Issuu on Google+

Tiny Homes p9 Delectable Insectibles p13 Sharon Jones’ Land p21

Everyone knows California’s other three-star chef. So who’s this Christopher Kostow?

p17

Magic at Meadowood


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Saturday, December 3, 7pm

1960'S HOLIDAY GLAM ROCK COSTUME PARTY! WITH AUTHOR MICHAEL LINDSAY-HOGG

Luck and Circumstance: A Coming of Age in Hollywood, New York, and Points Beyond Tickets are $15 per person or, buy a book and get two admissions and two drink tickets (Copperfield’s book receipt counts as two tickets) 1960’S HOLIDAY GLAM ROCK COSTUME PARTY! YOU’RE INVITED! 4&#"45010-$&/5&3'035)&"354p%FQPU4U

Info on more events at www.copperfieldsbooks.com or pick up a calendar in our store Montgomery Village Copperfield's moves across the Village to 775 Village Court. Opening 11/11/11!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM COPPERFIELD’S BOOKS Come see us this holiday season and let our booksellers help you find the perfect gift for someone you love. Enjoy: •

Excellent selections of books and gifts

•

Gift cards for those who like to select for themselves

•

Hot cider and complimentary gift wrap

• Shopper Bonus! Pick up Holiday Book Lists with recommendations in fiction, nonfiction, biography, humor, gift books, cookbooks, children’s, and more! Find great book and gift recommendations online at www.copperfieldsbooks.com and in our stores! • Need a little Kick this Holiday? With every purchase of $100 or more in our stores during December, we’ll give you a complimentary bag of Peet’s Coffee (while supplies last).

SUPER SALE: Buy 2, Get 1 Free on Publisher Overstock Sale books November 25 – December 4. Plus DOUBLE POINTS DAY for Reward Cards Holders on Black Friday!

NaNoWriMo Season!

Calling all writers for National Novel Writing Month. Our Petaluma store will be hosting a events designed to spark creativity and get words on the page. Inquire at our Petaluma store or online. 11/10 QNBOE 11/20 QN8SJUF*O &WFOUT#SJOHZPVSMBQUPQBOEDPNQPTFTPNFPGZPVS  XPSETJOUIFDPNQBOZPGPUIFSXSJUFST

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For tickets call 707.546.3600 (noon-6pm Tue-Sat) Online wellsfargocenterarts.org Highway 101 to River Road, Santa Rosa


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Bohemian

Live Entertainment

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Coyote Den

Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Bar & Dance Hall

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Copy Editor

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy $995* 800.573.DEBT Craig A. Burnett Attorney at Law

Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, John Blackwell, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Stett Holbrook, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Interns Anna Freeman, Lacie Schwarz, Alma Shaw

Design Director Kara Brown

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Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

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Sales Operations Manager Ashley Potter, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Dan Pulcrano; inset photos of Christopher Kostow by John Blackwell. Cover design by Kara Brown.


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nb TURN, TURN, TURN

Explosions of small red berries, the sky getting dark at 6pm, Melky Cabrera joining the Giants—welcome to fall!

This photo was submitted by Laure Lowe of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘I can no longer surprise people. The margin for error is zero. I have to work twice as hard.’ COVER STORY P17 No Running Inside the House

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Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Greez Zone p11 Dining p13 Wineries p16

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Film p23 Music p25 A&E p29 Astrology p34 Classified p35

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Reefer Madness, Indeed

Why ramp up an obviously failed war on drugs? BY JONAH RASKIN

T

he recent rash of news stories in local media about raids on marijuana gardens and dispensaries leads to an obvious conclusion: the prohibition of marijuana and the accompanying war on marijuana are both abject failures. Federal and state policies have resulted in crime and violence, just as the prohibition of alcohol led to crime and violence. The solution to the current problem is largely identical to the solution to the prohibition against alcohol: legalize it.

Many marijuana growers, dealers and users do not want legalization, much as many in law enforcement don’t want legalization either. Both have a great deal to gain from the prohibition of marijuana. Law enforcement gets good PR in the “war on drugs” and big budgets year after year. The marijuana traffickers get to be outlaws and to make big bucks. The losers are the American people who pay through the nose to buy marijuana and underwrite the continuation of the war. There have been more than 800,000 arrests every year for the last 10 years on marijuana charges. Since 1970, more than 20 million people have been arrested on marijuana charges. Those arrests have not deterred the growth of the marijuana industry and the steady arrival of new generations of pot smokers, stoners and heads. “Reefer Madness” has gone on far too long—for 74 years. It doesn’t seem likely to end soon, and the recent raids on dispensaries will have the effect of driving dealers back into the lucrative black market and the unregulated underground economy which has created marijuana millionaires. It’s time to look honestly at the issue, to see all sides, and think rationally about a subject that many are incapable of examining in the cold light of reason. The lack of clarity only adds to the problem. As citizens in Northern California, the U.S. region that grows more marijuana acre-by-acre—and better marijuana, too, than any other region in the United States—surely we ought to be able to put our heads together to come up with rational solutions for ourselves and for the nation at large. Jonah Raskin is an SSU professor and the author of ‘Marijuanaland: Dispatches from an American War.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Wake Up, Ignorati

The fallacy in Duclo Haymaker’s reasoning is actually hidden in his letter (“Money Talks,” Nov. 2) when he states “our political system, which is the entity that controls our banking and economic systems.” He has it completely backwards! The truth is that the private central banks like the Fed (in collusion with the majority of Fortune 500 corporations on whose boards they sit) own government and control the economy. This is a fundamental principle at the root of the Occupy movement. His well-directed complaint about campaign finance addresses an overt manifestation of this very principle. Overpopulation, however, is an overrated issue. It is the self-serving politics and greed of big money that prevent all 7 billion of us from eating everyday and living peaceful, productive lives. David Weinstock’s observation that no one is holding up a “Register and Vote” sign (“Rock the Vote,” Nov. 2) overlooks another fundamental principle of the Occupy movement: Our vote no longer changes things in a government that no longer represents us. As a government that only serves the aforementioned banks and corporate interests, America has become a true plutocracy. Our only recourse is to take action outside of the limits it imposes on us—new rules! The Occupy phenomenon cannot be stopped any more than the internet can be shut down. It is already resonating worldwide. Its truly collective and decentralized nature represents the way things will be done in the future. Big money desperately clings to a dying model and will fall one way or another. The grievances both of the Tea Party and the Occupy movement, as well as the global 99 percent, can ultimately be traced to the same source—control of our money supply by private interests, i.e. central banks. The tactics of big money are ages old and succinctly documented in Andrew Hitchcock’s online timeline “The History of the

Money Changers.” Google “private central bank” or “money changers” to school yourself and your friends. If the Tea Party people, as well the ignorati who are unable to see or refuse to acknowledge the faux in Fox News, would wake up and realize they are slitting their own throats in serving as Big Money’s minions, we could all join together and collectively turn the tide for real against a common foe of liberty and justice for all.

MALCOLM CLARK Occidental

Bank on It On Nov. 5, Sonoma County residents converged in league with over 1,000 cities nationwide in “Move Your Money” rallies. In just the last month, hundreds of thousands of American citizens have moved their money out of the “too big to fail” corporate banks to locally based community banks and credit unions. These same ‘Big Four’ corporate banks, you will recall, got the sweetheart deal of the century: their bad bets paid off with 100 cents on the dollar and a getout-of–jail free card. Their CEOs and senior staff have shown not a shred of social conscience over continuing to shower themselves with outlandish pay packages. They haven’t missed a beat when millions are losing their homes and entire neighborhoods are being destabilized, scattered and demoralized by chronic joblessness and consequent poverty. They refuse to take even the tiniest ‘haircut,’ while demanding payment in full for houses now worth half the paper price on the note. This after we made them whole in the great bailout. No wonder folks are riled up. The one simple act of moving your money is a concrete statement that we as a free people can make. Put your money where your beliefs are and invest in locally owned banks and credit unions who have a stake in our community and whose fortunes are aligned with our own. Make the move and feel the power of acting on your convictions.

BEN BOYCE Sonoma


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

Local Financial Services Now In Sebastopol! Redwood Credit Union Opens 18th Branch

E

very day, people tired of excessive bank fees are switching to Redwood Credit Union (RCU) for a safe, honest and affordable place to bank. Now North Bay residents and businesses can enjoy added convenience with RCU’s new full-service branch in Sebastopol! sFree Checking & Debit Cards–no monthly fees! sFREE Online Banking + Bill Pay s28,000 Fee Free ATMs sPersonal & Business Loans sInvestments and Insurance

Switch to RCU today and save!

(707) 545-4000 www.redwoodcu.org/sebastopol Sebastopol Branch Now Open to Serve You! 7840 Covert Lane (near Pacific Market) You can benefit and join RCU! Live, work or own a business in the North Bay or San Francisco and join with just $5 in a savings account. Clearance through ChexSystems required; restrictions may apply. Deposits federally insured by the NCUA. RCU Insurance Services license no. 0D91054. We look forward to serving you!

Dept. of Murakami Imagine our surprise when we bought Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 and noticed, right there on the first page, two, count ‘em two, typos. Well, hell, if one of the most anticipated books of the year can get things wrong, so can we. To wit: In our Oct. 12 Best Of handbook, Jeffrey Seligson is identified with Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate; the proper company name is Wine Country Group Realtors. Additionally, in an Oct. 26 preview of Forchetta / Bastoni, we named a former restaurant in the Sebastopol location as Ruby’s, when everyone knows it was called Lucy’s Cafe! That’s two errors, then. Can we get a book deal?

THE ED. Listening to Jazz and Eating Spaghetti

Top Five 1 Weird Al Yankovic name-

checks Bad Ass Coffee at Wells Fargo Center show

MELTS FAT FAST! Get in shape for the holidays now!

