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INSIDE Volume 43, No.35 Nov. 29-Dec. 5, 2017

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Get high quality prints in half an hour from your Instagram or Facebook RE: BUILD What kind of construction does Santa Cruz need—and how much? P11

LUNAR LANDING Author of ‘The Martian’ brings new moon-based novel to Santa Cruz P20

Local artist Lili Arnold on running her botanical print business from home P28

FEATURES Opinion 4 News 11 Cover Story 20 A&E 28 Events 37

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE Andy Weir seems to have the kind of fairy-tale story of which every aspiring author dreams. In fact, when you read in Steve Kettmann’s cover story about how Weir’s success unfolded— spoiler alert, he starts off with a blog and ends up with a hit movie based on his book—the first word that might come to mind is lucky. Certainly, Weir, who’ll you’ll discover in Kettmann’s story to be as self-deprecating as they come, would agree with you. But how much of his story really was luck? Kettmann takes a closer look at Weir’s writing in The Martian and his new novel Artemis—which he’ll be in Santa Cruz this week to talk about—to explain the real secrets of Weir’s success. That’s my favorite

LETTERS

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After almost six months of meetings of the city’s ad hoc Downtown Library Advisory Committee (DLAC), and with only one more meeting scheduled (12/13), the Library Director has finally scheduled a sort of “public meeting.” Frankly, this public meeting is a little too late—done after the fact, instead of at the beginning of the process, where our input would really count before options were set in stone. Keep in mind that the City’s original RFQ included the requirement that three community meetings be held. Rather than do that, the DLAC launched into its own dialogue, with the Library Director providing the agendas, herding the DLAC along talking to itself and dreaming big about how to build a brand new 21st-century Downtown Library. Rather than have the DLAC craft a vision based on the budget ($23 million) and ask the architect what could be designed around that budget, the DLAC spent months dreaming big and bigger. In the end, their visions were millions of

thing about this story—as much as we all marvel at the idea of a lotterywinner-type triumph, the story behind that story about how a self-made artist blazes his or her own path is even more interesting—and important. I also want to remind everyone that Santa Cruz Gives is on its way to being our most successful effort yet to raise money for the most innovative nonprofit projects in Santa Cruz County—but we need your help. Read the story in our news section this week about one of the SCG nonprofits, Senderos, and then go to santacruzgives.org to contribute to their efforts, and discover all of the other worthy groups we’re asking you to support this holiday season. With more than $100,000 dollars raised in just two weeks, we’ve had a great start toward our goal of $250,000 by Dec. 31. Keep that momentum going, and be a part of the positive change in our community! STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

dollars over budget. The result? Several DLAC members are disappointed and disillusioned, thinking that a renovation of the existing building means they have to accept some pitifully depauperate library project. Nothing could be further from the truth, of course. A renovated library, within budget, can be a library of excellence. But so far, the DLAC has not shown any inclination to see the possibilities of renovation and renewal. Please try to attend Sunday’s meeting (1-3 p.m. Dec. 3, Upstairs Meeting Room, Downtown Library) and speak to DLAC members one on one this time, lobbying for the “Renovation Light” option (two new elevators, all new ADA bathrooms, skylight over stairwell to second floor, new electrical, etc; cost = $23.9 million).

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Warming Center director Brent Adams has announced that his local program will assist in cleaning up the San Lorenzo Park encampment from Wednesday, Nov. 29, through Friday, Dec. 1. Adams says that he and fellow volunteers will also help Santa Cruz park rangers with the storing of homeless campers’ personal belongings. Adams says that immediately afterward, the Warming Center will help to open new storage lockers for the homeless at 1220 River St.—part of the recommendations the Homelessness Coordinating Committee unveiled this past spring.

Twin Lakes Church in Aptos has announced results from a two-month “experiment in radical generosity,” as senior pastor Rene Schlaepfer termed it. The church raised more than $286,000 for Second Harvest Food Bank—the equivalent of 1,145,000 meals. Parishioners gave 2,300 children’s pajamas to underserved youth and more than $50,000 toward immediate fire and flood relief. Others gave time, volunteering to clean windows, paint curbs and maintain local school buildings. For information on the Food Bank’s holiday giving campaign, visit thefoodbank.org.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I don’t believe in astrology—I’m a Sagittarius, and we’re skeptical.” — ARTHUR C. CLARKE

JEAN BROCKLEBANK | DON’T BURY THE LIBRARY

THEATER FOR ALL SEASONS I very much enjoyed reading about the history of theater in Santa Cruz (GT, 11/22) and the well-deserved accolades for Bonnie, Wilma, and everyone else at Actors’ Theatre. I moved to the area in 2008 and have since become very >8

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LOCAL TALK

What makes you want to play hooky from work? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Good waves, or work that I care more about. JAMES GALVIN DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | SANTA CRUZ

Sea shanty party. It’s when you call in sick for work, hang out with your friends, drink rum and toast the Kraken, and sing sea shanties. RYAN P MUSICIAN | SANTA CRUZ

Calling in sick. JESSICA OATMEAL SILLY GIRL | SEACLIFF

CINDY MEKIS NURSE | SANTA CRUZ

Surfing major swell and snowboarding fresh powder. MARIO HUERTA CONSTRUCTION | VENTURA

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Beach volleyball and mimosas.

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of November 29 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 I hope that everything doesn’t come too easily for you in the coming weeks. I’m worried you will be met with no obstructions and face no challenges. And that wouldn’t be good. It might weaken your willpower and cause your puzzle-solving skills to atrophy. Let me add a small caveat, however. It’s also true that right about now you deserve a whoosh of slack. I’d love for you to be able to relax and enjoy your well-deserved rewards. But on the other hand, I know you will soon receive an opportunity to boost yourself up to an even higher level of excellence and accomplishment. I want to be sure that when it comes, you are at peak strength and alertness.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 You were born with the potential to give the world specific gifts—benefits and blessings that are unique to you. One of those gifts has been slow in developing. You’ve never been ready to confidently offer it in its fullness. In fact, if you have tried to bestow it in the past, it may have caused problems. But the good news is that in the coming months, this gift will finally be ripe. You’ll know how to deal crisply with the interesting responsibilities it asks you to take on. Here’s your homework: Get clear about what this gift is and what you will have to do to offer it in its fullness.

GEMINI May21–June20 Happy Unbirthday, Gemini! You’re halfway between your last birthday and your next. That means you’re free to experiment with being different from who you have imagined yourself to be and who other people expect you to be. Here are inspirational quotes to help you celebrate. 1. “Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” - George Bernard Shaw. 2. “Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one’s mind.” - W. Somerset Maugham. 3. “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.” Ralph Waldo Emerson. 4. “The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind.” Friedrich Nietzsche.

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CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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I suggest that you take a piece of paper and write down a list of your biggest fears. Then call on the magical force within you that is bigger and smarter than your fears. Ask your deep sources of wisdom for the poised courage you need to keep those scary fantasies in their proper place. And what is their proper place? Not as the masters of your destiny, not as controlling agents that prevent you from living lustily, but rather as helpful guides that keep you from taking foolish risks.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22 In his book Life: The Odds, Gregory Baer says that the odds you will marry a millionaire are not good: 215to-1. They’re 60,000-to-1 that you’ll wed royalty and 88,000-to-1 that you’ll date a model. After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I suspect your chances of achieving these feats will be even lower than usual. That’s because you’re far more likely to cultivate synergetic and symbiotic relationships with people who enrich your soul and stimulate your imagination, but don’t necessarily pump up your ego. Instead of models and millionaires, you’re likely to connect with practical idealists, energetic creators, and emotionally intelligent people who’ve done work to transmute their own darkness.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 What might you do to take better care of yourself in 2018, Virgo? According to my reading of the astrological omens, this will be a fertile meditation for you to keep revisiting. Here’s a good place to start: Consider the possibility that you have a lot to learn about what makes your body operate at peak efficiency and what keeps your soul humming along with the sense that your life is interesting. Here’s another crucial task: Intensify your love for yourself. With

that as a driving force, you’ll be led to discover the actions necessary to supercharge your health. P.S. Now is an ideal time to get this project underway.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 Here are themes I suggest you specialize in during the coming weeks. 1. How to gossip in ways that don’t diminish and damage your social network, but rather foster and enhance it. 2. How to be in three places at once without committing the mistake of being nowhere at all. 3. How to express precisely what you mean without losing your attractive mysteriousness. 4. How to be nosy and brash for fun and profit. 5. How to unite and harmonize the parts of yourself and your life that have been at odds with each other.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 I predict that in the coming months you won’t feel compulsions to set your adversaries’ hair on fire. You won’t fantasize about robbing banks to raise the funds you need, nor will you be tempted to worship the devil. And the news just gets better. I expect that the amount of self-sabotage you commit will be close to zero. The monsters under your bed will go on a long sabbatical. Any lame excuses you have used in the past to justify bad behavior will melt away. And you’ll mostly avoid indulging in bouts of irrational and unwarranted anger. In conclusion, Scorpio, your life should be pretty evil-free for quite some time. What will you do with this prolonged outburst of grace? Use it wisely!

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 “What is love?” asks philosopher Richard Smoley. “It’s come to have a greeting-card quality,” he mourns. “Half the time ‘loving’ someone is taken to mean nurturing a warmish feeling in the heart for them, which mysteriously evaporates the moment the person has some concrete need or irritates us.” One of your key assignments in the next 10 months will be to purge any aspects of this shrunken and shriveled kind of love that may still be lurking in your beautiful soul. You are primed to cultivate an unprecedented new embodiment of mature, robust love.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 You know that unfinished task you have half-avoided, allowing it to stagnate? Soon you’ll be able to summon the gritty determination required to complete it. I suspect you’ll also be able to carry out the glorious rebirth you’ve been shy about climaxing. To gather the energy you need, reframe your perspective so that you can feel gratitude for the failure or demise that has made your glorious rebirth necessary and inevitable.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 In an ideal world, your work and your character would speak for themselves. You’d receive exactly the amount of recognition and appreciation you deserve. You wouldn’t have to devote as much intelligence to selling yourself as you did to developing your skills in the first place. But now forget everything I just said. During the next 10 months, I predict that packaging and promoting yourself won’t be so #$@&%*! important. Your work and character will speak for themselves with more vigor and clarity than they have before.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 There used to be a booth at a Santa Cruz flea market called “Joseph Campbell’s Love Child.” It was named after the mythological scholar who wrote the book The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The booth’s proprietor sold items that spurred one’s “heroic journey,” like talismans made to order and herbs that stimulated courage and mini-books with personalized advice based on one’s horoscope. “Chaos-Tamers” were also for sale. They were magic spells designed to help people manage the messes that crop up in one’s everyday routine while pursuing a heroic quest. Given the current astrological omens, Pisces, you would benefit from a place that sold items like these. Since none exists, do the next best thing: Aggressively drum up all the help and inspiration you need. You can and should be well-supported as you follow your dreams on your hero’s journey.

Homework: What change have you prepared yourself to embrace? What lesson are you ripe to master? Write: FreeWillAstrology.com

© Copyright 2017


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involved in the theater scene here, mostly at Mountain Community Theater (MCT) in Ben Lomond and Actors’ Theatre, via directing several times for the 8 Tens @ Eight Festival. I’ve heard some of the stories in the article before, but was not aware of a lot of the really fascinating history, and I thank the author for that. One correction needs to be made, however. The article says that, in 2011, when Actors’ Theatre gave up Center Stage to Jewel Theatre, Jewel “became the only local theater group producing plays yearround for several years.” In fact, MCT has been producing plays without interruption

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My bad, Peter. I failed to delineate a distinction that Jewel was careful to make during that time—they were the only company doing year-round professional theater (for the uninitiated, that means they use unionized actors affiliated with the Actors’ Equity Association). — Editor

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NEWS THE BORN IDENTITY In her new memoir, Dyane Harwood sheds light on the plight of postpartum bipolar depression and her fight to persevere BY WENDY MAYER-LOCHTEFELD

HAMMER TIME Sibley Simon, treasurer for the Homeless Services Center, says that nonprofit developers like himself can’t get

Santa Cruz out of the housing crisis alone—and that the city needs more construction in general. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Building Material

Affordability rules in question as mayor’s year of housing draws to close BY JACOB PIERCE

M

ayor Cynthia Chase remembers sitting down earlier this year with teachers, parents, and students at Mission Hill Middle School to discuss Santa Cruz’s rising housing costs. The students on the other side of the table that evening ran through a long list of beloved teachers and afterschool employees who had all left over the years—each squeezed out by steep rents in a quickly evolving town. “It’s really the fabric of the community that changes,” says Chase, who just this week wrapped up her year-long listening tour, during which she talked housing with locals at churches, in breweries and in their homes—in groups as

small as three, and as large as 50. Within the housing economy, Chase says teachers fall into an awkward gray area. Many make slightly too much to qualify for the deed-restricted housing created by the passage of Measure O 38 years ago. And yet, she explains, “they make just enough that they can’t afford the market rents.” Meanwhile, rents are rising all over the West Coast. So is homelessness. Here in Santa Cruz, Mayor Chase herself is a renter who once lived in an affordable Measure O unit. As her one-year term as mayor draws to a close, Chase’s tour is scheduled to culminate in a discussion during the Santa Cruz City Council meeting on

Tuesday, Dec. 5 to examine the state of housing locally. A 40-page staff report will be online by Wednesday, Nov. 29, laying out everything Chase heard from the community. She says that possible solutions may include revisiting fees for in-law units—also called accessory dwelling units or ADUs—and orienting new housing to be closer to transit. And the City Council, she says, supports finding new revenue to fund affordable housing, now that redevelopment funding has dried up. Former mayor Don Lane and former county treasurer Fred Keeley are working on a possible 2018 bond measure to do just that. Meanwhile, renters from the Lower Ocean neighborhood are clamoring >12

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When Santa Cruz’s Dyane Harwood gave birth to her second daughter Marilla, she looked into her baby’s eyes and felt elated. After a pain-free birth to a healthy child, her happiness was understandable, but within hours her mood took a disturbing turn. Wildly energized, she talked nonstop while her thoughts raced. Even though she was exhausted, she felt little need to eat or sleep. After she got home from the hospital, she began to display signs of hypergraphia, writing incessantly on her computer, in notebooks, on her arm, and on the wall, even while her baby needed her undivided attention. Harwood knew something was wrong, but as she tried to focus on her daughters, she downplayed what she didn’t realize were symptoms of mental illness. Harwood had become hypomanic, and soon these symptoms would threaten everything she cared about. In her new memoir, Birth of a New Brain: Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder, Harwood lays out the frightening reality of an often-unrecognized illness. One or two cases of postpartum bipolar disorder occurs for every 1,000 live births, according to the National Institute of Health. But in 2007, when her disease was triggered, even postpartum depression—which we now know occurs in at least 15 percent of new moms—was considered an outlier. According to the American Psychological Association, it’s still underdiagnosed by clinicians, along with other postpartum mood disorders, such as anxiety, panic, OCD, post-traumatic stress, and psychosis. Symptoms may appear at anytime during pregnancy or in the first year of motherhood. Harwood believes her bipolar disorder was latent, triggered by a combination of pregnancy, labor, hormones and genetics. Salle Webber, who was Harwood’s postpartum doula, agrees. “When these things occur, much of it has to do with hormonal changes in the body, chemical changes in the brain, and the demands on mothers to suddenly >14

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NEWS BUILDING MATERIAL <11 for rent control, as well as increased protections for renters. Behind all of this is a question with an answer as important as it is elusive: What are the best affordability rules for new housing developments? Many Santa Cruzans say the current requirements are ailing an already fragile housing ecosystem, either because the rules are too loose or too strict—depending on who you ask. When it first passed in 1979, Measure O required that 15 percent of housing units in a new complex be reserved as affordable. But once construction slowed years later, the City Council loosened those requirements to let developers pay an “in-lieu” fee to fund future affordable housing projects instead. Worried that stiff requirements are yet again strangling the housing supply, the planning department has floated the idea of reducing the requirement, possibly down to 7.5 percent, to better meet pent-up housing demand. Loosening those requirements may sound like a peculiar way to make housing cheaper, but Lee Butler, the city’s planning director, says that in order to bring down rents, the city has to meet demand and thus build more housing—even if it isn’t all “affordable.” And the tighter the city’s regulations, Butler says, the more difficult it is to build anything. “It’s going to take a lot of new housing to come online to create a dip in price, because we’re in such a deficit,” Butler says. Maybe so, but City Councilmember Chris Krohn campaigned on the opposite idea when he successfully ran for election last year. Krohn believes that new housing developments should make 25 percent of their units affordable, increasing that share from 15 percent. And he says it’s time to abolish the in-lieu fee, instead forcing developers to actually build their required affordable units. Far too little of the city’s housing is deedrestricted, he says. “Not all housing is equal,” Krohn states. “Building anything isn’t the goal.” Krohn isn’t the only one suggesting

that the city refuse to allow developments that don’t prioritize low- and middle-income tenants. Pushing the envelope, attorney Gary Patton went so far as to call for a 50 percent affordability requirement in any new development, via a Santa Cruz Sentinel column earlier this month. Developer John Swift called that suggestion “asinine” during the Monterey Bay Economic Partnership’s State of the Region conference. But Patton insists he is serious— even though he knows it’s a big ask. The former county supervisor admits that such a change could make it so incredibly expensive to build housing that nothing would ever get built again, although he thinks that’s OK because he doesn’t believe new housing construction could ever make a dent in affordability. The evidence, however, shows that line of thinking isn’t true, says Sibley Simon, an affordable housing advocate. Simon has been deconstructing the data for a paper he’s writing about the housing in the region. He found that for a two-year period starting in 2013, virtually no new units got built, and any miniscule housing construction was likely canceled out by houses getting turned into vacation rentals. During that period, rents climbed 20 percent, Simon says, creating what he estimates to be an increase in demand of 2,500 units countywide. Simon believes it would take fewer than 5,000 units—affordable or not—to get the county back to being “merely a very expensive place to live, as we were 10 years ago.” Even if developers built half that, Simon says it would make rents more manageable for renters. Statewide reports have come to similar conclusions about the need for more housing construction because building has not kept pace with California’s population growth. A report from the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development indicated that California needs to build 180,000 units per year for the next 10 years, essentially echoing similar findings from the state Legislative Analyst’s Office. Of course, the reasoning behind Patton and Krohn’s thinking is simple enough—tie developers’ hands in

hopes that it forces them to build more housing. But the logic behind the alternative is equally straightforward: There is too much competition for not enough housing, and so several hundred new units would provide some much-needed breathing room. Worried about traffic and overcrowding, Krohn says the city should focus on other approaches, like building teacher housing. Superintendent Kris Munro tells GT that the city’s school district is currently looking into workforce housing with a feasibility study. While Simon supports that model, he says there’s a bigger ecosystem too that Santa Cruz can’t lose sight of. “I’m totally in support of housing for teachers, but we need our housing market in general for a wider variety of people as well,” Simon says. “Still, if we get great housing for teachers, then they get that housing, and there’s a little less competition for the other housing that people can barely afford out there.” Krohn realizes that if Santa Cruz tightens its affordability requirements, some for-profit housing developers may walk away, but he believes that’s all right because nonprofit developers—who are comfortable with slimmer margins—will take their place and step up to the table. But here’s where that gets complicated: Simon, the executive director of New Way Homes, fits that profile perfectly. He’s busily preparing to submit a plan to build a 100 percent affordable complex within the footprint of Homeless Services Center. But even Simon says that there’s only so much nonprofit developers can do. Nonprofit developers, like himself, rely on grants to make their projects pencil out, and there’s only so much government cash to go around, he says. When it comes to affordable housing, politicians and advocates often kick around the term “sweet spot”—the ever-elusive magical percent that would maximize affordable units without making developers walk away. Simon thinks that number could come in lower than the current 15 percent requirement, as does Don Lane, another longtime affordable housing advocate. However, they both say that whatever the number, >16


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IF YOU SEE KIDS,

School is in session now. Kids might pop up where you least expect them—especially if they’re riding bikes on the sidewalk or in a hurry to get to class. Be alert and slow down as young people are often unpredictable and tend to ignore hazards and take risks. Watch for kids turning in front of you and popping up behind when you are backing out of the driveway. The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous; stop far enough away to allow kids space to safely enter and exit. Do not pass when red lights flash. And since we all know that traffic around schools is a drag, try parking a block away and walking. Get a little exercise, reduce traffic and stay safe. And always slow down if you see kids. It’s the Street Smarts thing to do.

cityofsantacruz.com/StreetSmarts

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

SLOW DOWN.

