 5:30pm, $12. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Oct 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIARE Design Awards Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? winning entries from the Redwood Empire Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Studio Blomster Oct 4-29, Works by David McGraw. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Towers Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hidden Treasures,â&#x20AC;? variety of styles from local artists. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

University Art Gallery Through Oct 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;25 Years, 25 Artists: The Painting Students of Mark Perlman,â&#x20AC;? works by SSU art teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best students. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Oct 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memento Mori,â&#x20AC;? art by Eddie Volla and D Young V. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Oct 5, Art Auction to benefit the museum. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

COM Art Gallery Through Nov 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1992,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Oct 26, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art to Live With,â&#x20AC;? works by Helen Webber. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Bergelli Oct 5-Nov 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duet,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling. Artist talk, Oct 12, 5pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Believe,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media pieces by Madeline Nieto Hope. Salon, Oct 20, 4pm. Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Residencia en la Tierra,â&#x20AC;? 10 artists show work with a deep resonance in the world. Salon, Oct 20, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;National Photography Show,â&#x20AC;? works


comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

country, followed by discussion on how to save them. Oct 3, 6pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Marin Society of Artists

Oktoberfest

Through Oct 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall Rental Show,â&#x20AC;? all pieces available to rent. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; SatSun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

German stuff. Oct 4. Mavericks, 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515. Polka, beer and food, all German. Fri-Sun, 6pm. through Oct 12. Highland Dell Lodge, 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

MINE Art Gallery Oct 5-Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;BreathingLight,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Sandra Cohn. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfamiliar Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? abstract and expressionistic mixed-media works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;StreetLight,â&#x20AC;? oil paintings by Rabbi Lawrence Kushner. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Seager Gray Gallery Oct 2-Nov 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Form and Place,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Dec 31, largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Through Nov 30, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art on First,â&#x20AC;? the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Through Jan 1, 2015, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metamorphosis,â&#x20AC;? outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Found in Translation,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Events Book Sale Books, movies and more on sale, proceeds go to Sonoma County libraries. Oct 4-7. $5. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Buffalo Field Campaign Road Show Short film, discussion and live music relating to the majestic buffalo. Oct 2, 7pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Calabash Silent auction of fine gourd art and live music played on gourd instruments. Oct 6, 1pm. $50. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville. 707.887.1647.

California State Grange Convention Speakers, music and more bringing together grange representatives from around the country. Oct 9-13. Free. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Fall Arts & Crafts Sale Jewelry, cards and handmade creations. Oct 5, 10am. Free. Vallejo Street Senior Apartments, 575 Vallejo St, Petaluma.

Fashion at the Vineyards Hot West Coast designers show their creations at this soiree. Oct 5-6, 5pm. $125. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

First Friday Art Show Oct 4, art by Abigail Zimmerman and music by Tom Martin. First Fri of every month. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Harvest Fair

Comedy

Wine, beer, grape stomping, music and more at this Sonoma County tradition. Fri, Oct 4, 4:30pm and Oct 5-6, noon-5pm. $50-$90. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Night for the Buffalo

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established

Short film on the majestic animals that once roamed the

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

by Simon Pyle, Chantel Beam, Douglas Ito and others. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

The Order of the Magi Treasure Hunt Find the right cards to win $5,000. Call for details. Oct 9, 7pm. Loveable Rogue Bookstore, 867 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.895.1081.

Pet Fair Police dog demonstrations, spash dogs, vendors and kids activities. Oct 5-6, 10am. Free. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Redwood Empire Stamp Fair Collectors exhibits and dealers from around the country. Oct 4-6, 10am. Free. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Savory Thymes Benefit Eat and mingle with actors from MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming plays. Park at MTC with shuttle service to Hillside Gardens. Oct 6, 2pm. $75. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Teacher SoirĂŠe & Open House Free admission for educators to get ideas for the classroom. Oct 2, 6pm. Free. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Whiskerino Participants judged on the length, sturdiness and style of their beards. Oct 5, 2pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Field Trips

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French Garden Farm Tour Join Dan Smith for practical tips on growing your own garden. First Sat of every month. Free. French Garden Farm, 11031 Cherry Ridge Rd, Sebastopol. ) 707.824.2030.