2

‘Waterbed Hev’ goes to the great freestyle battle in the sky: R.I.P., Heavy D

3 Chrome Lotus owner

Gianni Messmer starts a “Stop Occupying Downtown Santa Rosa!!!” Facebook page

4

Deer crashes through window at taco restaurant in Alpharetta, Georgia

5 It’s November, and soup is amazing. Hooray, soup!

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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WINE NOTES : SPECIAL EDITION

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Experience 130 Years of Excellence ~ Taste 4 signature wines and learn professional tasting techniques on this insider’s tour of Beringer wines and vines. While you sip and savor, explore our demonstration vineyard, Old Stone Winery and wine-aging tunnels. PRICE

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Jack Journey

Warren Miller’s latest film, Like There’s No Tomorrow, more than lives up to its title. The movie offers all the death-defying ski and snow action that we’ve come to expect from the extreme-sports movie producer. For those who want a taste of adventure without challenging death on rugged Chilean slopes, there is hope. On Wednesday, Nov. 16, the Bohemian and Lagunitas Brewing Co. host a party to celebrate the North Bay film release of Miller’s latest, providing the opportunity to tell your gnarliest Black Diamond tale over pint specials. Enter to win a trip for two to Heavenly, shuttle bus trips to Tahoe and tickets to the Nov. 17 film premiere at the Wells Fargo Center. The pre-party gets down on Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the Lagunitas Tap Room. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 6:30– 9pm. Free. 707.527.1200.

Tot Hike

SMALL WONDER A typical house by Jay Schafer, who lives in Graton and who’s inspired compact-dwellers nationwide.

Little Boxes

Living tiny with small-home guru Jay Schafer

T

he allure of living in something tiny—like, say, a shoe—has long held romantic sway in our imaginations. Who doesn’t love the aesthetic preciousness of doll-houses or, for that matter, those amazing space-maximizing, nook-and-cranny-exploiting rooms at IKEA? A year ago, Gusty and Jason

decided that they wanted to downsize their possessions and take to the road. After some Craigslist sleuthing, the couple found a woman in Mississippi looking to sell her 8-by-17-foot tiny house. They paid $16,000 and towed it across the country, landing at Green Valley Village in Sebastopol, where it cost them $300 a month to park. But being cooped up through the rainy season drove them into a roomier house on the property. The tiny house—now for rent—sits empty

BY JESSICA DUR

near the woods, like a quaint relic out of a fairy tale. The mastermind behind its design is Jay Schafer, the creator of Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, which sells 24 different floor plans for houses ranging from 65 to 837 square feet. For those reluctant to build their own, Tumbleweed also sells readymade tiny houses for an average of $35,000. Schafer built his first tiny house (110 square feet) in Iowa in 1999, and lived in it for five years before moving ) 10

Jim and Betty Doerksen purchased Ranchero Mark West, a 122-acre property five miles east of Santa Rosa, in 1967. Since then, they’ve planted countless trees and rejuvenated the property’s creeks. The Doerksens take forest stewardship very seriously; for the past 12 years, they’ve partnered with open-space preservationists Landpaths to offer educational and family outings that teach and inspire stewardship in the next generation. This weekend, as part of their “No Child Left Inside” series, Landpaths offers a “New Parents Hike” geared toward those with kids two and under, though older siblings are also welcome. Take the kids outside on Saturday, Nov. 12, at Ranchero Mark West. 11am. Free. Participants must RSVP at www. landpaths.org for more details and exact meeting location. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

Tiny Houses ( 9 out to Sonoma County, where he built himself another, even tinier houseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;70 square feet, smaller than many peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bathrooms. A self-described â&#x20AC;&#x153;claustrophile,â&#x20AC;? Schafer is one of the few people whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually beneďŹ ted from the economic downturn: as money gets tighter, so do peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s living spaces. His self-published tome, The Small House Book, has seen a sharp rise in sales, and his company currently sells about 10 sets of tiny house plans a month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re essentially selling a dream,â&#x20AC;? Schafer explains. Three years ago, after getting married and having a son, Schafer moved his family into a 500 square-foot house in Graton. His tiny house remains on the property, a cozy office space with a sleeping loft in case one of the parents needs a nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s respite from the baby. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My deďŹ nition of small is one in which all the space is being used well,â&#x20AC;? Schafer tells me on a recent morning, as we sit on two plush chairs in the cathedral-ceilinged great room of his tiny house. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I deliberately made the doorway small,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;to create the feeling of space after you walk through it.â&#x20AC;? Indeed, everything is artfully, brilliantly deliberate, from the vertical stainless steel bathtub (designed by caskmakers in Healdsburg) to the secret double-door closet where Schafer hangs his neat penciled blueprints. As a kid living in a 4,000-squarefoot trophy house in Iowa, Schafer actually envied the kids who lived in smaller, cozier homes; they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to spend hours vacuuming pastures of unused space. After studying painting in college, he called a number of small spaces home: a dome made of pine, an uninsulated 1964 Airstream and sometimes, for the night, the backseat of a car. Inspired by â&#x20AC;&#x153;religious architecture and vernacular common sense,â&#x20AC;? Schafer began designing tiny houses for funâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; until he discovered that they violated state building and zoning codes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I found out that

living in a tiny house was actually illegal in the United States,â&#x20AC;? he tells me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;then I had to do it.â&#x20AC;? It took him nearly a year to free himself of unnecessary accumulations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I took pictures of everything,â&#x20AC;? he says, and then, too impatient to even sell his paintings, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I took them to the dump and watched them get buried by a tractor.â&#x20AC;? Schafer believes that disentangling from â&#x20AC;&#x153;the secular idolatryâ&#x20AC;? of things can make people happier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting to know oneself,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is largely a subtractive process.â&#x20AC;? People, apparently, are hungry for less. In fact, so big has the tiny-house movement gotten that Schafer, who was recently proďŹ led in the New Yorker, built a fence to protect his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s privacy. His architecture, however, has proved harder to protect: people plagiarize his designs and brag about their accomplishments on the internet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,â&#x20AC;? Schafer says with characteristic nonchalance, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we contact them and ask for our money.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given workshops all over the nation, and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fenclâ&#x20AC;? design recently became spotlighted, thanks to Santa Rosa High School junior Austin Hay, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building his own tiny house, an enviable (and ecological) option to dormliving when he goes off to college. Thanks to all the press coverage, the county building department has been inundated with calls from interested parties. But, as Schafer points out, mandates are handed down from the state, the nation and even the International Code Council, which usually dictate that the smallest a â&#x20AC;&#x153;legalâ&#x20AC;? house can be is about 261 square feet. Still, the key to loophole heaven is quite simple: put it on wheels. Despite his Zen-like calm, Schafer is enraged over the paradox that banks will deny people loans for tiny (read: affordable) houses, but are happy to sell them too-big homes that become â&#x20AC;&#x153;debtorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prisons.â&#x20AC;? Creating tiny houses is at once his passion and his rebellion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a form of civil disobedience,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a way to creatively vent my anger.â&#x20AC;?


Green Zone

Post office closures cutting off community BY JULIANE POIRIER

W

hile urbanites struggle to create sustainable community, residents in rural areas, who more often live in naturally occurring community, are losing the centralizing presence of a rural post office.

The 300 or so residents of Oakville were notified by the USPS last month that the 144-year-old Napa Valley post office at Highway 29 and Oakville Grade would be the subject of the dreaded “discontinuance feasibility study,” the harbinger of a post office closure. For a town so small that the USPS had to conduct its Oct. 26 public comments meeting in a town a few miles away, the Oakville Post Office is much more than a place to buy stamps. Over a hundred townspeople showed up to protest the closure. “It’s part of our identity as a town,” says Oakville resident Colleen Croft. “You can run into everyone from a winery business owner to a person who picks grapes, and strike up a great conversation. My neighbor Maria

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Not at This Address

Dutra has been the holder of Box 1 for almost 60 years.” Even if protesting patrons opted for rural delivery, the carbon footprint of the USPS would expand. But postal administrators are focused on their financial crises. The rise in email and the drop in first class postal revenue, as well as a crippling Republican-borne mandate requiring the Postal Service to pre-fund its employee pensions 75 years into the future, has prompted planned closures of approximately 3,600 small post offices. The Yountville Vets Home is on that list, and protesters are asking how men and women in wheelchairs are supposed to go collect their mail off-site. “Any time you touch a post office, it’s a community issue,” says Augustine Ruiz, regional spokesperson for the USPS. “We document public concerns, and nothing is set in stone until the internal and external information has been collected.” Oakville plans to fight. Might any business or political connection of Oakville’s well-todo community hold sway in the ultimate decision? Ruiz says no. “It has nothing to do with the affluence of the community, or we wouldn’t have closed the Moraga Country Club Post Office.” That office was one of about 226 planned closures in the district to which Oakville belongs. “All of this is being done so we can stay in business,” says Ruiz. Local winegrowers want to stay in business, too. But the Oakville address is central to their official wine appellation. “We have 39 wineries and 19 winegrowers in our association,” said Larry McGuire, president of the Oakville Winegrowers. “For us, the use of Oakville in our letterhead as our mailing address is critical.” Some rural post offices are being replaced with skeletal services housed in retail establishments. Ironically, the USPS calls them “Village Post Offices.” Sadly, they come without a postmaster.

11

WELLNESS

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Holiday Soap Making Class 11/26/11 - 2:00 – 4:00pm Just in time to holiday gift-giving. Join MoonEssence for a fun, FREE interactive soap making class.

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12


CRAWLING IN LOVE Yes, those are mealworms on ice cream, and, no, you don’t have to eat them.

Full Squirm Edible insects continue their trajectory as the next bug thing BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

t’s only a matter of culture and geography that we ride horses instead of eating them. The same goes for cheese. While some cultures find eating fermented mammary gland secretions kind of gross, we love it, especially melted on top of the charred flesh of the same animals we raise for said mammary gland secretions. Go figure.

What we choose to eat isn’t really much of a choice of at all. It’s predetermined by our culture, and those cultural biases are hard to shake. Consider a readily available form of protein that is not only cheap and delicious, it’s nutritionally dense and environmentally benign. It’s got everything going for it except a little public-relations problem: it happens to be insects. But culinary trend watchers take note: the buzz surrounding edible insects is building.

