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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Edgar at El Brinquito Market by Michael Amsler. Cover design by Kara Brown.




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nb CRUISIN’ WITH THE DOGS

Yeah, man, I chased that cat outta the house, ate some Alpo, chewed up a pillow and now I’m rollin’ on Gravenstein Highway.

This photo was submitted by Bill Amatneek of Sebastopol. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘It’s the other side of the tracks. It’s almost like there’s an invisible wall at El Verano.’ COVER STORY P17

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Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Striking Down the Death Penalty T H E PAP E R P 8

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Bad Bus Business Sonoma County should end its contract with Veolia BY DEPPEN WEBBER

L

ast November, while traveling in the West Bank documenting human rights abuses, I rode on a segregated bus with the “Palestinian Freedom Riders.” At Hizma checkpoint outside Jerusalem, I witnessed six Palestinians violently dragged off the bus by the Israeli military.

How does this affect us here? Because Sonoma County has outsourced its operation of publicly owned buses to Veolia Transportation, the North American business unit of French multinational corporation Veolia Transdev, which operates buses in the occupied Palestinian territories. Approximately 80 local transit workers here are directly employed by Veolia. Last month, the Sonoma County Commission on Human Rights heard a presentation outlining human rights violations associated with Veolia’s operations. Veolia operates several bus lines on a network of segregated roads that discriminate against Palestinians. The routes connect Israel to Jewish-only settlements in the occupied West Bank. The company also operates the Tovlan landfill where Israeli waste is dumped onto Palestinian land, and it profits from the Jerusalem Light Rail connecting settlements to West Jerusalem. Following the lead of South Africans during apartheid, Palestinian civil society has called for boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel and companies profiting from or complicit in the occupation. While the BDS movement is more prevalent in Europe and other parts of the world, there has been increasing support in the United States. The Presbyterian Church recently voted overwhelmingly to boycott products grown or manufactured in Israeli settlements. The Methodists and Quakers have passed similar measures. Pension-fund giant TIAA-CREF removed Caterpillar Inc. from its Social Choice funds portfolio for Caterpillar’s role in supplying equipment used in demolishing Palestinian homes and orchards. As transpired with apartheid in South Africa, musicians are now choosing not to perform in Israel, including U2, the Pixies, Elvis Costello, Roger Waters and Carlos Santana. In the 1980s, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors made a principled decision to divest from South Africa. It must now disqualify Veolia from the contract renewal process due to its participation in grave human rights violations against Palestinians in the occupied West Bank. Deppen Webber has lived in Sonoma County since 1995. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco and currently works as a caretaker. To submit your 350-word topical essay, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Steve Jaxon, Patron Saint of Standup Comedy

What a wonderful article (“Laughing Matter,” Aug. 1). I’m so glad the Bohemian is giving props to these folks who willingly participate in one of the most vulnerable things in the world, for no pay and very few rewards. I love them! And I love that they are finally being supported in a big way. Also, I think Sonoma County’s comedy scene owes a lot to Steve Jaxon of KSRO, who regularly shines a spotlight on all of the funny people here and throughout the Bay Area.

KATE POLACCI Santa Rosa

Beyond Green I was so pleased to see coverage of the Robert Jacob campaign for Sebastopol City Council (“Green Indeed,” Aug. 1). As always, the Bohemian is at the forefront of reporting important issues. While the work Robert does for cancer and AIDS patients needing medical cannabis is very important, I do feel that the article was overly focused on this one issue. No mention was made at all that Robert has been a compassionate activist since he was a teenager. He did so much work with the Health Initiatives for Youth in San Francisco, he started and directed the Turlock Learning Center charter school, and he has done work for Face to Face. Robert is especially talented at bringing together people with differing opinions and getting them to work together on solutions.

KATHERINE BALLARD Sebastopol Note: A caption in the Robert Jacob article incorrectly identified Jacob as the owner of Peace in Medicine. He is the founder and executive director.—The Ed.

Car-Share Creativity

Great to see more people using WeGo Sonoma (“On the Go,” Aug. 1)—there’s certainly a lot of potential in our community, and Avego’s system makes ridesharing more flexible than ever before.

BRANT ARTHUR Santa Rosa

Breaking with the Big Box We have to fight the big box (“Express Lane,” July 25)! Monsanto bringing in chain stores would only make GMOs more available! What about community gardens in these areas? What about guidelines on stores in areas like these and on what they need to carry to be open? There are so many other guidelines they have to go by already to have the license they have, so why not? WTF? We’re going to give the go-ahead for shit like Wal-Mart but not try and bring our community together and plant a garden on all that land? Wake up! Two wrongs don’t make a right!

BRITTANY THOMPSON Via online

O Accountability, Where Art Thou? So, PG&E has refused to abide by the Sebastopol City Council’s request for a delay on SmartMeter installation until the Public Utilities Commission has reached a conclusion. Their rationale, according to PG&E spokesman Greg Snapper, is that, “We believe that individual choice rather than community opt-out strikes a good balance.” PG&E thus gives itself permission to act while a legally appointed agency’s ruling is pending. Following this example, my neighbor


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can remodel his home before he has a permit. A hotel can be built in a residential community while a zoning hearing is happening. A factory discharging chemicals into the Russian River can be constructed while an environmental impact report is still pending. Eminent domain over demolition of homes for a highway can happen while the planning commission is in the process of meeting. Think about it, folks. Everybody has permission, just like PG&E, to do whatever they please, whenever they please, however they please, and to hell with the rest of the community, town, city, state, nation and the world. It’s bad enough as it is. Do we have to make it worse?

MARYLOU SHIRA HADDITT Sebastopol Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

“Water Play: What Floats Your Boat?� Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

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Religion argues about chicken sandwiches while science lands on Mars

3

Sheep converge in Courthouse Square, storm downtown Santa Rosa

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5 Farewell to lifelong

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Paper THE

DEATH’S DOOR The lethal injection chamber at San Quentin, where former warden Jeanne Woodford oversaw four executions.

Lethal Blow

With $2.9 million behind Proposition 34, California may become the 19th state to abolish the death penalty BY LEILANI CLARK

A

t San Quentin State Prison, 724 inmates are housed in the largest death row in the United States, waiting their turn on the lethal injection gurney. But if the Savings, Accountability and Full Enforcement for California Act (SAFE) passes on Nov. 6,

their fate will change dramatically. On the ballot as Proposition 34, the initiative would abolish the death penalty in the state of California and replace it with life in prison with no chance of parole. If the proposition passes, California will become the 19th state to eliminate the death penalty.

Proposition 34’s foundation is built on a 2011 study by Judge Arthur L. Alarcón and Loyola Law School professor Paula Mitchell; their findings revealed capital punishment to be cost-heavy with few benefits. According to the study, ever since a successful 1978 campaign to reinstate the death penalty, California has spent roughly $4 billion and carried out only 13 executions. This breaks

down to $184 million a year spent on trials and investigations, death row housing, and both state and federal appeals. Most death row inmates wait more than 20 years to see their cases resolved. High-profile members of the SAFE California Act coalition include Ron Briggs, the man who wrote the 1978 Briggs Initiative, which reinstated and toughened the death penalty. Thirty-four years later, the El Dorado County supervisor has changed his mind. In a February 2012 Los Angeles Times editorial, Briggs admitted, “The only people benefiting today are the lawyers who handle expensive appeals and the criminals who are able to keep their cases alive interminably.” Jeanne Woodford, executive director of Death Penalty Focus and a former San Quentin warden who oversaw four executions during her 1994–2004 term, is a major force behind Proposition 34. Woodford says she opposes the death penalty because it’s expensive, depleting resources at a time when the money is desperately needed elsewhere. “We have a system that is broken beyond belief,” she says by phone, “one that continues to waste criminal-justice dollars at a time when people are laying off police officers and evidence is not being processed as it should.” Proposition 34 would allow for the establishment of a $100 million fund to help law enforcement agencies solve rape and homicide cases, says Woodford. Further, the proposition mandates that convicted killers work during their imprisonment, paying restitution into a victim’s compensation fund. The possible innocence of the convicted is also of concern. “The issue of innocence is really foremost in people’s minds,” says Woodford, citing the cases of Franky Carrillo and Obie Anthony, two men who turned out to be innocent after lengthy prison sentences. “More and more people have been exonerated across the country. There’s no coming back from the death penalty, and people are greatly concerned about that.” By July 12, funding for the


Off the Table Public safety will continue to avoid the financial sacrifices demanded of other city departments after Santa Rosa City Council voted last week not to allow voters to revisit certain aspects of Measure O in the coming November election. Passed in 2004, the measure imposes a quarter-cent sales tax that goes entirely to police, fire and gang prevention, and sets minimum funding requirements for public safety budgets. Though several options are possible for loosening these requirements, the council voted 4–3 not to put any of them on the ballot. Councilmember Gary Wysocky felt that voters should have a say in amending the costly measure, a point agreed upon by Susan Gorin and Marsha Vas Dupre. But Mayor Ernesto Olivares, himself a former law enforcement officer, along with council members John Sawyer, Jake Ours and Scott Bartley, voted to leave the measure alone. Currently, Santa Rosa spends between $1.5 million and $2 million a year on the prevention and intervention of gang-related crimes. Still, it’s unclear whether discrepancies in gang crime statistics presented by the Santa Rosa Police Department—as covered first in a Bohemian feature story in February and later picked up by the Press Democrat as front-page news— have yet been sufficiently addressed. Gang Prevention Awareness Week includes a gang-prevention training at Finley Park on Aug. 7 and the South Park Summer Day and Night festival on Aug. 1, which last year allowed the local SWAT team to place assaultstyle guns in the hands of small children. Advertising funds for the week appear to be going to Simon Malls, the owners of the Santa Rosa Plaza, for a large hanging banner in center court advertising Gang Prevention Awareness Week. City officials maintain the banner is paid for by private donors.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Join Our 10th Anniversary

Weekend ĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶ Saturday & Sunday August 18–19 Saturday, August 18 11:00am: Japanese Cherry Tree Ceremony with Deputy Consul General Michio Harada of Japan in San Francisco 1:00pm:>ŝǀĞ:ĂƉĂŶĞƐĞďƌƵƐŚƉĂŝŶƟŶŐŽĨ Snoopy by Yoshiteru Otani accompanied by Taiko drummer Rin Matoba

Sunday, August 19 10:00am: Class of the Art of Japanese WĂƉĞƌƵƫŶŐ͘ĚǀĂŶĐĞĚƌĞƐĞƌǀĂƟŽŶƐ and fees required, call to sign up 707.284.1263 2:00pm: Yoshiteru Otani will speak about his Museum works, Morphing Snoopy and the Peanuts Tile Wall, and ƐŚŽǁƚŚĞĮůŵThe Making of the Schulz Museum— Yoshi Art.

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campaign reached $2.9 million, propelled by significant donations from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and the ACLU. Opponents of the proposition, like the Peace Officers Research Association and the Sacramento County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association, have raised less than $45,000. “There are some crimes—like murder, torture and raping and murdering children—for which a lesser punishment is simply not appropriate,” says Kent Scheidegger of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, which is against the ballot initiative but cannot afford to fund an opposition campaign. “It would be a travesty if someone like the Night Stalker [Richard Ramirez] got to live out his natural life in prison.” Another opponent—one that may seem surprising—is death row inmate Kevin Cooper. Cooper was sentenced to death in 1985 for the murder of a Chino Hills family of four. Cooper and his advocates insist on his innocence, but in an essay written from San Quentin, Cooper announced that he does not support the SAFE California Act, citing frustration that no death row inmates were asked their opinion on the initiative. Cooper argues that a life sentence in a prison with “inhumane conditions” is simply another version of the death penalty. He further claims that those currently on death row will lose their ability to use the appeal process and legal habeas for case review. Woodford has read Cooper’s essay and sees flaws in his argument. “The initiative does three simple things. It does not expand or shrink the kinds of crimes that are eligible for special circumstances,” she says, adding that many inmates are already required to work and pay into a victim’s restitution fund. “It just takes existing law and crosses out death penalty. It’s a very simple initiative. It does nothing more than that.”


10

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Keeping Quiet Introverts, unite!

BY JULIANE POIRIER

O

ur climate crisis calls for drastic measures, such as ditching useless social paradigms. One of these is the “Extrovert Ideal,” dubbed as such by author Susan Cain in her revolutionary book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.