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NEWS

MOTHER ODE Dyane Harwood’s new book ‘Birth of a New Brain: Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder’ chronicles her struggles with the condition. She will discuss her

journey at a Ben Lomond event on Thursday, Dec. 7. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

THE BORN IDENTITY <11

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be in complete service to a tiny human being,” says Webber, author of The Gentle Art of Newborn Family Care: A Guide for Doulas, which includes a chapter on mental health and postpartum mothers. “Their whole physiological being is disrupted.” As for genetics, Harwood points to her father, a professional violinist and Fulbright scholar, who suffered from bipolar disorder, which infused her childhood with a sense of fear and sadness. She remembers calling him when she was first hospitalized. “He started to cry when I told him about my diagnosis,” she says, “because he didn’t want me to go through the misery that he’d been through.” Harwood, who will discuss her book at a Dec. 7 event in Ben Lomond, says her experience was a worst-case scenario causing prolonged hardship. “It took me seven years to stabilize. That’s a long time. I had to be hospitalized seven times,” she says. Then when her

father died in 2009, the major event triggered suicidal thoughts, and Harwood opted for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a controversial procedure that she credits with saving her life. She tried tapering off lithium medication in 2013, as many people with bipolar disorder do, she says, but it launched her into a deep depression. She turned to ECT again for help, and it worked. The biggest impact for her, she emphasizes, has been finding the right medication. She now takes what she calls an “old school” combination of drugs— lithium and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor called Parnate. “They’re often written off,” she says, “but for me, they ended up changing years of symptoms in three days.” Webber says that one of Harwood’s biggest gifts to her readers is showing the simple power of asking for help. “So many women aren’t able to do that, and they’ll benefit from Dyane’s courage,” Webber explains. “If there’s ever a time when a woman should ask for help, it’s when she’s given birth.” As she recovered, Harwood searched for lifestyle changes to help her heal. Her

Scottish collie, Lucy, has been “a huge comfort,” she says. “I encourage everyone to get a pet. Even a fish,” she says. Harwood has also embraced forest bathing, a practice developed in Japan that promotes spending time outside surrounded by trees as a way of healing. “Being in the redwoods and getting all these wonderful natural chemicals—the smell, the beauty, it’s helped me a lot.” And Harwood swears by regular exercise, something she used to do “for vanity,” she concedes. “But what motivated me in the calm after the storm of my bipolar experience is how much it affects brain health and stabilizes mood,” she says. Harwood believes simple changes in preand postnatal care, like better observation and screening practices, could further improve the lives of many young families and make everyone safer. “Simply screen women who are or want to become pregnant to find out if there’s a family history of mental illness,” she says. “If there is, pay closer attention during and after pregnancy. It’s getting better, but

there’s still a long way to go.” Harwood says she’s grateful that her marriage and the family she loves have remained intact in the face of extreme challenges. She’s also proud of her accomplishments in the wake of serious personal struggles. She’s founded a local chapter of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, which facilitates free support groups. Harwood has also written articles about postpartum bipolar disorder, in addition to her book. “As a reader, I couldn’t find anything out there about what I was going through,” she says. “Writing it gave me a sense of purpose, because I felt like this could really help people.”

Harwood will talk about postpartum bipolar disorder during a book signing on Thursday, Dec. 7, at Park Hall Community Center, 9400 Mill St., Ben Lomond. The event is sponsored by Valley Women’s Club and the Santa Cruz County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. For more information, visit dyaneharwood.com.


Shop-Donate-Recycle GREY BEARS, SUPPORTING SENIORS AND OUR COMMUNITY

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After Hours Holiday Boutique 1/2-Off Sale

THIS THURSDAY, November 30, 4-7pm

Storewide 1/2-Off Sale

SATURDAY, December 9, 10am-3pm Terrific gift ideas! Plus holiday decorations, jewelry, housewares, furniture, clothing and accessories, computers,TVs, appliances, books and media, medical equipment and more.

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS AT THE GREY BEARS

44th Annual Holiday Dinner THIS SUNDAY, Dec.3, 11:30am-1:30pm Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church Street

Your donations keep Grey Bears strong Your household donations to the thrift store, e-waste, and recycling centers, and financial gifts all help Grey Bears deliver weekly bags of groceries to 4,000 seniors all year long. Please donate now by mailing a check or on our secure website: greybears.org/support. Thank you!

RECYCLING CENTERS

2710 Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz: Open Every Day, 7:30-3:30. Free Drop-off of e-waste, appliances, metal, styrofoam (EPS#6) & more. Buena Vista Landfill: Open Mon-Sat, 7:30-3:30

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Healthy Food for Seniors –Volunteer– Donate

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Join us at our annual holiday gala for a delicious dinner and an exciting stage show, featuring Senderos Dancers, singersongwriters Ryan and Liam, Elaine’s Dance Studio, Santa Cruz Performing Arts singers, Ruth’s Dancenter and Casual Sax. Catch the free bus from the Watsonville Senior Center to/from the event. Contact Valerie to reserve your seat, (831) 722-1333.

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

BUILDING MATERIAL <12

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it should have some flexibility, with special incentives—for instance, if an apartment building is going to be much bigger, it should have a bigger fraction of its units listed affordably. Or perhaps, Simon says, buildings with more affordable units should not be held to quite the same burdensome parking standards. But Patton—a proponent of tightening, not loosening, the requirements—feels the typical laws of supply and demand don’t apply here in Santa Cruz when it comes to housing. The town can build as much as it wants, he says, and all of those homes will get snatched up by outof-towners, who are either looking to commute to jobs in higher-paying Silicon Valley or use their new places as second homes. Simon says the answer here is to build the kind of diverse housing portfolio that Santa Cruz wants to see—smaller units for locals, and not vacation homes by the beach. And anyway, the problem may not be unique to Santa Cruz. The Legislative Analyst’s Office found that a 10 percent increase in rents in one county leads to a five percent increase in the neighboring county. Patton says living in a desirable community like Santa Cruz carries an unfortunate curse. He notes that 2015 research out of the University of British Columbia found that startling numbers of homebuyers in Vancouver were coming from Asia, and condominiums there began to sit vacant, almost by the city block. Mayor Chase has a lot of memories from the past year’s listening tour. Some people cried as they recounted their struggles. Chase was frankly surprised that, during the whole year, she did not hear anyone say that Santa Cruz should not allow any new development whatsoever. The question is clearly where to put the development. And when pulled together, Chase says, the varied comments on housing construction are difficult to view through one big lens. “Nobody said ‘nowhere,’ but then it was ‘not here—somewhere else,’” Chase says. “Where that somewhere else is, I don’t know. Because when you add up those ‘not here’s, it ends up being nowhere.”

MOVERS AND SHAKERS Youth dancers from Senderos’ winter show in 2016.

Path Finders Senderos brings positive influence to local schoolkids with dance BY ANDREA PATTON

S

enderos is probably best known for its lively dance performances celebrating Latino culture at festivals around Santa Cruz County. But the group’s primary mission is revealed in its name, which means “pathways.” “The main goal is education,” says Fe Silva-Robles, a native Oaxacan who founded the organization with her sister, Nereida Robles, in 2001. While working as a middle school teacher, parents asked her for advice on steering their kids in a positive direction. She knew that an after-school program was the solution, but swim lessons and other activities were too expensive for families struggling to pay rent and buy groceries. As a lifelong Oaxacan dancer, she decided to offer free dance classes, and soon after, parents began raising funds to purchase what would become the colorful Oaxacan garments Senderos is known for. Silva-Robles believes dance and music classes go hand in hand with academic success. “When you are not connected with your culture, you are more vulnerable to different

things,” she says. “We were seeing how the students were distracted by sickness in the community.” Last year, Senderos awarded five college scholarships, and they are creating a college-going culture that benefits not only the students in the program, but also those around them as well. “If these kids are healthy, that health is going to spread in the community,” Silva-Robles says. This is the second year that Senderos has been selected to participate in Santa Cruz Gives. Senderos offers dance, music and tutoring programs that are held in a family-centered environment in partnership with Santa Cruz City Schools, and they welcome all. Rosy Tapia, a grandmother who has two granddaughters enrolled in the program, is learning dance and music as well. “One thing I love is they show respect to everybody. I feel really comfortable with everybody,” Tapia says. Kristen Silva, Silva-Robles’ daughter, has participated in the program since she was seven years old. Now she helps lead it. After

attending Santa Cruz Schools from K-12, Silva returned to her alma mater, Harbor High School, where she now teaches math to newcomers. “I think that’s really the core of our organization, that we’re not afraid to showcase the aspects of our culture that aren’t really highlighted in the news. And we’re also trying to shape these people and these students into the citizens who can contribute to our community,” Silva says. “One thing I think is so beautiful about this program is the intergenerational unity,” says Carolyn Coleman, Senderos Board Treasurer. Parents take pride in seeing their children connecting with their heritage, and kids feel stronger about their cultural identity in the face of racism. “My granddaughter was getting bullied two years ago,” Tapia says. “She started to feel depressed and didn’t want to go to school, but when she started here she started to be more comfortable. She didn’t put attention to them. Now she feels more powerful,” she says. Santa Cruz Gives donations from last year went toward building the musical instrument lending library, Coleman says. This year, they plan to use funds to continue building the library as well as purchase dance outfits. The all-volunteer organization includes musicians who are able to repair brass and reed instruments that may be sitting around in someone’s garage. The group’s annual winter performance, Winter in Mexico, is this weekend, showcasing dances from 14 states of Mexico. “Guanajuato is the highlight performance this year,” Silva-Robles says. “We are very lucky to have a professor from Guanajuato who has been teaching us dances from there for two months. We have the story, the knowledge of the culture, and the kids are very excited about it.” ‘Winter in Mexico’ is at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 1, and Saturday, Dec. 2, at Harbor High School Theater, 300 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. $10, $5 students & seniors. 854-7740. To donate to any of the 33 nonprofits participating in Santa Cruz Gives, visit santacruzgives.org through Monday, Dec. 31.


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Have we met?

Many people think all financial institutions are created equal. But did you know that for 40 years, your local Santa Cruz Community Credit Union has been working behind the scenes to promote FAIR FINANCIAL SECURITY for all people of Santa Cruz County? Once you meet us, you’ll know. It has always been our vision to give full access to financial opportunities to all people in our community.

We were founded on the guiding principle of economic justice. We believe in helping those who have been left behind by the big banks. We are grounded in the notion of doing what’s right for our members. We support our community where it’s needed most.

Have you heard?

Together We Advance: Juntos Avanzamos Santa Cruz Community Credit Union was the second in California to receive the Juntos Avanzamos designation which is recognition of our commitment to serving and empowering Hispanic consumers, immigrants and low and moderate-income communities. Simply put – we are in the business of helping those who are unbanked and vulnerable.

Have a heart.

We aren’t big, but we believe one of the most important ways we help our community is by investing in it. Here are some of our community friends who share our belief that we’re in this together! Community Bridges - Puentes De La Comunidad Community Action Board (CAB) of Santa Cruz County El Pajaro Community Development Corporation Davenport Resource Center (CAB) Second Harvest Food Bank Think Local First Watsonville Wetlands Watch WomenCARE Cancer Research Small Business Development Council of Santa Cruz County • Pajaro Valley Shelter Services • Farm Bureau of Santa Cruz County • Santa Cruz Community Ventures

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

• • • • • • • • •

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NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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N

othing that Andy Weir says in his calm, understated, chuckling-at-himself voice can begin to explain how this unassuming software engineer from Livermore—just another productive drone in the Silicon Valley hive for countless years—turned out to be the One. He has no idea himself. He keeps waiting for the chiming of his alarm to jolt him from what must surely be a dream. None of this could possibly have been real—not the giddy experience as an unpublished writer posting the chapters of his geek-out novel The Martian on his personal website, one by one, à la Charles Dickens, and finding that thousands of people were grabbed by his story and wanted more; not a sudden publishing deal with Random House; not No. 1 bestseller status, not the movie

starring Matt Damon. And not the chance to publish his second novel, the new moonscape crime drama Artemis. “It was a charmed existence,” Weir told me in a recent phone conversation, with a combination of openness and self-mockery. “It was really awesome. I tried to be as grateful as I could at the time because I told myself, ‘It’s probably not going to happen again.’” There was silence over the phone as he let it sink in that he was utterly, painfully sincere in having no idea if lightning could ever strike twice for him. “Of course I’ve got the ‘imposter syndrome’ thinking. I’m like: I don’t know what I did right. Really, I don’t know what the hell I’m doing. All I can do is write stories that I myself would enjoy reading.” 22>


SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

LIFE ON MARS Matt Damon in director Ridley Scott’s hit adaptation of Weir’s first novel, ‘The Martian.’

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MOON SHOT

LOCAL LANDING Weir will be in conversation with UCSC professor of Earth & Planetary Sciences Francis Nimmo at Santa Cruz High School on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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Weir is onto something there. If more writers would focus on telling stories they themselves wanted to read, the world of writing would do a much better job of connecting with readers, absent many an unfortunate detour through the landscape of the mannered, the trendy, the showy, the unreadable. It’s like cooking: A good place to start is whipping up a meal that tastes delicious to you. At least one person is going to be happy—and, chances are, others will as well. Not every fan of The Martian loves Artemis, which surged to the top of the bestseller lists as soon as it was published in November, reaching No. 6 on the New York Times hardcover fiction list its first eligible week, and it might be a while before any undergraduate seminars focus on Weir’s literary merits. He’s not a once-in-a-generation literary talent like Jennifer Egan (Manhattan Beach), Viet Nguyen (The Sympathizer) or Nathan Hill (The Nix). Andy Weir is the One because he’s given us a feel-good reminder of the

power of the imagination, and he can inspire anyone and everyone to pursue their own writing, maybe even becoming rock-star huge. Weir has talent, but mostly he has ideas. He has no fancy degrees, no privileged bond with a great-writer mentor; he’s your basic writer next door. Weir has gone from nowhere on the literary map to front and center, all because he’s a guy who loves stories, a guy who believes in the power of what used to be called daydreaming, and his amazing run of success can and should serve as inspiration to anyone with an idea, anyone wanting to let their mind race, anyone who believes in the power of an imagination powered by a sense of fun and unfettered by the closed-window heavy breathing of writing-seminar “notes” or trends in writing. Weir is the One, as well, because he’s a perfect test case for the way the internet now makes it possible for an individual with passion and


MOON SHOT

Fall/Winter Special

“One of my main influences was the movie ‘Chinatown,’ which is really about the growth of a city and everything that has to happen for that to move forward. When I was working on ‘Artemis,’ I kept thinking: this is similar to Chinatown.” - ANDY WEIR

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years ago and told me I needed to read a book called The Martian, I ordered it right away—and burned through it in a rush of pure joy. Weir’s follow-up is a far more ambitious undertaking. For me, it didn’t have quite the feel of uninterrupted dream that The Martian did, pulling you along inexorably, but in some ways I like Artemis better. It doesn’t feel like a one-off. It feels like a conduit into an entire world of revving imagination, akin to the Heinlein, Asimov and Clarke I read in my teens. For me, this kind of storytelling has power and social relevance. A lot of perspective can be packed into stories that have the liftoff of science fiction. Artemis is a tale all about the kinds of power plays that take place when deals have to be made to handle population growth despite scarce resources. Sound relevant and contemporary? Californians understand this very well, and setting the story on the moon in some ways harked back to an earlier era of expansion in this state. “I wanted the book to be about mankind’s first city that isn’t on Earth, and to me it was very obvious that that was going to be on the moon,” Weir told me. “Colonizing Mars before colonizing the moon would be like if the ancient Britons colonized North America before they colonized Wales. I love stories that take place in off-world colonies. There’s the frontier spirit you see in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, but I also thought of lesser-known Heinlein, like Farmer in the Sky, which is set on Ganymede. We’re

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stamina to put out a story that might resonate with others. He’s the future of publishing, or at least its avatar, not because of his prose style or his flawless psychological insights into his characters, but because he understands the importance of taking a reader for a ride. (Cue up appropriate Jimi Hendrix lyrics.) One of the pleasures of reading an Andy Weir novel is the certainty we have that we know exactly who Weir is, just from the story he tells. Yes, like Mark Watney, the main character in The Martian, and Jazz Bashara, the straw that stirs the drink in Artemis, he’s a sarcastic, wisecracking kind of guy. Yes, he loves science, and puts in the time to get it right. I even had the feeling I could picture Weir in his childhood, out in a California field somewhere, firing off Estes model rockets into the sky. “Did you ever play with model rockets?” I asked him, just for fun, knowing full well he’d say yes. “Estes! Big time!” he said. “I designed my own.” Once again, in Artemis, Weir soars. He blasts off, delivering a breezy joy ride sure to appeal to a wide audience, especially anyone who shares his enthusiasm for what he calls his “holy trinity” of major influences: Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. I don’t read much science fiction nowadays. Actually, as the father of two small girls, busy as the co-director of the Wellstone Center in the Redwoods writers’ retreat center in Soquel, I don’t get much time to read books at all. So when my older brother Greg, a lifelong fan of science fiction, emailed me a couple

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MOON SHOT

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Been frustrated, fearful and feeling worried about what to do in an emergency? Tune in FRIDAY DECEMBER 8 12 noon – 1:30 pm LUNCH AND LEARN Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst a VIRTUAL COMMUNITY EVENT Inspiring Speakers - Empowering Stories FREE Live Stream on Community TV or on www.HopefortheBest.info Sponsored by Haiku Web Services to help raise awareness & resources for Santa Cruz area neighbors, community and business friends.

MARTIAN CHRONICLER 'The Martian' won Weir the John W. Campbell Award for

Best New Writer.