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Marin Moonshiners Hike

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Monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Pack your own picnic. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15. Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film Culinary Cinema Oct 3, “Ingredients: A Documentary Film”; Oct 10, Napa Valley Film Fest short film preview. Thurs through Oct 10. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Danny from North Korea Short film followed by talk by nomads from Liberty in North Korea. Oct 8, 7pm. $5. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

The Fighter Movie inspired by Jack London’s “The Mexican” shown outdoors. Preceeded by talk about the book. Oct 6, 6pm. $15. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

The Graduates / Los Graduados Pressing issues in education are explored through the eyes of a diverse array of Latino adolescents. Oct 8, 7pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

High Stakes The story of one Pomo man who faces tribal disenrollment. Sun, 2 and 4pm. through Oct 20. Free. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Human Dignity Film Festival Films about wheelchairs and people who ride them. Oct 9, 6pm. $10. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Italian Film Festival Oct 5, “Azzurro”; Oct 6, “I Don’t Speak English”; Oct 12, “A Flat for Three”; Oct 26, “The Red and the Blue”; Nov 2, “1,000 Meters to Paradise”; Nov 9, “One Day More.” Sat, 5:30 and 7:45pm and Sun, Oct 6, 5:30 and 7:45pm. through Oct 12. $14-$91. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Jewish Film Festival Oct 3, “Paris-Manhattan”; Oct 10, “Joe Papp in Five Acts.” 7:30pm. $10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Mahnattan Short Film Festival Viewers allowed to submit voting cards in this event that spans 300 cities. Oct 3-4, 4 and 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Mill Valley Film Festival Screenings of new films, including appearances by Ben Stiller, Metallica, Dakota Fanning and others. Screenings in four theaters in Marin County, see www.mvff.com for details. Oct 3-13. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Mountainfilm Oct 2, “Eiger Sanction,” “Yosemite Falls High Line.” Wed, 7:30pm. through Oct 2. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sonoma Film Institute Oct 4, “Hollywood Hair”; Oct 11, “Always for Pleasure.” 4 and 7pm. through Nov 24. $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Symphony of the Soil Documentary explores the complexity and mystery of soil. Oct 2, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372. Documentary asks what the earth has to tell us. Discussion follows screening Oct 9, 7pm. Free. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

This Ain’t No Mouse Music West Coast premiere of the Arhoolie Records film. Live performances by Los Cezontles, Eric and Suzy Thompson and Creole Belles. Oct 8, 8:30pm. $32. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Food & Drink Foodie Films Chefs prepare a food inspired by a film. Oct 10, “Like Water for Chocolate”; Nov 7, “Julie

and Julia.” First Thurs of every month, 7pm. through Nov 7. $20. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Taste & Talk with Mollie Katzen Author of the Moosewood Cookbook is credited with bringing vegetarianism to the mainstream. Oct 5, 10am. Free. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Wine Pairing & Cooking Demonstration Chefs Rocky Packard and Jacques Kirk team up with Ziggy the Wine Gal. Oct 3, 6:30pm. $55. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Children’s Garden Whimsical environments for kids’ exploration. Hours: Mon, noon to 4; Tues-Sun, 9 to 5. Ongoing. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Saddle Club Children six and up are welcome for horse- and stable-related games and a casual dinner. Fri, 5:30pm. $20. Sunrise Stables, 1098 Lodi Lane, St Helena. 707.333.1509.


Art Uncorked Recreate masterpieces in this fun painting class. First Thurs of every month, 6:30pm. $45. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackles tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. First Sun of every month. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. www.napahistory.org.

Burbank Lecture Series Sep 11, Susan Hatch describes gardening with bulbs; Oct 9, Tour of Juilliard Park and the Church of One Tree with Bill Montgomery. Second Wed of every month. through Oct 9. $10. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Finding Your Soul’s Path Discover how to make empowered choices. Oct 4, 7:30pm. $30. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Human Rights Forum Sonoma County Human Rights Commission discusses human trafficking. Oct 5, 1pm. Hyatt Vineyard Creek, 170 Railroad St, Santa Rosa.

Revolution in Mexico SSU professor Tony White discusses Mexico’s 1910 revolution. Oct 3, 7pm. $7. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

PhD. Tues, 7pm. through Oct 15. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Sebastopol Buddhist Meditation Beginning-level Tibetan Buddhist meditation group. Sun, 1pm. Donations. Kagyu Takten Puntsokling, 5594 Volkerts Rd, Sebastopol. 707.824.4637, ext 2.