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If Cain had her way, society would be a safe place in which introverts could relax and be themselves—quiet, thoughtful people who have just as many good (and bad) ideas as extroverts, but don’t happen to be forceful presenters. In a more just social arena, extroverts would simply shut up and listen to what retiring persons have to say. I suspect survival might demand it. Cain traces the Extrovert Ideal back to the turn of the 20th century. When many Americans moved from farms to cities, they traded character for personality values in order to adapt to the new business world. Suddenly, there

was pressure to act confident and talk well. Dale Carnegie, author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, worked to make extroverts of everyone, or at least pseudoextroverts. (Present-day versions of Carnegie include self-help guru Tony Robbins, whose annual income from selling charisma tops $80 million.) Faked extroversion is the armor donned daily by one in three Americans in order to get through the day, according to Cain. Introverts are pressured by confident, forceful leaders—those who fit the Extrovert Ideal—to act confident and speak up if they want their contributions recognized in school, work, political and even religious settings (mystics don’t have a chance among religious extroverts). Pathologically shy and anxious personalities have been urged for a hundred years to be more sociable and talkative, as if introversion should and could be cured; recent studies, Cain writes, indicate that introversion is biologically determined, via genetic variant, and environmentally shaped. Introverts possess superior cognitive skills and are likely to be the artists and nerds who give the world its most extraordinary innovations. The designer of the first personal computer, Stephen Wozniak, was an introvert before the term nerd was invented. Rosa Parks, who shook the world of race relations in this country through a quiet action, was tiny, timid and soft-spoken—a classic introvert. Cain further posits that the market crash of 2008 came from too many extroverts occupying decision-making roles in U.S. financial institutions. What does this mean for the sustainability movement? Ditching the extroverted leadership paradigm might produce amazing and unexpected results. According to Cain, introverts possess exceptional leadership qualities, including listening and thoughtful decisionmaking. For individuals who happen to be introverts, Cain’s advice is simple: Be yourself.


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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Caffe Portofino Italian.

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$$-$$$. Great flavors and some eclectic dishes at this Santa Rosa institution. 535 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.1171.

Chloe’s French Cafe

1200 1 200 b bridgeway ridgeway ~ 4 415.331.3226 15.331.3226 salitoscrabhouse.com s alito t scrabhouse.com

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French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Dry Creek Kitchen California cuisine. $$$-$$$$. Fresh wine country cuisine from chef Charlie Palmer. Lunch and dinner, ThursTues. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Hana Japanese. $$$-$$$$. An oasis of cool tucked away in the atmosphereless Doubletree Hotel complex. Reservations on the weekend a must. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 101 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.586.0270.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Murphy’s Irish Pub Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

The Restaurant at Sonoma Mission Inn

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Drake’s Beach Cafe

$$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Wed-Mon; brunch, SatSun. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.5556.

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Water Street Bistro

California cuisine. $$$. In this world-class spa setting sample Sonoma County-inspired dishes or an elegant traditional brunch. Dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. 707.939.2415.

Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Simply Vietnam

preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese


N A PA CO U N TY Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

Checkers California. $$.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

You’d hate to be surrounded by wonderful wines without a drop to drink, so bring a fat wallet when festival guy Steven Restivo strikes with the San Rafael Food and Wine Festival on Saturday, Aug. 11 at the Falkirk Cultural Center (1408 Mission Ave., San Rafael; 1–5pm; free; 415.485.3328). . . . No wine goes without some good cheese, so plan ahead and make some of your own in under an hour! Stretch those curds during a homemade mozzarella class on Thursday, Aug. 9 at Relish Culinary Center (14 Matheson St., Healdsburg; $69; 707.431.9999). . . . And while you’re there, you might as well stay a few days and become an honorary Healdsburger at the handson Cook Like a Local class on Saturday, Aug. 11 (14 Matheson St., Healdsburg. $208. 707.431.9999). . . . Not interested in staycations? Then bon voyage á Le Petit Marché and chomp on croissants and crêpes while checking out antiques and collectibles at the French Market on Sunday, Aug. 12, at the Marin Center (10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael; 9am–3pm; free; 415.473.6358). . . . Sick of language ministries and ready for a siesta? Then cross a border and grab some chorizos at Pinot and Paella on Sunday, Aug. 12, at Freestone Vineyards (12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone; noon–2pm and 2pm–4pm; $30; reservations at 707.874.1010). . . . And on the way home, don’t trip on a Burbank “pop-up” dinner, a six-course bounty of local fresh goodies at a Chosen Spot Dinner. Aug. 11 is sold-out, but spots are still open for Sept. 8, at Luther Burbank Home and Gardens (204 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa; $75. 707.524.5445). —Catherine Zaw

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Highlighting

Marimar Torres Proprietor and Winegrower MARIMAR ESTATE VINEYARDS & WINERY Friday, August 10, 2012 MENU

special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and

TAPAS Creamy Eggplant Mousse Mushroom Caps

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Stuffed with Chorizo

Potato and Onion Omelet

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2010 Marimar Estate “Acero” Chardonnay

Baked Wild Salmon stuffed with shrimp and olives, fava bean purée 2010 Marimar Estate “La Masia” Chardonnay

W NTO N JOE W

Marinated and Grilled Rack of Lamb Mediterranean vegetables, romesco sauce, potato croquette 2008 Marimar Estate “La Masia” Pinot Noir

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

Aunt Oriola’s Pears red wine, fresh cheese filling, strawberry sauce 2007 Marimar Estate “Cristina” Pinot Noir

Coffee Service $

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

WOMEN IN THE WINE INDUSTRY

’S

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Foodie Whirlwinds

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides welcomes

photo: Marilee Koll

$$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Thai House

DO

The William Tell House American & Italian.

SMALL BITES

99 per person, plus tax & gratuity reservations: 800.541.7788 or 707.875.2751

dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

ummer elebrations Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8 –14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Christopher Creek The tasting room is a small, woodpaneled anteroom stocked with bins of wine. There are no fountains, Italian tiles or anything not having to do directly with the business of sampling wines made on the premises. 641 Limerick Lane, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 707.433.2001. Inspiration Vineyards The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

Rued Winery Dry Creek Valley grape growers since 1957, or since 1882 if you count great-great-grandfather’s Russian River Valley vineyard. Good folks offer their best product skimmed from 160 acres at comparatively farmstand prices. 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Daily 11am to 4:30pm. $5. 707.433.3261.

Talisman Wine Wineindustry husband-and-wife team play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space. Don’t miss the taste test between the Dijon and Pommard clones. 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.

N A PA CO U N TY Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Charles Krug Winery Founded 1861, and owned by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste awardwinning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in unassuming low building across from the original stone winery. Ask about the Johannesburger Riesling. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old

Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals Albariño and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–7pm; Friday– Saturday, 11am–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600. Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Envolve Winery The Bachelor remains married to the vine BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he conclusion of Ben Flajnik’s stint on the 16th season of ABC’s “reality” television series The Bachelor hasn’t stopped the rumors from flying. Down the street, I’m told that unruly bachelorette parties crowd Envolve Winery’s tasting room on weekends, mad to see Ben. “But I think he’s actually been there one or two times,” or so goes the rumor. Envolve anchors a warren of shops off Sonoma Plaza that’s lately become an all-wine gauntlet. Attractive young women slink in and out of the place. A pair of dudes drop in, taste, network and fly out within five minutes. A wide-screen television blares in the back room. It could almost be the hopped-up, TV-stoked reality winery of one’s imagination. But then, behind the bar, here’s Ben Flajnik. As seen on TV, he’s got sleepy-eyed, suntanned good looks and sports longish, 1970s heartthrob hair. But he perks up when the subject is wine; he’s almost as busy living down his televised persona as he is building up his brand, 100 hours a week, which he cofounded with childhood friends Mike Benziger and Danny Fay. Flajnik says he doesn’t get much flak around town about the show, in which he traveled the world while breaking hearts and cracking coconuts. “People don’t really bring it up,” he says. “It’s a story, and that story’s done. We never said, ‘Come to Envolve Winery.’ We said, ‘Come to Sonoma.’” An unscripted scene unfolds when the erstwhile celebrity jumps around the bar to retrieve a bottle of Pinot Noir, followed by the eyes of several women. “Is that him?” they consult. Sniffing the wine, Flajnik frankly admits it’s a bit off; maybe suffering from Brett. A less earnest wine booster might have tried to pass that off as “the terroir.” “We’re not claiming to be almighty winemakers by any means,” Flajnik says. “We’ve got a long way to go.” Humble is a wise hat for these twenty-somethings to don, having zoomed from zero to 20,000 cases in five years. But do they themselves make the wine? “Mike and I are punching down,” Flajnik affirms. Envolve is committed to organic, biodynamic and sustainable wines. The first wine they made is still being poured at the bar, a warm and rich 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon ($39.99), while the crisp, slightly sweet, broadly appealing Epilogue 2011 California Sauvignon Blanc ($13.99) is their bread-and-butter. Step up to the Envolve 2011 Sonoma Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($19.99) for a more zippy, New Zealand–style quaff. A tasting room favorite, the Envolve 2011 Sonoma Mountain Rosé ($24.99) is sweetly balanced with watermelon and strawberry flavors. “Girls scream over the rosé,” says Flajnik. Envolve Winery, 27 East Napa St., Ste. A, Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm. Tasting fees, $5–$15. 707.939.5385.


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THE NORTH BAY GUIDE

AKOIA

A balanced life is a happy, healthy existence. Whether during work or play, time with others or time spent alone, we strive for the center point of well-being. On a very basic level, everything in the universe seeks equilibrium. The ancients distilled this knowledge of balance into four distinct elements that work together and create our world—earth, air, water and fire. North Bay spas utilize these same elements in the treatments which assist clients in regaining balance in their lives—the hydrating waters of baths, the healing fire of hot stones or geo-thermal heat, the soothing products made from flowers, herbs, clays and muds of the earth, and the heady aromatherapy or deep cleansing breaths during an open air massage. Many spas feature facets of all four elements, but we have focused on one in particular which reflects both the setting of the spa and its primary services. Each spa’s element of choice is notated with an icon. Enjoy a spa treatment from one of the many beautiful facilities listed in the North Bay Bohemian Spa Guide, and regain the balance in your life. You’ll be in your element.

—Suzanne Daly

An owner-operated spa, Akoia entices clients upstairs above Healdsburg’s square to “treat thyself” to the unique services it offers. A warm Thai herbal poultice massage counterbalances the daily wear and tear of life. Anti-aging facials with pumpkin, papaya and pineapple Arcona products help defy the gravity of aging, and includes massage for the feet, neck, shoulder, face, arm and hands. Spa parties for 12 may be held in the airy loft space. Check the website or call for seasonal specials, or join their facebook page for locals’ specials.

105-A Plaza St., Healdsburg. 707.433.1270. akoiadayspa.com

BLISS ORGANIC DAY SPA Experience the bliss of holistic organic facials and body treatments that help put the chaos of daily life behind and will leave you feeling rejuvenated and positively glowing. Being pampered by exceptionally gifted aesthetician Annie Carouba is a thoroughly healing experience that revives both body and spirit for women, men and teens. As a bonus, Reiki and energy treatments are included with facials. Carouba is also a certified oncological aesthetician, specializing in serving clients in treatment for cancer and counteracting the ravaging effects that chemotherapy and radiation have on the body. The spa is fully accessible to clients with disabilities, from the elevator to the special equipment for transfers onto massage tables. Bliss is located upstairs in the Basso building right off the Sebastopol square, and also offers spa parties in the serene “ocean chic” atmosphere of the high-ceilinged space overlooking Main Street, complete with appetizers, non-alcoholic spritzers and, of course, spa treatments.

186 N. Main St., Ste. 230, Sebastopol. 707.861.3434. blissorganicdayspa.com.

BLUSH A DAY SPA Unassumingly nestled into the corner shop behind the Sonoma Ballet Conservatory, Blush a Day brings space-age technology to rural Sonoma. Run by a husband-andwife team, James and Delores De Alba, the spa specializes in skincare, make-up and treatments including massage, salt scrubs and a choice of several different facial masks. Organic products are used, incorporating many essences, sea salt and mud from the earth, resulting in a grounding experience. Some facials also incorporate the use of NASA-developed Max 7 LED light therapy. Using seven different wavelengths—colors—of light to noninvasively strengthen and heal skin, the glow will have you blushing from compliments.

561 Broadway, Ste C., Sonoma. 707.935.0116. blushspasonoma.com.

2012 SPA GUIDE | SONOMACOUNTYSPAS.COM

BE IN YOUR ELEMENT


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COLDWATER CREEK—THE SPA

AFTER

Famous for its pedicures, Coldwater’s clients have been known to fall asleep in the spectacularly cushy chairs, only to awaken to newly refurbished toes. There’s a pedicure specifically for guys, too, and they love the comforters, hot neck wraps and eye pillows that heighten the experience. Join the email list to receive customer specials. Repeat customers who rebook their next midweek appointment before they leave receive a 20 percent discount on any 50–80 minute service.

In Montgomery Village, 728 Farmers Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.566.9314.