<23 basically talking about a frontier society in space.” Which takes us back to California. As the novel was taking shape in Weir’s imagination, he found himself drawing inspiration from movies even more than sciencefiction novels, specifically a 1974 classic starring Faye Dunaway and Jack Nicholson, and set during California’s water wars of the early 20th century. “One of my main influences was

the movie Chinatown, which is really about the growth of a city and everything that has to happen for that to move forward,” Weir says. “When I was working on Artemis, I kept thinking: this is similar to Chinatown. So I watched the movie again.” It’s a great movie, with a script from Robert Towne that’s considered one of the best in the history of cinema. No one who has seen it will forget the younger Nicholson


MOON SHOT

“I would love for ‘Artemis’ to be a series. I’m working on the next book already.” - ANDY WEIR Artemis was choosing to narrate his book in the voice of his female lead character, Jazz. Even many fans of the book have some issues with a middle-aged white guy trying to write in the voice of a woman in her 20s. Writing in the New York Times, for example, N.K. Jemisin went glib: “She talks and acts like a Middle American white man.” Even Kirkus, in a swipe I have to call bizarre, took a shot at Weir for thanking his publisher and U.K. editor and other women in his acknowledgements “for helping me tackle the challenge of writing a female narrator.” What’s wrong with that? Kirkus thought acknowledging help made it sound “as if women were an alien species.” Hold on there. Reviewers often don’t know much about how books actually get written—they’re more the sit-back-and-snipe types—but fine-tuning voice takes work, and one always asks for help. If you’re narrating a book with a character from England, and you yourself are from California, you get help to hunt for anywhere you can improve—that doesn’t mean you think people from England are an “alien species.” Weir couldn’t win, in other words, but he knew that going in—and he’s disarmingly open about how harrowing it was to go with his impulse to build the book around a young woman. “That was probably the biggest challenge in the book for me,” he told me. “I don’t know if I did a good job or not. Some people Call Dr. Ana to have strong reactions, saying, ‘This Ask about book your Botox visit is horrible. Andy Weir doesn’t know fillers for anything about women.’ There are instant results demographics that would never accept a female lead written by a BeautyWithin man under any circumstances—you 7492 Soquel Dr., Suite D may not have a female lead written Aptos, CA 95003 by a man, period.” 831.313.4844 Botox He’s right about that,$10 of per unit Dermalgoing Fillersto• Chemical Peels course, but he’s surely piss some people off by saying so. It probably helps his cause

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with tape on his nose, playing Jake Gittes. I highly recommend reading the Weir novel and then watching the movie again as a way to explore how one creative work can infuse and inform another. Both have about them a feeling of gradually uncovering deeper truths. In the case of Artemis, the drama also hinges on a power play over resources. It’s complicated, but here’s the basics of the setup: Jazz Bashara is estranged from her father, a master welder, who like her lives on a small colony on the moon called Artemis. She works as a porter—a low-income, lowprofile job that serves as a useful cover for her other occupation: a large-scale smuggling operation with the help of an Earthside pen pal she’s been close to for years. Through her smuggling operation, she meets a wealthy businessman named Trond Landvik who offers her a million credits to engage in some major sabotage—an insanely difficult mission that she, wanting the money, decides to accept. She comes up with a good plan, and almost pulls it off, sabotaging all but one of the automated mining harvesters operated by Sanchez Aluminum. Then she goes to see her wealthy businessman client—only to find him murdered. It turns out that the enforcer of a Brazilian crime syndicate—which, this just in, owns Sanchez Aluminum—has murdered the businessman and is now after her, only he’s a little off his game in the low gravity of the moon, putting him at a disadvantage. By teaming up with her estranged father, and a lovable geek named Martin Svoboda, who becomes an unlikely love interest, Jazz brings her schemes to an unlikely conclusion. Anyone who says they saw it all coming—the kind of hair-ball analysis regularly coughed up online—is full of it. Weir’s most daring choice with

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MOON SHOT <25 that he’s matter-of fact-and mild about the observation—not angry, not combative, just accepting of conditions, like an engineer planning a rocket launch. “I was interested in developing a female character who was a flawed person, with shady morals, who makes bad life decisions,” he says. “These are all character flaws that if I had applied them to a man, people would say, ‘OK,’ but applied to a woman, some people say, ‘All women aren’t like that.’ The Martian had no character depth. No one accused it of being literature. This time, I wanted deeper characters. No one’s going to talk about it with the Pulitzer committee, but I hope I stretched myself.” They are interesting quandaries. Weir wrote the book knowing full well that given the proclivities of Hollywood producers, and given the success of the film version of The Martian, the new novel he was writing had a decent shot at hitting the big screen. So in writing a vehicle for a sarcastic, flawed young woman character who also happens to be smart, resourceful and complex, he was working in a small way against the historically male-dominated tradition of science fiction, which thankfully has slowly begun to diversify. That said, of course any author is fair game, and if people find some of Jazz’s lines clanging, so be it. Here’s a pretty good test case: “I stared daggers at Dale. He didn’t notice. Damn, I wasted a perfectly good bitchy glare.” I thought the line was funny. I thought it came through that Weir was having a lot of fun with his writing. Then again, I am a reader of a similar age and background to Weir himself. The novel has been optioned, and I’d be stunned if it didn’t hit the big screen with a young actress nailing the part. In fact, I think we’re going to be seeing a lot of Jazz Bashara for years to come. Weir definitely stretched himself here, and I for one am glad he did. “I really tried to convey Jazz’s flippant attitude,” he said. “It was

much harder to write Artemis than The Martian. The Martian was so much more simple. It was a lot of math problems, and I’m good at that. Complex human interaction is more challenging. Mark is more or less flawless. He makes errors, but there’s no moral ambiguity to him. He’s a guy with no personality flaws other than being snarky sometimes, where Jazz has made very bad decisions and most of her problems are self-inflicted. She had everything she needed to get a start in life—a parent who loves her, an education. She still managed to piss all that away.” Some readers are put off by her endless wisecracking and sarcasm, but again, on the screen that could work out just fine. “She has a sarcastic sense of humor,” Weir says. “That’s just me. I think everything I write is going to be through that lens, because that’s just who I am … I don’t have an idea what a character looks like. I don’t get a visual. Like when I wrote The Martian and finished, I couldn’t have told you what color Mark Watney’s hair was. Like with Jazz, I don’t see her. I know she has olive skin. I’d like her to be played by a woman who has that skin tone.” As for what we can expect next from Weir, he’s not going anywhere. The ideas keep exploding out of his active imagination. “I would love for Artemis to be a series,” he told me. “I’m working on the next book already, just a few thousand words so far. I’m working on that, but don’t want to get too enthusiastic yet. What if people don’t like Artemis? If it goes over well, I can see a whole series of books.” Andy Weir will read from and discuss ‘Artemis’ in conversation with Francis Nimmo, UCSC professor of Earth & Planetary Sciences, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 5 at Santa Cruz High School, 415 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. Hosted by Bookshop Santa Cruz, ticket packages are $29.43, and include two tickets and one copy of the book. bookshopsantacruz.com, 423-0900.


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&

ART

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ON POINT Lili Arnold, who specializes in prints of cacti and other succulents, operates her art business entirely out of her bedroom. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

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Spiking Interest

How Santa Cruz’s Lili Arnold has built a career—and a 100,000-strong Instagram following—with her botanical prints BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

I

n a small room filled to the brim with beautiful botanic prints, frosted light bulbs and scented candles, Lili Arnold is making magic happen. Though succulent season is over and cacti have gone dormant for the winter, they are

HOT TICKET

Arnold’s printmaking specialty year-round. Specializing in botanical printmaking, Arnold can make anywhere from 15-50 prints daily while also maintaining her website, numbering and packaging her

work, and freelancing. She’s a bit of an anomaly—at only 28, she’s made printmaking into a full-time, successful career from the comfort of her bedroom. The remarkably tidy 300ishsquare-foot studio-bedroom is

MUSIC

FILM

Valerie June lets her songs define themselves P31

How Charles Dickens stole Christmas P52

home to countless paint tubes, around 50 linocut blocks and several mandolins, each of which fits comfortably in its place. Cozied up with a knit sweater and herbal tea, Arnold sits at a makeshift portable >30 table next to her bed.

DINING New tasting room brings the Wild West to the wine scene P58


LIVE AT THE SANTA CRUZ CIVIC AUDITORIUM 5 PERFORMANCES

Fri, Dec. 15, 8pm Sat, Dec 16, 1pm and 4:30pm Sun, Dec 17, 1pm and 4:30pm

Co-Executive Artistic Directors Robert Kelley and Diane Cypher

TICKETS by phone

831-420-5260 (press 5) o n l i n e scbt.com or santacruztickets.com in person

Civic Auditorium Box Office Tues - Fri 11a - 6p 307 Church St, Santa Cruz

scbt.org Make some new Christmas memories this year. Buy your tickets today.

Thank you sponsors: Arts Council Santa Cruz County, Community Printers, Dream Inn /Aquarius, Google, Good Times, Organic Brand Management, Santa Cruz Sentinel, The Art Institute of California Silicon Valley, The Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County, The Studio

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Maestro Pamela Martin conducts the Santa Cruz Ballet Theatre Orchestra Music by P.I. Tchaikovsky

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ART

TOM RALSTON PRESENTS

NOMADS

Saturday RIO Dec 2, 2017 THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

7:30 pm

30

Santa Cruz

TICKETS $20 available at: brownpapertickets.com/event/3085809 riotheatre.com or at the door

VOCALS LISA TAYLOR, LISA LEUSCHNER

& THE NIGHTINGALETTES BASS DANIEL VEE LEWIS SAX GARY REGINA DRUMS JIMMY NORRIS GUITAR KEN HARRILL HARP JENNIFER CASS CELLO KRISTEN GARBEFF VIOLIN SHANNON DELANEY HORNS RICHARD FENNO, BRIAN MOORE, NICK BIANCHINI PERCUSSIONS GARY KEHOE HARMONICA MATEO LETTUNICH PIANO & VOCALS TOM RALSTON

&

<28 “Most people are surprised I work out of this room,” she says, looking around it. “I have to be very careful about putting things away and cleaning up so that the clutter doesn’t get out of control.” But don’t be fooled by the immaculate cleanliness of the carpet or her perfect wavy hair; Arnold is a very busy woman. She’s prepping for the holidays, she explains, apologizing for the prints sprawled across her bed and about the room. With several large protea susara prints hanging over her sink, it’s a wonder she manages to brush her teeth. “I'm going to start running out of space,” she says. “I am already maxing out here.” She gestures around the room as she explains how what began as a hobby unexpectedly blossomed into a career. Since graduating from UCSC with an arts degree in 2011, she spent several years in graphic design and textile printing and only took up printmaking as a weekend creative outlet. Amid a pop culture obsession with drought-tolerant plants, her work garnered more interest, and and she eventually began selling it in local shops and online. Since her work isn’t traditional fine art, she’s her own salesperson—no Sotheby’s here. She admits readily available art online may be taking away some value from fine art, but says that overall, art is much more accessible than it’s ever been. An online presence can make or break a career—and in her case, having more than 100,000 followers on Instagram (@ liliarnoldstudios) has its perks. The majority of her direct sales come from social media. “That is the only reason why I have been able to do this, because of Instagram,” she says. “The only way I make direct sales is by promoting on Instagram and Facebook. I don’t know what I would do without it.” With her worldwide clientele, it’s fair to say Arnold has made a pretty big name for herself. Her followers ask her for advice on materials and processes, and she often meets

other artists through her social media pages. She’s also expanded her wholesale retail to 15 locations from California to Colorado. Her most recent and popular cactus series showcases stunning iridescent blooms diluted by the symmetry and simplicity of their host cactus or succulent. She’s done several series of prints, including her first ocean series, and multiple commissioned band posters and freelance projects. She says she’s looking forward to starting new projects, and is considering featuring the banksia plant, known for its spikey, woody foliage and bulbous blooms. “It would be cool to start an entirely new series that’s graduated from the cactus, something a little more complex, a little more interesting,” she says, sipping her tea. As the daughter of two artists, she says it was inevitable she would go into some creative arts field, though she acknowledges that she didn’t think her hobby would become a career, since the job landscape for art majors is a bit nebulous. But technology influences everything it touches, and art is no exception. Arnold hopes to take a brief break from social media to get back to her creative roots, but can’t stay away for too long, since her sales and promotion depend on it. “Social media and technology are making art more accessible for people,” she says. “Whether its Etsy or Instagram, social media is giving artists a better chance to be seen and make a career.” For more information, or to purchase prints, visit liliarnold.com. Arnold will also be selling her work at upcoming holiday fairs, including 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1 at Cosmic Design Holiday Fair, 115 Cooper St., Santa Cruz; 11 a.m.5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 3 at the Pleasure Point Holiday Fair at Opal Creative Co., 3912 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 10 at Lúpulo’s Sip and Shop Event, 233 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz; and 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 16, at the Winter Makers Market at Alibi Interiors Warehouse, 802 Estates Drive, Aptos.


MUSIC

CRASH INTO JUNE Valerie June plays the Rio on Sunday, Dec. 3.

Root Cause

V

alerie June’s long, thick dreadlocks lead some people to expect the Jamaican accent of a reggae singer. With just a few words in her thick Tennesseean accent, however, June makes assumptions evaporate, and opens the door to questions about what kind of music she plays. As she explains it, she’s a songwriter, first and foremost. Her songs journey through folk, blues, soul, country and R&B, so she could broadly be called an American roots artist. But her particular sound—a soulful, acoustic, porch-jam style—is like nothing else. One reviewer remarked that June has the “most strikingly individual delivery [he’d] heard in ages.” But June sees it as simply writing

songs in whatever form they come through. “I let the song be what it is,” she says. “I don’t say, ‘OK, this has got to be a blues song because I’m a blues singer.’ That’s boring. If I write a rock ’n’ roll song, it’s a rock ’n’ roll song. If I write a gospel song, it’s a gospel song.” Born in Jackson, Tennessee, June grew up surrounded by music. She’s always loved it and she “just soaked up every single type.” At 21, she picked up a guitar and started writing and performing. At 35, she now plays the banjo and lap steel guitar, as well. In 2013, the Brooklyn-based June became a global sensation with the release of her major label debut album, Pushin’ Against a Stone. She had previously self-released two

BY CAT JOHNSON

albums, but Pushin’ was an overnight sensation 10 years in the making. June found herself the focus of tastemaking publications and shows, including the New York Times, the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, NPR, The Tonight Show and Austin City Limits. She even performed at the White House at the invitation of former First Lady Michelle Obama. June found herself very busy, very quickly—and for good reason. Pushin’ is a masterclass in artistry, originality and authenticity. The album remains utterly fresh. This year, June dropped her sophomore release, The Order of Time. Where some artists who make big splashes fail to deliver on their sophomore release, June went deeper into the magic that

Valerie June will perform at 8 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 3 at the Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $27/gen, $40/ gold. 423-8209.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Valerie June’s music defies all assumptions

makes her unique, and emerged with a record that leaves listeners wondering where her talents end. The Order of Time sees June sharing stories of her family and life. The opening tune, “Long Lonely Road,” is a sparse and quiet song about the sacrifices her ancestors made and the journey through hard times to better days. It sets the tone for an album that’s been called her best work yet. Recording the new album was a chance for June to step into her own vision and courage. On Pushin’, she was new to the big business of recording and producing. On The Order of Time, she was in familiar territory. “Pushin’ was my training ground,” she says. “It was me going into the room and learning how musicians talk to each other, how to speak to an engineer, what the language is that producers use with artists.” On The Order of Time, June was more confident making decisions and directing the sound. She told the musicians what she wanted—and if it failed, they tried something else. “I was more fearless,” she says. An open-hearted fearlessness runs through June’s music. She’s acutely aware of the transience of life and the beauty of everyday moments. The Order of Time is an exploration into the big picture questions of life: existence, loss, family, joy and spirit—themes she’s drawn to in the music she loves. “When I listen to my favorite songs, that’s what I hear,” she says. “Every single moment of this life is special. When you’re in love or when you’re in sadness; when you’ve got the blues, when you don’t have the blues. All these things are really special.” For June, music is part of the animating and connecting force between all of us humans just trying to figure things out. “It all seems to be a spiritual thing to me,” she says. “If I get out of my body and just listen to the songs, it’s a spirit talking to another spirit ...These songs come from the spirit world—they just exist out there in the ether. Bringing them into this body and sharing the messages that they have is kind of my job.”

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A ONE-MAN PERFORMANCE OF DICKENS’ CLASSIC GHOST STORY

THE HAUNTING OF EBENEZER PRESENTED BY JEWEL THEATRE COMPANY PERFORMED BY

JEFF GARRETT* “Mr. Garrett does not disappoint”

– Charles Kruger of TheatreStorm

Like all of Charles Dickens’ work, A Christmas Carol contains multitudes: a giant cast of characters, each with their own quirky name, memorable tics and distinctive humanity. Veteran Bay Area actor Jeff Garrett now steps up to play them all in a tour-de-force one-man show, Scrooge: The Haunting of Ebenezer. Watch the beloved ghost story come alive as Garrett transforms himself into Bob Cratchit, Jacob Marley, Fezziwig, Tiny Tim, Scrooge and many, many others. No movie or TV special can summon the wit and fire of the original work quite like one man, alone on the THURS. FRI. SAT. SUN. stage, tackling every character Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 10 7:30pm 7:30pm 2:00pm himself. Glory in (Preview) (Opening) 7:30pm Dickens’ language and delight in Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 16 Dec 17 Garrett’s audacious 7:30pm 7:30pm 2:00pm 2:00pm skill as a performer 7:30pm in this limited engagement of Scrooge: The Haunting of Ebenezer.

Tickets: Preview $35. All other $40.

www.JewelTheatre.net (831) 425-7506 *Member, Actors’ Equity Association.

December 8-17, 2017 at THE COLLiGAN THEATER at the Tannery Arts Center | 1010 River Street, Santa Cruz

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Chartwell School: Empowering students who think and learn differently.

32

For students with dyslexia and other learning differences.

Prospective parents:

join us for a Tuesday Tour Tuesday, December 5 at 10:30 am. Register today at www.chartwell.org or call 831.394.3468 Chartwell School | 2511 Numa Watson Rd. | Seaside, CA 93955

This production is funded, in part, by grants from the following organizations:

JTC voted best theatre company in Santa Cruz!


ready... ENGAGE

DECEMBER 1ST

DECEMBER FEATURES Tannery Art Center Winter Art Market 1010-1070 River Street 4 - 8pm

227 Cathcart Street 6 – 8 pm

Wargin Wines - Plein Air Competition Winners

Vault Gallery at Coffeetopia John F. Johnson 3701 Portola Drive, 4 - 7 pm You know John F. Johnson’s work. You’ve seen it a lot and you’ve seen it for years. Especially you Piggies out there. Join KPIG Radio and friends of local cartoonist and graphic artist, John Johnson for this informal art show. John’s work helped define the look and feel of Santa Cruz years ago and much of it can still be seen out in the wild today.

5015 Soquel Drive 4 - 7 pm Six of the winning artists from the Capitola Plein Air competition will be featured at Wargin Wines. Meet and Greet with the artists while enjoying the perfect pairing of art and wine. 25% of wine sales from First Friday go to the Bay Area Firefighters and Families: Sonoma and Napa Fires.

sponsored by

Julie Forbes Follow Julie this First Friday on Instagram #FirstFridaySantaCruz Julie Forbes fled the cold winters of Pennsylvania nearly two decades ago for the warm California sun. Her passion is to shoot the people, places, and natural wonders of her adopted hometown. She is inspired by the words of Henri Cartier-Bresson: “To photograph … is to put on the same line of sight the head, the eye and the heart.” When she is not out shooting, you can find her reading on the beach or playing with her sweet black lab Scarlet and hiking with her partner David.

GALLERIES

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

The Winter Art Market at the Tannery kicks off on First Friday and lasts all weekend long. There will be dozens of Tannery Artists, lots of live music, s’mores, fire pits, bubbles, hot chocolate and cider, kids games, a treasure hunt and a lighted bike ride. A great family friendly start to an artful holiday season. More times and details at tanneryartscenter.org

FIRST FRIDAY FOCUS

Rare Bird Salon T.S. Anand The collages on display at Rare Bird Hair Salon speak to this artist’s interest in such themes as: concepts of beauty, relationships with hair, the interface of self-image & identity, and a variety of figures in the landscape. The imagery ranges from abstract to surreal—with humor and social commentary. All artwork, presently on display at Rare Bird Hair Salon, is original collaged imagery — no reproductions.

santacruz.com

FRIDAY ART TOUR

FIRSTFRIDAY

FIRST

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ART TOUR

Galleries/DECEMBER 1ST Agency Shelby Graham 1519 Pacific Ave. Shopagencyhome.com 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

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DOWNTOWN

NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Ann Baldwin May Art Quilts Ann Baldwin May 1001 Center St. #4 Annbaldwinmayartquilts.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Artisans Gallery Whimsy Spot & Kimberly Langston Hagen Jewelry Design 1368 Pacific Ave. Artisanssantacruz.com 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm Botanic and Luxe Amadeo Bachar 701A Front St. Botanicandluxe.com 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm Buttercup Cakes & Farm House Frosting Mezza9 1411 Pacific. Ave. Farmhousefrosting.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Cosmic Cosmic Hosts: The Third Choose Santa Cruz Popup Market— Holiday Edition! 115 Cooper St. Designbycosmic.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Food Lounge Sara Webb - Manuela Aponte Eli Torres - Isabella R. Rincon - Saki Quintero 1001 Center St. Suite 1 Scfoodlounge.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 Luma Yoga and Family Center Bryan Garrison 1010 Center St. Lumayoga.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Rare Bird Salon Sundari Designs (T.S. Anand) 227 Cathcart St. Rarebirdsalon.com 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Resource Center for Nonviolence Seeking Justice in the Middle East 612 Ocean St. Rcnv.org 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Rivendell Yonat Michaelov 1001 Center St. Suite 6 Rivendellarts.com 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Rosie McCann’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Justin Schwarz 1220 Pacific Ave. Rosiemccanns.com 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

MIDTOWN

FRIDAY

Solaire Restaurant + Bar @ Hotel Paradox Carrie Clayden 611 Ocean St. hotelparadox.com/dining-en.html 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Stripe MEN Vincent Waring 117 Walnut Ave. Stripedesigngroup.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Nectar Creations Oceanus & Jennifer Cervelli 1325 Pacific Ave. Nectarcreations.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Stripe Stephanie Martin 107 Walnut Ave. Stripedesigngroup.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Nut Kreations Ali and Nick 104 Lincoln St. Nutkreations.com 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm

The Homeless Garden Project Downtown Store Gala Holiday Open House 110 Cooper St. Suite 100G Homelessgardenproject.org 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Pure Pleasure Shannon Morgan 111 Cooper St. Purepleasureshop.com 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Village Yoga Neno V. Villamor 1106 Pacific Ave. villageyogasantacruz.com/our-studio 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