Last summer, San Francisco resident and artist Monica Martinez created an insect street food project called Don Bugito as part of the San Francisco Street Food Festival. She plans to open her food cart as a full-fledged business with the help of La Cocina, a food business incubator that focuses on women and immigrant communities. “You’re going to start seeing edible insects all over the Bay Area,” says Martinez. “I’m not the only one doing this. Hopefully, it

becomes very popular.” Martinez showcased her cooking before a standing-room only crowd last month at the Headlands Center for the Arts in Sausalito. I don’t imagine the hundred or more attendees crowding into the old military mess hall at Fort Barry were particularly bold or adventurous eaters; the food was simply good, no holding of noses required. (I brought my seven-year-old son, and he had more trouble with the spiciness of some of the food rather than the fact he was eating bugs.) Edible insects were a key component of pre-Hispanic cuisine in Mexico, so serving a Mexican-themed meal was a natural. The first dish was escamoles—bean-shaped ant eggs found in the roots of agave plants—with browned butter. The nutty, wonderfully rich eggs are only harvested in the rainy season, so this was a rare treat. Paired with pasilla peppers, corn and zucchini sautéed in brown butter and served with fresh made blue corn tortillas, it was superb. Next came a crunchy salad of toasted crickets, pumpkin seeds, jicama and sweet potato in a lime vinaigrette. While the crispy toffee mealworms (they taste just like bacon fat) over vanilla ice cream were good, better was the crispy wax moth larvae served on a rich corn custard with spicy tomato sauce and a sprinkling of cordyceps, a fungus with reputed medicinal properties which infects insect larvae with spores that germinate before the cocoons are formed. Will edible insects become as popular as Martinez predicts? Probably not. But sushi was once considered crazy culinary exotica, something that no redblooded American would eat. Now you can find raw fish at the lowliest shopping mall food court. Are mealworm tacos next? Free your mind and your stomach will follow. For more information about Don Bugito and edible insects, see www.minilivestock.org.

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Stett Holbrook

Dining

13


Dining

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14

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

De Schmire Hearty continental. $$-$$$. Informal, with emphasis on seafood. Generous portions, open kitchen, outside dining. Dinner daily. 304 Bodega Ave, Petaluma. 70.762.1901.

Dempseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alehouse

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SANTA ROSA SEAFOOD MARKET Local & Exotic

Largest selection of oysters Over 15 varieties Local King Salmon available NOW! Also at Windsor & Santa Rosa Farmers Markets

707.280.2285

946 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa corner of SR Ave & Petaluma Hill Rd

santarosaseafood.com

H oliday Catering www.TheOysterGirls.com LOCALLY GROWN DESIGNER OYSTERS 0RIVATE0ARTIESs7INERY%VENTS 7EDDINGSs(OLIDAY#ATERING

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Haven-style thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrĂŠes. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Water Street Bistro

Dierkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parkside Cafe

preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955.

Johnny Garlicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s California. $$. At Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, garlic is Godâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Pazzo Mediterranean-

Local Dungeness Crab Season Opens Nov 15

takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

Moroccan. $$-$$$. Dishes from Spain, France, Italy, Greece or Morocco that are all excellent, like the chicken Marrakech, goosed with Moroccan spices, garlic, onions, tomatoes, eggplant and almonds. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 132 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.763.3333.

Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrĂŠes. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Williâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious

Williâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Peter Lowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Cafe Gratitude Vegan. $-$$. Mecca for vegans and raw foodists. Clean, light, refreshing food. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 2200 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.824.4652. Casa MaĂąana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists


Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Bake or Buy? If you happen to have been laid off or downsized, or if you’re just broke, you’ve probably taken it upon yourself to make from scratch food you used to buy at the store. Mill Valley’s Jennifer Reese found herself out of a job as Entertainment Weekly’s book critic, and soon after, walking through the grocery store, she had a nagging feeling that she could—and should—be cooking from scratch instead of buying boxes and bottles. It raised a question: what if it actually costs more to make your own jelly, yogurt and ice cream? The result is Make the Bread, Buy the Butter, a funny, authoritative cookbook that breaks down what’s worth making from scratch and what’s not. Reese’s analysis is based on dollars and cents, but also investments of time. Sure, you could make your own hot dogs, but the labor and cleanup required test one’s patience. Most of the time, however, the answer is “make it.” The food industry would have us believe that fending for ourselves is far too difficult and that we need to buy mustard, bread, pesto, muffins and caramel corn. The reality is many of the foods we never considered making ourselves are ridiculously easy, and they usually taste infinitely better. Jennifer Reese speaks on Saturday, Nov. 12, at Book Passage. 1pm. Free. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.—Stett Holbrook

Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

Miguel’s Mexican-

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale

Enjoy our elegant holiday desserts Frangelica Hazelnut Cakes Pumpkin Cheesecakes Princess Cakes Pumpkin shaped

Pear Frangipan Tart Black Forest Cake

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides welcomes

Plus, our wonderful selection of award-winning breads, pastries, scones, muffins and holiday cookies.

PETRONI VINEYARDS

Now taking Thanksgiving orders

Lorenzo Petroni, Proprietor Friday, November 11, 2011 MENU

7225 Healdsburg Ave · Sebastopol 707.829.8101 1445 Town & Country Drive · Santa Rosa 707.527.7654 1353 Lincoln Ave · Calistoga 707.942.1443

Chilled Prawn Cocktail avocado, diced tomato, aurora sauce 2009 Sauvignon Blanc, Sonoma County

Tart Tatin of Ricotta roasted pepper, basil, balsamic glaze 2008 Chardonnay, Napa Valley

Orecciette Pasta rapini, spicy Italian sausage 2007 Rosso di Sonoma, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

Filet of Beef hazelnuts, red wine sauce, basil-mashed potatoes, julienne of vegetables 2005 Poggio alla Pietra, Brunello di Sonoma, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

Profiteroles bitter chocolate custard filled, cabernet sauce 2006 Cabernet Sauvignon, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

Coffee Service

Buster’s Barbecue

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Winemaker Dinner Series

SMALL BITES

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and

Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

$

99 per person, plus tax and gratuity

reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

15 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | N OV E M B E R 9 –1 5, 2 0 1 1 | B O H E M I A N.COM

with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.


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16

8ZLUO

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY

Syrah from ad man turned cellar geek. 1014 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa. Barrel tasting, by appointment only. 707.527.9700.

in the kind of Cabernet that makes the Wine Spectator drool. 2121 Diamond Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.942.0707.

Adobe Road Winery

Wind Gap Wines One-

Freemark Abbey In

time vintner of big, opulent Pax Syrah refocuses on coolclimate locales that yield a more savory, European style. 6450 First St., Forestville. By appointment only. 707.887.9100.

1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Woodenhead Damn

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual

Award-winning Cab, Pinot, Zin, Cab Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah. Their tasting room is located in Petaluma at the Racers Group Porsche race headquarters. 1995 S. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 707.939.7967.

Charles Creek Vineyards The wines dazzle. Chardonnays and Merlot, those old workhorses, shine. 483 First St. W., Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 707.935.3848.

Chateau St. Jean Winery Take the educational tour and sample both reserve and premier wines on acres of vineyard with gardens and gourmet food. Famed Riesling and rare Malbec. 8555 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.833.4134.

D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

DaVero Sonoma Get lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000.

David Coffaro Vineyards Coffaro specializes in unique red blends and Zinfandels. Coffaro keeps an online diary of his daily winemaking activities (www.coffaro.com/diary. html). 7485 Dry Creek Road, Geyserville. Appointment only. 707.433.9715.

Eric Kent Wine Cellars Nevermind the art of wine, there’s art on the wine. Limited release Chard, Pinot,

good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Clos Pegase Winery (WC) Practically an art museum. A 2,800-square-foot “cave theater” plays frequent host to parties and more. Tasting flight of four wines, red and white, $10. 1060 Dunaweal Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 800.366.8583.

Constant (WC) Boutique winery specializing

outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

Raymond Vineyards

W

hen Burgundy wine scion Jean-Charles Boisset bought De Loach Vineyards, he scarcely added a French accent to that name. With Buena Vista in the portfolio, he only plans to restore that historic cellar. But at Raymond Vineyards, a steady Napa Cab producer since the 1970s, he’s gone all-out. A cursory glance at the grounds, the glitz and the choice of activities that comprise the “Raymond Vineyards Experience” might prompt observers to confirm that old saw about Napa being a “wine Disneyland.” But no, that does not quite capture it at all. This is JeanCharles Land.

An overgrown 1950s ranch house, Raymond looks sedate enough on the outside. The grounds have been transformed into a “Theater of Nature,” where visitors may tour (with the aid of an iPod app) a demonstration biodynamic garden complete with herbs, vines, compost and animals. Chickens scratch around in their coop; goats thoughtfully munch hay. Inside, a left turn leads to the conservative main tasting room, while a right turn leads to the “Corridor of the Senses,” where a “pleasure pole” represents wine textures—velvet, fur, rubber—and a series of glass pots offer up a panoply of aromas. A wine library displays past vintages; wine seminars are held in the cool, gray Rutherford Room. Further on, the members-only Red Room is a dimly lit speakeasy decked out in red velvet, with leopard-print carpet. Out back, the surreal “outdoor living room” is furnished with white, Louis XV–style chairs. Extravagant? We’re not done yet. Beyond gold curtains, the JCB Room is outfitted with gold bricks, plush sofas and vintage Playboy magazines, while a replica stuffed leopard snarls in the corner. If this seems over-the-top, our host points out the faux gold-plated lamp in the shape of an AK-47. Ah-ha moment: Boisset’s personal touch is not merely lavish; there’s an abundant—if unironic and exuberant—sense of humor here. Just want to taste some Napa Cab? Welcome to the Crystal Cellar. Down a stainless-steel-sheathed hallway, the bar is located within a tank room. Lit in red and blue, with mannequins camping on the catwalks, it’s a clublike scene. Chandeliers and crystal doodads abound, and “everything here,” our host explains, “is for sale as well.” Over there, Boisset himself, wearing his trademarked gold smoking jacket, is leading a group in a song. After that, he bounds across the room to talk with a few ladies at the bar, ending their visit with an expansive gesture of his arms, declaring, “Life is but a moment of pleasure,” or words to that effect—it sounds better with a French accent. Raymond Vineyards, 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am to 4pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.963.3141. —James Knight


17

Meet Christopher Kostow, Meadowood’s rising star BY STETT HOLBROOK

C

hristopher Kostow doesn’t fit the stereotype of the hot, young chef. The 35-year-old at St. Helena’s Restaurant at Meadowood speaks quickly but thoughtfully. He was a philosophy major at Hamilton University in upstate New York, and still retains an intellectual air. With his square, black-framed Polo glasses and short-cropped beard, he looks the part of a smart, indie rocker. He favors a short-sleeved chef’s coat, and unlike many of his new-school colleagues, his arms are free of tattoos.