GARDEN SPA AT MACARTHUR PLACE Named for its aromatic gardens and whimsically decorated with gardening implements, the spa offers clients treatments based on fruits, flowers, vegetables, herbs and old Mother Earth herself. Of note are the signature treatments, especially the Citrus Tree, a scrub, bath and massage applying all the sweetness of an orange or lemon grove. Unique vegetable treatments include the Eight Greens Facial. Spa clients may use the pool and co-ed steam room for the day. Saddles Restaurant is also on the property. Join the Garden Club for online specials throughout the year, including a 15 percent discount for locals.

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29 E. MacArthur St., Sonoma. 707.938.2929. macarthurplace.com.

KENWOOD INN & SPA model

Kenwood focuses on the healing properties of all parts of the grape, from seeds to wine, in custom-made vinotherapy products used in scrubs and wraps. For a very different and unique experience, try the Fire and Ice Facial, utilizing two therapeutic masks to safely and rapidly resurface the skin. A series of oxygen infusions for revitalizing the skin are also on the menu. Kenwood also features Intraceutical products favored by celebrities, as well as the Hungarian Eminence line. Day guests accepted upon availability.

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www.osmosis.com 707-823-8231

10400 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), Kenwood. 707.833.1293. kenwoodinnandspa.com.

LE CARRE HYATT VINEYARD CREEK SALON & SPA True to its name, Le Carre Salon & Spa at Hyatt Vineyard Creek in Railroad Square is a wine-based spa, and most of the products used, including those made from lavender and mustard, are locally made. Treatment options are classed as tours, pairings and tastings. Clients may choose between Merlot and Chardonnay to nourish, hydrate, and saturate the skin with anti-oxidants or

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G

grape sugars. Le Carre also exclusively offers Matanzas Creek lavender products for wraps, scrubs, facials and just a nice deep breath of Sonoma. The staff is extremely professional, with impeccable attention to every detail. Charlie Castellisi and Maria Shahi, the spa’s owners and stylists, work their magic in the full-service hair salon adjacent to the spa. Le Carre offers a 20 percent off “locals special” year-round. Clients have use of the heated outdoor pool, steam room, fitness center and relaxation area.

170 Railroad St., Santa Rosa. 707.636.7300. lecarresalonspa.com.

MERMAIDS SPA & SEAWEED BATH SHOP You can almost hear the ocean at this spa that caters more to locals than visitors. Mermaids’ forte is massage combined with one of the many healing hydromineral baths infused with remedies from around the world, including Pacific seaweeds, aromatherapy oils and Italian mud baths. Seaweed is also used for body wraps and facials. The five-hour Divine Mermaid Day package combines treatments with a gourmet lunch from nearby restaurants (excluding alcoholic beverages). Wednesday is locals day, and all treatments are discounted 10 percent.

115 S. Main St., Sebastopol. 707.823.3535. mermaidsspa.com.

MORPHEUS MEDICAL AESTHETICS Morpheus Medical Aesthetics is a physicianowned and -operated medical aesthetics spa delivering high-quality skin and bodycontouring services to Sonoma County and the greater Bay Area. All services are delivered in a soothing setting, and are beneficial for both men and women who want to look and feel their best. Please contact to schedule a consultation with a physician. Ask us about special offers, private group events and how to be part of Morpheus’ ambassador program.

Suite 100-A, Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.921.7447. morpheusmedspa.com.

OSMOSIS The charming Victorian home of Osmosis shelters the only cedar enzyme baths in the country, drawing tourists as well as locals interested in an all-green staycation destination. Services also include massage, facials and a three-week enzyme cleansing treatment designed to detoxify the body over several visits. Lifestyle and nutritional coaching with a supervising physician is included. Free morning meditation each Thursday at 8am. Check online for monthly events (one Thursday per month) and other discounts, and sign up for birthday specials.

209 Bohemian Hwy., Freestone. 707.823.8231. osmosis.com.


This day spa is tucked away in a quiet place near the bustle of downtown Petaluma. In addition to offering excellent massage and relaxing body treatments, an authentic Finnish sauna provides rejuvenating steam that improves circulation and detoxifies the body, leaving you feeling lighter, calmer and clearer. When combined with a foot reflexology treatment, you will experience an overall improvement in your mental and physical well-being.

131 Liberty St., Ste. D, at Washington Street, Petaluma. 707.782.9898.

A SIMPLE TOUCH This little earth-toned spa near the plaza offers private, intimate parties complete with appetizers and wine or Champagne, so guests can fully relax and enjoy the full menu of spa treatments. Of note is the rose whey body wrap and facial. In appreciation of those serving our country, military personnel are offered 25 percent off all services, and locals are offered a 10 percent discount. Call for monthly specials.

239-C Center St., Healdsburg. 707.433.6856. asimpletouchspa.com.

SOFT SHELL Located for 16 years in historic Petaluma, two blocks from the Petaluma River, Soft Shell Spa is an oasis of relaxation for locals and visitors alike. An experienced staff and comfortable environment will put you at ease in one of seven cozy rooms, tastefully decorated in natural themes. Menu favorites are the Soft Shell Luxury therapeutic oxygen pore-cleansing facials and the problem-solving massage therapy, which targets client’s individual trouble spots. Soft Shell is an Authorized Bare Essential salon.

10 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 707.773.4950. softshellbeautypetaluma.com.

SOULSTICE “Earth-friendly” Soulstice is a new spa that focuses on treatments using vegan, all-natural, sustainable body-care products, all made in the USA. Even non-allergenic linens and PVC-free massage tables are used. A portion of all proceeds from purchasing a Soulstice product is donated to vital nonprofit social and environmental organizations working to make our world a more beautiful place. Check the website for specials.

2462 W. Third St. (at Fulton Road), Santa Rosa. 707.843.3539. soulsticespa.com

SONOMA COAST VILLA INN & SPA This secluded Mediterranean-style estate offers guests a full slate of spa services. All

treatments begin with a footbath, heated neck wrap and a cup of tea, and finish with a blanket cocoon. Aromatherapy is also included. Particularly appealing is the Net Release, a treatment designed to de-stress and ease the numbness and tension from repetitive-use syndrome computer users experience. Guests may order lunch or light, healthy spa meals made with ingredients grown in the one-acre, on-site garden. Locals receive a discount after their second visit. Day users must have an appointment.

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16702 Hwy. 1, Bodega. 707.876.9818. scvilla.com.

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SPA DOLCE Spa Dolce (formerly Alles European Day Spa) is newly located near the historic square in Healdsburg in a serene, green environment .Exquisitely peaceful and quiet, Spa Dolce breaks out of the box and gives European-style treatments in a distinctive oval room. The spa offers a unique treatment of manual lymphatic massage, which gently detoxifies the body to promote systemic health, eliminate congestion and enhance the immune system. Spa Dolce uses locally made body products and also carries biodynamic skincare products like Babor and Dr. Hauschka’s from Germany, and others from Switzerland and France.

250 Center St., Healdsburg. 707.433.0177. spadolce.com

THE SPA AT HOTEL HEALDSBURG This attractive, modern spa sits across from the plaza, with neighboring chic boutiques and high-end restaurants, like the hotel’s renowned Dry Creek Kitchen and sister H2O Hotel’s Spoonbar. A combination deep-tissue, hot stone, shiatsu and reflexology massage package will guarantee that a few melted guests enjoy the pool afterwards. A whirlpool bath is also available for use with spa services. Those in the 707 area code receive 15 percent off all treatments Monday–Thursday. Check online for special seasonal packages.

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THE SPA AT MONTECITO HEIGHTS What could be more rejuvenating and refreshing than having a full-body scrub with exotic essential oils and sea salt, and then being rinsed in a warm summer rain? The Flamingo Resort’s on-site spa specializes in the only Vichy shower treatments in Sonoma County, utilizing a Vichy wand with seven different shower heads for full body coverage while you lay on the massage table. Sportsrelated massage is also available, perfect after working out at the hotel’s vast sports complex. Skincare ranges from teen facials to anti-aging facials, and everything in between. Check the

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CALISTOGA SPA HOT SPRINGS An unpretentious resort, this newly renovated spa caters to families with children. There are three heated pools plus a kiddiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pool for the splashers, as well as outdoor mineral baths. Accommodations include kitchenettes and outdoor barbecues. Bargain pricing for a family getaway.

1006 Washington St., Calistoga. 707.942.6269 or 866.822.5772. calistogaspa.com

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Built on the site of ancient thermal baths, this elegant Spanish-mission-style spa is one of the only luxury resorts in the country with its own source of thermal mineral water. Featuring pools of varying temperatures, the spa offers a bathing ritual to guests and locals who partake of its services. This expansive facility is noted for its extensive facials, including ones with caviar or Sonoma lavender. Sonoma Valley residents beneďŹ t from the Good Neighbor program, receiving discounts on all spa treatments Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thursday. Call the spa directly for their â&#x20AC;&#x153;treatment of the month.â&#x20AC;?

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2777 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.526.0529. montecitoheights.com.

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Established in 1952 as an alternative medical treatment, Dr. Wilkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is a Calistoga institution and still offers mud and mineral baths and massage.

1507 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.4102. drwilkinson.com.

EUROSPA & INN A soothing and intimate yet light-hearted locale, EuroSpa offers something different in Calistogaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no mud baths. They do have mud wraps, however, packaged with massages and facials for a complete rejuvenating experience. EuroSpa maintains a lovely backyard space to unwind and wine and dine al fresco after treatments, and will cater to private parties. Check the website for specials. Calistogans receive 15 percent off all treatments.

1202 Pine St., Calistoga. 707.942.4056. eurospa.com.

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GOLDEN HAVEN HOT SPRINGS & SPA This newly remodeled Calistoga institution is one of the few that offers couplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mud baths. This spa also guarantees that guests will lose a minimum of six inches off their total body measurement after just one of their European body wraps. Day users have the use of the hot mineral pool, whirlpool bath and sun deck with any spa treatment. Lots of internet specials are available, including room rates at great discounts.

1713 Lake St., Calistoga. 707.942.6793. goldenhaven.com.

HEALTH SPA NAPA VALLEY Fire up your body and mind at Health Spa Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state-of-the-art ďŹ tness center, and then enjoy a day of indulgence with one of the many unique organic spa treatments available, such as the zero-gravity nail bar. A private yoga room and a blissful outdoor lap pool and hot tub are available to patrons, as well as delicious poolside lunches and peaceful relaxation in the private Bamboo Lounge. Mention the North Bay Bohemian to receive 15 percent off treatments Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thursday. Monthly specials are also offered online.

1030 Main St., St. Helena. 707.967.8800. napavalleyspa.com.

INDIAN SPRINGS RESORT & SPA Named for the Native Americans who used this site long before European settlers arrived, Indian Springs has been a healing resort since 1862. Ancient volcanic ash from the 16-acre hillside mixed with mineral water from the four geysers is used for the mud baths and other treatments. The thermally fed, Olympic-sized pool dates back to 1913, and is heated yearround. An adults-only, cool water pool has been added to the freshly renovated spa area. Clients may relax before or after treatments at the Buddha Pond, an oasis of tranquility graced by palm trees and an eight-foot, handcarved granite Buddha. Pool use is available to day guests receiving spa services. Check online for specials and discounts.

1712 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.4913. indianspringscalistoga.com.

LAVENDER HILL SPA Tucked into a hillside garden decorated with exotic Asian statuary and art, Lavender Hill sets the mood for couples (or individuals and friends) in warm and inviting, softly colored double-tub or massage rooms. Intimacy is guaranteed, since the spa only serves a maximum of eight clients at a time. Unique bath preparations, including tropical summer treatments using coconut milk, mango and citrus, remedy sore bodies, and clients ďŹ&#x201A;oat


1015 Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. 707.942.4495. lavenderhillspa.com.

LINCOLN AVENUE SPA If Black Bart came to rob the First Bank of Calistoga as he did in 1865, he’d be quite surprised to find the folks inside bathing in mud. Located in the beautiful and historic stone building that once housed the very same bank, Lincoln Avenue offers a broad slate of highly individualized treatments. Clients can opt for Moor mud imported from Hungary or native Calistogan mud, personalized with 12 Ayurvedic herbs, kelp, wine products or even chocolate. If thick mud isn’t your thing, try the liquid mud whirlpool bath or the detoxifying Ayurvedic treatment on specially designed steam tables. Great website specials rotate monthly, but online coupon must be presented at time of payment.

1339 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.5296. lincolnavenuespa.com.

MOUNT VIEW HOTEL & SPA Easy to spot on Calistoga’s main street, the Mount View Spa is tucked in a Registered Landmark Green Hotel, celebrating 100 Years of Hospitality. The art of relaxation manifests itself in the charm of this elegant, art decostyle hotel, its luxurious spa and the backyard, with cabanas, a large heated pool, and a jacuzzi. For an intimate party away from home, try the Relaxation Group package for six or more people. The Relaxation Group package starts at $99 per person, with the option to add on a Champagne brunch or wine and cheese happy hour for just $20 per person, including a souvenir wine glass for each. All spa clients receive all day use of the pool and mineral whirlpool jacuzzi. Daily spa specials can be found listed on the board outside the hotel, and Sonoma County residents receive 15 percent off all treatments every day of the week. Check the online Spa Director’s Special which changes monthly.