EarthBelly Levi Siegel 318 Soquel Ave. Eatearthbelly.com 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Home/Work Brittany Costanzo 1100 Soquel Ave. Shophomework.com 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Santa Cruz Art League Art/Now/Next 526 Broadwayscal.org 12:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Cosmo Chic Sonia Le 1050 River St. Unit 117 Cosmochicsc.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Santa Cruz County Government Center County Government Center Art Exhibit 701 Ocean St. 1st and 5th floor Sartscouncilsc.org 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History Free First Friday 705 Front St. Santacruzmah.org 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Childish Santa Cruz Nick Vargas and Aidan Monahan 1127 Soquel Ave. childishsantacruz.com 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Apricity Gallery Winter Art Market 1060 River St studio #104 Apricitygallery.com 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Santa Cruz County Bank Quintessential Santa Cruz County 720 Front St. Santacruzcountybank.com 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

TANNERY

FIRST

Flora & Fauna Caroline Webster and more. 1050 River St. #127 facebook.com/everythingflorafauna 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Gallery 125 Jean Sheckler Beebe, Andrew Purchin, Joan Hellenthal, Chris Miroyan, Chela Zabin, Beth Shields, Lynne Todaro 1050 River St. Space #125 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Printmakers at the Tannery PATT 1010 River St Studio 107 Pattpress.org 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Radius Gallery SMALL WORKS 1050 River St. #127 Radius.gallery 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Stephanie Schriver Gallery Stephanie Schriver 1050 River St. #122 Stephanieschriver.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Tannery Arts Center Artists of the Tannery 1050 / 1060 River St. Tanneryartscenter.org 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Watershed Art Studio Linda Cover & Kerri Linden 1050 River St. #116 Tanneryartscenter.org 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm


WESTSIDE

43-Ethan Estess Art+Design Ethan Estess 15 Ingalls St. ethanestess.com/gallery.html 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm MJA Vineyards Janet Allinger 328 Ingalls St. Ste. mjavineyards.com/ 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm R. Blitzer Gallery Rydell Visual Arts Fellows Exhibition 2801 Mission St. Rblitzergallery.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm Sesnon Gallery at UCSC The Gail Project 1156 High St. at Porter College 2nd Floor art.ucsc.edu/galleries/sesnon/current 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Stockwell Cellars Sefla Joseph & Company 1100 Fair Ave. (across the St. from New Leaf Market) Stockwellcellars.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm The Loft Salon & Spa Janet Silverglate 402 Ingalls St Suite #8 Theloftsantacruz.tumblr.com 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

PLEASURE POINT

Galleries/ DECEMBER 1ST

RIVER STREET

ART TOUR

SOQUEL

FRIDAY

SC MTS

FIRST

Friday Realty Howard Boots McGhee 1040 41st Ave. FridayRealty.com 5:30 pm - 9:00 pm Vault Gallery at Coffeetopia John F. Johnson 3701 Portola Ave. 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm Michaelangelo Studios Multiple Artist 1111-A River St. Michaelangelogallery.net 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm Oasis Tasting Room & Kitchen Emily Cafaro 415A River St. OasisSantaCruz.com 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Wargin Wines Soquel Village Plein Air Competition Winners 5015 Soquel Dr. Warginwines.com 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm Garimoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Real Soap Studio & Gallery Hosts Pottery of Jasper Marino, Tom Watson, Kyle Jouras, Olivia Cater, Travis Adams 6225 Hwy. 9 facebook.com/pages/Garimos-Real-Soap-Studio 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

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FIRST FRIDAY IN DECEMBER Meet Community Agroecology Network Staff and Network Par tners

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NOVEMBER 2--DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Networks across borders— inspiring action for change.

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“Community Agroecology Network (CAN) works sideby-side with our partner organizations so that farmers and their families have healthy food to eat year round. With our partners, CAN has decreased hunger, improved diets, and supported sustainable farming practices. Every seed planted is an opportunity to scale food systems that are sana, cercana y soberana (healthy, local, and sovereign)!” Roseann Cohen, Executive Director

December 1, 5-8 PM Hosted by Cornucopia Real Estate SANTA CRUZ ART CENTER 1001 CENTER ST, STE 5, DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ


CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

32ND ANNUAL LIGHTED BOAT PARADE The lighted boat parade is back, and more lit than ever: this year’s theme is “Holiday Magic!” One of the most anticipated holiday events of the year, mariners decorate their boats with lights and holiday decorations and parade them across the harbor for your oohing and aahing pleasure. There are few things more magical than watching the festooned boats glide through the harbor on a cold December night. The event will happen rain or shine, so grab a hot chocolate and a blanket and get there early for a good seat. The parade can be viewed from either side of the harbor, so feel free to stroll along the channel, too. INFO: Saturday, Dec. 2. 5:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Harbor, 135 Fifth Avenue, Santa Cruz. santacruzharbor.org. Free.

ART SEEN

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 11/28 FOOD & WINE TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia night at 99 bottles. 21 and up. 8 p.m. 110 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz. 459-9999. DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1:30 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

GROUPS PRESCHOOL ADVENTURES AT THE MONTEREY BAY MARINE SANCTUARY EXPLORATION CENTER Preschool Adventures at the Sanctuary Exploration Center. Come enjoy weekly preschool adventures at the Sanctuary Exploration Center with ocean themed book readings, show-and-tell, and crafts. Perfect for kids ages 2-5. 10-11 a.m. Monterey Bay Sanctuary Exploration Center, 35 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. montereybay.noaa.gov. Free.

CHRISTIAN GUENTHER GLASS EXHIBIT Among artisan crafts, glasswork is in a category of its own. It has got to be one of the riskiest crafts ever—not only is the final product incredibly breakable, but the entire process of molding glass requires temperatures above 2,550 degrees Fahrenheit. Christian Guenther will showcase his nearly 30 years of working with glass beginning this First Friday. His work is based on our coast and other natural environments, and the show will feature around 50 glassworks and sculpture. INFO: Opens Friday, Dec. 1 and runs through Monday, Jan. 1. Opening reception Friday, Dec. 1, 6-9 p.m. Felix Kulpa Gallery, 107 Elm St., Santa Cruz. felixkulpa.com. Free.

B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot. After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 3-6 p.m. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29. B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 deficiencies are common, as the vitamin is used up by stress, causing fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia and more. Not well absorbed in the gut, B12 injections can be effective in helping to support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Come get a discounted shot from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12-injections or 515-8699. $15.

SCOTTS VALLEY HOLIDAY BOOK SALE It’s gift season, and what better gift than a book? The Scotts Valley chapter of Friends of the Santa Cruz Public Libraries is holding its annual Holiday Book Sale for all of your gift needs. There will be gently used books, CDs and DVDs. There are sure to be some real literary gems, plus all proceeds benefit the Scotts Valley Friends group. INFO: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Scotts Valley Branch Library, 251 Kings Village Road, Scotts Valley. fscpl.org. 427-7700. Free.

MUSIC OPEN MIC NIGHT Open Mic Night every Wednesday in Capitola Village. Join us at the new Cork and Fork Capitola. All are welcome. Always free, always fun. Awesome wines by the glass or bottle, Discretion beer on tap, hand made pizzas and great small-plate dishes. 7 p.m. Cork and Fork, 312 Capitola Ave., Capitola. corkandforkcapitola.com. Free. WORLD HARMONY CHORUS The World Harmony Chorus is a community chorus that welcomes participants of all ages

and ability levels. There are no auditions nor entrance requirements. 7:15-9:15 p.m. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. instantharmony.com. MIKE PZ TRIO AT DISCRETION BREWING From Salinas come Mike Perez and two other members of his band, Mike PZ and the Associates! A rock ’n’ roll group specializing in American roots music and more. This working band loves to jam to oldies, switch off to a fusion jam, then bounce to a cumbia, before slowing it down with a blues. 6:30 p.m. Discretion Brewing, >38

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

HEALTH

SATURDAY 12/2

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CALENDAR

SUNDAY 12/3 PLEASURE POINT HOLIDAY FAIR Did you miss Black Friday or Small Business Saturday? Don’t fret, there are plenty of opportunities for you to support local businesses, like the Pleasure Point Holiday Fair. There will be artisan crafters from across the county and beyond, for all of your handmade soaps and candles needs. If you’re looking for something a bit more permanent, check out the reclaimed wood decor and home goods, and maybe snag some holiday salted caramels for good measure.

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

INFO: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Opal Creative Co. 3912 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz. pleasurepointholidayfair.com. Free.

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<37 2703 41st Ave. Suite A, Soquel. discretionbrewing.com. Free.

THURSDAY 11/29

honky-tonk in l961, and continued a correspondence with Cline until her death. 7:30 p.m. The Colligan Theater, 1010 River St., Santa Cruz. jeweltheatre.net. $26.

ARTS

FOOD & WINE

SCOTTS VALLEY HIGH PRESENTS ‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE’ Scotts Valley High Performing Arts and directors Larry Wenner and Kendra Kannegaard present James W. Rodgers’ It’s a Wonderful Life, adapted from Frank Capra’s film and Philip Van Doren Stern’s story. 7 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, this week and next week. $10 general/$8 students and seniors. Tickets at showtix4u.com.

TRIVIA NIGHT This festive event brings together trivia aficionados, boneheads and the chic geek for a night of boisterous fun. 8:30 p.m. Woodstock’s Pizza, 710 Front St., Santa Cruz. 427-4444.

JEWEL THEATRE PRESENTS: ‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’ More than a tribute to the legendary country singer who died tragically in a plane crash in 1963. Based on a true story about Cline’s friendship with a fan from Houston named Louise Seger, who befriended the star in a Texas

ALES 4 TAILS Drink beer! Raise money! Adopt a dog! $1 of all “on-site” beer purchased will go to the Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter. Meet cool dogs that need your love. SCMB will be raffling off a Jug Club Membership and all proceeds will go to the shelter. 11 a.m. Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing, 402 Ingalls St. Suite 27, Santa Cruz. 425-4900 or scmbrew.com. Free.

>40


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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

WINTER IS HERE!

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Holiday Art & Craft Faire Simpkins Swim Center Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM Free Admission & Parking - Unique hand-made gifts for everyone on your \ list, created by local artists and craftspeople. You’ll find jewelry, ornaments, scarves, bags, art glass, chocolates, photographs, cards, soaps, ceramics, hats, succulent mini-gardens, & more!

For more info. including the list of artists and images of their work, please visit www.scparks.com.

CALENDAR <38

HEALTH

B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 helps support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Since B12 is not absorbed well during digestion, and all B vitamins are depleted by stress, most Americans are deficient. Having B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the malabsorption problem, and people often feel an immediate difference. Every Thursday morning, we offer discounted vitamin B12 by walk-in or appointment. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC OPEN MIC Bob Carter’s Open Mic every Thursday at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge. Featuring the talent of local singersongwriters. Come on out, enjoy the music with friends or take a turn behind the mic. All ages welcome. Dog-friendly patio. 5:30-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. scfoodlounge.com. Free.

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IRISH CHRISTMAS IN AMERICA Produced by Sligo fiddler Oisín Mac Diarmada, the hugely popular Irish Christmas in America show features top Irish music, song and dance in an engaging performance rich in humor and boundless energy. The 2017 tour features special guest singer Niamh Farrell, a Sligo vocalist who has toured with UK singer/songwriting star David Gray. 7:30 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. 427-2277 or kuumbwajazz.org. $30/$26. HANK & ELLA WITH THE FINE COUNTRY BAND AT THE CROW’S NEST Hank & Ella with The Fine Country Band bring back the golden era of country music. Hailing from Santa Cruz California, husband and wife duet, Hank & Ella Warde sing the classic songs of Hank Williams, Skeeter Davis, Skeets McDonald, the Everly Brothers, as well as many other pioneers. 8:30-11:30 p.m. The Crow’s Nest, 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 650-921-5010 or thefinecountryband. com.

FRIDAY 12/1 ART PREVIEW PARKSTORE HOLIDAY SALE 2017 Shop early for thoughtful holiday gifts at the Preview ParkStore Holiday Sale. All proceeds benefit our local state parks and beaches. Friends members receive up

to 30 percent off on select iconic Michael Schwab park illustrations on apparel and more. Plus jewelry, maps, local history books, educational toys and other merchandise that represent the special cultural history and environment of our parks. 4-7 p.m. Natural Bridges State Beach, Swanton Blvd. and West Cliff Drive., Santa Cruz. 429-1840 or thatsmypark.org. WINTER OPEN HOUSE Enjoy nature’s gifts and explore the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History with admission during our Winter Open House. Celebrate the season with crafts and activities, and take advantage of our storewide sale to find something special for the nature lovers in your life. Plus complimentary hot cider and cookies. 10 a.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History, 1305 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 420-6115 or santacruzmuseum.org. Free. FIRST FRIDAY PARENT’S NIGHT OUT Enjoy an evening out while we entertain your kids. Check out the First Friday events downtown or have dinner at a grown-up restaurant! We’ll have crafts, board games, and legos, plus a movie with popcorn and snacks. Please pack a sack dinner or feed your child before they arrive. For kids ages 6-12 only. Pre-registration required. 5-9 p.m. Dream Maker Creative, 1001 Center St. #2 Santa Cruz. 508-1012 or dreammakercreative.com. $35/$25.

FOOD & WINE WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Every Friday is B12 Happy Hour at Thrive Natural Medicine. B12 improves energy, memory, mood, immunity, sleep, metabolism and stress resilience. Come on down for a discounted shot and start your weekend off right! Walk-ins only. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC MUSIC FOR THE FEAST OF CHRISTMAS Join Cabrillo Symphonic Chorus, Cabrillo Youth Chorus, and Ensemble Monterey Chamber Orchestra for this popular concert,


CALENDAR a wonderful way to begin the holiday season with an evening of warmth, music and singalong Christmas carols. Special performance of Imant Raminsh’s Peace of Wild Things, with composer Raminsh speaking at each performance. 8 p.m. Holy Cross Church, 126 High St., Santa Cruz. 479-6154 or feastofchristmas.com. $25. DECEMBER IN MÉXICO PRESENTED BY SENDEROS Enjoy the dance and music of México! Senderos is proud to present its annual December in México performance, México Lindo y Querido. Colorful folkloric dancing by Centeotl Danza y Baile will be featured showcasing traditional dances from many states in Mexico. Also performing will be Ensamble Musical, the youth band of Senderos. 7 p.m. Harbor High Little Theater, 350 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. 854-7740 or scsenderos.org. $10/$5. JAMES GARNER’S TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY CASH: A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR LEO’S HAVEN The amazing James Garner’s Tribute to Johnny Cash will provide an evening of toe-tapping entertainment in support of Leo’s Haven, the first inclusive playground in Santa Cruz County for children of all abilities. 5:30 p.m. Regeneration Church/Calvary Chapel, 1500 Green Hills Road, Scotts Valley. 419-1662 or santacruzplaygroundproject.org. $30.

SATURDAY 12/2 MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY THEATER PRESENTS: ‘THE ULTIMATE CHRISTMAS SHOW (ABRIDGED)’ The fruitcakes of Mountain Community Theater invite you to take an irreverent, comedic, yet heartwarming trip through the holidays in their upcoming comedy production of Reed Martin and Austin Tichenor’s The Ultimate Christmas Show (abridged). 2 p.m. Park Hall, 9401 Mill St., Ben Lomond. Plays Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through Dec. 17. $20 general admission/$17 seniors and students. mctshows.org.

SWANTON ARTISANS 17TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY SALE Nothing brightens the spirit quite like a down home holiday sale! And for the 17th year in a row, nine North Coast artists are staging their wildly fun and festive Swanton Artisans Holiday Sale. Locally crafted sea glass jewelry, local landscape paintings, ornaments, organic coffees and teas, eclectic jewelry, tea towels, prints, lavender sachets, notecards, soaps

CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE Come join us for coffee and cookies while you shop. Real Time Pain Relief, Jewelry, WildTree, Scentsy, H20@ Home, Younique, Thirty One Bags, LuLaRoe, Avon, Perfectly Posh, Beaches and Bubbles, DoTerra Essential Oils, Lipsense, Empowering Hands Massage, Stamping Up, Bronze Poppy, Sun Mountain Soul, Usborne Books and much more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Jade Street Park, 4400 Jade St., Capitola. cityofcapitola.org. Free.

NORRIE’S GIFT AND GARDEN SHOP HOLIDAY SALE Come explore the expanded selection of books, jewelry, scarves, hats, games and toys. A fresh assortment of nature-inspired crafts, decorations and wreaths. Give gifts that delight and have a lasting impact on the garden. Support a local treasure and enjoy hot cider and cookies while you shop. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, High Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. arboretum.ucsc.edu. Free.

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SCOTTS VALLEY FRIENDS HOLIDAY BOOK SALE The Scotts Valley Friends chapter of the Santa Cruz Public Library will be holding its Holiday Book Sale. Many gently used books, dvds, and cds will be sold. Give the gift of reading this season. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Scotts Valley Branch Library, 251 Kings Village Road, Scotts Valley. santacruzpl.org. Free.

HOLIDAY ART & CRAFT FAIRE Shoppers will find one-of-a-kind items created by local Santa Cruz County artists, including jewelry, handmade bags and wallets, textiles, ornaments, chocolates, soaps, wreaths, mosaics, and much more. Come on by to find that perfect last-minute gift, or something for yourself. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Simpkins Family Swim Center, 979 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. 454-7901 or scparks.com. Free.

CLASSES FIRST SATURDAY ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN TOURS Around the world in 60-90 minutes. An opportunity to visit Mediterranean Climate gardens from California, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa as well as specialty gardens focused on aromas, bees, butterflies, or succulents. And always Hummingbirds and hundreds of other avian friends. 11 a.m. UCSC Arboretum, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz. 502-2998 or arboretum.ucsc.edu. >42

Santa Cruz County a community service of CSU Monterey Bay

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

ARTS

and salves and more.10 a.m. Swanton Berry Farm, 25 Swanton Road, Davenport. swantonberryfarm.com. Free.

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CALENDAR

G IVE TH E GI FT OF

FLOAT TH ER A P Y • • • •

Decrease Stress Reduce Anxiety Minimize Pain Improve Sleep

<41

FOOD & WINE

APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Boony Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

GI FT CER TIF IC ATES AVAILABLE! Local • Family • Legacy

SCOTTS VALLEY FARMERS MARKET

1395 41ST AV E. C APITO LA, C A “At Services we empowerStarted individuals, in 2009 with the City of Scotts 83Monarch 1.854.2700

families, and our community to take Valley, actionthe against market represents farmers and the Community Foundation specialty food purveyors along with cookedV domestic I S I T U violence. S O N L We I N trust E AT Local • Family Legacy to •see the good work we do and to support us. Like they food. This local market is the place W W W. A G year E F L Owith AT SaPA . C O to M help payto-order didSthis grant for a licensed forofthe Scotts Valley community to get their “At Monarch Services we empower individuals, therapist to work with child survivors trauma.” Local • Family • Legacy fill of fresh, healthy, locally grown fruits and milies, and our community to take action against LAURA SEGURA, DIRECTOR, LEEANN LUNA, BRIANA LONGORIA & “At Monarch ServicesEXECUTIVE we empower individuals, vegetables. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 360, Kings Valley estic violence. We trust the Community Foundation ESMERALDA MONARCH SERVICES families, and our community to take RIVAS action• against Road, Scotts Valley. 454-0566. e the good work we do and to support us. Community Like theyFoundation domestic violence. We trust the

see the do a and to support us. Like they d this year with a to grant togood helpwork paywe licensed Local • for Family • Legacy did this year with a grant to help pay for a licensed herapist to work with child ofwetrauma.” “Atsurvivors Monarch Services empower individuals, therapist to work with child survivors of trauma.”

families, and our community to take action against domestic violence. WeBRIANA trust the Community Foundation SEGURA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEEANN LUNA, LONGORIA & LONGORIA & LAURA SEGURA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEEANN LUNA, BRIANA to see the good work we do and to support us. Like they ESMERALDA RIVAS • MONARCH SERVICES ESMERALDA RIVAS • MONARCH SERVICES did this year with a grant to help pay for a licensed therapistLocal to work• with child survivors of trauma.” Family • Legacy

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LAURA SEGURA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEEANN LUNA, BRIANA LONGORIA & ESMERALDA RIVAS we • MONARCH SERVICES “At Monarch Services empower individuals, families, and our community to take action against domestic violence. We trust the Community Foundation to see the good work we do and to support us. Like they did this year with a grant to help pay for a licensed therapist to work with child survivors of trauma.”