Behind the line, chefs are often merciless in the heat and pressure of dinner service. But in Meadowood’s utilitarian kitchen, Kostow commands a staff of more than a dozen cooks with an easy calm. He orders an AWOL pantry chef back to her station in a simple, matterof-fact way. He calls out an order (“Two times two canapés,” “Two cockscombs”), and a chorus of cooks repeat the order back, a kitchen procedure ensuring everyone’s heard what he said. Between the steady call and response of one dish after another, he’s chatty, affable and happy, as if he still can’t quite believe his good fortune. And he has been fortunate. This past summer, Kostow bought a house in St. Helena and got married. He broke ground on a nearly three-acre kitchen garden, and just got word that plans are in the works to add livestock nearby as part of an education program for at-risk youth that will provide him with a source of premium-quality meat. (“I’m an at-risk youth,” he joked with the project planners.) Oh, and then there was the news last month that he retained his three Michelin stars. “I genuinely doubted,” he says of the annual award announcement. “I don’t think I slept a wink the night before.” There are only two chefs in California with three Michelin stars. One is the French Laundry’s Thomas Keller. You may have heard of him. The other is Kostow. Yet in spite of the acclaim, Kostow still isn’t a household name outside of foodie circles. But with Kostow’s poise, smarts and talent, that’s likely to change. This is a man with a vision.

) 18

MICHELIN MAN “You can’t be great in two years or four years,” says Kostow. “It takes time.” Photo by John Blackwell.

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Chef on A Mission


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ostow was elevated from up-and-coming chef to culinary elite last year— Oct. 26, 2010, to be exact. That was the day when former Michelin guide director Jean-Luc Naret called to inform Kostow that he had been awarded a third Michelin star, making him the second American-born chef and third youngest chef ever to receive three Michelin stars. At the time, he had spent three years at Meadowood, an elegant 50-seat restaurant tucked into an exclusive 250-acre resort in St. Helena. Kostow had retained the restaurant’s two-star status, and was expecting a call from the prestigious restaurant guide to learn if he kept his stars. He was walking through a vineyard with his then-girlfriend, now-wife, Martina, and got the call. Naret had made it a practice of calling each chef who received Michelin stars; his call to Kostow was his last of the day. “We weren’t anticipating three stars by any means,” he remembers, quickly adding that he felt his cooking was up to threestar status. So Naret’s message was a surprise and a thrill. “Then all hell broke lose,” he says. Suddenly, the lanky chef was thrust into chef superstardom. With three stars and a growing list of accolades, he says diners no longer wondered if his food would be great—they expected it, and looked for flaws in the jewels he set before them. He says the pressure to maintain his status now is far greater than the effort it took to get there. “The reality is I can no longer surprise people with how good it is,” he says. “The margin for error is zero. I have to work twice as hard.” When the Michelin awards debuted in America six years ago, the restaurant industry was ambivalent. The French-based guide is revered in Europe—one French chef went so far as to kill himself when the tire company stripped him of one his stars. But would the awards carry the same weight in America?

John Blackwell

18 Chef on a Mission ( 17

Apparently, yes. Restaurants have gained acclaim without the Michelin awards, of course, but the internationally recognized imprimatur filled a void that American chefs perhaps didn’t know they had. Now the awards, imperfect as they may be, are met with anticipation and dread each October. It’s the restaurant industry’s Oscar night, and winning three stars is like claiming a trophy for best screenplay, best director and best picture all in one.

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fter Kostow learned he’d retained his stars this year, he stayed up too late celebrating, but then it was back to work. With his food’s reputation well established, Kostow set about to implement his vision. He’s built the foundation with his cooking. Now he wants to build the house. “If you think you’ve arrived in this business,” he says, “you’re dead in the water.” So he continues to swim. Sharklike. His vision is simple. “I want to be a guiding light,” he says. “The tip of the spear.” That means overseeing an extensive remodel of the kitchen. He’s also expanding the restaurant’s garden program, deepening his connections with the Napa Valley community, spending more time engaging the media, and he’s at work on a cookbook. In short, he’s creating a legacy. “It’s all about putting down roots, personally and literally,” he says. Kostow grew up in Hyde Park, Ill. After majoring in philosophy at Hamilton, displaying an intellectual streak that still runs through his cooking, he applied his love of knowledge to food. He worked in several Chicago restaurants before moving to San Diego for work at George’s At the Cove in La Jolla. It was there he met his first mentor, executive chef Trey Foshee. Foshee says that while Kostow was green, he distinguished himself with his focus and dedication. “He started with me at the bottom, but he was supermotivated,” Foshee recalls today. “He was always that guy who wanted to do the extra work.

LANDSCAPES Kostow’s creations, like this foie gras “stump” with pear, parsnip, pistachio moss and pickled pine needle, are like fragile architecture.

Motivation is what drives this industry. Not everyone has that in him, and he definitely showed it.” Since Kostow was a rookie in the kitchen, the rowdy crew took to calling him “Chico Che,” after an oversized, spectacle-wearing musical prodigy from Mexico. Kostow was skinny but wore glasses, so the name stuck. Foshee says Kostow took the heckling in stride, kept his head down and just kept on working. “He absorbed everything,” he says. “He didn’t just do it; he made it part of him. I think that’s what sets him apart. I still catch myself calling him Chico, but he definitely deserves to be called chef.” Kostow passed on culinary school, an experience he thought would be “superfluous,” and instead headed to Europe to cook. He landed back in San Diego briefly before heading up to San Francisco, where he worked for rising-star chefs Daniel Humm at Campton Place and Daniel Patterson at Elisabeth Daniel. In between, he spent more time cooking in Europe. When Humm, who now holds three Michelin stars at New York

City’s Eleven Madison Park, was ready to decamp to Manhattan, he invited Kostow to come with him. But Kostow declined and instead took a job as chef at Chez T.J. in Mountain View. “I wanted to do my own thing, and Chez T.J. was a tremendous opportunity,” he recalls. “It’s a perfect first chef job.” Humm remembers Kostow as being driven and creative. “He was a great part of helping Campton Place get four stars [from the San Francisco Chronicle],” Humm says. Humm had the chance to eat Kostow’s food twice at Chez T.J., and remembers the young Kostow having the maturity not to let creativity or fancy technique get in the way of what’s most important: making delicious food. “It was clear he was going to be successful,” Humm says now. Chez T.J. is a small restaurant, but Kostow wanted to be far enough from San Francisco that he wouldn’t be outshined by more established chefs, and close enough that if he did something extraordinary it wouldn’t go unnoticed. His cooking did not go unnoticed.


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t Meadowood, Kostow’s cooking has evolved but still displays the same elegance and finesse I first tasted at Chez T.J. His food is now more elemental, more fundamental. There’s a lightness and delicacy to his cooking that’s woven around precisely calibrated flavors and textures. His tasting menu is a procession of nine dishes that rise and fall like a piece of music, building, hitting high notes and then backing off before another crescendo of flavor bursts across the palate. Meadowood is the kind of place you’re only likely to eat at once or twice in your life. The tasting menu with wine pairings runs $850 for two, plus tax and tip. Kostow knows this, and aims to deliver the kind of once in-a-lifetime meal people have come to expect. It’s hard to pigeonhole Kostow’s style. He describes his cooking as progressive but not precious. He likes to surprise. “I’m always looking for every dish to have some angle and some pop,” he says. “There has to be something a little quixotic about it.” His cooking is modern, for sure. It’s rooted in French technique but draws liberally from Japan. With ingredients from Kostow’s own gardens, wild food foraged in nearby forests and the bounty that Napa Valley and Northern California offers, his menus are firmly rooted in season and geography. “This is the best place to cook,” he says. “I can’t imagine another

place on earth like this. It’s Eden.” Rather than plates of food, Kostow creates edible landscapes in miniature, tiny worlds of flavor and visual delight that are as much about texture as flavor. He takes the term “landscape” literally, often using mats of moss, stone or tree bark to showcase his food. He’s also fond of riffing off one ingredient—a persimmon, say, or a radish—and rendering it into several different forms, flavors and textures, as if he’s demonstrating the potential of each ingredient. On a recent night, Kostow served an oyster dish, three little orbs of shellfish, paired with emerald-dark mounds of intense vegetable and savory braised borage with a pool of warm baked potato cream, dense and supremely rich. Quivering, translucent forms of gelatinized oyster liquor and ossetra caviar added a singing, briny note that answered back to the silky potato cream. In three or four spoonfuls, it was gone, disappearing too fast like a sweet dream. That was only the opening course. Eight more, each exquisitely imagined and beautifully executed, followed.

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iven that he and Thomas Keller each have three stars and their restaurants are 20 minutes apart, it’s easy to compare the two. But generationally and stylistically, they are very different. Keller’s got the name recognition, but he’s been at it longer. In the end, Kostow says he likes having the French Laundry down the road. The pressure of working near what many regard as the one of the world’s greatest restaurants makes him better. “I’m very ambitious,” he says. “We want to be seen as the best at what we do. But you can’t be great in two years or four years. It takes time. But now I really feel I know what my vision is.” So far so good. In addition to a skilled crew and a larder of premium ingredients, he’s got two other valuable commodities: youth and talent. No matter how you slice it, that’s a pretty delicious combination.