Speaker Series Lectures first Wed of every month at 7:30 in Creekside Room. First Wed of every month. Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. www. millvalleyhistoricalsociety.org.

TEDx Marin Doctors, philosophers, entrepreneurs and other really smart people talk about new ideas with the theme of “Past Presents Future.” Oct 2, 6pm. $75. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Wade Davis Former NFL cornerback talks about coming out as gay in the world of sports. Oct 8, 7pm. Free. Cooperage, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Wild Birds of Northern California Presented by The Bird Rescue Center. Oct 4, “The Mystery of Bird Song” with David Lukas; Oct 11, “Realities of Rescue, Rehabilitation and Release” with Veronica Bowers. Fri, 7pm. through Oct 11. Free. Presbyterian Church of the Roses, 2500 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa.

Working with Beavers Learn how beavers could help both urban and rural communities across California restore watersheds. Oct 9, 7pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Science Buzz Cafe Oct 3, “Electricity: It’s Alive!” with Robert Porter, PhD; Oct 8, “The Social Life of Bees” with Dan Smith; Oct 15, “The Mondragon Economic Experiment” with Gus diZerega, PhD; Nov 7, “Geological Evolution of the Earth Landscape” with Richard Ely; Nov 12, “Conversations with Bacteria: Women of Science Series” with Philip Harriman, PhD; Nov 19, “Life In The Universe: The Science of Astrobiology” with Carl Pilcher,

Readings Angelico Hall Oct 9, 7pm, “David and Goliath” with Malcolm Gladwell, includes signed book $35. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Aqus Cafe Oct 7, 6:30pm, Rivertown Poets with Marvin R Hiemstra and Peter Carroll. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra.

189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

for the Arts

Book Passage

Oct 6, 4pm, “Reaching for the Moon: More Diaries of a Roaring Twenties Teen” with Julia Park Tracy. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Oct 2, 7pm, “What Poets Are Like: Up and Down with the Writing Life” with Gary Soto. Oct 3, 7pm, “Cartwheel” with Jennifer duBois. Oct 4, 7pm, “Burial Rites” with Hannah Kent. Oct 5, 1pm, “Sweet Thunder” with Ivan Doig. Oct 5, 4pm, “The Woman Who Lost Her Soul” with Bob Shacochis. Oct 5, 7pm, “If I’d Known You Were Coming” with Kate Milliken. Oct 6, 1:53pm, “Through Gilly’s Eyes: Memoirs of a Guide Dog” with Matthew VanFossan. Oct 6, 4pm, “Mountain of Light” with Indu Sundaresan. Oct 6, 7pm, “Free Spirit” with Joshua Safran. Oct 7, 7pm, “Local Souls” with Allan Gurganus. Oct 7, 7pm, “Mañana Means Heaven” with Tim Hernandez. Oct 8, 7pm, “Blowback” with Valerie Plame, in conversation with Lt Governor Gavin Newsom. Oct 8, 7pm, “The Mountain: My Time on Everest” with Ed Viesturs. Oct 9, 7pm, “Dirty Love” with Andre Dubus III. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 3, 6:30pm, “Unbreakable: Legion Book 1” with Kami Garcia. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 3, 4pm, “Lost Kingdom” with Matthew Kirby. Oct 4, 7pm, “An Atomic Love Story: The Extraordinary Women in Robert Oppenheimer’s Life” with Patricia Klaus. Oct 7, 7pm, “Enon” with Paul Harding. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Oct 9, 7pm, “Enon” with Paul Harding. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Battling Giants

Oct 5, 2pm, “Healing the Earth” poetry with Raphael Block. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Oct 5, 9am, Writing Rumi with Kate Levinson and Jaune Evans. Oct 5, 4pm, “Training the Wisdom Body: Buddhist Yogic Exercise” with Rose Taylor Goldfield. 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Theater Chapter Two Semi-autobiographical story about love and second chances by renowned playwright Neil Simon. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 13. $13-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Driving Miss Daisy A stubborn, aging Jewish widow in Atlanta has an African-American hired to be her chauffeur–in 1948. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 4pm. through Oct 6. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Mauritius Theresa Rebeck’s comedydrama that explores sibling rivalry, greed and the little known world of philately (stamp collecting). Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Oct 13. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