LAURA SEGURA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEEANN LUNA, BRIANA LONGORIA & ESMERALDA RIVAS • MONARCH SERVICES

www.cfscc.org | 831.662.2000

www.cfscc.org | 831.662.2000

www.cfscc.org | 831.662.2000

Rydell Visual Arts Fellows Exhibition

OUTDOOR

OPENING:

LIGHTED BOAT PARADE The 32nd annual

Santa Cruz, CA 95060

R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission Street

831.458.1217 | www.rblitzergallery.com

Santa Cruz Harbor on Saturday, Dec. 2.

| www.rblitzergallery.com R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission Street Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 831.458.1217 Noon–5:00 pm The pageant features Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, Noon–5:00 pm dozens of colorfully Santa Cruz, CA 95060 www.cfscc.org | 831.662.2000

Visual Arts Fellows Exhibition OPENING: Rydell Visual ArtsFriday Fellows Exhibition OPENING: First December 1, 5:00–9:00pm ber 1–30, 2017

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B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot! After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 10 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc. com. $29.

Rydell Visual Arts Fellows OPENING: December 2017 First FridayExhibition December 1, 5:00–9:00pm Rydell Visual Arts1–30, Fellows Exhibition OPENING: Lighted Boat Parade will set sail in the | www.rblitzergallery.com R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission Street December 1–30, 2017 First Friday December 1, 5:00–9:00pm December 1–30, 2017831.458.1217 First Friday December 1, 5:00–9:00pm Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, Noon–5:00 pm

Santa Cruz, CA| 95060 www.cfscc.org 831.662.2000

Gallery, 2801 Mission Street z, CA 95060

HEALTH

December 1–30, 2017

First Friday December 1, 5:00–9:00pm

831.458.1217 | www.rblitzergallery.com

831.458.1217 | www.rblitzergallery.com R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission Street Gallery Noon–5:00 pm Noon–5:00 pm Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 hours: Tuesday–Saturday,

festooned boats sailing from the Murray Street bridge to the middle of the harbor entrance channel and back. 5:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Harbor, 135 5th Ave., Santa Cruz. santacruzharbor.org. Free.

SUNDAY 12/3 ARTS SCM MAKERS MARKET HOLIDAY POP-UP

FRIDAY 12/1-SUNDAY 12/3 TANNERY WINTER ARTS MARKET AND FIRST FRIDAY The Tannery is one of the most creative hubs in the county, and their Winter Arts Market is a prime example. The annual event features around 30 Tannery artists, including ceramicists, jewelers, sculptors, framers, and musicians. Bike Santa Cruz will host a Light Up the Night bike ride, light-up costumes are encouraged and free bike lights are provided (while supplies last). While you’re there, check out the newly opened cafe, which will offer $5 kids meals, s’mores, cider and hot chocolate. INFO: Friday 4-8p.m. Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Tannery Arts Center, 1010 River St., Santa Cruz. tanneryartscenter.org. Free.

MARKET AT OASIS TASTING ROOM & KITCHEN It’s a Holiday Pop-up Market at Oasis Tasting Room and Kitchen. Join us for a fun event featuring more than 20 artists and crafters from the SCM Makers Market, live music by the lovely ladies of Sugar by the Pound, and a special Uncommon Brewer’s beer release. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The Oasis Tasting Room and Kitchen, 415 River St., Santa Cruz. scmmakersmarket.com. Free. 10TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY GIFT SHOW Join us for refreshments, music, handmade artisan goods, and plenty of holiday spirit. Find unique gifts like jewelry, ceramics, woodwork, clothing, handbags, leather goods, prints, paintings and much more. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Bantam, 1010 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. ribbonstreet.com. Free.

FOOD & WINE LIVE COMEDY AT THE CROW’S NEST Crow’s Nest features live comedy, with talent from the national circuit, every Sunday night year-round. 21 and up. 2218 E. Cliff Drive,

Santa Cruz. 476-4560. $7. APPLE CITY AMBER PARTY We joined up with our buddies at Santa Cruz Cider experimenting with using their apples in our mash, their juice in our boil, and the lovely Vermont ale yeast to make the magic. We had no idea what would happen, but the results happily surprised us. We think you will love it so much, we are throwing a party. 6 p.m. Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing, 402 Ingalls St. Suite 27, Santa Cruz. scmbrew. com. Free.

VOLUNTEER CLIMB FOR FIRE RELIEF 2017 Pacific Edge Climbing Gym will be hosting a fundraiser for victims of the Napa and Sonoma fires. The fundraiser will feature climbing opportunities for experienced and new climbers, live music, a silent auction and a bake sale. 6-9 p.m. Pacific Edge Climbing Gym, 104 Bronson St. #12, Santa Cruz. 454-9254 or pacificedgeclimbinggym.com. $20/ Donation. >45


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NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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420 Water Street Santa Cruz 831.466.3444 | diggardens.com | Open Daily 10-6


CALENDAR

ltations u s n o c Holiday Special! $45 Renewals $55 New patients with copy of this ad

FRIDAY 12/1

MON-SAT, 11AM-5PM closed Sunday

‘MELISSA, SO FAR’

ONE STEP EVALUATION PROCESS

Gateway School believes there isn’t enough conversation around gender identity, particularly at a young age. With this in mind, Gateway’s middle school production of Melissa, So Far tells the story of a transgender fourth grader who feels disconnected from the body she was born with. Originally based on the novel, George by Alex Gino, the main character is initially bullied and isolated because of her identity, but finds solace and support in her friends and family. The performance takes aim at and promotes the important conversation around gender identity at all ages. Support a greater conversation around transgender identity and meet the author and playwright during its second ever performance. INFO: Shows at 1 and 7 p.m. Broadway Playhouse, 526 Broadway, Santa Cruz. gatewaysc.org. 423-0341. Free. Limited seating, advance registration recommended.

CLEANUP Join Save Our Shores for our monthly cleanup at Davenport Main Beach! Come out and show your support for a healthy marine environment on the first Sunday of each month. 9-11 a.m. Davenport Cove Beach, Highway 1, Davenport. saveourshores.org. Free.

MONDAY 12/4 ARTS POETRY OPEN MIC CELEBRATES NEW VENUE What started four years ago as a small group of poets performing at the Tannery Arts Center has quickly evolved into an entire collective of Santa Cruzans and UCSC students that hosts weekly poetry events. 4 p.m. Tannery Arts Center, 1010 River St. Suite 112, Santa Cruz. 621-6226. Free. SWISS FLORISTS SHOWCASE Our Santa Cruz and Bay Area Swiss expats are a tightknit community, and among them several

florists have prospered in the city. To share their passion and knowledge, they have decided to organize a free showcase every year in November. 11 a.m. Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. swissflowerdelivery.ch. Free.

TUESDAY 12/5 CLASSES COMPOSTING CLASS Fall is a great time of year to start composting with the fallen leaves and pruning debris from your garden. Come learn the basics from UC Master Gardener and Master Composter Otis Johnson. You will learn how to successfully build and maintain a compost pile, including the do’s and dont’s of what to include. Building and maintaining worm bins (vermiculture) will also be covered, which are especially good for smaller gardens. 1-2:30 p.m. Costanoa Commons Community Farm, 335 Golf Club Drive, Santa Cruz. mbmg. org. Free.

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND SHOOBIES

There’s a video on the Shoobies Facebook page of singer/guitarist Jacob Ellzey ripping a mean solo while the other two band members rock out hard. It’s short, but it shows off Ellzey’s shredding skills.

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

“We’re not good at writing lyrics, so those are helpful devices to fill some space, I guess,” Ellzey says when I ask him about his penchant for ripping into his guitar. “Every once in a while, we come up with some good stuff, though.”

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Solos aren’t the only thing at which the group excels—there is also their talent for vocal harmonies, and ’60s-inspired, danceable garage rock tunes. The group is so obsessed with capturing that raw retro sound that they even recorded their demo on a four-track. “I don’t think we’re going to be going into a studio anytime soon. We like that lo-fi sound that we get from doing that DIY stuff,” Ellzey says. The group formed earlier this year. Ellzey put up flyers around town and attracted bassist Alex Vareljian. Drummer Evan Hildebrand was also putting up flyers for a band he wanted to start, and listed the same influences. The trio formed and hit the ground running with their first show at Café Pergolesi in April. Next up, the group hopes to record a seven-inch vinyl single—recorded lo-fi on Ellzey’s four-track, of course. AARON CARNES

INFO: 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 429-4135.

TUNE-YARDS

WEDNESDAY 11/29 JAM

HIGGS What is “cosmic California rock,” you ask? Short answer: Southern California band the Higgs. Long answer: a whole assortment of styles—funk, psych-rock, jazz, prog rock—done with some elements that are structured, and also some freeform improvisation. I guess you could call them a jam band, but the jams aren’t long guitar solos, they’re group explorations of groove. AARON CARNES INFO: 8:30 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $7/adv, $10/ door. 479-1854.

THURSDAY 11/30 CELTIC

IRISH CHRISTMAS IN AMERICA Now in its 12th year in Santa Cruz, Irish Christmas in America is a celebration of Irish music, humor, dance and history—all imbued with holiday spirit. The tour and performance is produced by Oisín

Mac Diarmada of award-winning lrish group Téada and is traveling to venues around the country, including the Kuumbwa Jazz Center. Performers at this year’s familyfriendly concert include special guest singer Niamh Farrell, Séamus Begley, and dancer Samantha Harvey. CAT JOHNSON INFO: 7:30 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $26/adv, $30/door. 427-2227.

JAZZ

QUEEN ESTHER MARROW Queen Esther Marrow received her crown directly from a duke— Duke Ellington, that is. As a complete unknown just starting to think about pursuing music professionally, the 22-year-old Marrow got the call from Ellington to sing in the 1965 Concert of Sacred Music that consecrated San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral. Her soaring voice provided a highlight of the evening, and she went on to work with other royalty, performing at events with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Over the years she’s recorded in gospel, jazz, and R&B

settings, but has spent much of the past two decades working in Europe. Looking to re-establish herself back stateside, she’s performing in California with an ace trio. ANDREW GILBERT INFO: 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/door. 427-2227.

FRIDAY 12/1 GARAGE-ROCK

THE PACK AD The video for Pack AD’s song “Dollhouse” is unsettling. The entire video is a continuous shot of singer Becky Black, who stares directly at your soul while her head bleeds, and she sings the words “Do you realize we live in a dollhouse?” to you. Her image goes in and out of focus. But that’s not the weirdest part. The video opens with a solid 20 seconds of her just staring, with no music playing. It’s like she knows you’re there! The group, a minimalistic duo, plays beefy bare-bones garage rock riffs backed by darkly humorous lyrics about depression and grief. Fun! AC INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $8. 429-6994.


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST PIXIES

KPIG HUMBUG HOEDOWN

SATURDAY 12/2 INDIE

TUNE-YARDS

INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $16/adv, $21/door. 429-4135.

SUNDAY 12/3 ROOTS

KPIG HUMBUG HOEDOWN The KPIG Humbug Hoedown is back

Hawaiian music to country, reggae, jazz and classical, Willie has something in his repertoire. He’s particularly fond of the blues and, on Sunday, he performs at Moe’s as part of the Afternoon Blues Series. CJ

INFO: 7 p.m. Don Quixote’s, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15. 335-2800.

Outside of the hip-hop world, it’s hard to find teenage artists with No. 1 hits, but that’s just how Jonny Lang broke into the scene. Twenty years ago, at the ripe age of 16, Lang burst onto the airwaves with his first hit, “Lie To Me,” off his second album of the same name. Since then, the Grammywinning artist has continued to grow with his blend of blues, gospel and rock to perform with some of music’s biggest artists, like Aerosmith, Buddy Guy and the late B.B. King. This year, he returns with his first new album in four years, Turn Around, which hit the Billboard 200 charts. MAT WEIR

HAWAIIAN

WILLIE K Prince once called Hawaiian multiinstrumentalist Willie K a “funky mother#%@&er.” In the music world, I’m not sure there is any higher praise. And Willie is well-deserving of the title. A musical force who can play any style of music thrown at him, he is also a down-to-earth, kindhearted person who derives great joy from playing music and loves to share that joy wherever he is and whatever he’s playing. From indigenous

INFO: 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 11. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $40. 423-1338. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 6 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

INFO: 4 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. 479-1854.

TUESDAY 12/5 BLUES

JONNY LANG

INFO: 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $28/adv, $30/door. 429-4135.

IN THE QUEUE BLITZEN TRAPPER

Indie-rock meets country-rock. Thursday at Moe’s Alley TRACE BUNDY

Guitar and looping phenomenon. Friday at Don Quixote’s ROSIE PLAZA

Surf rock and pop out of Oakland. Saturday at Crepe Place COLLIE BUDDZ

American/Bermudian reggae. Sunday at Catalyst NORA JANE STRUTHERS

Folk-rock singer-songwriter. Monday at Don Quixote’s

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

In 2011, the indie world became obsessed with Tune-Yards, the project of Merrill Garbus. It’s not hard to see why. The song “Gangsta,” for instance, is a highly infectious African-beat-influence pop song and will immediately make you want to jump out of your chair and dance with total abandon. Discussions revolved around the fact that a white girl was playing music so clearly pulling from African sounds. But this critical perspective was short-lived, especially as she proved that her influences were much vaster, and that her execution was authentic to her own oddball artsy self. AC

and bringing the holiday season in piggie-worthy style. Kicking things off is the Carolyn Sills Combo, our hometown heroes of the national Western swing scene. Headlining the evening are the T Sisters (pictured above), a California-based family band comprising three sisters—Erika, Rachel and Chloe—who have been writing and performing together their entire lives. The group’s repertoire includes folk, pop, indie and Americana. Bring at least five cans of food—for people or for pets— to save $5 at the door. CJ

The secret to the Pixies’ success is that listening to their music is like talking to the preachy-preach about kissy-kiss. It’s like looking up at the sky in a poetic kind of way, what you call it when you look up at the sky in a poetic kind of way. You know, when you grope for luna. But you already know this, and, sure, you want to see the most influential rock band of our generation. But this show is sold out, because despite being more than a decade into their reunion, this band is as hot a ticket as ever. So try this trick: follow the directions below to try to snag our giveaway tickets. (SP)

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Wednesday November 29th 8:30pm $10 Cosmic California Rock

THE HIGGS + DOS OSOS Thursday November 30th 8:30pm $18/20 (((FolkYEAH!!!))) Presents

BLITZEN TRAPPER + LILLY HIATT

Friday December 1st 9pm $20/25 The Keepers Of The Flame Return

MELVIN SEALS & JGB Saturday December 2nd 9pm $12/15 Bluegrass, Americana & Roots Music

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY

Sunday December 3rd 4pm $20/25

Afternoon Blues Series With Hawaii’s

WILLIE K

Wednesday December 6th 8:30pm $10/15 Funk & Soul Favorites

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

POLYRHYTHMICS

48

Dec 7th MCCOY TYLER + KELLY MCFARLING Dec 8th SPACE HEATER + MIDTOWN SOCIAL Dec 9th THE ITALS Dec 10th KIMIE MINER + TENELLE Dec 13th GARY HOEY Dec 14th STU ALLEN & MARS HOTEL Dec 15th & 16th THE ENGLISH BEAT Dec 17th COCO MONTOYA (Afternoon) Dec 17th HARRISON STAFFORD of GROUNDATION (Eve) Dec 22nd SOULWISE + Nomalakadoja & Pacific Roots Dec 23rd SHLUMP + UM Dec 28th CON BRIO Dec 29th MONOPHONICS Dec 30th THE MERMEN - CD Release Dec 31st MARTY O’REILLY & O.S.O + Whiskerman Jan 4th COSMIC PINBALL + PUFFBALL COLLECTIVE Jan 5th THE HIDALGO’S (w/ David Of Los Lobos & Fam) Jan 11th DESERT DWELLERS Jan 13th KATDELIC Jan 14th LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD Jan 18th CELSO PIÑA Jan 19th HILLSTOMP + THE SAM CHASE Jan 24th DIRTY REVIVAL + SAL’S GREENHOUSE Jan 26th ORGÓNE Jan 28th TOMMY CASTRO Feb 15th DAVID LUNING BAND Feb 16th THE BLASTERS Feb 17th BRAZILIAN CARNAVAL Feb 27th WHITNEY ROSE

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

LIVE MUSIC WED

11/29

THU

11/30

FRI

12/1

SAT

12/2

SUN

12/3

MON

12/4

TUE

12/5

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Al Frisby 6-8p

AQUARIUS RESTAURANT Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Rockin’ Johnny Burgin Steve Freund 6-8p 6-8p

Lloyd Whitely 1p Preacher Boy Trio 6-8p

Minor Thirds Trio 6:30-9:30p

Minor Thirds Trio 7-10p

Aki Kumar & Little Jonny Lawton 6-8p

Mojo Mix 6-8p

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Homebrew, King KongZilla, Crown Chakra $5 9p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Crazy Horse Punk Night

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 9:30p-1a

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Matt Kazee Free 8p

Karaoke Free 8p

Swing Dance Free 5:30p Fyre Reggae Free 8p The Knutzens Free 8p

Alex Lucero & friends 8-11p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Karaoke 9-12:30a

The California Honey Drops $20/$22 8p

Wax Taylor Solo Set & Guests $18/$20 8p

Collie Buddz $25 8p

Jonny Lang $28/$30 7p

Tune-Yards $16/$21 8:30p

Naomi Punk $8/$10 8p

Dirtwire $14/$17 8:30p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

Comedy, 80s Night, Safety Dance Free 8:30p

JFA, CRAP, Mokosos & more $15 9p

Fulminante, Fare Game, Enemy of My Enemy $7 9p

Andy Santana Duo 6-8p

The Box Goth Night 9p

Dag Nasty $13 9p

Karaoke

Karaoke Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

SC Jazz Society Free 3:30p

Pool Free 8p

Comedy w/ Shwa Free 8p

CASA SORRENTO 393 Salinas St, Salinas CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Deorro $25-$35 8p

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Chris Travis $20/$25 8:30p

Davey Suicide $10/$12 The Stone Foxes 8:30p $12/$15 8:30p

OPEN LATE EVERY NIGHT! wed 11/29 & thu 11/30

BOURBON AND BURLESQUE

vip includes bourbon flight Advance Tickets at www.ticketweb.com

Doors 7pm/Show 8pm $10 gen admin $20 vip

friday 12/1

THE PACK AD w / SUPERNAUT

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

saturday 12/2

ROSIE PLAZA w / MANORLADY w / NRVS LVRS

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

sunday 12/3

WICKED MAN w / DAN JUAN

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $8 Door

TUESday 12/5

7 COME 11 Show 9pm $5 Door

wednesday 12/6

SPACE CAPTAIN w / GETAWAY DOGS

Doors 8:30pm/Show 9pm $10 Door 12/7 BELLS ATLAS, LE VICE 9PM MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

429-6994

FOR MORE INFO CALL (831) 419-6070


LIVE MUSIC WED

11/29

THU

11/30

CAVA CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

FRI

12/1

Dave D’Oh Free 6:30-9:30p

Celebrating Creativity Since 1975

Friday, December 1 • 7 pm SAT

12/2

JP The Band Free 6:30-9:30p

SUN

12/3

MON

12/4

TUE

12/5

Mark Creech Free 2-5p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Free 7-10p

CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Bourbon & Burlesque $10/$20 7p

Bourbon & Burlesque $10/$20 7p

The Pack AD, Supernaut Rosie Plaza, Manorlady, $8 9p NRVS LVRS $8 9p

Wicked Man, Dan Juan $8 9p

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

Harpin’ & Clark Duo $3 7:30p

Hank & Ella w/ the Fine Country Band $5 8:30p

Matt Masih & The Messengers $6 9p

Live Comedy $7 9p

Reggae Party Free 8p

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p Bonny June & Bonfire Free 7-10p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport

Petunia & the Vipers plus Miss Lonely Hearts $10 8p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

HINDQUARTER BAR & GRILLE 303 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz KUUMBWA 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Sherry Austin w/ Henhouse 6-9p

The Dooners 6-9p

DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

HENFLING’S 9450 Hwy 9, Ben Lomond

Tsunami $7 9:30p

Don MacAngus & Friends Free 4-7p

Flingo 7:30p

Trace Bundy $20 8p

Shady Groove, The Real Sarahs $17 8p

Scooby & El Fuego Free 8p

RoadHouse Ramblers Free 8p

The T Sisters, Carolyn Sills Combo $15 7p

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Monday, December 4 • 7 pm

TESSA SOUTER An imaginative vocalist weaving global influences into her musical approach.