Traditional 3 Course Menu (Choice of one of the following)

Homemade New England Style Clam Chowder or Butter Letttuce Salad with fresh apple, glazed walnuts and feta cheese

Annual Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday, Nov 24, Noon–7pm

Entrees

(Choice of one of the following)

Fresh Oven Roasted Turkey or Country Glazed Petaluma Baked Ham traditional cornbread stuffing, creamy mashed potatoes and gravy, candied yams and homemade cranberry sauce

Salmon Wellington with spinach and mushroom duxelle, topped with Champagne sauce and served with rice pilaf and roasted vegetables

Prime Rib with Yorkshire pudding, baked potato and roasted vegetables

Desserts

(Choice of one of the following)

Reservations Advised

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Pumpkin Pie, Apple Pie a la Mode, Pecan Pie, or Chocolate Decadence Cake 3495 Adults/ 2995 Seniors 65+ 1995 Children’s Menu (under 10) Three-Course Vegetarian Dinner available by reservation

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Out on his own for the first time, he was awarded two Michelin stars in 2007. I reviewed Kostow at Chez T.J. in 2006, and his talent was already evident. His cooking was technically precise, provocative, creative and consistently delicious. In spite of his brash inventiveness, there was an elegance to his cooking that always left me wanting just one more bite. His food was seductive. But with two Michelin stars and a $40,000 salary, Kostow predictably outgrew Chez T.J. He began looking for a new job when he heard his friend and chef Joseph Humphrey was leaving Meadowood. He called and within days he had a deal.


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Crush CULTURE

The weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events: a selective guide

STRINGED Fiddler and stepdancer April Verch plays Nov. 13 at Dance Palace. See Events, p31. I


NATURALLY With an authentic old-school soul sound and an electrifying live show, Sharon Jones is one not to miss.

The Hard Way Sharon Jones, the Queen of Funk

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haron Jones has just ďŹ nished up a long lunch at Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oyster in Portland, Maine. She orders another glass of wine and settles into an enticing, detailed description of the lobster soup, corn, shrimp with marinara and baked oysters that made up her meal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel bad telling you about all this, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so good,â&#x20AC;? Jones tells me on the phone, with a laugh. Born in Augusta, Ga.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the same hometown of James Brown,

BY LEILANI CLARK

whose fevered dance theatrics have most certainly inďŹ&#x201A;uenced Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; own stage showâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for the good things in life runs deep, from food and a study of the Spanish language to her infectious live performances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have all the smoke and dancers coming out to keep people occupied,â&#x20AC;? says Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;so I get on that stage with the Dap-Kings and we groove off the audience, and I just feel.â&#x20AC;? Listening to the Dap-Kings, Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; backing band, is like being privy to a rare soul back

catalogue; known for an authentic old-school R&B sound, they rock original songs that couldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come straight out of the Stax Records vault. Jones describes performing this music that lies so close to her heart as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a gift.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I walk on that stage, people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be high on drugs or drunk, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that natural high,â&#x20AC;? she says. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a long road for a singer who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t experience success until she hit her early 40s. Jones worked both as a wedding singer and a corrections officer

at Rikers Island before meeting Gabriel Roth (aka Bosco Mann), founder of the Dap-Kings, in 1996. Roth asked Jones to sing on a series of 45s, and soon, she was permanently fronting the band. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dap-Kings are no joke,â&#x20AC;? Jones says with admiration. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings released their ďŹ rst album, DapDippinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in 2002, going on to release four more records since. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve performed at festivals across the States, played a soldout stand at the Apollo Theater, and seen their horn-laden cover of â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Land Is Your Landâ&#x20AC;? featured in the opening credits of the George Clooney vehicle Up in the Air. Last January, Prince asked them to open one of his Madison Square Garden shows, an experience that Jones, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Queen of Funk,â&#x20AC;? describes as surreal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He said that he saw me on Austin City Limits and that I â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;took him to church,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says Jones, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how we got the gig.â&#x20AC;? Jones has moved from the stage to the camera in recent years. She tells me that she spent the previous day ďŹ lming scenes for a ďŹ lm called Queen City, starring Vivica A. Fox, and in 2007, she landed a small role as a jukesinger in The Great Debaters, alongside Denzel Washington. But while growing recognition has opened up opportunities for the Brooklyn-raised singer, her heart still lies in the rich, soulful funk music that the Dap Kings have mastered. At 55, is Sharon Jones ready to slow down? No way, she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about me,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I still have a few more years to go.â&#x20AC;? Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings perform Thursday, Nov. 17 at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $35. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

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ArtsIdeas

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Stage Linnea Mullins

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WHAT FOOLS! Ashley Jarret and

Justin Keim (in horsehead) in SSU’s reimagining of Shakespeare’s classic.

These Mortals SSU’s ‘Midsummer’ makes new magic out of old BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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Midsummer Night’s Dream, with its undeniable underlying sexual energy and not-so-subtle antiauthoritarian attitude, is a perfect fit for a college theater program. The energetic student cast currently bringing Shakespeare’s beloved fantasy-romance to life at Sonoma State University clearly understand the characters: the hormonal would-be lovers, the gleefully anarchistic fairies and the desperate would-be actors. The chief pleasure of this production, directed by Paul Draper, is the joy and dedication the performers bring to roles and themes with which they clearly identify.

And then there’s the car. Thirteen years ago, Draper directed a similar production of Midsummer. It was so successful and so memorable that it’s become a part of local theater legend. Skateboards. Flying costumes. Street-people fairies—and that car. Convincing a generation of young theatergoers that Shakespeare could be relevant, the 1998 Midsummer was a highwater mark for SSU’s theater department. It’s the reason many students give for wanting to be a part of the university’s theater department, and also the oftcited inspiration for many young students to make Shakespeare a part of their life. This new production is largely an experiment to see if lightning can strike twice, with Draper reassembling the same artistic team that created the original show. Using archived notes, photos, sketches and lists of inventoried props, costumes and scenery items, they’ve recreated the same look and feel of the show that lingers so clearly in people’s memories. It’s impossible, of course, to recapture the same magic, since it has likely expanded and inflated in our minds over the years. And, of course, the original cast brought much of that magic, spun from their own unique choices. The question, then, is whether this “new” production works on its own, with actors who were mostly in elementary school when SSU first staged the piece. Though the acting is slightly inconsistent and the pace slackens toward the end, there are some lusciously invested performances. A strong sense of take-no-prisoners electricity and a sexy, slinky exuberance charges across the stage. Whether it’s as good as ’98 will be a matter of taste. The 2011 version is infectious in its own way, from the first moment to the last. ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ runs Nov. 8, 10 and 12 at 7:30pm, and Nov. 9 at 6pm, at the Evert B. Person Theatre, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. $9–$16. 707.664.2353.


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n the operatically pervy The Skin I Live In, Antonio Banderas plays Dr. Robert Ledgard, a wealthy plastic surgeon living in a sealed-off estate in Spain. Ledgard embodies what professors call â&#x20AC;&#x153;the privileged male gaze,â&#x20AC;? taking his private privilege in his bedroom, where he puffs a little after-work opium.

With high-def cameras, he studies a captive woman named Vera (Elena Anaya). The doctor is advancing on synthetic skin to aid his mĂŠtier, face transplantation. He describes one such operation as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most moving experience of my life,â&#x20AC;? though his short-sighted colleagues shun his methods. With the return of a ďŹ gure from the doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past (Roberto Ă lamo as Zeca, a hugely muscled criminal in a tiger costume), we learn that Ledgard was once a married man whose family was destroyed under alarming circumstances. This is Pedro AlmodĂłvarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20th ďŹ lm and likely his craziest, with a soap-opera plot of rapine and revenge thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as togged as the Gaultier clothes the cast ďŹ&#x201A;aunts. After beautifully turned but valedictorian work such as Broken Embraces, AlmodĂłvar goes down and dirty here, visiting the other side of cinema. With beauty and wit, AlmodĂłvar brings the dungeon melodrama back to a cinema thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degraded it, made it gory and annoyingly moralizing. The basic humanity of the ďŹ lm isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in doubt, and viewers can ďŹ nd a pal in Marilia (Marisa Paredes), the salt-of-the-earth, Thelma Ritterâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;style housekeeper. The Skin I Live In reconciles mad passions with happy endings, and one of the happy must be Banderas. Loved and sadly typecast in rich-Corinthian-accent parts, Banderas shows what a performer he is in his native language. Banderas, as an actor, is a major critic of the interior contradictions and madness of machismo. Naturally, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a convincing madman, playing his part as coolly sane as he can. This reunion was a blessing for both director and star, and the audience couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask for a richer, stranger autumn ďŹ lm. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Skin I Live Inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Friday, Nov. 11, at Summerfield Cinemas.

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Antonio Banderas cool and loony in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Skin I Live Inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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Film

23


AN ENTERTAINING ROLLER COASTER RIDE!”

LA TIMES

Film

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt, Richard von Busack, Leilani Clark and Lacie Schwarz.

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THE OUTSIDER

ROCKET MAN

THE WARRIOR

NEW MOVIES MR. DETROIT

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24

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STARTS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 11 SUMMERFIELD THEATRE

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD, SANTA ROSA 707-522-0719 WWW.SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM CALL THEATRE FOR SHOWTIMES

From the director of “WHO KILLED THE ELECTRIC CAR?”

Immortals (PG-13; 98 min.) From the dingalings who brought you 300 comes the CG-enchanced story of Theseus leading the war against the titans. (NB) J. Edgar (R; 137 min.) Biopic of head G-Man stars Leonardo di Caprio in the title role. With Naomi Watts and Judi Dench, and directed by Clint Eastwood. (NB) Jack and Jill (PG; 91 min.) Riding the wave of Thanksgiving holiday movies is Adam Sandler vehicle Jack and Jill, with Sandler playing both roles of staid executive brother and irritating passive-aggressive sister. Co-stars Katie Holmes, Al Pacino and Dana Carvey. (NB)

Revenge of the Electric Car (NR; 90 min.) Chris Paine, director of Who Killed the Electric Car?, provides his own update in new doc about the now brighter future of gasless autos. (NB)

The Skin I Live In (R; 117 min.) Pedro Almodovar’s latest stars Antonio Banderas as a loony plastic surgeon. See review p23.