1457 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.5789. mountviewhotel.com.

ROMAN HOT SPRINGS RESORT The Roman offers the three m’s: mud, mineral pools and massage. An intimate boutique spa catering to couples, Roman’s clients are able to fully relax knowing that the spa prides itself on customer service. Guests experience very private, unhurried treatments from the professional and friendly staff. Call the spa for monthly manager’s specials and local discounts.

1300 Washington St., Calistoga. 707.942.2122. bathsromanspa.com.

SOLAGE CALISTOGA This contemporary spa encompasses 20,000 square feet and offers a full array of relaxing and invigorating services within its artfully designed and environmentally conscious facility. Solage’s signature Mudslide—a new twist to the traditional mud bath—starts with guests choosing an essential oil that will be mixed with the mud and the geothermal water to create a silky body mask. After the mud is applied in the treatment room with the aid of an attendant, clients lay on a heated lounge to “bake” and relax. Lastly, a shower and a soak in the geothermal water ensure a clean, restful finish. Clients may soak in the co-ed geo-thermal pool or in the privacy of the separate men’s or women’s clothing optional pools. Day guests receiving a 50-minute spa treatment pay a $25 fee for use of the spa facilities and spa pools. Check the website for seasonal specials.

755 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. 707.226.0820. solagecalistoga.com.

SPA GAIA Decorated in a tropical Balinese atmosphere, Spa Gaia is a “Pacific fusion retreat for the soul.” Spa offerings include traditional Asian rituals using coconut, ginger and lemongrass. A Balinese flower bowl provides a beautiful focal point during massages. Other treatments like the signature Crush all-over skin treatment, use ingredients indigenous to the fertile Napa Valley, cabernet grape-seed products and lavender. Spa Gaia is located in the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel.

3600 Broadway, American Canyon. 707.674.0168. spagaia.com.

THE SPA AT THE NAPA VALLEY MARRIOTT Revel in a day of mother-daughter or fatherson bonding. This spa has packages designed to bring out the best in everyone, and locals get 20 percent off treatment prices Monday– Thursday. Romance packages are also offered for couples enjoying life without kids. In the candlelit wet room, lovebirds can partake in Vichy showers, body scrubs, massage and other sensuous treatments at the same time. A fantastic 25 per cent discount is offered on specials each day of the week: Monday, facials; Tuesday, body scrubs; Wednesday, mani/pedi combo; Thursday, any single 80-minute service; and Friday, certified organic facials. Check online for seasonal specials.

3425 Solano Ave., Napa. 707.254.3330. napavalleymarriott.com.

VILLAGIO INN & SPA Welcoming to locals, the Villagio makes visitors feel like they are guests at a wealthy friend’s Tuscan estate. The spa boasts 13,000 square

feet and 16 treatment rooms, yet insists on personalized service for every patron. Locals there for a day’s pampering may upgrade their service, with treatments given in one of the lavish suites for a taste of the good life. Try the Montecelli, a creamy Italian mud mixed with cypress, pear, lemon and fennel. Separate sauna and steam rooms for men and women are also available for a day’s enjoyment. Napa County locals receive a 15 percent discount Sunday–Thursday.

6481 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.8877. villagio.com.

MARIN COUNTY EDEN DAY SPA

experienced fully clothed, if so desired. Also heavily into rituals, Evo presents a new way to wear precious gems with kaya kalpa, an ancient ritual traditionally reserved for royalty. A pasty, herbal mixture of gold, silver, mineral ashes of crystals and seven gemstones, and warm cream is painted over the entire body. Warm oil is then poured over the forehead and hair to calm the nervous system. The ritual ends with a Tibetan bowl foot massage for balance. Sign up on the email list to receive monthly online coupons and specials, or join Evo’s premiere rewards program for more deals.

800 Redwood Hwy., Ste. 216, Mill Valley. 415.383.3223. evo-spa.com.

SHIBUI GARDENS

A spa full of fountains in the heart of quaint San Anselmo, Eden offers treatments that range from ancient to the latest German technology. Threading, an ancient Middle Eastern form of hair removal, is much less painful than waxing. Eden also provides a European treatment which replaces Hyaluronic moisture cells, rejuvenating and strengthening mature skin and stimulating collagen and elastin production. A free foot massage is given with first-time facials. Walk-ins are welcome, but reservations are recommended. Check for monthly online specials.

Embracing the values of Marin’s founding hippies—hot-tubbing under the stars—this unpretentious, open-air institution of 40-plus years offers hot tubs, saunas and massage late into the night. Tubs are twofor-one Monday–Thursday from 2–6pm, and massages are 10 percent off 2–4pm. Shibui also offers free open-air, hot-water soaks or sauna before a massage treatment. Children under eight can join parents in the hot tub for free. Seniors receive 50 percent off all treatments.

411 San Anselmo Ave., Ste. 101, San Anselmo. 415.464.9111. edendayspa.com.

19 Tamalpais Ave., San Anselmo. 415.457.0283. shibuigardens.com.

KIMBERLY HENRY, M.D. MED SPA Voted Marin County’s “Best Plastic Surgeon” for the past seven years, Dr. Kimberly Henry offers highly professional therapeutic skincare and beauty treatments in addition to plastic and cosmetic surgery. Sensitive to women’s needs, Dr. Henry combines an artistic touch with a surgeon’s perfectionism to obtain the most natural looking results possible. Book a consult with Dr. Henry and receive a complimentary med-spa facial through the month of August.

350 Bon Air Road, Ste. 1 Greenbrae 415.924.1313 and 141 Lynch Creek Way, Ste. B, Petaluma 707.778.2313. drkimberlyhenry.com

EVO SPA Transformation is Evo’s passion, and If you can’t find the spa treatment you are looking for here, you probably won’t find it anywhere. From Hungarian paprika facials and noninvasive facelifts to coffee body scrubs, Evo’s got it. Thirty minutes of a Hydro-Heaven session drains stress and tension from the body, and is said to equal a full night’s sleep. This zerogravity, dry hydrotherapy from Italy utilizes healing chromatherapy lights and can be

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G

SPA DE NOVATO This establishment will even pick up, drop off and take out to lunch those clients who anticipate being too blissed-out to ambulate, cook or drive after enjoying one of the spa packages. Featuring a full slate of massage and baths, Spa de Novato also gives haircuts and has a full mani-pedi service.

1305 Grant Ave., Novato. 415.897.4511. spadenovato.com.

STELLAR SPA Located for the past decade in Corte Madera’s Old Historic Square, Stellar Spa offers unique and creative treatments, like ultrasonic microdermabrasion. Clients may have massages in the seawater inhalation room, breathing in the calming effects of negative ions via a fine water mist. Studies show this helps relieve headaches, allergies and jet lag. Purchase a six-treatment series plan and receive a 10 percent discount and a complimentary facial or bodycare accessory kit. Join the spa’s free online club and receive special monthly discounts, free spa e-vouchers and exclusive invitations to special spa events. Monthly specials can also be found online for non–club members.

26 Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.924.7300. stellarspa.com.

5 2012 SPA GUIDE | SONOMACOUNTYSPAS.COM

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Traveling the Taco Trail It looks run-down to the average tourist, but locals know there’s culinary gold in this vibrant region between Glen Ellen and Sonoma Michael Amsler

BY STETT HOLBROOK

HOT SPRINGS

Chef and co-owner Antonio Barrios prepares chicken huaraches at Rancho Viejo.

T

he drive from Santa Rosa to Sonoma along Highway 12 is among the most beautiful in Sonoma County. The onelane road threads tunnels of trees through a narrow valley of vineyards and farms rising to densely forested oak and pine-covered hills. The route traverses the Valley of the Moon, the name of a Jack London novel celebrating the milk-and-honey glory of the area, past Kenwood and Glen

Ellen, but as it approaches the town of Agua Caliente, the view changes abruptly. A sign announces the end of the scenic drive, and in an instant the surrounding landscape morphs from rural to urban. Instead of chateaus and verdant vineyards, there are car-repair shops, second-hand stores and Mexican restaurants. Lots of Mexican restaurants. The scenic drive may have ended, but it’s by no means the end of the roadside attractions. While most

people pass through the area on their way to weddings or winetasting in Sonoma and beyond, the two-mile stretch of Highway 12 on the outskirts of the Sonoma city limits has a story to tell, and good food to eat. I call it the Taco Trail. The unincorporated region between Agua Caliente and El Verano Road is collectively known as “the Springs,” encompassing the towns of Agua Caliente, Fetters Hot Springs, Boyes Hot Springs and El Verano. Once upon a time, the towns were all train stops; in the late 1800s, the area was a resort destination for San Franciscans and day-trippers ) 18


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Michael Amsler

18 Taco Trail ( 17 who came to soak in the thermal mineral waters at resorts like Agua Caliente Springs. Like the simple summer cottages that sprang up along the Russian River near Guerneville, there was similar development in the Springs area—modest cottages on small lots for vacationers looking to escape the summer fog of the city. The Great Depression sank the hot springs business, but Agua Caliente Springs lives on as the Sonoma Aquatic Club, a private swim and fitness club with two pools and a jacuzzi heated by thermal springs. A fire in 1923 wiped out many of the buildings. One of the few that survived is now occupied by Taqueria La Hacienda, a comfortable sit-down restaurant with an encyclopedic menu and full bar. The legacy of the area lives on, too, in the small restaurants and shops along Highway 12.

I

f you roll into the Springs area from Santa Rosa around lunch time, one of the first things you’ll see—and smell—are the chickens grilling outside of El Brinquito Market, a yellow grocery store with a taqueria inside. The smoke from the wood-fired grill wafts over the road, compelling you to pull over. Heed the call. The whole, butterflied chicken is available either to go or on picnic tables under a tarp next to the market. Grab some beans, tortillas, salsa and a beverage from inside to go with your pollo asado, and you’ve got the makings of an outstanding lunch. Next to El Brinquito are not one but two more carnicerias, or meat markets; in all, there are five carnicerias along the taco trail, further evidence of the strength of the area’s Latino business community. The first to open—25 years ago—was Chapala Market in the Fiesta Plaza shopping center, also home to Sonoma Taqueria, a full-service taqueria that mixes in some American classics like burgers and fish and chips. But you don’t want a burger here. Stick with the tacos or an order

ARRACHERA ARIETTA Arturo Ulloa in his Chapala Market, which he runs with son Carlos.

of chilaquiles, a spicy, messy mix of tortilla chips, chile sauce and scrambled eggs. Chapala’s current owner, Arturo Ulloa, has had the market for 12 years, and runs it with his son Carlos. Ulloa changed the name from Chapala Carniceria to Chapala Market to appeal to a wider clientele. And he says it’s working: he’s getting more gringo customers who come looking for bargains. (I saw 10 limes going for $1—take that, Costco.) The meat counter has a fullservice butcher, and the spotless display case is loaded with arrachera (also known as flat meat or carne asada) and virtually every other cut of beef, pork and chicken. The market makes its own carnitas, available to go on weekends. I also spotted what Ulloa called tomatillos milperos, or cornfield tomatillos. The marblesized tomatillos are much smaller than the typical tomatillo, and

work great for salsa, Ulloa says. In the state of Jalisco, where he and many other Springs residents hail from, the plants are typically grown in and around fields of corn. The word “milpero” comes from milpa, or cornfield. Artist Michael Acker has lived in the area since 1997 and serves as treasurer of the Springs Community Alliance, a local business and community improvement group. He’s also an amateur historian of the area. “It was a very thriving community until the 1950s,” he says. In the 1960s, Acker adds, the neighborhood fell into disrepair and acquired a reputation as a hangout for outlaw bikers and druggies. In the early 1970s, the most famous (and infamous) restaurant in the area was Juanita’s, owned by dynamic restaurateur Juanita Musson, who allowed flocks of chickens to roam

the dining room and threw plates of food at diners who dared leave food on the table. As Sonoma County’s wine and agriculture industry grew in the 1970s and 1980s, so too did the need for immigrant labor, and the Springs area provided affordable housing for low-income laborers. The area’s Latino population continued to grow, and about 10 years ago the majority of the neighborhood’s population became Latino. “Now we’re getting to be a real Mexican food area,” says Acker. Kara Reyes is director of family planning at La Luz, a socialservice agency that serves the community’s Latino and lowincome residents. She’s lived in the area for 15 years. “This neighborhood has always been the low-income area of Sonoma,” she said. “It’s the other side of the tracks. It’s almost like there’s an invisible wall at El Verano.”