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, December 7 • 7 pm

STUART HAMM-DEAN BROWN TRINITY FEAT. GERGO BORLAI An explosive and deft fusion ensemble - a true power trio. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS!

Nora Jane Struthers $15 7:30p

Friday, December 8 • 7:30 pm

PETER ROWAN’S “MY ALOHA!” Tickets: snazzyproductions.com Roadhouse Karaoke 8p

Jesse Daniel 8p Karaoke 10p Queen Esther Marrow Irish Christmas in w/ The Tammy Hall Trio America $26/$30 7:30p $25/$30 7p

QUEEN ESTHER MARROW WITH THE TAMMY HALL TRIO A remarkable singer, discovered by Duke Ellington, accompanied by Bay Area stalwart pianist Hall and her trio.

Saturday, December 9 • 8:30 pm

SIN SISTER’S BURLESQUE Tickets: eventbrite.com Monday, December 11 • 7 & 9 pm

MIKE STERN BAND WITH RANDY BRECKER & DAVE WECKL A dynamic band led by the six-time Grammy nominated guitarist.

Tessa Souter $23/$28 7p

Thursday, December 14 • 7 pm

SIMON PHILLIPS PROTOCOL A drum-led group of undeniable prowess. Monday, December 18 • 7 & 9 pm

CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO WITH SILVANA ESTRADA & CARTER MCLEAN A playful and experimental ensemble, led by a master of the seven-string guitar. Saturday, January 6 • 8 pm

Flyer & Promo distribution from 70¢

831.466.0560 clutchcourier.com

PACIFIC MAMBO ORCHESTRA A swinging ensemble honoring the sounds of the great Latin big bands of the 1940s. AT COCOANUT GROVE BALLROOM Thursday, January 11 • 7:30 pm

VICTOR WOOTEN TRIO FEAT. DENNIS CHAMBERS & BOB FRANCESCHINI Legendary Grammy-winning bassist joined by powerhouse drum and saxophone collaborators. AT THE RIO THEATRE

Monday, January 15 • 7 pm

LEW TABACKIN TRIO WITH BORIS KOZLOV & MARK TAYLOR An electrifying flutist/saxophonist who has created his own sound with classic elements Become a member today!

Learn more about membership levels and benefits at kuumbwajazz.org/donate. Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa prsented concerts. Premium wines & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Package Delivery from $10

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International Music Hall and Restaurant FINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD

FLYNN’S CABARET AND STEAKHOUSE will be presenting its Grand Opening end of December...and yes...of course, we are keeping the music! Farm-to-table, non-GMO with 40% Vegan, Vegetarian menu. Thu Nov 30

Petunia & The Vipers plus Miss Lonely Hearts Roots

rocking and balladeering, yodeling, ‘30s, ‘40s, ‘50s Jazz, Jugband, Americana, French, Mexican, Cajun & more $8 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Fri Dec 1

Trace Bundy Astonishing

guitarist: 35,000,000 (yes, 35 Million) YouTube views to date

$16 adv./$20 door seated <21 w/parent 8pm

Sat Dec 2

Shady Groove plus The Real Sarahs Bona fide

20-year-old Jerry Garcia Band experience $17 adv./$17 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Sun Dec 3

KPIG HUMBUG HOEDOWN - The T Sisters plus Carolyn Sills Combo

A very special night of acoustic music $15 at door ONLY, or $10 w/donation of at least 5 cans of people or pet food

seated <21 w/parent 7pm Mon Dec 4

Nora Jane Struthers

Wed Dec 6

Gypsy Soul Soulful blend of

LIVE MUSIC WED

11/29

THU

11/30

FRI

12/1

SAT

12/2

Acoustic Soul 7:30p

John Michael Band 7:30p

Breeze Babes 8p

Grateful Sundays 5:30p

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Aki Kumar & Little Jonny Lawton 6p

Al Frisby 6p

Lloyd Whitley 6p

Broken Shades 1p Steve Freund 6p

Dennis Herrera 6p

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

The Higgs & Dos Osos $7/$10 8p

Blitzen Trapper $18/$20 8p

Melvin Seals & JGB $20/$25 8p

Poor Mans Whiskey $12/$15 8p

Willie K $20/$25 3p

Libation Lab 9:30p-1:30a

Tone Sol 9:30p

Tech Minds 9:30p

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Trivia 8p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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$22 adv./$22 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm Sat Dec 9

Fleetwood Mask

The ultimate tribute to Fleetwood Mac $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

Wed Dec 13

Mike Renwick’s Holiday Deluxe Dazzling synthesis of acoustic ‘60s and ‘70s folk & rock with a hard-hitting R&B horn section

$25 adv./$25 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Fri Dec 15

Soohan plus KR3TURE

Adventures in world music remixing, global bass, acoustic & deep electronic ingredients $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm

Sat Dec 16

The Sun Kings

The Ultimate Beatles Experience

$20 adv./$20 door Dance – ages 21+ 9pm COMIN G RIGH T U P

Dennis Dove 6p

Wed. Dec. 20 Star La’Moan & the Kitchenettes w/Tammi Brown Thu. Dec. 21 Wheelhouse – Playing the Music of the Grateful Dead Fri. Dec. 22 Zeppelin Live Thu. Dec. 28 Peppino D’Agostino & Carlos Reyes Sat. Dec. 30 Foreverland –Twas the Night Before NYE Thriller Ball Reservations Now Online at www.donquixotesmusic.com Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

Rob Vye 6p

Virgil Thrasher & Blind Rick Stevens 6p

Hip-Hop w/ DJ Marc 9:30p

Isaiah Picket 2p

Open Mic 4 -7p Michael Sigmund & the Sea Monsters 9p

Laura May, Heather Michelle w/ Pieces 9p

Comedy Open Mic 9p

Open Mic 8-11p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Toby Grey Acoustic Favorites 6:30p

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Moshe Vilozny Acoustic/World 6:30p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Brunch Grooves 12:30p Evening Acoustic 6:30p

Brunch Grooves 12:30p Featured Acoustic Chas Crowder 6p 6:30p

Nomads & Nightingales 7:30p $20

Valerie June $27/$40 8p

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135 Wednesday, November 29 • Ages 18+

DEORRO

Wednesday, November 29 • Ages 16+

CHRIS TRAVIS

Thursday, November 30 • Ages 16+

DAVEY SUICIDE

plus Calling the Skies

Friday, December 1 • Ages 16+

THE CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS Friday, December 1 • Ages 16+

THE STONE FOXES

plus Shoobies

Saturday, December 2 • Ages 16+

WAX TAILOR Saturday, December 2 • A 16+ TUNE-YARDS

ges plus Linafornia

Sunday, December 3 • Ages 16+

COLLIE BUDDZ Sunday, December 3 • Ages 16+

plus Pardoner also Alms

Tuesday, December 5 • Ages 16+

JONNY LANG Tuesday, December 5 • Ages 16+

DIRTWIRE

12/5

Jazz Jam Santa Cruz 7p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

NAOMI PUNK

TUE

Asher Stern 10p-12a Alex Lucero 6p

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm

An evening of music, song and dance associated with the festive season

12/4

Tacos & Trivia 6-8p

Roots, Pop, Blues, Soul & Jazz

w/Molly’s Revenge, Christa Burch and The Rosemary Turco Irish Dancers

MON

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

Blurring the lines between Folk, Roots and Rock Presented with Snazzy Productions

Winterdance Celtic Christmas Celebration

12/3

The Blind Rick Trio 7:30p

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent 7:30pm

Thu Dec 7

SUN

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

plus Headphone Activist

Dec 6 San Holo/ Just A Gent (Ages 16+) Dec 8 Bone Thugs-N-Harmony (Ages 16+) Dec 9 Petty Theft (Ages 16+) Dec 10 Louis The Child (Ages 18+) Dec 12 The Grouch Del The Funky Homosapien (Ages 16+) Dec 13 Barely Alive/ Virtual Riot (Ages 18+) Dec 15 Sahbabii/ T3/ 4orever (Ages 16+) Dec 16 Iamsu! (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

A scenic breakfast. . . That’s for shore! Served daily from 7:30am

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

CLASSIC SPECIALS

Good deals in the dining room, M-Th, lunch and dinner.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

James Murray Soulful Acoustic 6:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

11/29

THU

11/30

FRI

12/1

SAT

12/2

SUN

12/3

MON

12/4

Comedy Night 9p

12/5

Open Mic 7:30p

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

Spun 8p-12a

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Sambassa w/ Jeff Buenz & more 7:30-10:30p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

Hot Fuse 6:30p

Jesse Sabala Pro Jam 7-11p

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-9:30p

Sasha’s Money 7:30-11:30p

Bonedrivers 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Alex Lucero 7-11p

Yuji & Steve 7:30-10:30p

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Sherry Austin $15/$18 7:30p

WHALE CITY 490 Highway 1, Davenport

TUE

Open Mic w/ Steven David

Puffball Collective 6-9p

WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Rd, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Ziggy Tarr 6-8p

Willy Bacon 7:30-8:30p

ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Live Again 9:30p

Nomalakadoja & Soulwise 9:30p

Upcoming Shows DEC 02 Nomads & Nightingales DEC 03 Valerie June DEC 08 Justin Townes Earle DEC 09 December People DEC 13 Christopher Titus DEC 15 Miranda Sings SOLD OUT DEC 16 Richard Thompson DEC 24 Hope Church DEC 29-30 The White Album Ensemble JAN 11 JAN 20 JAN 30 JAN 31

Victor Wooten The Comic Strippers Eric Johnson Ladysmith Black Mambazo

FEB 04 Leo Kottke FEB 09 Bruce Cockburn FEB 17 Caravan of Glam FEB 22-25 Banff Mountain Film Festival FEB 27 David Rawlings

Ziggy Tarr 11a-1p

MAR 03 Journey Unauthorized MAR 10 Rob Bell APR 12 Jon Foreman APR 20 House of Floyd JUN 15 The Sammy Awards

^ƵŶĚĂLJ͕ĞĐĞŵďĞƌϯƌĚ ĂƚϳƉŵ ŽŶQuixote’s /Ŷƚ͘ DƵƐŝĐ ,Ăůů

Dec 2 19th Annual Monterey Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival 7:30pm

ΨϭϱĂƚŽŽƌ ͬ ΨϭϬ ǁŝƚŚ ĂƚůĞĂƐƚ ϱ ĐĂŶƐ ŽĨ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ĨŽŽĚŽƌƉĞƚĨŽŽĚ

Dec 12 A Holiday show with PINK MARTINI (featuring China Forbes) 8pm presented by (((folkYEAH!)))

ĞŶĞĨŝƚŝŶŐ^ĞĐŽŶĚ,ĂƌǀĞƐƚ &ŽŽĚ ĂŶŬ ĂŶĚ ^ĂŶƚĂƌƵnj ŽƵŶƚLJŶŝŵĂů^ŚĞůƚĞƌ

Jan 12 Lewis Black: The Joke’s On US Tour 8pm Mar 9 Chris Botti 8pm

^ƉĞĐŝĂůĂĐŽƵƐƚŝĐ ƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞƐďLJ͗

Apr 8 Arlo Guthrie 8pm Apr 20

Art Garfunkel: In Close-Up 2018 8pm

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽ͗ĚŽŶƋƵŝdžŽƚĞƐŵƵƐŝĐ͘ĐŽŵ

kpig.com

For Tickets www.GoldenStateTheatre.com 831-649-1070

Fri, Dec 8 7:30 pm • $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle Kuumbwa

Thur. Jan 4 7:30pm • $20 Adv./$20 Door Michael's on Main

Sun. Jan 7 7:30pm • $25 Gen. Adv./$40 Gold Circle Kummbwa

Celebration of Joni Mitchell w/Kimberly Ford

Sat. Jan. 13 7:30pm • $25 Gen. Adv./$40 Gold Circle Rio Theatre

john mc cutcheon

Gold Circle: Rio Theatre: first 8 rows (100 seats), Kuumbwa: First 3 rows including 2 seats each side (40 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included. Tickets: www.snazzyproductions.com or on the Snazzy tickets hotline 831.479.9421

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Nov 29 An Irish Christmas 8pm

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

51


FILM

WRITER’S STUDY Dan Stevens plays Charles Dickens in Les Standiford’s ‘Man Who Invented Christmas.’

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Holiday Cheer

52

Dickens facts vs. fiction in entertaining ‘Man Who Invented Christmas’ BY LISA JENSEN

H

ere’s the thing: I’m a Charles Dickens geek. A Christmas Carol is probably my favorite novel, for both the economy of its storytelling, and the scope of its story. I have an insatiable appetite for the Carol, and I’ve seen every version, good, bad, and ugly—from Alistair Sim and Bill Murray to Mr. Magoo and the Muppets. Still, glutton that I am for this Dickensian feast, you have to wonder how anyone could possibly find anything new to bring to the story. The answer is The Man Who Invented Christmas, a delightful fantasia on the writing of A Christmas Carol at a pivotal moment in the life of its author. It’s based on Les Standiford’s nonfiction book on

how Dickens, beset by financial and family worries, set out to write and publish a Christmas book in only six weeks. But dry facts are transformed into delicious fiction by scriptwriter Susan Coyne, who combines Dickens’ real life with the volatility of his active imagination—whose impudent characters keep overflowing into every other aspect of his life. Directed by Bharat Nalluri (Miss Pettigrew Lives For a Day), the movie begins in 1842, where Dickens (Dan Stevens) is treated like a rock star on a speaking tour of America. A year later, after three poorselling “flops,” he promises his anxious publishers he’ll produce a Christmas story in time for the

approaching holiday—although he hasn’t an idea in his head. With a new house to furnish and an ever-burgeoning family, Dickens roams the London streets in search of inspiration—an elderly waiter at the Garrick Club; beggars in the street. But it’s not until he overhears the young Irish nanny, Tara (winsome Anna Murphy), telling a spooky story to his children, that Dickens gets the idea for a ghost story set on Christmas Eve—as experienced by a greedy, covetous old sinner named Scrooge (Christopher Plummer), who calls the season “Humbug!” As the story takes shape in his head, Dickens’ characters come alive onscreen, haunting him like Scrooge’s

ghosts, occupying his study to egg him on, or criticize his story. Meanwhile, in the real world, his publishers reject the first stave of his story; Dickens angrily returns their check, pays to publish the installments, and hires illustrator Leech (Simon Callow) out of his own pocket—while desperately trying to finish the book. Coyne is the ideal translator of this material, well-versed in acting, writing and theater. (She created the hilarious cult Canadian TV series Slings and Arrows, about the tension between art and commerce in a modern Shakespearean theater company.) Her scenes of Dickens at work ring especially true. Every writer has experienced that moment: the idea has come, you’re just starting to commune with your characters, and boom! Somebody knocks on the door. The phone rings. Your story dissolves and you’re back in the real world. And Stevens is a master of the eye-rolling slow burn as Dickens, reacting to every interruption with teeth-gritting cordiality. He’s great as the physical embodiment of the writing process (which is generally not a spectator sport), stalking around his study, having animated conversations with characters only he (and we) can see. But what’s most interesting about Coyne’s interpretation—and it sneaks up on you amid the fun and frivolity—is the way Dickens himself is shown to have a dark side that also informs his work. Beneath his unfailingly polite and jovial exterior, he too has begun to forge a chain; it’s not yet as long as Scrooge’s, but redemption must be sought before he can move on. You don’t have to be an expert on the Carol, or Dickens’ oeuvre, to appreciate the sly gusto with which Coyne and company weave references to Dickens’ world and his work into the fabric of their film. Yet this is a highly original work of holiday cheer: witty, bracingly unsentimental (yet honestly moving), and hugely entertaining. THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS **** (out of four) With Dan Stevens, Christopher Plummer, and Jonathan Pryce. Written by Susan Coyne. Directed by Bharat Nalluri. A Bleecker Street release. Rated PG. 104 minutes.


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53


FILM NEW THIS WEEK THE DISASTER ARTIST There is no movie quite like Tommy Wiseau’s The Room— there’s a reason the book about it is titled The Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made. And there is no “auteur” like Wiseau, who has embraced his film’s cult status and artfully obscured the issue of whether the terrible acting and writing in the film were done on purpose. So it makes sense that there will probably be no “behind the scenes” film quite like The Disaster Artist, which fully embraces the legend of Wiseau’s clueless, fame-at-any-cost enthusiasm. (R) 103 minutes. (SP) SPECIAL SCREENINGS Royal Opera House’s staging of Christopher Wheeldon’s ballet based on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll shows one day only, on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

Clothing Jewelry Accessories Gifts Shoes

Locally Owned Since 1972 Santa Cruz • (831) 423-3349 • 1224 Pacific Ave

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Capitola • (831) 476-6109 • 504C Bay Ave

54

Visit us on Facebook

CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https:// groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS The bad moms are back, and because they have to check all the boxes of movie clichés, this sequel sees Mila Kunis et al. get a visit from their bad moms. FYI, Daddy’s Home 2 comes out next week with exactly the same gimmick. Curse you, Meet the Parents, for creating the idea that if you can’t think of a good idea for a dysfunctional-family comedy sequel, you can just stunt-cast the parents instead. Jon Lucas and Scott Moore direct. Susan Sarandon, Cheryl Hines and Christine Baranski co-star as the bad grandmoms. (R) 104 minutes. (SP) COCO Prepare for kids everywhere to go Day-of-the-Dead crazy with the release of this much-anticipated Pixar film about a boy named Coco whose family secrets and dreams of becoming a musician lead him to the Land of the Dead. Lee Unkrich directs. Featuring the voices of Benjamin Bratt, Anthony Gonzalez and Gael Garcia Bernal. (PG-13) 109 minutes. DADDY’S HOME 2 Somebody out there must have been really naughty this year if Santa thought moviegoers deserved both Daddy’s Home 2 and A Bad Moms

Christmas this holiday season. They are, of course, essentially the same movie, this time bringing in dads of the first movie’s dads (instead of moms of the first movie’s moms) to try to milk a second film out of a dumb premise. Mel Gibson and John Lithgow join original feuding dads Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell. Sean Anders directs. John Cena, Linda Cardellini and Hannibal Buress costar. (PG-13) 100 minutes. GEOSTORM What would be amazing is if all the scientists in this global disaster movie were like, “Oh no, here comes a GEOSTORM!” And then a 1993 Isuzu Geo Storm drives up, and everybody goes, “Aw, actually it’s so cute, why did we stop making them?” I emailed the producers of Geostorm like 1000 times about my idea, but they still wouldn’t let me write this movie. Sad! Dean Devlin directs. Gerard Butler, Abbie Cornish and Ed Harris star. (PG13) 110 minutes. (SP) HAPPY DEATH DAY Whether or not you have any interest in this horror take on Groundhog Day—a teen keeps reliving the day she dies over and over until she can figure out who her killer is—I think we can all agree it’s a lock for worst title of the year. Christopher Landon directs. Jessica Rothe, Israel Broussard and Ruby Modine star. (PG13) 96 minutes. (SP) JANE This documentary about legendary primatologist Jane Goodall draws on over 100 hours of footage taken by Dutch filmmaker Hugo van Lawick, who was sent to film her at work in 1964, and ended up falling in love with and marrying her. Lawick’s footage had been stored away in the National Geographic archives and forgotten about for more than half a century, and along with new interviews of Goodall, brings some close-up insight into her celebrated life and work. Brett Morgan directs. (Not Rated) 90 minutes. JIGSAW When asked about their approach to making a Saw film in 2017, the directors of this movie summed it as … “Saw for 2017.” Whoa, insightful! Don’t look now, but Get Out was also “Get Out for 2017” and Suburbicon is “Suburbicon for 2017.” For future reference, citing the year that you are making a new movie for a long-dead franchise that hadn’t even been good since its original entry in 2004 is not the same as justifying the existence of that movie. Even the Jigsaw Killer himself has officially been dead for 10 years within the universe of these movies, so who knows where they’re going with this. Directed by Michael and Peter Spierig. Starring Tobin Bell, Matt

Passmore and Callum Keith Rennie. (R) 92 minutes. (SP) JUSTICE LEAGUE For those tricked into going to Suicide Squad because it seemed like all those top comics characters in one movie couldn’t go wrong, this follow-up DC team flick may be a case of “fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice—hey, is that Aquaman? Whoa, Wonder Woman’s in this too, she’s cool! I thought Ben Affleck said he was never going to play Batman again, or something? Hey, how did I end up in this seat?” Zack Snyder directs. Affleck, Gal Gadot, Amy Adams, Jason Momoa and Robin Wright co-star. (PG-13) 121 minutes. (SP) LADY BIRD With Lady Bird, writer-director Greta Gerwig delivers a wry but warmhearted portrait of family, home, and dreams in modern America. The family in question is not dysfunctional in any clichéd movie comedy way, but Gerwig captures the gulf of potential calamity in the fractious relationship between a high-school senior (Saoirse Ronan) and her loving, but harried mom (Laurie Metcalf). As in most motherdaughter relationships, one false move or the wrong word might set either one of them off as they try to navigate the minefield of what they think or feel, and their ability (or not) to express it. Odeya Rush and Jake McDorman co-star. (R) 93 minutes. LAST FLAG FLYING Writer-director Richard Linklater’s latest stars Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston and Laurence Fishburne as three Vietnam War buddies who reunite for a much different kind of mission: a road trip after the death of one of their sons in Iraq. Deanna Reed-Foster and Yul Vazquez costar. (R) 124 minutes. THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS Reviewed this issue. Bharat Nalluri directs. Dan Stevens and Jonathan Pryce co-star. (PG) 104 minutes. MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS It’s got to be tricky adapting one of the world’s most famous whodunit novels, almost a 100 years after its release—mainly because a lot of people already know whodunit. Especially since Agatha Christie’s 1934 book has been adapted for film, TV and even video games many times. Still, director Kenneth Branagh (who also stars as Christie’s detective Hercule Poirot) is here to give it his best shot, with an all-star cast and a stylish modern look. Co-starring Johnny Depp, Judi Dench, Willem Dafoe, Penelope Cruz and Michelle Pfeiffer. (PG-13) 114 >56 minutes.