No Sex Please, We’re British Fast-paced British farce tells of newlyweds who receive a mistaken order in the mail. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 20. $20$28. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

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Oct 3, 7pm, “The Holy Universe” with David Christopher. Oct 9, 7pm, “Journey of Your Soul: A Channel Explores the Michael Teachings” with Shepard Hoodwin. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618. First Sunday of every month, 9pm, North Bay Poetry Slam, Monthly poetry performance and competition. Aug 4, National Team Stockton. $5-$10. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 2–8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Lectures

The sweet transvestite, Frankenfurter, dances the “Time Warp” in person with his motley crew. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 13. $15-$25. Studio Theatre, Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Malcolm Gladwell talks success and disadvantage Nobody wants to be the underdog, right? Not so, says New Yorker staff writer Malcolm Gladwell, whose latest book David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants takes on the idea that David was at a disadvantage against Goliath—when in reality he deployed cunning against brute strength—to arrive at a new understanding of success. The author of The Tipping Point, Blink and Outliers, all bestsellers in their own right, Gladwell has built his success as a writer on his ability to begin at knowledge assumed to be true and turn it on its head. David and Goliath examines the minds of cancer researchers, the battlefields of Vietnam and unsuccessful classrooms, exposing the way we “fundamentally misunderstand the true meaning of advantages and disadvantages.” With a blend of psychology, business and history acumen, Gladwell posits questions that turn the fabric of life inside out. When is a traumatic childhood a good thing? When does a disability leave someone better off? Consistent and dexterous, Malcolm Gladwell appears on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at Dominican University. 50 Acacia Ave., San Rafael. $35 (includes book). 7pm. 415.485.3202.—Leilani Clark

A Streercar Named Desire Tennessee Williams’ most famous play features lots of drinking and domestic violence in New Orleans. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Oct 19. $10-$20. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 2

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Are you good at haggling? Do you maybe even enjoy the challenge of negotiating for a better price, of angling for a fairer deal? The coming week will be a favorable time to make extensive use of this skill. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will thrive on having friendly arguments with just about everyone, from your buddies to your signiďŹ cant other to your mommy to God Herself. Everywhere you go, I encourage you to engage in lively discussions as you hammer out compromises that will serve you well. Be cheerful and adaptable and forceful. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

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MEDITATION CENTER OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, Oct 8, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. If you are new to Buddhism or Meditation and wish to find out what it is all about, please attend our free Open House. The evening will include a guided relaxation, breathing meditation and a short talk on Meditation & Buddhism as well as an introduction to the Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs. Everyone is welcome. Compassion Buddhist Ctr, 436 Larkfield Center, SR, 707.477.2264, www.meditateinsantarosa.org

In David Marksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experimental novel Wittgensteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mistress, the protagonist fantasizes about the winter she lived at the Louvre in Paris. She says that to keep warm she made big ďŹ res and burned some of the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s precious artifacts. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anything remotely resembling that in the coming week, Taurus. I understand that you may be going through a cold spellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a time when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re longing for more heat and light. But I beg you not to sacriďŹ ce enduring beauty in order to ameliorate your temporary discomfort. This, too, shall pass.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say you want love,â&#x20AC;? writes San Francisco author Stephen Sparks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Say you want the morning light through a paint-ďŹ&#x201A;ecked window; say you want a gust of wind scraping leaves along the pavement and hills rolling toward the sea; say you want to notice, in a tree you walk past every day, the ruins of a nest exposed as the leaves fall away; a slow afternoon of conversation in a shadowy bar; the smell of bread baking.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly the oracle I want to give you, Gemini. In my opinion, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to be generic or blank in your requests for love. You must be highly speciďŹ c. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to ask for the exact feelings and experiences that will boost the intensity of your lust for life. (Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sparksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tumblr page: invisiblestories.tumblr.com.) CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are stronger in the broken places,â&#x20AC;? wrote Cancerian writer Ernest Hemingway. By my estimation, my fellow Crabs, we are now entering a phase of our astrological cycle when we can make dramatic progress in healing the broken places in ourselves. But even better than that, as we deal dynamically with the touchy issues that caused our wounds, we will become stronger than we were before we got broken.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope you have given deep thought to understanding who you are at this moment of your life. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also hope that you have developed a clear vision of the person you would like to become in, say, three years. How do you feel about the gap between the current YOU and the future YOU? Does it oppress you? Does it motivate you? Maybe a little of both? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll offer you the perspective of actress Tracee Ellis Ross. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am learning every day,â&#x20AC;? she told Uptown Magazine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;to allow the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me.â&#x20AC;? VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Do the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;purityâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;purifyâ&#x20AC;? have any useful purpose? Or have they been so twisted by religious fundamentalists and mocked by decadent cynics that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re mostly just farcical? I propose that you take them seriously in the coming week. Give them your own spin. For instance, you could decide to purify yourself of petty attitudes and trivial desires that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in alignment with your highest values. You might purify yourself of selfdeceptions that have gotten you into trouble and purify yourself of resentments that have blocked your creative energy. At the very least, Virgo, cleanse your body with extra-healthy food, good sleep, massage, exercise and sacred sex. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) I periodically hike alone into the serene hills north of San Francisco and perform a set of my songs for the birds, insects, squirrels and trees. Recently, I discovered that British comedian Milton Jones tried a similar experiment. He did his standup act for a herd of cows on a farm in Hertfordshire. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak for Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; motivations, but one of the reasons I do my nature shows is because