B

efore it disbanded, the Sonoma County Redevelopment Agency helped to fund street and business improvements along the area’s commercial corridor. Construction of sidewalks and streetlights was completed for half of the neighborhood, from El Verano north. (Plans were nearly complete for the rest of the project; the community is still waiting on the state to revive the project.) As in Santa Rosa’s Roseland district— also primarily Latino and not in the official city limits—the agency provided facade-improvement loans that helped businesses to add some curb appeal. Today, the small homes, tight lots and winding streets have created a hodgepodge of development that’s home to a thriving Latino community drawn to the relatively low-cost housing. While tourists visit the Sonoma town plaza and the restaurants and

winetasting rooms that surround it, the Springs is where many of the region’s vineyard, farm and service workers live and eat. The Springs may have a scruffy appearance, but business is flourishing. The small commercial lot sizes have helped keep large retailers out in favor of locally owned, family-run businesses. And because many of the neighborhood’s Latino residents lack access to transportation, they depend on local shops and restaurants. “A lot of local families built their businesses here from the ground up,” says Reyes. And in spite of the economy, she says, local businesses are doing very well. “Almost every month, something new is opening.” One of the must-stops on the Taco Trail is El Molino Central. To the extent any visitors are familiar with the neighborhood, it’s due to Karen Waikiki’s

T

aco trucks are a regular sight along Highway 12. One of the more regular ones is Tacos Acapulco, conveniently parked across from La Michoacana, purveyor of exotically flavored ice cream and popsicles. What drew me in was a banner advertising “Pedro-style” tacos. What’s Pedro-style? Turns out it’s just named after one of the owners. I couldn’t detect any signature style in the carnitas taco, but its sand-dollar-size taco was great, especially in its wellprepared meat. After a taco, cross the street and head directly to La Michoacana,

another necessary stop. The store serves all the basic flavors, but it’s the tropical fruit flavors (mamey, guanabana, nanche) and interesting combinations like pineapple and chile that are the real attraction. Lest you forget where you are, you can also get nachos, chicharron and cueritos, a pickled pork skin, but I’d stick with the ice cream and paletas. Part of the fun of exploring the Springs area is poking your head into so many different markets and restaurants, and seeing what’s good to eat. Two of my finds using this method were Pasteleria La Mixteca and Tienda y Pananderia Iniguez. Pasteleria La Mixteca is a bakery that specializes in wedding cakes, Mexican pastries and cookies. For me, the real attraction are the tortas. The best tortas I’ve had come from bakeries, if for no other reason they make their own telera and bolillo rolls, an all-important ingredient to a good torta. La Mixteca makes its own, too, and offers classics like lomo (pork loin), ham and milanesa (breaded steak), but also less-common specimens like turkey and tinga, a shredded chicken in a chipotle chile sauce. Mercado Iniguez isn’t much to look at, with its narrow aisles and floors crowded with produce boxes, but what you find in the boxes is worth a look. I found wonderfully fresh squash blossoms (they’re great filled with goat cheese or queso fresco and fried in olive oil) and bunches of purslane. I can’t find either of those items at my local Whole Foods, and if I could, I bet they would cost a lot more. I also discovered El Gran Taco, a hole-in-the-wall taqueria set back from Highway 12 that makes tangy grilled chicken and fresh tortillas by hand. On weekends, the place offers red mole, barbacoa and birria, all perfect stewlike dishes great for mopping up with fresh tortillas. Although Reyes has lived in the Springs area for 15 years, she’s reluctant to single out a favorite restaurant. She’s not only a social worker, she’s a diplomat, too. “I like to go to all of them,” she says.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Michael Amsler

YUCATAN PRIDE Genny and Antonio Barrios of Rancho Viejo Restaurant.

outstanding restaurant. El Molino is a departure from the taco and burrito fare that dominates most Springs restaurants, and specializes instead in Oaxacan food, especially with its superb hand-made tamales. El Molino means “mill,” and indeed the restaurant mills its own masa to make tamales and tortillas. It also notably stands out for its use of organic and locally sourced produce and meat. The three-year-old Rancho Viejo is another favorite on the Taco Trail. Co-owner Genny Barrios lives in the neighborhood, and is out to bring a healthier kind of Mexican food to the residents. Like El Molino Central, Rancho Viejo gets much of its produce from local farms and the Sonoma farmers market, where, incidentally, Barrios is a regular vendor, selling ceviche, empanadas and other prepared food. Originally from the Yucatan, Barrios brings several peninsula specialties to the menu, such as cochinita pibil, a classic dish of slow-roasted, pulled pork in a citrus marinade tinted red with annatto seed; pok chuk, pork chops, also citrus-marinated; rellenos negros; and panuchos, thick masa patties topped with beans and beef or pork. Instead of lard, she cooks with olive oil—as is the tradition in the Yucatan, thanks to the Lebanese traders who landed in the Caribbean state of Mexico. “For us, it’s not just business; it’s about showing Sonoma what real Mexican food is all about,” says Barrios.


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Crush The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

S A N TA R O S A

Roses Have Lips?

Straight from England after a fresh split from supermodel Heidi Klum comes four-time Grammy Award winner Seal. For over two decades, his silky, crushed-velvet-and-dark-chocolate voice has towered the international music charts, showing a hell of a lot of Commitment, his seventh studio album. In the unlikely case the audience isn’t blown away, the six-foot-tall singer of worldfamous hit “I Try,” Macy Gray, adds her talent to the show. Two soul-moving singers sharing a single stage? Perhaps an experience better than being kissed by a rose. See the two on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $65–$85. 707.546.3600.

N A PA

Four-String Fantasy Aloha, brah! Strap your ukuleles to your haole backs and join King Kukulele onstage as the big kahuna makes a special appearance on the Oxbow deck for the Uke-a-Palooza! If the tiny guitars irritate your eardrums, then head for the luau, including classic Hawaiian flatbread, ahi poke appetizers, Kahlua porchettas, and everything coconut, pineapple and sea salt. Vintage printed tourist shirts are also on sale, so even from the mainland, you’ll feel like you’re sitting in a beach chair and kicking your flip-flops into the sand. Holoholo to this second annual Polynesian-themed festival on Friday, Aug. 10, at Oxbow Public Market. 644 First St., Napa. 6–9pm. Free. 707.226.6529.

N A PA

C’mon, Vogue If the corn dogs, apple pie and animal races during the Napa Town and Country Fair don’t knock you off your tired feet, then watch out when powerful hitmaking trio En Vogue take the stage. Fresh from the West Coast of the early 1990s, these divas were “born to sing,” riding the soul train for longer than any other female group in MTV history. And who can forget their timeless collaboration with Salt-n-Pepa, “Whatta Man?” You’ll be “losin’ your mind” when these funky girls take the fair to another level on Thursday, Aug. 9, at the Napa Valley Expo. 575 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $13; 12 and under free. 707.253.4900.

HEALDSBURG

Quiet Storm “On the day I was born, said my father, said he / I’ve an elegant legacy waiting for ye,” sings Milwaukee-born Al Jarreau on his hit song “Look to the Rainbow.” Elegance is one way to put it—longevity is another, and this jazz artist’s vocals are not to miss. Joining him in the act is multi-instrumentalist George Duke, best known for his fusion-filled collaborations with Frank Zappa. The smooth-fusion stalwarts are ready to shake up more than just “heaven and earth” on Saturday, Aug. 11, at Rodney Strong Vineyards. 11455 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. 5pm. $50–$80. 707.869.1595.

—Catherine Zaw

YOU’RE MY THRILL Singer Jane Monheit continues the Napa Valley Opera House’s excellent jazz series on Aug. 10. See Concerts, p25.


UNADORNED Much of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gerard Richter Painterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; simply shows the artist at work in large-scale settings.

Strokes on Film

New documentaries on Gerard Richter and Ai Weiwei let the art speak for itself BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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or creative types, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strangely soothing to watch other people work. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the Rafael Film Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s short run of both Gerard Richter Painter and Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, showing a brace of artists separated by thousands of miles, is so welcome. The two ďŹ lms add to the wealth of art documentaries in sculpture (Rivers and Tides), dance (Pina), street art (Exit Through the

Gift Shop) and photography (The Woodmans). H. G. Clouzotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mystery of Picasso (1956) was perhaps the ďŹ rst demonstration of an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process caught on ďŹ lm. Picasso seemed tranquil about being watched, but Richter dreads it: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worse than being in the hospital,â&#x20AC;? heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Painting is a secretive business anyway. You do it in secret and then reveal it in public.â&#x20AC;? Richter, arguably the most eminent living painter, painstakingly scrapes his canvases

with oversized squeegees, and one learns more about Richterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art from watching him paint than by having it explained. The work ranges from soft Vermeer-like portraits to slate, tar and charred abstract canvases. In 2009, we watch him wrestling with a series of predominantly yellow and red canvases, as artiďŹ cially bright as mustard and ketchup. He brings in edged tools to grade them into dense and dynamic pictures, dragging a butcher knife to scrape the surfaces and reveal new layers.

Richter shares with conceptual artist and sculptor Ai a background in the stultifying art tradition of the Communist bloc. Richter never saw his mother and father again after he escaped East Germany in 1961, and Aiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father attempted suicide numerous times after re-education. If Richter is the image of the abstracted yet exacting German, Ai Weiwei is a ďŹ&#x201A;eshy man of the people, the bull in Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shop. At times, Aiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work is investigative journalism as much as art. Likely because of the Olympics, in 2008 the Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Republic attempted to hide the number of casualties of the Sichuan earthquake. The artist and his apprentices hunted down the names of the 5,000-plus dead and broadcasted them. Later, Ai covered the outside of Munichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Haus der Kunst with a memorial mosaic of some 5,000 nylon school backpacks. When Ai was slugged by a policeman during a 3am raid, he was left with a brain injury that required surgery. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to understand Ai ďŹ&#x201A;ipping Tiananmen Square the middle ďŹ nger, or to get what he means when he tells the camera â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fuck you, Motherland.â&#x20AC;? Some of Aiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art is more slippery, and literally so, as in the case of the millions of ceramic sunďŹ&#x201A;ower seeds with which he carpeted the Tate Modern in London. A deeper analysis of the roots of Aiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art is tantalizingly absent in Alison Klaymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary, which nevertheless serves as an account of one brave, persistent man. Aiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still ďŹ ghting government harassment and using Twitter (@Aiww) to get information past â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Great Firewall of China.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gerard Richter Painterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Aug. 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ai Weiwei: Never Sorryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Aug. 10 at the Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. $10. 415.454.1222.

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Stage Thais Harris

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Porchlight presents sprawling play set in early Australia

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

O

ne of the things that has made Porchlight Theatre special over the years,â&#x20AC;? says actor, director and Porchlight co-founder Tara Blau, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never shied away from staging plays with large casts. For our current show, we have to populate a whole town. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a luxury most companies donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Next weekend, Porchlight launches one of its largest shows ever. Our Countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good, by the celebrated British playwright Timberlake Wertenbaker, is an epic 1988 drama set in 1780 in New South Wales (which eventually became Australia).

The sweeping story examines the relationship between several British naval officers, the ďŹ rst jailers of Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harsh Australian penal colony and an assortment of various prisoners, men and women, several of whom decide to stage a classic play to alleviate their boredom. The play has 22 characters, roles that will be ďŹ lled by 11 actors when Porchlight brings the show to the outdoor Redwood Amphitheatre at the Marin Art and Garden Center. The production is being co-directed by Ann Brebner and Blau, who ďŹ rst encountered the rarely staged play when she acted in a production while in graduate school in Denver. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I fell in love with Timberlakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words and her story,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just loved it, and I never forgot it.â&#x20AC;? Not only does the play have a sprawling cast, requiring the kind of large-scale rugged set that works well for the Redwood Amphitheatre, the play itself is remarkably rich and entertaining. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a play in which every character has a moment of transformation,â&#x20AC;? observes Blau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone has an arc, which is an amazing thing.â&#x20AC;? Now that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directing the show she once appeared in, Blau sees it in a very different way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re acting,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;you mostly just think of what is right for your own character, but as a director you notice all of them, you see the arc of the whole show and how all the charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; individual arcs ďŹ t together to tell the larger story.â&#x20AC;? And what a story it is, crammed with colorful characters, twists and turns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about what people go through when faced with hardships,â&#x20AC;? says Blau, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also about the power of theater and the spoken word. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like an onion. It keeps exposing itself, layer by layer.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Our Countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Goodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday, Aug. 17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sept. 8, at the Marin Art & Garden Center. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross. 7:30pm. Bring a blanket and picnic foods. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 415.251.1027.


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BANANA LOVE Won’t someone please hit the sack with Meryl Streep?

The Long Marriage Streep and Jones capture midlife ennui in ‘Hope Springs’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

here’s one fault a woman will never forgive in a man, and that’s miserliness. Tommy Lee Jones’ Arnold in Hope Springs is a tightfisted Omaha accountant. Arnold withholds even the best free thing in life. Thus, his wife of 31 years (the last five have been sexless) drags him to a couples’ retreat out in coastal Maine to work on their marriage under the guidance of a shrink, played with admirable colorlessness by Steve Carell.