SantaCruzGives.org November 15 – December 31

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

The new way of giving. 33 local nonprofits. Contribute with confidence. It’s easy to do.

55


FILM

Give Your Children What They Really Want – You! Make Music Together and precious memories with them that will last a lifetime.

musicalme.com • (831) 438-3514

DEAD SPACE ‘Coco’ is Pixar’s deep dive into Day of the Dead and other Mexican traditions.

Gift Certificates Available

<54

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

THE STAR The nativity story gets re-told as B-movie children’s animation, with talking animals stumbling upon the manger. Something tells me you’re gonna wish it was a silent night. Timothy Reckart directs. With the voices of Zachary Levi, Christopher Plummer and Kristin Chenoweth.

56

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE The good news is that this story of U.S. soldiers trying to readjust to civilian life after serving in Iraq is based on David Finkel’s book—the best look at PTSD in recent memory. The perhaps-not-so-good news is that it’s the directorial debut of Jason Hall (who also penned the script), best known for writing bad movies like Spread and Paranoia before getting an Academy Award nomination for his disturbingly glowing portrait of a bloodthirsty “patriot” in American Sniper. Miles Teller and Haley Bennett star. (R) 108 minutes. (SP) THOR: RAGNAROK Okay, it’s less about the gods of classical Norse Mythology than the Marvel Comics pantheon, but only a real killjoy would fail to get a kick out of this third installment of the Thor series. Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston continue to have way too much fun with the prickly relationship between heroic Thor, God of Thunder, and sly, acerbic half-brother Loki,

deliciously untrustworthy Trickster God. But — surprise! This time Hemsworth gets most of the laughs. It's all directed with a droll, light touch by Taika Waititi, who give his adroit cast plenty of room to maneuver. Jeff Goldblum brings priceless eccentricity to his role as Grand Master, presiding over a combat arena in some distant world. Tessa Thompson struts around with brio as the last survivor of the Valkyrie sisterhood, and Mark Ruffalo proves himself the best screen Hulk ever in the comic timidity he brings to brainy science nerd Bruce Banner before hulking out into his colossal alter-ego. Oh, and that’s Cate Blanchett in a black Vampira wig as Hela, Goddess of Death. (PG-13) 130 minutes. (LJ) THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Frances McDormand plays the anti-Marge Gunderson in this film from the writer-director of In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths. When the police in her town can’t find the person responsible for her daughter’s murder, McDormand’s Mildred Hayes unleashes her anger via roadside billboards, getting herself into a feud with the chief of police (Woody Harrelson), things escalate quickly. Directed by Martin McDonagh. Co-starring Sam Rockwell, Abbie Cornish and Peter Dinklage. (R) 115 minutes.

TYLER PERRY’S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN Spike Lee once criticized Tyler Perry’s work for the tired, negative stereotypes of African Americans that he continues to peddle to great success. Perry responded with the carefully crafted counterpoint that Lee should “shut the hell up.” Whoever you’ve got in that fight, this sequel to Perry’s god-awful Halloween film last year is unlikely to change your mind. Judging from the trailer, this movie seems to rely on the same overdone, bottomof-the-barrel horror-parody cliches as the last one. So who should be more offended—African Americans or horror movie fans? Probably African American horror movie fans, I guess. Perry directs and stars. (PG-13) (SP) WONDER I was just listening to the Movie Crush podcast, and comedian Tig Notaro was talking about how much she loves the Peter Bogdanovich movie Mask. (Not the one with green Jim Carrey. The ’80s one where Cher was the mom of the kid with a deformed skull, who you couldn’t tell it was Eric Stoltz.) I remember thinking, “Someone loves Mask? Now I’ve heard everything!” Which is just a figure of speech. But anyway, I have a feeling Tig is going to love this movie, too, because it’s basically Mask for the 21st century, with Julia Roberts as the mom and Jacob Tremblay as a fifthgrader with a facial disfigurement. Stephen Chbosky directs. Owen Wilson and Mandy Patinkin co-star. (PG) 113 minutes.


80th

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Menu is available Nov 29, 2017

APPETIZERS

CLAM CHOWDERS

Shrimp Cocktail small 2.95 New England Cup Crab Cocktail small 5.95 Bowl Oysters on the half shell (6) 4.95

SANDWICHES

2.80 3.80

SEAFOOD LOUIE

Shrimp Louie 7.95 Shrimp Sandwich 8.00 Crab Louie 9.95 Crab Sandwich 8.00 Side Salad 1.95 Fish Sandwich 8.00 DEEP FRIED French Fries, Rice, Cole Slaw Fish & Chips 8.00 GRILLED Prawns 8.00 Petrale Sole 8.00 Calamari 8.00 Pacific Snapper 8.00 French Fries, Rice, Cole Slaw Ling Cod 8.00 CHARBROILED Vegetables, and your choice Salmon Fillet 8.00 of rice or fries (or baked Sea Bass 8.00 potato after 4 p.m.) Vegetables, and your SHELL FISH choice of rice or fries (or baked Steamed Black Mussels 8.00 potato after 4 p.m.) Steamed Clams 8.00

2017

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Located on the Santa Cruz Wharf

(831) 423-2180 | Open daily from noon

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

DRINKS & DESSERTS

Coffee, hot tea, sodas and iced tea 1.00 Ice Cream 1.00

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FOOD & DRINK gifted with a huge bounty from the nonstop persimmon harvest that struck Santa Cruz last week. Every yard seemed to glow with the gorgeous heart-shaped Hachiya fruit, dripping from trees whose very leaves echoed the vermillion hue. Seriously, the persimmon has to be the most beautiful fruit. My sweetie painted many oil portraits of the harvest that graced our table this month. My friend Dee is so passionate about persimmons that she freezes the pulp and dries the fruit so that she can both snack on and bake with persimmons all year long. Here’s to the persimmon!

WINE OF THE WEEK

BIRICHINO REDUX Alex Krause (left) and John Locke, co-owners of Birichino Winery on Church Street, pause in the midst of

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

their final renovations, which will continue through the month. PHOTO: CHRISTINA WATERS

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Birichino Rising Birichino Winery Tasting Room now open, plus gorgeous persimmons ready for the picking BY CHRISTINA WATERS

A

n antique mirror in elaborate gold frame, circa 1880, approximately 12 feet high, holds its dramatic own at the far corner of the new Birichino Winery Tasting Room, a study in 19th century Wild West avant garde decor. Forest green wall treatment flatters the curved mahogany heartwood bar bordered with rare pewter trim. A Buddha perches next to a

vintage hand-tinted oval portrait, and sophisticated spherical light fixtures are suspended from the pressed tin ceiling. An astonishing retro flourish—with plenty of postmodern wit—in which to celebrate, pour, taste, and enjoy the vibrant line of Birichino wines. At long last the tasting room is now open—still a work-inprogress, mind you—but open to help nudge us toward the holidays. Congratulations to Alex Krause

and John Locke. 204 Church St. in downtown Santa Cruz. 425-4811, birichino.com.

PERSIMMON HARVEST No one told me that persimmons were extraterrestrial. But clearly they are, as I discovered when I began making persimmon pudding cake last week. My hands were quickly covered with gleaming, gelatinous orange goo, and I flashed back to the latex monster of the scifi classic Alien. I had found myself

The structurally robust and aromatically appealing Tempranillo Pierce Ranch 2013 from the hand of Santa Cruz Mountain Vineyard’s winemaker Jeff Emery. Offered for close to $20 under Emery’s Quinta Cruz label, the ambidextrous red wine partners memorably with chile verde or highly seasoned curries, as with meals of salmon and quinoa, or—yes—a juicy cheeseburger. Recently elevated in our hearts and tastebuds to new status as our house red, this lovely wine yields an aromatic middle bandwidth of dark berries, bay leaves and anise. Perfect for the briskets of Hannukah or any other meal that requires a sturdy, distinguished red wine. At Shopper’s.

SURPRISE APPETIZER OF THE WEEK

Sometimes you win and sometimes you don’t when ordering an unknown dish on a menu. This time we won! The place was Ambrosia India Bistro in Scotts Valley, the dish was a global creation of crisp samosa, stuffed with potatoes and peas, plus fresh avocados. It’s called Samosa Avocado Chat—who could resist? and it arrived in a large square dish with the above ingredients covered thickly with a blanket of yogurt spiced with mint and tamarind. Cool yogurt, intriguing spices, and the warm crisp samosa accompanied by fat slabs of ripe avocado. Easily enough for an entree, this bold appetizer gave us flavor thrills and unexpected ingredients—a lot for $6.50. ambrosiaib.com.


Lunch

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

Cocktail Hour

4:30pm to 6:00pm Tuesday through Saturday $5-8 Bar Bites | $6 Wine $8 Cocktails | $8 Whiskey w/ Draft Beer

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LUNCH & DINNER

B o th L o cati o n s O p en E ver y Day Sept 1 East End will start serving brunch starting at 10:30 sat and sun

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HANDCRAFTED FOOD, BEER & WINE

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ON TAP

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Get Your Cheer On! Eight German Beers on Tap

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TYROLEAN INN 9600 Hwy 9 - Ben Lomond (831) 336-5188

PINCH YOURSELF After a disappointing 2016-2017 season, local Dungeness

crab is abundantly available now through the spring.

PHOTO: TALLULA PRESTON

Snap Judgment Dungeness crab season has arrived, and it’s looking good BY LILY STOICHEFF

T

JOIN US FOR BRUNCH!

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

-SAT & SUN, 10AM-3PM-

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FEATURING CHEF PIERRE MANGÉ’S CREATIVE TWIST ON A CLASSIC BRUNCH, CAT & CLOUD COFFEE, AND BEER COCKTAILS — ALL ON OUR SUNNY BEER DECK! 233 Cathcart St. Downtown Santa Cruz

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wo days after the official opening of Dungeness crab season, I found myself happily squished around a table in my friend’s living room with a dozen other guests, reaching for my umpteenth crab leg from a large silver bowl. Using a metal cracker, I shattered the rust-colored shell to reveal the cream-colored meat, and gently pulled a soft chunk free, drawing it through spicy harissa aioli before bringing it to my lips. Like many Californians, I know this taste well. Dungeness crab is one of winter’s culinary delights, and after a dismal and brief 20162017 season in which toxic levels of domoic acid made the crabs unsafe to eat, the opening of the commercial crab season on Wednesday, Nov. 15 was eagerly anticipated by many. My friend and accomplished home cook Tallula Preston was among them and wasted no time in inviting me and a few other lucky friends over for a crab boil. Fresh crab truly is a cause for celebration, and the communal hands-on cracking and peeling creates a festive atmosphere. If you have the means, I highly recommend gathering your “framily” together to welcome

back our West Coast crustacean. Commercial crab season is open until June 30 next year, but the best crabs are available in winter. Dungeness crab is native and abundant in the area, and the Monterey Bay Seafood Watch rates pot-caught crab a “Good Alternative.” H&H Fish Co. in the Santa Cruz Harbor, Reel Good Fish in Moss Landing, Stagnaro Bros. on the Wharf, and Fish Lady in Soquel all purchase crab from local fishermen, as do most of the local markets. As guests tore into the seasonal treat, an attending East Coaster posed the question of which was better—Atlantic blue crab, lobster or Pacific Dungeness. Most quickly decided there was no contest. For Preston, as for many other locals, it’s personal: “I love seafood, and to me, crab is our seafood here in the Bay Area and the Central Coast,” she says. “Dungeness crab is one of the best things in the world, and we live in a place where it’s so plentiful. In my family, it’s always been our tradition to eat it around Thanksgiving and Christmas. As much as I love lobster, it’s not my home crustacean.”


Celebrate the Holidays

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Sunday & Monday’s $11.95 Baby Back Ribs (5pm) Tuesday’s $13.95 Local’s Favorites (5pm) Wednesday’s $15.95 Live Maine Lobster (5pm) Friday’s $15.95 Prime Rib (5pm) Saturday & Sunday (breakfast) $3 Mimosa’s M-F 11am-9:30 pm, Sat-Sun 8am-10pm | 106 Beach St. at the Santa Cruz Wharf

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GLUTEN FREE crusts available on all pizzas

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12 - 5 Sat -Sun The Winery on Silver Mountain dr, off San Jose - Soquel rd & Miller Cut off, open Saturday 12-5

VINE TIME

h Passion or Quality ilver Mountain Wine

n organic and sustainable Fine Winos since 1979. Officiel the Santa Cruz Symphony.

info@silvermtn.com

ilvermtn.com

A leader in organic and sustainable practices. Fine Wines since 1979. Official Wynery of the Santa Cruz Symphony.

A leader in organic and sustainable practices. Fine Wines since 1979. Officiel Winers of the Santa Cruz Symphony.

In Santa Cruz 402 Ingalls Street 3 -7 Fri, 12 - 5 Sat -Sun The Winery on Silver Mountain dr, off San Jose Soquel rd & Miller Cut off, open Saturday 12-5

420 HAMES RD. CORRALITOS silvermtn.com 831.728.5172 | ALFAROWINE.COM 408-353-2278

info@silvermtn.com

In Santa Cruz 402 Ingalls Street 3 -7 Fri, 12 - 5 Sat -Sun The Winery on Silver Mountain Dr, Off San Jose Soquel Rd & Miller Cut Off, open Saturday 12-5

408-353-2278 info@silvermtn.com

silvermtn.com

HOLIDAY CASE SPECIALS SAVE 33%

TOP-FLIGHT TASTING Winemaker Mark Hoover of Integrity Winery will be at Deer Park Wine & Spirits in Aptos on Friday, Dec. 8.

Handcrafted in the Santa Cruz Mountains

Mon-Wed-Thurs 2-6 Fri-Sat-Sun 1-6 Closed Tues 334-C Ingalls Street • Santa Cruz www.equinoxwine.com • 831.471.8608

1100 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz (831) 818-9075 Now Offering Open Fridays 2-9 Saturdays 2-7 Cheese Plates Sundays 12-5 stockwellcellars.com

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

DRINK

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VINE & DINE

Live with Passion Thirst for Quality Enjoy Silver Mountain Wine

WINE TASTING Live with Passion SATURDAYS ALL YEAR Thirst for Quality SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER Enjoy Silver Mountain Wine

ruz 402 Ingalls Street 2 - 5 Sat -Sun y on Silver Mountain dr, off - Soquel rd & Miller Cut off, urday 12-5

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94 pts Wine Enthusiast - November 2016 Editors’ Choice BEST PINOT NOIR of REGION - California State Fair 2016

S torrS

Visit our Tasting Room, Open DAILY, 12 - 5 p.m. 303 Potrero Street in the Old Sash Mill, Santa Cruz 831.458.5030 • storrswine.com

A Riesling 2016 to pair with Indian or Asian cuisines BY JOSIE COWDEN

W

hen you taste a superb Riesling, such as the one made by the newly opened www.silvermtn.com Integrity Wines, it’s as if the clouds parted and delicious nectar rained down. Integrity’s Riesling impressed Live with Passion Thirst for Quality me greatly when I tried it at a food Enjoy Silver Mountain Wine and wine event in October. A leader in organic and Riesling can be a bit of a black sustainable practices. Fine Winos since 1979. Officiel Winers of the sheep—and its reputation got rather Santa Cruz Symphony. ruined some time ago with lots of tawdry stuff on the market, but this one made by winery owner Mark In Santa Cruz 402 Ingalls Street 3 -7 Fri, 12 - 5 Sat -Sun The Winery on Silver Mountain dr, off San Jose - Soquelof rd &the best Rieslings I Hoover is one Miller Cut off, open Saturday 12-5 have tasted in a long time. I contacted info@silvermtn.com 408-353-2278 Hoover and he tells me that his wines have just gone into Deer Park Wine & Spirits—a top-flight liquor store in Aptos which holds wine-tasting events with guest winemakers— usually for around $3. From 4-7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8 the winemaker will be Mark Hoover of Integrity. Grapes for this 2016 Riesling ($20) were harvested from Santa Lucia Highlands, and the beautiful flavors and aromas result from two different pickings. “During fermentation,” says Hoover, “both lots gave off an amazingly Jolly Rancher apple candy aroma, and I was worried I had screwed

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Integrity Wines the wine up. Fortunately, that aroma gave way to a much more complex set of aromas which we get to enjoy.” Rieslings can be rather sweet, but that sweetness means it pairs well with spicy food such as Indian or Asian. But for me, this honeysuckle beauty is perfect just by itself. Integrity Wines, 135 Aviation Way, Suite 16, Watsonville. 322-4200. Tasting room is open Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE ON THE SUMMIT Celebrate the holidays at Burrell School, Loma Prieta and Wrights Station wineries—complete with live music, food vendors, wine specials and artsy crafts. Fashions by Lula Roe, Shelley’s Biscotti and live music at Burrell School. At Loma Prieta Winery, there will be light complimentary appetizers, a chance to taste a vertical trio of Karma Vineyard Pinotage, and a free reindeer cork ornament with any three-bottle purchase. At Wrights Station, enjoy holiday jazz by Bob Burnett, along with food and vendors. The festive event is from noon to 5 p.m. on Dec. 9 and 10.


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Sun. Night

"LOCALS NIGHT"

Mon. Night

"GARY'S RIB NIGHT"

Tues. Night "ITALIAN NIGHT"

Weds. Night "SURF AND TURF"

Thurs. Night "DATE NIGHT"

H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES MERCURY RETROGRADE, ADVENT AND FULL MOON Esoteric Astrology as news for week of Nov. 29, 2017

Around midnight Saturday night/Sunday morning, Mercury turns retrograde (Sagittarius, 29 degrees) moving back to 13 degrees by Dec. 22. It’s best to purchase all holiday gifts (sending cards early, too) prior to the 22nd. Something seems to happen to gifts purchased (everything, actually) during retrograde times. The items become empty, unrecognized and not useful. Notice if this occurs. Sunday is the Full Oak Moon/Sagittarius solar festival (12 degrees). The New Group of World Servers recites the keynote for Sag, “We see the goal, we reach that goal, and then we see the next goal.” We recite the Great Invocation (Mantram of Direction for Humanity), too, radiating the Will-to-Good which becomes Goodwill within humanity everywhere.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

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Fill’er up!