they bring out my wild, innocent, generous spirit. Now is a good time for you to do something similar for yourself, Libra. What adventures can you undertake that will fully activate your wild, innocent, generous spirit?

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

Are you anxious and agitated, afraid that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re careening out of control? Is there a ďŹ&#x201A;ustered voice in your head moaning, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stop the insanity!â&#x20AC;?? Well, relax, dear Scorpio. I promise you that you no longer have to worry about going cray-cray. Why? Because you have already gone cray-cray, my friend. That is correct. You slipped over the threshold a few days ago, and have been living in Bonkersville ever since. And since you are obviously still alive and functioning, I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obvious that the danger has passed. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the new truth: If you surrender to the uproar, if you let it teach you all it has to teach you, you will ďŹ nd a lively and intriguing kind of peace.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) To give you the oracle that best matches your current astrological omens, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve borrowed from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweetness,â&#x20AC;? a poem by Stephen Dunn. I urge you to memorize it or write it on a piece of paper that you will carry around with you everywhere you go. Say Dunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words as if they were your own: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Often a sweetness comes / as if on loan, stays just long enough // to make sense of what it means to be alive, / then returns to its dark / source. As for me, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care // where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been, or what bitter road / itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traveled / to come so far, to taste so good.â&#x20AC;?

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) In her book Teaching a Stone to Talk, Annie Dillard apologizes to God and Santa Claus and a nice but eccentric older woman named Miss White, whom she knew as a child. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am sorry I ran from you,â&#x20AC;? she writes to them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am still running from that knowledge, that eye, that love from which there is no refuge. For you meant only love, and love, and I felt only fear, and pain.â&#x20AC;? Judging from your current astrological omens, Capricorn, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say that now would be a good time for you to do something similar: take an inventory of the beauty and love and power you have sought to escape and may still be trying to avoid. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ďŹ nally ready to stop running and embrace at least some of that good stuff. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) The Dragon Lives Again is a 1977 ďŹ lm that tells the story of martial arts legend Bruce Lee ďŹ ghting bad guys in the underworld. Among the villains he defeats are Dracula, James Bond, the Godfather, Clint Eastwood and the Exorcist. I urge you to use this as inspiration, Aquarius. Create an imaginary movie in your mindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the hero, of course. Give yourself a few superpowers and assemble a cast of scoundrels from your pastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;anyone who has done you wrong. Then watch the epic tale unfold as you do with them what Bruce Lee did to Dracula and company. Yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only pretend. But you may be surprised at how much this helps you put your past behind you. Think of it as a purgative meditation that will free you to move in the direction of the best possible future.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

After studying the myths and stories of many cultures throughout history, Joseph Campbell arrived at a few conclusions about the nature of the human quest. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s apropos for you right now: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek.â&#x20AC;? He came up with several variations on this idea, including this one: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The very cave you are afraid to enter turns out to be the source of what you are looking for.â&#x20AC;? I urge you to consider making this your operative hypothesis for the coming weeks, Pisces.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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