The audience that made Midnight in Paris a hit will want to come out and see the results. Streep’s thespian heft ensures this isn’t dry Neil Simon fare; it’s more of a drama-comedy than a comedy-drama. Of course, any actress so often called the greatest actress alive will have some ham in her. She’s overdrabbed in Costco eyeglasses and a $25 haircut. Streep faces a part that demands getting alarmingly physical, and she handles that fine. But she also throws herself at the mercy of the audience in a few moments of low comedy: fondling a salami at the supermarket, and oohing at that old burlesque fave, the ejaculating Champagne bottle. And yet this movie is a winner. Jones’ bottled-in older man verges on bastardry that would credit a Nicholas Ray movie, and his crumbliness end-runs the usual equation of “woman’s picture=man’s fault.” His performance here is a credit to the amount of hurt that goes on in a seemingly long and tranquil marriage. Arnold’s side of the picture is painted in full, either in resentment of the aggravatingly calm shrink or of his wife (“All those goddamn years,” he swears). Those behind the scenes have come through as well. Scriptwriter Vanessa Taylor is a longtime TV writer, but flatness only seems apparent on the peripheral characters here, including a squandered Elisabeth Shue. Director David Frankel (also loads of TV, plus Marley and Me and The Devil Wears Prada) once again takes the mayonnaise out of domestic comedy. ‘Hope Springs’ opens Wednesday, Aug. 8, in wide release.

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ZZ Top meets Rick Rubin, and all fur breaks loose BY ALAN SCULLEY

B

illy Gibbons has learned one important word while working on ZZ Top’s new album: patience. Plenty of fans are eager to hear what the “Li’l Ol’ Band from Texas” has been up to in the studio all this time, but Gibbons is fully on board with the album’s famed producer, Rick Rubin, and his exacting standards. “Rick is in no hurry to allow any recorded work that he’s associated with to hit the streets prematurely,” Gibbons says in a recent phone interview. “I think that there have been a couple of artists that got a little too impatient and left the fold. They said, ‘Gee whiz, this takes too long.’” After four decades as a band,

ZZ Top, who play the Wells Fargo Center Aug. 15, know a little bit about things taking time. “It’s really [difficult] these days to find someone willing to stick it out,” Gibbons says. “It is tempting to want to rush right out and show the world what you’ve got. But it’s also a great value to have another opinion in the mix.” The process began four years ago, when the band went into the studio with Rubin for some initial recording. That session yielded about 20 rough song ideas, which over time were redeveloped by Gibbons and Rubin, best known for producing stark comeback albums from Johnny Cash, Neil Diamond and Donovan. “The scariest part is when you completely tear a song down and are nearly starting it over,” Gibbons says. “It can be challenging to sit and listen to a song, the same song, for two hours, and then you say, ‘Gee whiz, let me sing that top to bottom. I want to go sing it again.’ Then you do that and then you say, ‘Gee whiz, would this word be better here? Let me sing it again.’ After a full day, you’re just toast.” Between touring and work on the new CD, Gibbons’ services may also be required for the Fox television series Bones, in which he plays the cool but intimidating father of Angela Montenegro. “The creator, Hart Hanson, is a genuine music fan,” Gibbons said. “I think he thought it would be novel just to have me show up, shake a hand, and that was seven years ago, if you can believe that. And he says, ‘Gee whiz, the guy can act. We’ve got to get this guy back.’ So once a season, I’m the bad dad. But we’ve all gotten along famously. Everyone seems to enjoy the day when the bearded boy shows up.”

ZZ Top play with opening act Nashville Pussy on Wednesday, Aug. 15, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $69–$129. 707.546.3600.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Al Jarreau & the George Duke Trio Seven-time Grammy-winning jazz singer has been making songs to make babies by since the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s. Aug 11, 5pm. $50$80. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

August Bash Disability-awareness rock festival featuring Foreverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End, Crush, the Adversary, Amongst Reason, Osasuna and Absolute Zero. Aug 11, 12:30-7pm. $10. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Crux Appearing with the Highway Poets, Frankie Boots, E Minor & the Dirty Diamonds, Girls & Boys. Aug 10, 7:30pm. $10. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Friday Night Live Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer-long series features Honey Island Swamp Band on Aug 10. 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Jazz It Up Wine & Jazz Series Ferrari-Caranoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seasons of the Vineyard invites guests to sip wine and enjoy series of Saturday jazz concerts, featuring Benny Barth Trio, Judi Silvanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indigo Moodsâ&#x20AC;? trio and many others. Aug 11. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

KWTF Farm Fest Girls in Suede, John Courage and the Great Plains, Eight Belles, Semi-Evolved Simians, the Chelsea Set and others play on the farm. Aug 11, 2-10pm. $12-$17. Laguna Farm, 1720 Cooper Rd, Sebastopol.

Live at Juilliard Evening shows in Santa Rosa park feature Blue Moon Band on Aug 12. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Peacetown Summer Concert Series Featuring music from the

Fabulous Luv Rustlers on Aug 8. 5pm. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Seal & Macy Gray Two R&B greats on one stage. Aug 11, 8pm. $65-$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Summer Nights on the Green Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Full Steem on Aug 9. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Patsy & the Bobcats on Aug 14. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

ZZ Top The sharp-dressed, bearded bikersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first appearance in Santa Rosa. Aug 15, 8pm. $69$129. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY God Street Wine The jam band reformed last year, now playing in the in the Bay Area for the first time in 20 years. Aug 10-11, 9pm. $27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Hills to Hollers Bluegrass legend Laurie Lewis, soul icon Linda Tillery and Grammy-nominated, singersongwriter multi-instrumentalist Barbara Higbie. Aug 9, 8pm. $13-$15. Studio 55 Marin, 1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

New Riders of the Purple Sage The return of the New Riders of the Purple Sage features guitarist David Nelson and pedal steel wizard Buddy Cage with others. Aug 8, 8pm. $25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY

25 8/10 8 /10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8/16 8 /16

Calistoga Summer Concert Series

Hope H ope Springs Springs R

Featuring Swing 7 on Aug 9. 6:30pm. Free. Pioneer Park, Cedar and Elm streets, Calistoga.

(1 (10:15, 0 :15, 12:30, 12: 30, 2:45, 2: 45, 55:00) : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 9:30 9 : 30

En Vogue Free Your Mind with this hitmaking Oakland R&B group. Aug 9, 8pm. $10-$13. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa.

Ruby R uby S Sparks parks R (10:35, (1 0 : 35, 1:00, 1: 00, 3:45) 3 : 45 ) 7:00, 7: 00, 9:25 9 : 25

IIntouchables ntouchables R (11:15, (1 1:15, 1:45, 1: 45, 4:15) 4 :15 ) 6:45, 6 : 45, 9:15 9 :15

Beasts o Beasts off tthe he Southern S outhern Wild Wild PPG13 G13 (10:30, (1 0 : 30, 12:45, 12: 45, 33:00, : 00, 5:15) 5 :15 ) 7:30, 7: 30, 9:35 9 : 35

Tony Lindsay Lead singer for Carlos Santana performing his own material. Aug 10, 7pm. $20-$25. Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Jane Monheit Jazz vocalist whose romantic interpretations of music have earned multiple Grammy nods. Aug 10, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Opry at the Opera House Benefit for education with the Silverado Pickups, Striking Matches & Radney Foster. Aug 8, 7pm. $35-$75. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weird Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yankovic If it Smells Like Nirvana, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Eat It Like a Surgeon, in an Amish Paradise because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re White and Nerdy. Aug 9, 7pm. $55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine Aug 10, Benyaro & Tracorum. Aug 11, Hadley Hill, Stages of Sleep and the Blueness. Aug 12, Church Marching Band. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Chateau St Jean

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5 51 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 0719

Doc Hollidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon

Handcrafted folk music of the best kind led by Velvy Appleton and Anita Sandwina. Recording a live CD at this event. Aug 12, 8pm. Free. Studio 55 Marin,

Mon, DJ Mixxxa. Tues, Family Karaoke. Wed, Country Music Wednesdays. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. ) 707.623.5453.

26

Fri, Aug 10 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:25pm Foxtrot lesson and a BALLROOM, LATIN & SWING DANCE hosted by California Ballroom Sat, Aug 11 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 7:25amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm CIRCLE Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES HOEDOWN Sun, Aug 12 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING $10 Mon, Aug 13 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Aug 14 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet

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Wed, Aug 8, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Hurdy Gurdy, Pennywhistles & more

French Session 4HUR !UG nPMsSolo Saxophone

Michael Bolivar: By request Fri, Aug 10, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm Standup; $5 cover

Monkey Fight Comedy Night -ON !UG nPMsLiterary salon

Dine with the Authors Wed, Aug 15, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm Helen Pachynski, emcee

Comedy Open Mic 4HUR !UG nPMsJazz

The Skerries Fri, Aug 17, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Latin America and the Caribbean

De Corazon a Son Doug Jayne Presents Wed, Aug 22, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Authentic and Unplugged

Celtic Jam $

Spark & Whisper

Thur, Aug 9 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club

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3AT !UG nPMsParty!

Aug 10, Classical Piano with Jessica Chow & Michael Shinn. 8555 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.4134.

Wed, Aug 8 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

&INE"EERS7INESs 5 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707.544.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Â?Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iiÂŤĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;iiĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?Â? Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thu, April 22nd Prada Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;The Devil Wears Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th Academy Award â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Best Foreign Language Film! In Years!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Box OfďŹ ce ­£Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;

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Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! ­£Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\xxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\äxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;* 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING ­£\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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Advance Tickets at rialtocinemas.com BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF FILM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Unity Festival 

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Celebrating J\gk\dY\i(+#(,(the sacred Arden Park Roots * Stone Senses * Talawa through musicart-dance- Keithie Kulcha * Hula Skirt * Trevor Lyon DJ education & Rotman J & Zionyouth Crew comm-unity

Friday

Saturday

Midnight Sun Massive * The Simpkin Project * Mystic Roots 3 days Shoreline Rootz * Madi Simmons & The Mra * Ras Indio of music- Highest Intention * Counter Culture food-camping Just added to our late night Saturday! Cornflower Outpost * Dysphunctional Species * Selector Science & fun

SundayHolding Ghosts of Electricity * Wake the Dead Co Stu Allen Mars Hotel \XicpY`i[  jXc\10, Xkk_\^Xk\1  (*, [Xpk`Zb\kj XmX`cXYc\

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RIVER THEATER MUSIC SHOWCASE

Music ( 25 Flamingo Lounge Aug 10, Reed Fromer. Aug 11, Valley Rhythm Section. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Friar Tuckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fri, DJ Mike. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Aug 8, French Session. Aug 9, Michael Bolivar. Aug 11, the Ruminators. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Aug 10, Symptomatics. Aug 11, Saritah. Aug 12, Sol Flamenco. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 10, Susan Sutton and Bill Fouty. Aug 11, Mark Levine Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 9, the Spyralites. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 8, Shade. Aug 9, Thousand Years at Sea. Aug 10, JimBo Trout. Aug 11, Jinx Jones. Aug 12, the Pine Needles. Aug 15, Blue Merle. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Aug 10, Crux, Highway Poets, Frankie Boots, Girls & Boys, E Minor & Dirty Diamonds. Aug 11, Metal Shop. Thurs, Open Mic Jam Night with the Boomers. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station

FEATURING: MELVIN SEALS

Aug 10, Vernelle Anders. Aug 11, Phil Edwards. Aug 9, Susan Sutton. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Aug 10, Foreverland. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

SATURDAY AUGUST 25 2012

Tickets; $40 www.g-a-entertainment.com

RIVER THEATER 16135 MAIN STREET, GUERNEVILLE, CA (707)869-8022

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Aug 10, Adam Traum & the Traumatics. Aug 11, Larry Carlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mostly Simply Bluegrass Night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Aug 8, the Lee Boys. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Full Speed Highway Poets explore Americana versatility Those who had the good fortune to stumble upon the Highway Poets during their fiveday residency at the Sonoma County Fair would have noticed a few things: first, the band membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clip-on beer holders on each microphone stand; second, the vintage suitcase full of copies of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new CD, Stay â&#x20AC;&#x2122;til Dawn, with a 1903 photo of the Hill Opera Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;now the Phoenix Theater in Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on the cover. But those who brought that CD home and popped it in would have heard a much more mellowed version of the full-steam thundering juggernaut that plowed through the din of roller coasters and carnival barkers. Where was the rock? The answer lies in the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roots as Hillside Fire, a rock band that recently went more acoustic and changed its name, hence the folksy nature of Stay â&#x20AC;&#x2122;til Dawn. But the Highway Poets have been wooing their electric guitars again, and have incorporated their Crazy Horseâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; style jams in with their bluegrass setlists. Whatever facet they choose to play, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do so expertly on Friday, Aug. 10, at the Last Day Saloon, with the Crux, Frankie Boots, Girls & Boys and E Minor and the Dirty Diamonds. 115 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 7:30pm. $10. 707.545.2343.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Redwood Cafe

The Rocks Bar & Lounge

Aug 15, Junkyard Academy. Thurs, Open Mic. Second Friday of every month, Hundred.