Tower Heist (PG-13; 103 min.) Ben Stiller and Eddie Murphy star in a comedy about a band of N.Y.C. apartment dwellers who avenge the Ponzi schemer (Alan Alda) who made off with their pensions. With a slew of co-stars: Matthew Broderick, Michael Pena, Casey Affleck and the very funny Tea Leoni. (NB) A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas (R; 90 min.) Yet another lowcomedy franchise swiping the title from the late-’80s Brady Bunch reunion film. (NB)

candidate at the center of a struggle for power. The power-house cast includes Paul Giamatti, Marisa Tomei, Jeffrey Wright and Philip Seymour Hoffman. (LC)

In Time (PG-13; 115 min.) Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried co-star in sci-fi thriller about a future where old-age can be overcome by those wealthy enough to afford (literally) more time. Directed by Andrew Niccol (Gattaca, Lord of War). (NB) Martha Marcy May Marlene (R; 101 min.) Elizabeth Olsen plays a girl completely hollowed out by a cult leader. After she escapes the compound, her estranged sister puts her up, but is thwarted at her every attempt to reconnect with her damaged sibling. Directed by Sean Durkin. (RvB) Paranormal Activity 3 (R; 84 min.) A year after the second, Paramount releases the third installment of director and video-game programmer Oren Peli’s horror franchise. (NB)

Puss in Boots (PG; 90 min.) Puss in Boots (based on the Shrek character) goes wrong where prequels usually do, by changing the nature of the characters we love in the name of fleshing them out. Naturally, though, there are sweet lines (“Fear me if you dare,” Puss threatens) and some lovely sequences, such as the characters’ romp in the clouds outside the giant’s castle at the nether end of the beanstalk. But the plot is convoluted and doesn’t seem about something, the way a fairy tale has to be—it doesn’t have any resonance. Features the voices of Anotonio Banderas (as Puss), Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis and Billy Bob Thornton. (RvB)

The Rum Diary (R; 120 min.) A New York

ALSO PLAYING 50/50 (R; 99 min.) Kyle (Seth Rogen) uses any and every means necessary—sex, drugs and profanity—in this heavy-hearted comedy to help his best friend Adam (Joseph GordonLevitt) cope with a recent cancer diagnosis. (LS) Footloose (PG-13; 117 min.) Remake of the 1984 film that launched Kevin Bacon stars newcomer Kenny Wormald. Also with Andie MacDowell and Dennis Quaid. (NB) Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life (NR; 130 min.) Biopic on the great French pop singer follows his boyhood in occupied France to his death in 1991 at age 62. Based on the graphic novel by director Joann Sfar. (NB) The Ides of March (R; 101 min.) Ryan Gosling continues his rise to ultimate moviestar status in this drama about an idealistic young campaign consultant who discovers that all is not what it seems on the campaign trail. George Clooney plays the presidential

journalist sinks into the mire of alcohol and tangled love in San Juan in this adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s novel of the late 1950s. Stars Johnny Depp. (NB)

The Three Musketeers (PG-13; 110 min.) Resident Evil director Paul W. S. Anderson is the latest to update the classic Dumas tale. Stars Milla Jovovich, Orlando Bloom, Christoph Waltz and Mads Mikkelsen. (NB)

The Way (PG-13; 115 min.) A California doctor (Martin Sheen) takes a journey that will change his life after he flies to France to collect the remains of his son (Emilio Estevez), killed while trekking the Pyrenees, and decides to finish his son’s pilgrimage. Written and written by Estevez. (NB)

Worst in Show (NR; 90 min.) Awardwinning documentary about Petaluma’s famous Ugliest Dog contest screens at Boulevard Cinemas, Petaluma, Nov. 10 at 7pm. Presented by co-directors Don Lewis and former PD writer John Beck. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Petaluma Animal Shelter. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Jay Farrar Bobby Bare Jr opens for veteran of Uncle Tupelo and Son Volt. Nov 9 at 7:30. $19-$23. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Gram Parsons Tribute Annual homage to the great Americana singer/songwriter by Laughing Gravy. Nov 11 at 7:30. $5-$10. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Highway Poets With CV1, Earstu & Box Office Poison, benefit for local school music programs sponsored by Benson Music and Mr Music Foundation. Nov 12 at 8. $5$10. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, www.musicforkids.com.

Hot Buttered Rum Bluegrass aficionados tour for latest album, “Limbs Akimbo,” with openers Greensky Bluegrass. Nov 10 at 8:30. $18-$21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Lachrimae Antiquae Opening the Sonoma Bach 2011-’12 season, featuring countertenor Christopher Fritzsche and Live Oak Baroque Orchestra. Nov 12 at 8. $18$30. Holy Family Episcopal Church, 1500 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 877.914.2224. Second performance on Nov 13 at 4, at Our Lady of Guadalupe, 8400 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor.

Novemberfest with Dan Asia & Adam del Monte

Scott Gerber & Cori Wood

Napa Valley Youth Symphony

Traditional ballad, classic country and Western swing. Nov 12 at 7:30. $20. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.763.0100.

Napa Valley Youth Symphony kicks off season with concert of classical favorites. Nov 13 at 3. $5-$10. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Steel Pulse

Chely Wright

Reggae legends carry the torch. Nov 9 at 8. $26. Phoenix Theater, 201 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Napa Valley Film Festival presents renowned country singer. Nov 10 at 8. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

MARIN COUNTY David Nelson Band Originals and Grateful Dead classics for Fall Tour 2011. Nov 10-11 at 8:30. $25-$35. Palm Ballroom, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.389.5072.

Mill Valley Philharmonic Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 includes introductory talk by director Laurie Cohen. Nov 11 at 8, Nov 12 at 4. Free. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley, 414.383.8013.

Rwanda Children’s Choir Twenty-four young Rwandans tour the county to thank organizations that have helped feed, clothe and provide medical care for them. Various Marin and Sonoma County performances through Dec 2. Nov 10-Dec 2. Angelico Hall, Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.948.8357.

Mitch Woods Featuring Kenny “Blues Boss” Wayne, Mitch Woods, Caroline Dahl, Wendy DeWitt and Todd Morgan. Nov 12 at 8. $21-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Composer Dan Asia and guitarist Adam del Monte join music faculty in a fourconcert series. Nov 6-12. $38. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2353.

Ecstatic Dance

Santa Rosa Symphony

Elvin Bishop & the Blues Broads

Program features acclaimed violinist Tedi Papavrami and “Magnum Opus” composition by David Carlson. Nov 12 and 14 at 8, Nov 13 at 3. $15-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.8742.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Nov 11, Robert Ethington. Nov 12, Deborah Crooks, Kwame Copeland. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Nov 10, Pluck ‘n’ Squeeze. Nov 11, Sean Garvey Band. Nov 12, Driftwood. Every Sunday, Sunday Jazz. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Nov 10, Smilin’ Iguanas, Marshall, Bolt & Harr. Nov 13, Steel Toed Slippers. Nov 14, Drum Our Souls Free. Tues at 7, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Flamingo Lounge Wed & Thurs, karaoke. Nov 11-12, UB707. Sun, salsa with lessons. Tues, swing night with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Nov 9, Da Fe (tango). Nov 10, Tony Gagarin (slide guitar). Nov 15, Jim Adams (jazz). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern

NAPA COUNTY Second Fri, 8-10:30. Get your ya-ya’s out. $10. Welcome Grange Hall, 3275 Hagen Rd, Napa.

Nov 10, Juke Joint with Garth. Nov 11, Doomsday Burlesque Cabaret. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg

Blues icon performs in Napa. Nov 12 at 8. $40. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Nov 11, Michael Coleman & Kim Cass Duo (jazz). Nov 12, Robb Fisher Trio with Keith Saunders & Ron Marabuto. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan

Inn at the Tides

Mariachi band plays to benefit

Sat at 7, Maple

) 26

FREE Pre-Party! Raffle Giveaways! for Warren Miller's North Bay film release

Wed, Nov. 16 6:30–9pm at the Lagunitas Tap Room & Beer Sanctuary 21+ ONLY Enter to Win Big Prizes! 1 FREE raffle entry per person. UÊ10 pairs of film tickets for Nov 17 film premiere at Wells Fargo Center UÊi>Ûi˜ÞÊÌÀˆ«ÊvœÀÊÓÊ܈̅ʏˆvÌÊ«>ÃÃià UÊœ*ÀœÊ Êi“iÌÊ ,"ÊUÊ<i>Ê"«ÌˆVÃÊ«œ>Àˆâi`Ê}œ}}iÃÊ܈̅Ê*UÊ>}՘ˆÌ>ÃÊÃÜ>}ÊUÊ7>ÀÀi˜ÊˆiÀÊ>««>Ài]ÊLi>˜ˆiÃ]Ê 6 UÊ,iÃÌ>ÕÀ>˜ÌÉL>ÀÊ}ˆvÌÊV>À`ÃÊUÊÓÊ-…ÕÌ̏iÊ ÕÃÊÌÀˆ«ÃÊ̜Ê/>…œiÊvÀœ“ UÊ*ÕÃʓœÀiÊ܈˜ÌiÀÊÃÜ>}t

Pint specials all night long! Party with our ski babes and dudes! 1280 N. McDowell Blvd. Petaluma 707.769.4495 info: 707.527.1200

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Music

25

Puertas Abiertas and Children’s Health Initiative. Nov 11 at 8. $35-$55. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.


Music ( 25

433-6335 raventheater.org

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Saturday, Nov. 12, 8PM

Sun, Open Mic. Wed, Brainstorm (Dubstep). 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 9, Solid Air (folk rock). Nov 10, Artifacts. Nov 11, Hank Band. Sep 11, Danny Montana. Nov 12, Steve James. Nov 13, Doug Adamz and Chris Goddard (guitar duo). 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

raventheater.org

Every Wed at 7, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Nov 10, Sonoma County Pro Jam. Nov 11, KRAWL, Seeds of Hate, Aftertayst. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

433-6335

433-6335

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Last Day Saloon

Nov. 19 8PM/NOV. 20 2PM

Mack’s Bar & Grill Nov 11 & 12, Old Man Playing Rock & Roll. 10056 Main St., Penngrove. 707.793.9480.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Profant. Bay View Restaurant, 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay, 800.541.7788.