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It’s possible you will review something from the past that was a deep loss—a person, resource, marriage, an intimacy. Review this loss and turn it around. Make it a gift, a power received, something of great value to you. Review all desires and aspirations. Do you know the difference? Ask everyone around what they value in you. You will learn new things.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

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garden environments, you realize you’ve come to love and appreciate and value all of them. They offer a specific calmness and orderliness that you need. They soothe your spirit and provide your life with daily context. They relieve anxiety. You realize you’ve had this all along, since birth. The change has occurred within. Have gratitude for the past. It built your present.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

You must ponder upon new, different, more inclusive ways of communicating. You realize it’s important to listen with curiosity, asking questions (instead of solving problems) when others speak. With deep listening, great insights occur for both listener and speaker. Search for ways to have more trust. Then you can reveal the deep hidden truths about yourself without fear.

Over the next several weeks and a bit beyond you assess your self-image. Not what others think of you but what you think of yourself. And then you begin to create a new image. No longer an outer persona, but one more in depth presented to the world. You no longer need to veil, arm or protect a self-image that’s no longer real. You are more and more authentic. There’s nothing to lose, nothing to gain. You’re the Buddha on the road.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Care for your health in all ways, from morning till night. Make this your priority. Begin with morning exercise before eating. Move onto green smoothies (almond milk, kale, chard, lemon, beets, parsley, apple, pear, spirulina, chaga, barley grass powder). Make cilantro pesto. Eat an avocado a day. Something, both dissolving and refining, occurs with work. Seek to understand a partner’s sorrows. Listen and observe. Maintain quiet.

Sorrows and sadness from the past seek a new state of gladness to replace them. All thoughts begin to be clothed in compassion. There’s no longer the question of why. There’s only the feeling of goodness, that life’s precious and paradox is acceptable. You will walk through a door in the next several weeks. You will open that door and then shut it behind you. You will see a mountain with an ascending light. You glimpse of your life ahead. Get good shoes.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

These are NO wimpy burgers!

Sunday is also the first Sunday of Advent (Latin for “something’s coming.”) Advent wreaths are made which mark the week until Winter Solstice, (new light, birth of the Holy Child in Bethlehem). Advent wreaths (evergreens) have five candles—four violet and one rose candle in the circle with one white candle in the center (lighted Christmas morning). Each Sunday night a new candle is lit, until Christmas when all four candles are lit. Advent wreaths are art forms. Children especially love them. They prepare our hearts to watch and wait. The dark is set aflame. Many photos, ideas, etc. on making advent wreaths can be found on Pinterest and familyholiday.net.

You will consider what in the past brought you joy, what helped you be creative, and what you were enthusiastic about. You will realize you’ve become more than you thought you would be. Non-verbal ways of expressing yourself are appropriate now. Spend most of your time in gardens, museums, places with art, creativity and beauty. Explore all of nature and what it means to be your natural self.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 You may see family and friends from the past, perhaps from childhood. Family may seek to include you in celebrations, attempting to relive their past, which you have set aside. You remember younger years, when you were free and wandering, when the light you lived under came only from the firelight, sun and stars. Impressions from the past seek new interpretations. Plant blue morning glories inside and outside the home.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 Over and over the same thoughts and ideas circulate through your mind. You want to discover all aspects of a puzzle, attempting to put it together. Thoughts come to mind but you are unable to articulate many of them. In this unusual silence, your eyes see more than ever before. It’s as if your senses shifted. As one sings, the other doesn’t. Seek to understand everyone’s truths. Let them stand equally with your truths.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22 When you look around at your living and working and

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 During this retrograde time, be very aware of new insights, new revelations and new understanding appearing quietly and subtly. All previous experiences, especially sadness, coalesce into new states of knowledge. An old friend makes contact; strange twists and turns of relationships begin to ease. Defeat becomes triumph. Speak your mind with truth at all times. Allow others to adapt to you. Frustration turns to opportunity. Art calls.

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 You don’t allow any glamorous nonsense to be in your life. Everything seems to be changing every moment. This will continue. You will seek stability wherever you find it. New revelations occur. New thinking. Use all of these in your work, present them to the world, allow others to respond and exteriorize whatever is in them. You know your path. It’s always the surprising unusual view. Community calls.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Up till now you’ve had a firm grasp of what you want in your future. This is and will change in the coming months. You will accept where you are and the situations you’re in. An old dilemma becomes a great Truth. A philosophy is differently interpreted and you cherish it like a golden apple, a golden coin. Old friends drop away seeking a different path. Your work expands. You build within the crystal square.


Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF MATTHEW SCOTT LADAGE CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV02708. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner MATTHEW SCOTT LADAGE has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: MATTHEW SCOTT LADAGE to: MATTHEW SCOTT SABA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 11, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 10

located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Oct. 19, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 11, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 10 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Oct. 19, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: KAIDEN TANIOS SABA to: KAIDEN TANIOS SABA . THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 11, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 10 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition.

hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 13, 2017 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Oct. 30, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

Dated: Oct. 19, 2017. Denine J. Guy, Judge of the Superior Court. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Oct. 30, 2017. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

DONALD JAMES MCVAY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/31/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Oct. 31, 2017. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29.

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CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF KAIDEN TANIOS SABA CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV02708. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner KAIDEN TANIOS SABA has filed a Petition for

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1796 The following Married Couple is doing business as BOXER REVIVAL, PLAMWERKS. 125 HANGAR WAY SUITE 170, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. EDWARD JOHANNES PLAM & JAMIE JOANGELEE PLAM. 125 HANGAR WAY SUITE, WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by a Married Couple signed: JAMIE JOANGELEE PLAM. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1745 The following Individual is doing business as HOLIDAY LIGHTING COMPANY. 343 SUMMIT DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. KEVIN DEBOER. 343 SUMMIT DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: KEVIN DEBOER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Oct. 20, 2017. Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1800 The following Individual is doing business as MCVAY & CO. 1317 ESCALONA DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. DONALD JAMES MCVAY. 1317 ESCALONA DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1828 The following Corporation is doing business as HERBAL CRUZ OF SANTA CRUZ. 1051 41ST AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. NORTHEASTERN MANAGEMENT, INC. 1051 41ST AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. Al# 3631063. This business is conducted by a Corporation signed: NORTHEASTERN MANAGEMENT, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/1/2014. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 3, 2017. Nov.15, 22, 29 & Dec. 6. ]FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1807

CAREER CONSULTATION LOCAL EXPERTS

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831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ PETITION OF MELANIE MARIE CROSS CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV02708. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner MELANIE MARIE CROSS has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: MELANIE MARIE CROSS to: MELANIE DAVISSABA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF ARIEF MAGNUS PRABU CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.17CV02751. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner ARIEF MAGNUS PRABU has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: ARIEF MAGNUS PRABU to: MAGNUS ARIEF PRABU. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a

65


real estate PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as SMART METER GUARD. 4581 OPAL CLIFF DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. SAFETY FIRST SHIELDS, LLC. 4581 OPAL CLIFF DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. AI# 21510271. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: SAFETY FIRST SHIELDS, LLC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 1, 2017. Nov. 15, 22, 29, & Dec. 6.

66

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF IDAHO, FOR THE COUNTY OF KOOTENAI. PETITION OF LACY REBECCA WHITEHEAD CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.CV17-8178. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner LACY REBECCA WHITEHEAD has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of

this court for an order changing the applicants name from: LACY REBECCA WHITEHEAD to: LACY REBECCA HUNT. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 11, 2017 at 1:30 am, located at District Court of Idaho, 451 Government Way, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in

Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Oct. 27, 2017. Jim Brannon, Clerk of the District Court. Nov. 15, 22, 29 & Dec. 6. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1852 The following Individual is doing business as JOHNNY MOSES STORYTELLING. 200 E. LOMOND ST., BOULDER CREEK, CA 95006. County of Santa Cruz. JOHNNY MOSES. 200 E. LOMOND ST., BOULDER CREEK, CA 95006. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JOHNNY MOSES. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/9/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 9, 2017. Nov. 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17- 1861. The following General Partnership is doing

business as MERMAID MAFIA TRI CLUB. 138 FARALLON CT, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. MELANI AMARIS & CHRISTINE MATHENY. 138 FARALLON CT, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: CHRISTINE MATHENY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/9/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 13, 2017. Nov. 22, 29, & Dec. 6, 13. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1880 The following Individual is doing business as COMPASS CAD. 442 MONTEREY DRIVE, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. VERONICA HOOVER. 442 MONTEREY DRIVE, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: VERONICA HOOVER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name

Good Times Helps Businesses Grow! “Through the years, we have found the GOOD TIMES consistently delivers the best results for our marketing budget of any local paper, making it one of our primary go-to sources for local print advertising.” Datta Khalsa, Broker/Owner, Main Street Realtors

1101 Pacific Avenue Suite 320, Santa Cruz, CA 95060

831.458.1100

listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 16, 2017. Nov. 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1768 The following Individual is doing business as BURROS BUILDING. 230 8TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ALAN BURROS. 230 8TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ALAN BURROS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Oct. 26, 2017. Nov. 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1815 The following Individual is doing business as NUT KREATIONS. 104 LINCOLN STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. STEPHEN PATRICK VERUTTI. 104 LINCOLN STREET, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business

is conducted by an Individual signed: STEPHEN PATRICK VERUTTI. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/2/2017. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 2, 2017. Nov. 29, & Dec. 6, 13, 20. The following Individual is FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 17-1887 doing business as SHOWTIME PIZZERIA. 7960 SOQUEL DR, APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. VENTURA LUNA.7960 SOQUEL DR, APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: VENTURA LUNA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Nov. 20, 2017. Nov. 29 & Dec. 6, 13, 20.

FOR SALE “FOR SALE BY OWNER” 8 YR. old manufactured home 2 bed 1 bath, very clean, low rent all age park, walk to Soquel High. Priced: $324,999.00 Please call if interested (831) 462- 2229

GARDENING Happy Gardens Rototilling (831) 234-4341

HELP WANTED Direct Care Full and part time positions working with intellectually challenged adults. $500 hiring bonus! Training provided. Call (831) 475-0888, M - F 9 am - 3 pm. Program Director Want to make a lasting impact in our community? Community Bridges is hiring a Program Director for our Family Resource Collective. 40 hr/wk, exempt position; to apply please visit www. communitybridges.org/employment or contact Sergio Velazquez at 831-688-8840 x200. Future Motion Inc seeks candidates for the following position in Santa Cruz, CA: Director of Operations (Job ID F419). MS in CS, EE or rel field + 6 mos exp. In electromech manuf req’d. To apply, mail resume to 2881 Mission St., Santa Cruz, CA 95050 and ref Job ID. EOE. Principals only.

MASSAGE A*wonderful*Touch. Relaxing, Therapeutic, Light to Deep Swedish Massage for Men. Peaceful environment. 14 yrs. Exp. Days/Early PM. Jeff (831) 332-8594. Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail. com.

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All Adults 21+ Welcome This January

These brownies contain NO cannabis.

5mg

2hrs Use a Low Dose 5 to 10 mg of THC

Be Patient

Don’t Drive

Expect to Wait Two Hours Before Feeling Effects

Eating THC will impair your driving

Don’t Mix with Alcohol

Keep Away from KIds

Combining Edibles and Alcohol Isn’t Recommended

Lock Up Your Cannabis Products

For more tips on responsible adult use of cannabis edibles, go to kindpeoples.org/cannabissafety 3600 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz (831) 471-8562 8am – 10pm

Two Locations Open Daily

140 Dubois St, Suite C, Santa Cruz (831) 424-6200 11am – 7pm

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 5, 2017

Start With A Low Dose

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 78 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 12/5/17

GROCERY

BUTCHER SHOP

WINE & FOOD PAIRING PAN-SEARED NEW YORK STEAK

BEEF

INGREDIENTS

■ TRI TIPS, U.S.D.A Choice/ 6.98 Lb

■ NEW YORK STEAK, U.S.D.A Choice/ 12.98 Lb

■ HOT ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 5.98 Lb

■ BECKMANN’S, California Sour Loaf, 24oz/ 3.49

PRODUCE Organic: Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organic ■ RED YAMS, Premium Quality/ 1.49 Lb ■ GREEN BEANS,

■ CANARD DUCHENE, Authentic Brut Privilege,

(92WS, Reg 44.99)/ 29.99 (Reg 39.99)/ 29.99

■ GOLDEN SHEAF, Ciabatta Loaf, 24oz/ 3.89

Incredible Reds ■ 2012 ESTANCIA, Pinot Noir, Reserve, (Reg 29.99)/ 12.99

■ 2014 ROTHCHILD, Bordeaux, (Reg 21.99)/ 11.99 ■ 2011 DECUGNANO ROSSO, (Reg 26.99)/ 14.99 ■ 2007 OLIVIERO TOSCANI, Toscana,

■ TRUE STORY BEEF HOT DOGS, 12oz/ 6.99

(Reg 45.99)/ 14.99

Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz

Chilean Red Wines

■ WISCONSIN SHARP, “rBST Free”

■ 2015 LOS VASCOS, Cabernet Sauvignon,

Loaf Cuts/ 5.09 Lb Average Cuts/ 5.49 Lb

(92JS)/ 9.99

■ ENGLISH COTSWALD,

Great as a Side Dish/ 1.99 Lb ■ CRANBERRIES, Top Quality/ 1.99 Ea ■ CELERY, Fresh and Crisp/ 1.49 Ea ■ RUSSET POTATOES, Peak Quality/ .59 Lb

WINE PAIRING J. LOHR SEVEN OAKS CABERNET SAUVIGNON

■ AVOCADOS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ 1.49 Ea

SHOP PER S POTLIG HT

■ KELLY’S, Sweet Baguette, 8oz/ 2.19

■ BELGIOIOSO BARRATA, 8oz/ 5.99

CALIFORNIA-FRESH, Blemish–free, Local/

■ YELLOW ONIONS,

■ 2012 SANTA EMA, Cabernet Sauvignon,

“ A Customer Favorite”/ 12.99 Lb

(92JS)/ 13.99

■ WEXFORD MATURE IRISH CHEDDAR,

■ 2012 MONTES ALPHA, Syrah,

■ ITALIAN PECORINO ROMANO WHEEL,

■ 2013 RITUAL, Pinot Noir, (94JS)/ 19.99

Shop Local First

Connoisseur’s Corner- Chardonnay

“Imported”/ 12.99 Lb

(92WS, Reg 26.99)/ 9.99

“Imported”/ 11.99 Lb

A Kitchen Must Have/ .49 Lb

Fresh from the Filed/ 1.49 Lb

■ GH MUMM, Cuvee Privlege Brut,

■ FILED ROAST FRANKFURTERS, 16oz/ 4.99

Cut steak diagonally across grain into thin slices. Discard thyme and garlic; spoon reserved butter mixture over steak.

Reg 15.99, Shoppers Special 9.99

(91WE)/ 19.99

■ WHOLE GRAIN, Nine Grain, 30oz/ 4.19

■ BOAR’S HEAD SAUERKRAUT, 16oz/ 2.09

Peeled & Deveined/ 12.98 Lb

■ CHLOE, Prosecco, (Reg 16.99)/ 8.99

■ SCHARFFENBERGER, Brut Excellence,

■ PILLSBURY PIE CRUST, 14.1oz/ 2.99

■ COOKED PRAWNS, Large,

Celebration Sparklers ■ ROEDERER ESTATE, Brut, (92WE)/ 19.99

Delicatessen

■ SALMON LOX TRIMMINGS/ 9.98 Lb

■ BROCCOLI CROWNS,

■ EAGLE RARE/ 31.99

■ GAYLE’S, Francese Buns, 12oz/ 3.49

■ FRESH TILAPIA FILLETS/ 9.98 Lb

Great Source of Vitamin “A”/ .59 Lb

■ SAZERAC RYE/ 29.99

■ SPINDRIFT, Sparkling Water, 4 pack, 12oz Cans/ 3.99

Local Bakeries - Fresh Daily

■ LOOSE CARROTS,

■ RITTENHOUSE RYE/ 24.99

6 Pack, 11.15oz Cans/ 4.99+CRV

■ MILD ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 5.98 Lb

■ BAY SHRIMP MEAT, Fully Cooked/ 12.98 Lb

Sprinkle salt and pepper evenly over steaks. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add steaks to pan; cook 3 minutes on each side or until browned. Reduce heat to medium-low; add butter, thyme, and garlic to pan. Carefully grasp pan handle using an oven mitt or folded dish towel. Tilt pan toward you so butter pools; cook 1 1/2 minutes, basting steaks with butter constantly. Remove steaks from pan; cover loosely with foil. Let stand 10 minutes. Reserve butter mixture.

■ BUFFALO TRACE/ 24.99

■ SAN PELLEGRINO, Italian sparkling Juice,

■ BREYERS ICE CREAM, 1.5 Qt/ 4.99

FISH

Let steaks stand 30 minutes at room temperature.

■ WILD TURKEY 101/ 14.99

All Flavors/ .99+ CRV

SAUSAGE

■ BREAKFAST PORK LINKS/ 4.98 Lb

PREPARATION

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Whiskey-750ml

■ CRYSTAL GEYSER, Sparkling Water, 1.25L,

■ COULOTTE STEAKS, Thick Cut/ 6.98 Lb

2 (12-ounce) New York steaks 1 teaspoon kosher salt 3/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons butter 2 thyme sprigs 2 garlic cloves, crushed

WINE & SPIRITS

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range Compare & Save chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, ■ SANTA CRUZ ORGANIC LEMONADE, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products. All Kinds, 32oz/ 1.99

■ 2011 KOYLE ROYALE, Carmenere, (91WS)/ 22.99

■ KAREN ANNE’S GRANOLA, 16oz/ 8.49 ■ SHELLEY’S BISCOTTI, 7oz/ 8.39

■ 2014 LIQUID FARM, “White Hill”, (94WE)/ 43.99

■ BELLE FARMS OLIVE OIL, Estate Grown, 8.5oz/ 12.99 ■ THERESA’S SALSA ASADA, 16oz/ 6.59 ■ MARIANNE’S ICE CREAM, Qt/ 4.59

■ 2015 BEAUREGARD, Bald Mountain/ 49.99

■ 2012 NEWTON UNFILTERED, (94WA)/ 55.99

■ 2014 SIGNORELLO, Hope’s Cuvée, (96WA)/ 59.99 ■ 2010 MOUNT EDEN, Estate, (95V)/ 49.99

KEVIN ONORATO, 25-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

Occupation: Drinking water treatment operator Hobbies: Biking, hiking, motorcycles, cooking Astrological Sign: Taurus What got you shopping here? A friend told me about Shopper’s and the butcher shop, which is the best! Shopping here is fun, and there’s a familiarity. The people recognize us, and we’ll engage each other, from the meat guys to the checkers. My sons, Rowan and Sawyer, feel comfortable here and like picking out their own fruit and vegetables. My preference is to shop our local businesses, but I don’t support stores just because they’re local. Shopper’s is a really good store and well organized. I can get everything I need, and enjoy seeing friends from the neighborhood and others I haven’t seen in years. I like the vintage feel — it’s a Santa Cruz classic.

You plan on shopping here for holiday meals? Oh yeah! We’ll get a turkey and a prime rib, and sugar pumpkins and bake our own pies. We’ll also make maple walnut pies. Naturally we’ll get all the fixings too. Do your sons like to cook. Yes, we made burgers last night and individual pizzas together a couple of nights ago — everything was from Shopper’s. I do a lot of meat and vegetables such as sausages, ground beef, chicken, pork chops, and the occasional steak. With vegetables, I like making salads, soups, sautéing greens such as kale and collards. Roasting cauliflower is a favorite, so is baking Brussels sprouts with pecans, walnuts and topped with bacon bits.

Your sons enjoy your veggie dishes? They’ll try some but their wheel house is corn, broccoli, and some salad. We have a healthy diet. I believe the only thing stopping us from eating healthy is ourselves. Shopper’s carries great local foods, like their fresh salsas, eggs, and ice creams. You take these products, along with the meats, cheeses, and their fresh, beautiful produce, and Shopper’s pricing is totally reasonable. I appreciate the extensive spice selections and the wines from the sale rack are always really good. If someone is new to the community, I say, ‘Go to Shopper’s and check it out. Feel the warm, friendly energy. It’s the heart of a great neighborhood!’

“If someone is new to the community, I say, ‘Go to Shopper’s and check it out. Feel the warm, friendly energy.’”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

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November 29-December 5, 2017