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Rodney Strong Vineyards Aug 11, Al Jarreau & the George Duke Trio. 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Russian River Brewing Co Aug 9, American Dog. Aug 12,


West of Next. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Schon Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon

Aug 11, Catfish Jack. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Aug 10, DJ Oz. Aug 11, El Radio Fantastique. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Society: Culture House

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Aug 8, Rocket House. Aug 9, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sandwich. Aug 10, 85s. Aug 11, Chrome Johnson. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Aug 10, McKenna Faith. Aug 11, Walt the Dog. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Aug 11, the Kalahari Experience: Voices of South Africa. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Sausalito Seahorse

Aug 14, Semi-Evolved Simians, Rat Damage, Slandyr, Decent Criminal. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Aug 9, Blind Will. Aug 11, Freddy Clark. Aug 12, Orquesta Borinquen. Wed, Marcello and Seth. Fri, Julio Bravo. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Aug 10, Honey Wilders. Aug 8 and , Aug 12, Frankie Boots. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Vino di Amore Aug 11, Kerouac. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 10, Groove Society. Aug 11, This Old Earthquake. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Aug 12, Spark and Whisper. 1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Aug 8, New Riders of the Purple Sage. Aug 9, Eric McFadden and Clowns in Orbit. Aug 10-11, God Street Wine. Aug 12, the Shut-ins. Aug 14, Eddie Roberts & the West Coast Sounds. Mon, Open Mic. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 9-12, Terrapin Hoedown. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 9, Brian Cline. Aug 10, North Bay Blues Jam with West Coast Blues Review. Aug 11, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW

MIRACLE MULE Aug 10 Gumbo Honky Tonk Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

THE PULSATORS Aug 11 Funky New Orleans R&B, Driving Sat

Blues and Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll 8:30pm

Sun

Aug 12

BBQ ON THE LAWN! DAN HICKS AND THE HOT LICKS Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm

Thur

SINGER/S ONGWRITER SERIES HOSTED BY LAURALEE BROWN

Aug 16

7:00pm / No Cover

JEB BRADYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAND Aug 17 R&B and Blues Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

Sat

Aug 18

Aug 8, Opry at the Opera House. Aug 10, Jane Monheit. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 8, Jim â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kimoâ&#x20AC;? West. Aug 10, Tony Lindsay. Aug 11, Tim Hockenberry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

THE RANCHO ALLSTARS FEATURING

MIKE DUKE

Great Dance Band! 8:30pm

Napa Valley Opera House Sun

Aug 19

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Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

CD RELEASE PARTY

THE BILLYLOVE EXPRESS

Dance to Funky, Soulful Originals 8:00pm

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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Aug 9, Weird Al Yankovic. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Wells Fargo Center Aug 11, Seal & Macy Gray. Aug 15, ZZ Top. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 9, Eric Vaughn Quartet. Aug 10, the Nickel Slots and Todd Morgan & the Emblems. Aug 12, Tim Hockenberry and Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Outside Lands Festival Neil Young, Metallica, Stevie Wonder, Skrillex and many others in three-day fest. Aug 10-12 at Golden Gate Park.

Nicki Minaj A toy doll with tourettes whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been fed three mochas. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to love? Aug 9 at the Paramount Theatre.

Cafe Tacuba

Ali Akbar College of Music

Cross-pollinating rock band from Naucalpan, Mexico, with huge fanbase up north. Aug 9 at the Fox Theater.

Aug 11, Gaayatri Kaundinya and Alam Khan. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6264.

Cobra Skulls

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Aug 9, Arrival from Sweden: The Music of ABBA. Aug 10, World Disco DJ Night. Aug 11, Wall Street. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club Aug 9, Natt Johnson, Omatic, Zelus. Aug 10, Devin the Dude. Aug 11, Buddy Owenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthday Bash. Aug 12, Phil Hardgrave & the Continentals. Aug 15, Miles

Trio from Reno, Nev, play everlasting all-ages punk club with Murderburger, Hard Girls and more. Aug 11 at 924 Gilman.

The Blackbyrds Doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it in the park. Doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it after dark. Ooooh yeah. Aug 11-12 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER WED 8/8s0-$//23ss FUNK & GOSPEL BAND

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STEVE KIMOCK WITH BERNIE WORRELL, WALLY INGRAM, AND ANDY HESS FRI 8/24s8PM DOORSss DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

POP FICTION PLUS METAL SHOP

35.s7PM DOORSss ROCK/POP

BROWNOUT

3!4s8PM DOORSs!$6$/3s AMRICAN SINGER/SONGWRITER

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sebastopol Library

Sweetwater Music Hall


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28 BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

T THUR HUR – AUG AUG 9

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ C ABARET/ VARIET Y

CABARET C ABARET D DE EC CALIENTE ALIENTE WITH W ITH U UPRIGHT PRIGHT TWISTED TWISTED

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

HOUSE HOUSE F FUNDRAISER UNDRAISER +B BABY ABY SEAL SEAL CLUB CLUB

$$10 10 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

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SYMPTOMATICS S YMPTOMATICS S WORLD W ORLD / SO SOUL UL / R REGGAE EG G A E

Come see us!

+M MATT ATT M MASIH A SI H M MUSIC USIC

Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS LLIVE IVE / FFLAMENCO L AMENCO / D DANCE A N CE

SOL S OL F FLAMENCO LAMENCO

+P PAMELA AMELA MARTINEZ, M AR T I N E Z , M MARK ARK TTAYLOR, AYLOR, JJOELLE OELLE GONCALVES, GONCALVES, GEOFF GEOFF HAWKINS HAWKINS

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THUR T HUR – AUG AUG 1 16 6

JJUKE UKE JOINT JOINT & DOUBLE DOUBLE D PRESENT PRESENT DOWNTEMPO D OWNTEMPO / ELECTRONICA ELEC TRONIC A / CHILL CH I L L

RANDOM R ANDOM RAB R AB

+ BELI3VER BELI3VER ((WIN WIN W WIN IN P PRO, RO, OAK) OAK ) & LLENKADU ENK ADU

$$15 15 ADV/$20 ADV/$20 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI F RI – AUG AUG 1 17 7

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS JJAZZ A ZZ / EEXP XP / A ALT LT

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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DOWNTEMPO D OWNTEMPO / ELECTRONICA ELEC TRONIC A / CHILL CH I L L

PETER P ETER GOETZ GOETZ + SOFIA: SOFIA :

Cover May Apply

PETERS P ETERS S SURF UR F F FILM ILM F FEATURE EATURE

AFROMASSIVE A FROMASSIVE & LLAFA AFA TAYLOR TAYLOR @ FIRE FIRE FLY FLY ((OUTDOOR OUTDOOR FFIRE IRE D DANCE ANCE SSHOW) H OW ) + M MALARKEY ALAR RKEY

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

At 5:30pm. Napa Valley Museum, “Memory Bank II: An Exhibition of Place and People” captures people and places of Napa’s history during an era of transition in photos and film. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

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BEAT B EAT / HIP HIP HOP HOP / ELECTRONICA|AFRO ELECTRONICA|AFRO / WORLD WORLD / FUNK FUNK

At 4:30pm. Occidental Center for the Arts, “Body of Art,” figurative art from local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

At 6pm. Gallery 300, “Shadow of the Ego,” mixed media by Cat Kaufman. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

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Aug 10

At 5pm. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, “Culture Shock!” with works by Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

SUN S UN – A AUG UG 12 12

OPENINGS

Aug 11

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT – A AUG UG 1 11 1

SERITAH S ERITAH

Galleries

Thur, Aug 9 X$350 for all beer on tap 6pm, Sign-ups at 5pm XOPEN MIC Fri, Aug 10 XJazz/Funk/Groove 9pm XHUNDRED Sun, Aug 12 X4pm XIRISH MUSIC Wed, Aug 15 X7pm

THE JUNKYARD ACADEMY Thur, Aug 16 X6pm, Sign-ups at 5pm

OPEN MIC Fri, Aug 17 X5:30pm XBRIAN FRANCIS 9pm XREDWOOD COMBO Vocal Jazz/R&B X

8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868 www.redwoodcafe.com

At 2pm. Marin Society of Artists, “Summer Harvest Show: Good Is Plenty,” juried exhibit for MSA members working in 2-D and 3-D. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Art Works Downtown

Through Sep 8, “Second Nature,” paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects on the abundance of the natural world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Aug 10-Sep 28, “Organic Intentions,” dynamic sculptural works by Bay Area artists Mari Andrews, Mary Button Durell & Patricia Lyons Stroud. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Occidental Center for the Arts

China Camp State Park

Aug 10-Oct 14, “Body of Art,” figurative art from local artists. Reception, Aug 10, 4:30pm. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Historical Museum and Library

Gallery Route One Aug 10-Sep 30, 150 artists each receive a small wooden box to create something amazing. Nothing living, though. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Marin MOCA

Through Sep 9, “Showin’ on the River,” juried fine art featuring 25 artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Gallery Aug 13-Sep 30, “Wild Prayer: Listening to Nature,” acrylic paintings by Sandy Eastoak. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum

Aug 11-Sep 1, “Shadow of the Ego,” mixed media by Cat Kaufman. Reception, Aug 11, 6pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Aug 11-Oct 16, “Culture Shock!” with works by Becoming Independent and community artists. Reception, Aug 11, 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa.

Through Sep 13, “Cross Pollination,” the art of painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Gallery 300

Aug 11, Dorallen Davis, Bernd Enders, Barbara Moffat and Laura Culver paint on-location and sell pieces for Friends of China Camp. N San Pedro Road, San Rafael. 415.456.0766.

Aug 11, 10am-5pm, Quilts of Hoffman Challenge and quilts made by quilt lovers. $5. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Through Aug 12, 11am-5pm, “Santa Rosa’s Chinatown,” exhibition explores how Chinese communities developed in Sonoma County, with special attention on Santa Rosa. $5-$7. Through Sep 9, “Trees” featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, “Sonoma Oaks: Points of View” featuring Hugh Livingston’s multimedia installations on the patterns and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

SONOMA COUNTY

MARIN COUNTY

Through Aug 19, “Horizons,” an artist members exhibition runs concurrent with “Jeffrey Sully: Poetic Contours.” Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Aug 31, Seven artists show their paintings in this summer salon. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Sep 23, “Entering the Wild” featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum Aug 11-Sep 23, “Memory Bank II: An Exhibition of Place and People” captures people and places of Napa’s history during an era of transition in photos and film. Reception, Aug 11, 5:30pm. Panel discussion, Aug 18, 2pm. Through Sep 29, “Secret Life of Paper,” celebrating paper as an art medium. Includes work by Patti Brown, Deborah Donahower and others. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.


Events

29

Caribbean theme, with dancing to the music of the Pan Extasy Caribbean party band. Food available from culinary stars. Aug 11, 6pm. $100. Culinary Institute of America, 2555 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.2320.

Napa Town & Country Fair “American as Apple Pie” theme. Daily and nightly concerts. Aug 8-12, noon-10pm. $10-$13. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa.

San Rafael Food & Wine Festival Live jazz music, winetasting from regional wineries, chef demonstrations and food tastings. Aug 11, 1-5pm. Free. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

BLANE, GROWN UP Actor Andrew McCarthy is at

Book Passage on Aug. 10. See Readings, p30.

Uke-a-Palooza Performance by King Kukulele, and guests are encouraged to bring their own ukulele and perform. Aug 10, 6pm. Free. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Wine Country Baseball Classic Six to 12 teams compete for the third annual Leonhardt Cup at fields throughout Sonoma County, including SRJC. Through Aug 12. $10. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

Field Trips Canoe Trip Meandering float down the Russian River sipping wine. Aug 11, 9:30am. $70-$80. Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

Historic Core Walking Tour Walk downtown led by a member of the Napa County landmarks docent team. Sat, Aug 11, 10am. $10-$20. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. 707.224.1739.

Solar Observing Safely look at the Sun through a solar telescope. Aug 11-12, noon-4pm. Free. Robert Ferguson Observatory,

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

“Coraline” on Aug 10. 8:30pm. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa.