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Mostl y Mozart!

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26

Nov 11, Hellhounds. Nov 12, Larry Carlin’s Mostly Simply Bluegrass Night. Nov 13, Sean Carscadden & Marty O’Reilly. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Nov 9, Jay Farrar (see concerts). Nov 10, Hot Buttered Rum, Greensky Bluegrass (see concerts). 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Nov 10, Soldier Stories featuring Nell Robinson, Jim Nunally & others (bluegrass). Graton Road and Bohemian Hwy., Occidental.

Phoenix Theater Wed at 6, jazz jam. Nov 9, Steel Pulse, Top Shelf. Second & fourth Thurs, writers workshops. Nov 11, Taiowa, F.L.I. High, Heap of Stone, Skylark. Nov 12, Victim of Society, Necrosin, Hemotoxin, Ariabes, Civilian Assault. Sun at 5, rock and blues jam. Mon at 7, young people’s AA. Tues at 7, acoustic Americana jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Nov 12, Piezo Electric Effect (jazz). 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Teenagers Rejoice The Uptown busts the 21-and-over restriction Since its opening last year, Napa’s Uptown Theatre has been a 21-andover venue, and trying to sneak in was the only option for underage music enthusiasts. As of this weekend, they now have the option of using the front door. Uptown manager Sheila Groves-Tracey says it’s something she’s wanted since day one. “There are a lot of people under 21 that have been really bummed that they can’t be part of the Uptown, and almost every single night I have someone in line with an underage kid who can’t come in. It’s always heartbreaking,” she says. California law states that underage kids aren’t permitted in venues where alcohol is served but food is not. This weekend, the Uptown starts serving food with the opening of its Courtyard Cafe, and—voilà!—of-age patrons engage their appetites and the youngsters have access to shows. Groves-Tracey clarifies that all shows will be 12-and-up, and some may still be 21-andover, depending on the target audience on a concert-by-concert basis. New rules apply when Elvin Bishop and the Blues Broads play on Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 7pm. $35 (tickets half off for patrons under 21). 707.259.0123. —Lacie Schwarz

Rosager & friends. Fri-Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

The Rocks

Sebastopol Community Center

Nov 10, Kress Cole, Lars

Nov 11, Gram Parsons tribute by

Laughing Gravy (see concerts). 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Spancky’s Nov 9, Reggae Night. Thurs at 9, DJ Dray Lopez. Nov 11, Kerouac. Nov 12, Metal Shop, Electric Funeral.


8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds

Transient Lounge Thurs, Reggae Night. 400 Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.583.9080.

Unity Music Nov 10, Vespertine Orchestra (chamber electronica). 840 Piner Rd, Suite 8, Santa Rosa.

The Zoo Every Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 527 Barham Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.0980.

MARIN COUNTY

Wed, Tengo Tango. Sun at 4, Salsa-lito. Tues, Noel Jewkes & friends (jazz jam). 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Nov 9, Finger-style Guitar Showcase. Nov 10, Danny Click’s Teas Blues Night. Thurs at 9, Texas Blues. Nov 11, Five 4 Five Benefit. Nov 12, Uke jam. Sat at 2, uke jam. Nov 13, Judy Hall. Sun at 2, Irish music. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. Nov 15, Liz Stires Student Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Nov 10, Fox & Woman. Nov 11, Jerry Hannan. Nov 12, Beso Negro. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse

Nov 13, April Verch Band. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Wed, Philip Claypool & friends. Nov 10, Macy Blackman. Nov 11, Stages of Sleep. Nov 12, Lavay Smoth and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

George’s Nightclub

Taste of Rome

Dance Palace

Nov 11, Cheeseballs. Nov 13, Lester Chambers, Big Cat Tolefree, The Hipnotics. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Nov 11, Andoni’s Quartet (jazz). 1001 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Compadres Thurs at 8, Douglas Houser or Brian Kline. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.253.1111.

Downtown Joe’s Nov 10, Ralph Woodson. Every Monday at 4, Monday Night Football with Big John. 902 Main Street, Napa.

First Presbyterian Church Nov 13, Organ & Handbells Concert. 1333 Third St, Napa.

27 Gaia’s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet = F F ;ÝD L J @ :Ý8 I KÝ: F D D L E @ K P Wed Nov 9, 7–9 Violin-Accordian Duo

Da Fe Thur Nov 10, 7–9 Bottleneck Blues & Slide Guitar

Tony Gagarin &RI.OV nsMusic & Poetry

100,000 Poets for Change Fri Nov 11, 6:30–7:30 Dinner Music

Mon Nov 14, 6pm Linda Loveland, Mali Apple, Joe Dunn, Laura McHale Holland, Camille Picott, Jan Ogren, Linda McCabe and Bonnie Lee &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707-544-2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

Old Western Saloon Nov 12, Lonestar Retrobates. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Nov 9, Miracle Mule. Nov 10, Bakers Dozen. Nov 11, Rusty Evans, Ring of Fire. Nov 12, Ooh!. Nov 13, Sexy Sunday. Every Mon, acoustic open mic. Nov 15, First Draught: Pints & Prose. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

FRI & SAT 11/18 & 11/19 • 7:30PM DOORS $36 ADV/$41 DOS • 21+ HARD ROCK/HEAVY METAL

Y&T

PLUS GRETCHEN MENN

FEATURING MOOKIE SIEGEL PLUS SCAREKROW

San Francisco’s City Guide

19 Broadway Club

Fri at 9, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun at 3, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. Tues at 8:30, open mic with Damir. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

HOT BUTTERED RUM & GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE

Sun, Mon, Wed-Fri, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

No Name Bar

FROM SON VOLT

SAT 11/26 • 7:30PM DOORS • $26 • 21+ COUNTRY ROCK

Nickel Rose

Nov 9, Phil Hardgrave, Continentals. Nov 10, Fairfax Stand-up Comedy. Nov 11, Boris Garcia. Nov 12, Perfect, Chezldek. Nov 13, Natural Gas Jazz Band, Buddy Owen. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

JAY FARRAR THUR 11/10 • 7:30PM DOORS • $18 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ BLUEGRASS

Dine with Local Authors

Nov 12, Elvin Bishop with The Blues Broads (see concerts). 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

WED 11/9 • 7:30PM DOORS • $19 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ ALTERNATIVE COUNTRY

Sat Nov 12, 7–9 Contemporary Folk

Fri at 5:30, live mariachi. Sun, acoustic guitar. 1237 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4400.

Uptown Theatre

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak

Carl Sokol Sally Haggard

Through Nov 12, Napa Valley Film Festival (see Film). 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

McNear’s Dining House

PLUS BOBBY BARE JR

Pacifico Restaurante Mexicano

Silo’s

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

MON 11/28 • 7:00PM DOORS • $29 ADV/$31 DOS • 21+ AMERICAN ROCK-N-ROLL

M83

TRIGGER HIPPY

France’s most overboard cinematic producer, Anthony Gonzalez, on the tour of the month. Nov 10 at Mezzanine.

Ra Ra Riot Ivy League-wave sextet from Syracuse high on violins and uplift. Nov 11 at the Great American Music Hall.

Poor Man’s Whiskey Bluegrass tribute to ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ on 11-11-11 with stunning visual show. Nov 11 at the Fillmore.

David Murray Saxophone colossus leads Cuban ensemble honoring Nat King Cole’s Spanish recordings. Nov. 11-13 at Yoshi’s SF.

They Might Be Giants The Johns play free 4pm in-store between evening shows in the city (at the Fillmore on Nov 12 and 13). Nov 13 at Amoeba SF.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

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Nov 9, Chainsaw George Heagerty. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. Nov 11, GDX. Nov 12, Dave Sparks Band. Nov 13, Science Fiction Jazz. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

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The other guy in the kitchen looked like he was mulling the same question. We got to talking and settled for the beer option, and talked some more. He was from Baltimore, he told me. “Baltimore?” I asked. “Hey, have you ever heard the song ‘Streets of Baltimore’ by Gram Parsons?” I’d just met this guy in the kitchen of some party. Dumb question. How would he know that song? “Yeah,” he said, surprising me. “That’s kind of the story of my life, that song.” It all came spilling out: he

moved to Baltimore, but only because his girlfriend wanted to, just like the guy in the song. Soon as they got there, the girl started spending more nights out on the town, just like in the song. She eventually left him. He moved back here. Big Gram Parsons fan. We clinked our beer cans. I’d been there, too. My story, I told him, had been “A Song for You.” After all, I’d been the one doing the leaving, left to float adrift in the awkward single life at 25 among other friends who didn’t know who they belonged to. But lately my song had changed. I’d been seeing this girl, and we’d been drinking and slowdancing to “Sin City” almost every night in my small apartment. He wished me luck. I forget where the party was or how I got home. When I was hungover, I’d listen to “We’ll Sweep Out the Ashes in the Morning” or “In My Hour of Darkness.” She kept coming around and slowdancing with me. Usually she’d put on happier songs, like “Return of the Grievous Angel,” about trucking, the open country and being in love. We’d sing along, and it sunk in, that love part. We fell hard for each other, staying up late to songs like “The New Soft Shoe” and “Hot Burrito #1,” trying to figure out if they were happy songs, or sad songs, or both. “Twenty thousand roads I went down, down, down,” Gram Parsons sang, “and they all led me straight back home to you.” When we realized we both felt the same way, we got hitched. Small city hall ceremony, a little reception with friends. We had the DJ play “$1,000 Wedding” for us, and we danced and kissed, and that’s how my story turned out. I still think about that party, and I wonder what happened to the other guy. I hope he’s alright. Laughing Gravy plays a Gram Parsons tribute show on Friday, Nov. 11, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7:30pm. $5–$10. 707.823.1511.