Film

Food & Drink

The Artist Film night in the park with the 2012 Academy Award winner for best picture. Aug 10, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

La Bayadére Paris Opera Ballet showcases the major work of dancer Rudolf Nureyev, set in lush, exotic India. Sun, Aug 12, 10am. $12-$15. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

The Muppet Movie Film night in the park with the original Muppet movie. Sing along to “The Rainbow Connection.” Aug 11, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

We Have a Pope A cardinal refuses the office of pope and talks about it with a therapist in this comedy. Aug 11, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

West End Summer Movie Night Movies in the barn include

Ballroom & Dining Room One-hour dance lessons followed by a special threecourse menu created by chef Aaron Wright. Second Mon of every month. $40. Lark Creek Inn, 234 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Danny Mia Knife Demo Sheraton Hotel executive chef shows off his Kikuichi knife skills. Aug 12, 2:30pm. Free. Sonoma Cutlery, 130 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.6433.

Farm to Table: Cook Like a Local Meet the Healdsburg farmers market purveyors, tasting and learning about their exquisite products. Aug 11, 9:30am. $208. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999.

The French Market Experience a Parisian intimate neighborhood market with antiques, jewelry, French music and crepes. Aug 12, ) 9am-3pm. Marin

30

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8 –14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Hands Across the Valley


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Readings

Hemophilia Fundraiser

Aug 8, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saved by Beauty: Adventures of an American Romantic in Iranâ&#x20AC;? with Roger Housden. Aug 14, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Age of Desireâ&#x20AC;? with Jennie Fields. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Eighteen-winery tasting event. Aug 12, 4pm. $150. Sonoma Mission Inn & Spa, 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma.

Homemade Mozzarella

Pinot & Paella

Occidental Center for the Arts

Peter Greenberg CBS travel editor in conversation with Phil Cousineau. Aug 9, 8pm. $10. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Andrew McCarthy Actor, director and travel writer in conversation with Don George. Aug 10, 8:30pm. $10. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Susan Orlean

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Higher Space Gallery Aug 15, 7pm, Vignettes & Postcards, writings from the evening workshop at Shakespeare and Company, Paris. Rebound Bookstore, 1611 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

Lectures

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Book Passage

Transform one gallon of milk first into curds and then into a pound of mozzarella balls in less than one hour. Aug 9, 7:30pm. $69. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999. Jose Castaneda prepares a perfect pair for Pinot. Aug 12, noon-4pm. $24-$30. Joseph Phelps Freestone Vineyards Guest Center, 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. 707.874.1010.

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New Yorker staff writer in conversation with Don George. Aug 11, 8:30pm. $10. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Camilla Schneider President of the Task Force on the Americas will report on her participation in a recent delegation to Ecuador. Aug 10, 7:30pm. $5-$10. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Aug 12, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What the Animals Taught Me: Stories of Love and Healing from a Farm Animal Sanctuaryâ&#x20AC;? with Stephanie Marohn. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

River Reader Aug 9, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Family Valuesâ&#x20AC;? with Eric Newcastle. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Aug 8, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When We Were the Kennedysâ&#x20AC;? with Monica Wood. Aug 14, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Southern Homeâ&#x20AC;? with Waights Taylor, Jr. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Aug 9, 6pm, Poet Laureate Summer Poetry Series, readings from Iris Dunkle, Terry Ehret and Katherine Hastings. $5-$10. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio 333 Second Thursday of every month, 7pm, Why There Are Words, reading series presents various writers on a theme. $5. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.8272.

Theater

Star Party Check out the Perseid Meteor Shower with the help of knowledgeable docents and high-powered ocular magnification. Aug 11-12, 9pm. $3. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Avenue Q Sesame Street-style puppets acting very much like adults. This show is not for kids, but it is hilarious. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 11. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Blithe Spirit An improbable farce by Noel Coward, presented by the Summer Stock Players. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 12. $5-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Circle Mirror Transformation During a six-week adult Creative Drama class, four strangers and their teacher learn more about themselves than they do about acting. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 26. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Enchanted April Play by Matthew Barber, based on the novel by Elizabeth Von Arnim. Designed, produced and directed by Michael Tabib. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 12. $12-$15. Hall for Performing Arts, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Greater Tuna The show focuses on small town Southern life. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Harvey Three Rabbit Productions presents the classic play about a man and his bunny. Directed by Rosie Frater. Thurs, Aug 9, 8pm, Sat, Aug 11, 8pm and Sun, Aug 12, 2pm. $18. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

King John Marin Shakespeare Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition under the stars is sure to strike a romantic chord. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $20 to $55. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

And Then There Were None

A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream

Silver Moon Theatre presents the Agatha Christie play directed by Nellie Cravens. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Aug 12. $18-$22. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Kate Kennedy directs Avalon Players for Shakespeare under the stars. Thurs-Sun, 7pm, through Aug 25. $25. Buena Vista Carneros, 18000 Old Winery Rd, ) Sonoma.

32


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32 Arts Events NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

( 30

CRITIC’S CHOICE

BY ROB BREZSNY

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

For the week of August 8

Robert Currier directs outdoor production set in Hawaii where the scent of hibiscus and twang of ukuleles will permeate Shakespeare’s story of lunatics, lovers and poets. Dates and times vary. Through Sep 30. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Picasso at the Lapin Agile Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso meet at a bar in Montmartre, Paris in 1904. Written by Steve Martin. Aug 10, 8pm and Aug 11, 2pm. $18. Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso meet at a bar in Montmartre, Paris in 1904. Written by Steve Martin. Aug 10, 8pm and Aug 11, 2pm. $18. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pinky When a sweetly romantic teenager named Pinky appears at the local bowling alley, nerdy highschooler David is instantly smitten. Dates and times vary. Thurs-Sun through Aug 11. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sister Cities Dark comedy written by Colette Freedman, directed by Jacquelyn Wells. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 19. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Sweet Charity This tender, poignant and funny look at the adventures in the ways of love features songs like “Hey Big Spender.” Dates and times vary. Through Aug 19. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Winnie the Pooh When Piglet gets roped into Kanga’s household Pooh goes to the rescue, but his appetite for honey gets him stuck in the door. Sat, 11am. through Aug 25. $7. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an

Astrology

FREE WILL

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Apollo astronaut Russell Schweickart had a vision of loveliness while flying through outer space in his lunar module. “One of the most beautiful sights is a urine dump at sunset,” he testified. He said it resembles a “spray of sparklers,” as 10 million little ice crystals shoot out into the void at high velocity. As you feed your quest for a lusty life, Aries, I urge you to be as quirky and resourceful as Schweickart. Come up with your own definitions about what’s gorgeous and revelatory. Take epiphanies any way you can get them. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Kilo Whiskey Tango Foxtrot CSA farm and CSR station join forces for KWTF Farm Fest “KWTF” is sure fun to say in polite company, but there’s nothing WTF-esque about the Sonoma County community radio station. Serious about getting on the terrestrial airwaves, the station holds a fundraiser this weekend at Sebastopol’s Laguna Farm. KWTF currently broadcasts online at KWTF.net and on an 11-watt station, KXCF 91.5, in Marshall. But the station needs $80,000 for a 420-watt tower to begin broadcasting on 88.1 FM from Bodega Bay. And so far, so good; in the four years since KWTF was conceived, “there were a lot of opportunities for this thing to shrivel up and die,” station manager Ben Saari says, “and it’s made it through a lot of tests.” Saari says Laguna Farm, which has a community supported agriculture weekly farm box subscription program, is a perfect match with KWTF: “What we’re trying to do with radio is sort of analogous to what they’re trying to do with food.” Performers include Odd Bird, Hot Club Beelzebub, Those Unknown, Girls in Suede, Semi-Evolved Simians and others on Saturday, Aug. 11, at Laguna Farm. 1764 Cooper Road, Sebastopol. 2–10pm. $12–$17. www.kwtf.net.—Nicolas Grizzle

item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St,

Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

At the heart of this horoscope is a quote from Maya Angelou. While it may seem schmaltzy, I assure you that its counsel will be essential to your success in the coming weeks. “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said,” said Angelou, “people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Can you see how valuable this principle might be for you, Taurus? If you hope to get what you desire, you should turn your empathy on full blast. If you’d like to supercharge your vitality, hone your skills as a judge of character. If you want to get the love you think you deserve, be a master at making people feel good in your presence.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) The coming week will be prime time to celebrate your eccentricities and cultivate your idiosyncrasies. Do you like ketchup on your bananas? Is heavy metal the music you can best relax to? Do you have a tendency to break out in raucous laughter when people brag about themselves? I really think you should make note of all the qualities that make you odd or unique, and express those qualities with extra intensity. That may grate on some people, true, but it should have a potent healing effect on you. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Here are my questions: Will you thrust your foot across that imaginary line, or will you back away from it, scouting around for an escape route? Will you risk causing a commotion in order to scratch the itch in your ambition? Or will you shuffle on back to your comfort zone and caress your perfect daydreams? Personally, Cancerian, I’m hoping you will elect to do what’s a bit unsettling. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you should. If you make a bold move, make sure you’re not angling to please or impress me—or anyone else, for that matter. Do it as a way to express your respect for yourself—or don’t do it.

LEO (July 23–August 22) When Tchaikovsky wrote the musical score for his famous 1812 Overture, it included 16 cannon shots. Literally. These blasts weren’t supposed to be made by, say, a sledgehammer pounded against a wooden mallet, but rather by the detonation of an actual cannon. As crazy as that is, you’ve got to admire Tchaikovsky’s creative gall. He was going way out of the box, calling on a source of sound no other composer had ever done. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to be inspired by his example, Leo. In your own chosen field, mess with the rules about how to play in your chosen field. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

“And if nothing is repeated in the same way,” says poet Antonio Porchia, “all things are last things.” That’s a good principle to adapt for your own purposes, Virgo. A few weeks from now, I bet you’ll be enmeshed in an orgy of novelty, creating yourself from scratch and exploring experiences you’ve never heard of before. But in the meantime, as you bring this cycle to a close, be equally inventive about how you finish things off. Don’t imitate the approach you used in tying up loose ends in the past. Don’t put stale, boring karma to rest in stale, boring ways. Nothing repeated! All things last things!

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) All of us feel bad sometimes—sad, discouraged, helpless, unloved and all the rest. It’s a natural part of being human. Here’s the good news: I am not predicting you will go through a phase like that anytime soon. Here’s the even better news: The coming week will be an excellent time to come up with effective strategies for what to do in the future when you go through a rough period. For

example, instead of wallowing in self-pity or berating yourself for your weakness, maybe you can resolve, next time, to amble aimlessly out in nature, dance to cathartic music for three hours or go to the gym and smack around a punching bag.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

When a domesticated weasel captures some treasure or beats out a competitor for food, it performs a celebratory dance that’s referred to as the “weasel war dance.” During this triumphant display, it might hiss, arch its back, fluff out its tail and hop around madly. I encourage you to come up with your own private version of this ritual, Scorpio. It can be more dignified if you like: snapping your fingers, singing a magical phrase or raising your arms in a V-forvictory gesture. Whatever you choose, do it after every accomplishment, no matter how small: buying groceries, arriving at an appointment on time, getting a good new idea or any other success.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) One out of every four of us is afraid that we have missed our calling—that we have misread our soul’s code and failed to identify the labor of love that would provide our ultimate fuel for living. If you’re among this deprived group, I have good news: the next six weeks will be an excellent time to fix the problem, to leave the niche where you don’t belong and go off to create a new power spot. And if you are among the 75 percent of us who are confident you’ve found your vocation, the next six weeks will be prime time to boost your efforts to a higher level.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You can take this as a metaphor if you like, but I’m getting a psychic impression that you will soon be drawing on the energy of one of your past lives. Will it be a 13thcentury Chinese lute player or a kitchen maid from 15th-century France? Will you be high on the vitality you had when you were a Yoruba priest living in West Africa 300 years ago or when you were a 16th-century Guarani herbalist in what’s now Paraguay? I invite you to play with fantasies like these, even if you don’t believe they’re literally true. You might be surprised at the boost you get from imagining yourself alive in a different body and historical era. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) The Italian mattress company Sogniflex has created a bed with features designed to facilitate love-making. It has straps and handles, plus a trench that helps you get better traction. The extra-strong springs produce an exceptional bouncing action. You might consider buying one for yourself. The astrological omens suggest it’s time to play with more intensity in the intimate clinches. You could also try these things: 1. Upgrade your licking and sucking skills. 2. Cultivate your ability to listen receptively. 3. Deepen your sincere appreciation for what’s beautiful about anyone you’re attracted to. 4. Make yourself even more lovable than you already are. PISCES (February 19 March 20)

My $10-an-hour counsel only requires a few seconds to deliver. Here it is: “Never try to be someone you’re not. Discover what you were made for, and do it with all of your passionate intensity.” On the other hand, Pisces, my $100-a-minute wisdom is more complicated, subtle and hard to impart in less than an hour of storytelling. Here’s a hint of it: There are times when you can get interesting and even brilliant results by experimenting with being something you’re not. Going against the flow of your instinctual urges and customary tendencies might tweak you in just the right way— giving you an exotic grace and wild depth when you ultimately return to the path you were born to tread.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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