29

Galleries OPENINGS Nov 12 From 3 to 7pm. Calabi Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Postwar Modernism of the West,â&#x20AC;? work by Robert McChesney, Roy De Forest, Nathan Oliveira and many others. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.781.7070. At 3pm. Occidental Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Inside/Out Gallery Showâ&#x20AC;? with various artists. Reception Nov 12 at 3. Graton Road and Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 707.874.9392. At 5pm. Riverfront Art Gallery, Late Fall Show with Karen Spratt and Lance Kuehne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART. At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, grand opening inaugural exhibition in new location. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

SONOMA COUNTY

Rabbit Holeâ&#x20AC;? with works by Ricky Watts. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256.

Calabi Gallery Opening Nov 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Postwar Modernism of the West,â&#x20AC;? work by Robert McChesney, Roy De Forest, Nathan Oliveira and many others. Reception, Nov 12, 3 to 7. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, 2012, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flipside of Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art: More Than Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? original drawings by Charles Schulz. Through Dec 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d from the Panel,â&#x20AC;? parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art. Through Nov 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Games Children Play.â&#x20AC;? $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Dec 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Yourself at Home,â&#x20AC;? exhibit of unusual home and garden accessories. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Ending Nov 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Texture with Paper,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glimpses of Natureâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heavy Mettle.â&#x20AC;? 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Medlock-Ames Winery Ending Nov 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Honor of Melissa,â&#x20AC;? a photography series about honey bees by Amanda Lane. 13414 Chalk Hill Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.8845.

Occidental Center for the Arts Nov 9-Jan 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Inside/Out Gallery Showâ&#x20AC;? with various artists. Reception, Nov 12 at 3. Graton Road and Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Pelican Art Through Jan 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Worksâ&#x20AC;? with various artists. Open TuesThurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Nov 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pirates,â&#x20AC;? a kid-friendly exhibit featuring everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite seafaring marauders. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Aqus Cafe

Graton Gallery

Ending Nov 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mentor Me Petalumaâ&#x20AC;? participants show their work. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Through Dec 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plein Aire Paintingâ&#x20AC;? with works by Susan Ball. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

RiskPress Gallery

Hammerfriar Gallery

Opening Nov 9, Late Fall Show with Karen Spratt and Lance Kuehne. Reception, Nov 12 at 5. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Nov 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Annual Collaborative Showâ&#x20AC;? with various artists. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery

Through Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;On and On: Sequel of Memories,â&#x20AC;? installation work by Kathleen Yorba. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Through Nov 28, Michael Coy exhibit. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Ongoing, paintings by California artists featuring work by Joshua Meador; also, landscapes by Linda Sorenson, Kathi Hilton and Alex Dzigurski. Wed-Sun, 10 to 5. 1785 Coast Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2911.

J Howell Fine Art

Rohnert Park Community Center

Ending Nov 12, a special show of the work of Rip Matteson (1920-2011). Sun-Mon, 11 to 4; Thurs-Sat, 11 to 6. 101-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2684.

Through Nov 18, fine arts by local artists of the Santa Rosa Art Guild. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Tattoo Gallery

Through Nov 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Points of View,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Olga Storms and Cathy Coe. Daily,

Through Jan 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Down the

Local Color Gallery

STOMPY JONES Saturday, Nov 12 Wed, Nov 9 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Nov 10 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 11 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm West Coast Swing Lesson and Ballroom, Latin & Swing Dance hosted by California Ballroom Sat, Nov 12 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm Scottish Challenge with Gary Thomas 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther presents STOMPY JONES! Sun, Nov 13 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am ZUMBA GOLD WITH TONING 1:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:30pm VINTAGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Nov 14 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Nov 15 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm African and World Music Dance

Russian River Art Gallery Through Nov 15, Day of the Dead

) 30

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Quicksilver Mine Company Ending Nov 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Signs,â&#x20AC;? recent oil paintings by Cecilia Armenta Hallinan. Through Dec 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rambin Modes,â&#x20AC;? an evolving window display by Monty Monty. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

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Arts Events


Robert P. McChesney

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | N OV E M B E R 9 –1 5, 2 0 1 1 | B O H E M I A N.COM

30

‘COMPO #A5’ Work by Robert McChesney (above) and others opens with ‘Postwar

Modernism of the West’ at Calabi Gallery on Nov. 12. See Openings, p29.

The T he

LED ZEPPELIN ZE EPPELIN

CONCERT EXPERIENCE CONCER

Arts Events show. Daily, 10 to 6. 16200 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.9099.

Shiloh Sophia Gallery Shiloh Sophia Galley. Ongoing, work by Shiloh Sophia. Wed-Sat, 11 to 6; Sun, 12-6. 126 Plaza Street, Healdsburg. 707.318.8189.

Featurin Featuring HEAR TB HEARTBREAKER

NOVEMBER 19 Spreckels Performing P Arts Center C BOX BO X OFFICE 707 5 588 3400 588-3400

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Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jan 1, “Sonido Pirata,” curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Dec 31, “Nouveau Holiday,” with various artists. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY

( 29 Marin Arts Council Gallery Ending Nov 12, “Asia Observed,” works addressing the cultural complexity of Asia. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Marin MOCA Through Nov 13, work by Manuel Neri. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Nov 12, “84th Annual Members’ Show,” a juried exhibit featuring works by MSA members. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Red Barn Gallery Through Jan 6, “Grounded: A California Indian Life,” art by Miwok/Pomo artist Kathleen Rose Smith. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

Seager Gray Gallery Formerly Donna Seager Gallery. Through November, inaugural exhibition in new location. Reception, Nov 12 at 6. TuesSat, 11 to 6. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Gallery Route One Through Dec 11, “Vaporization” with Betty Woolfolk, “The Wilds of Point Reyes,” Artists’ Book Show. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

NAPA COUNTY

and other media of Robert Wuilfe. Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Gallery 1870 Ongoing, works by various artists, currently highlighting Imre Buvary, Kay Geis and Takayuki Harada. 6525 Washington St, Yountville. 800.322.1870.

Gordon Gallery Ongoing, original landscape paintings and limited-edition prints by Steven Gordon. Wed-Sun, 10:30 to 5:30. 6484 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0823.

I Wolk Gallery Ongoing, contemporary sculpture, painting and mixed media. 1354 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.8800 or 707.963.9922.

Mumm Napa Cuvee Ending Nov 13, “Signs of Life,” photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Napa Valley Museum Ending Nov 14, “Dia de Los Muertos,” works by local artists and high school students. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Di Rosa

Silverado Museum

Through Feb 18, “Looking at You Looking at Me” featuring the photography, video

Ongoing, tribute to Robert Louis Stevenson includes original letters, manuscripts,


Celebrate launching of Sebastopol independent music label “New Vintage Artists.” Nov 11 at 7:07. $11. Forestville Club, 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.495.9001.

Native American Heritage Month Nov 16 at 7, screening of award-winning film “Follow Me Home.” Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2382.

New Parents Hike Strap on your infant and hit the trails at Ranchero Mark West. Nov 12 at 11. Free. Mark West Creek, 6985 Saint Helena Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

April Verch Internationally renowned Canadian fiddler, singer, songwriter and stepdancer April Verch explores Southern mountain traditions. Nov 13 at 7. $22-25. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Veterans’ Day Dance Dinner, music, silent auction to benefit H.A.V.E. Nov 11 at 5:30. $15-$30. Jenner Inn & Cottages, 10400 California 1, Jenner. 707.887.0250.

Food & Drink Anderson Valley Brewer’s Dinner Dinner featuring five beers paired with a variety of entrees. Nov 13 at 6. $55. Hopmonk Sonoma, 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Soup-er Bowl

Italian Film Festival

,

Experimental filmmaker Myron Ort’s take on Christo’s “Running Fence.” Nov 12 at 7. $5-$10. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 707.874.9392.

The Met: Live in HD High-definition opera broadcasts from the Metropolitan Theatre in NYC. Nov 9, “Siegfried.”$16-$23. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa.

Tenth Anniversary of Hotel Healdsburg

Napa Valley Film Festival

Nov 11 at 5, community cocktail party, at 7:30, celebratory gala. $40-$180. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 800.889.7188.

Inaugural fest in multiple venues featuring over 100 films, including works by Drake Doremus, Alexander Payne and Clint Eastwood and appearances by Adrian Grenier, Jeffrey Wright, Judy Greer, Dane Cook and Matthew Lillard. Nov 9-13. $10-$495. Various locations, Napa Valley. www.napavalleyfilmfest.org.

Between Two Worlds Bay Area filmmakers Deborah Kaufman and Alan Snitow present and discuss documentary on community and family divisions in Jewish culture. Nov 14 at 7. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Documentary Series Opening Nov 11, “Revenge of the Electric Car.” $7.25-$10. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

The Films of John Korty The first major retrospective celebrating the work of John Korty: Nov 10 at 7, “Miracle in a Box: A Piano Reborn”; Nov 13 at 4:15, “Who Are the DeBolts?”; Nov 13 at 7, “The Crazy Quilt”; Nov 20 at 7, “Funnyman”; Nov 27 at 1, “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman”; Nov 27 at 7, a variety of shorts; Dec 1 at 7, “Alex and the Gypsy”; Dec 4 at 1, “Farewell to Manzanar”; Dec 4 at 7, “Twice Upon a Time.”

i n fo o: 707.763.6700

Making an Art of the Film

Fill a handmade bowl with all-you-can-eat soup made by Calistoga restaurants to benefit Calistoga Art Center. Nov 12 at 6. $45. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. 707.942.2278.

Film

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M

Moonshine Ball

Selected modern films from the land of Antonioni, Fellini and Leone. Nov 12, “Santa Claus Gang.” Showtimes at 5:30 and 7:45. $14-$78. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Tom Hudgens, author of “The Commonsense Kitchen,” whips up Thanksgiving side dishes. Nov 15 at 6:30. $49 (including meal). Next Key Center at Homeward Bound, 1399 North Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363.

Sa atturday a Nov 19 5p pm

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Advance screening with Gary Oldman and director Tomas Alfredson in attendance. Nov 15 at 7. $20-$25. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

F LY J U

Second Sat monthly at 1, meet, watch and talk to professional cartoonists.Nov 12, Scott Metzger. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Chef Tom Hudgens

TAPS and WILIBEES PRESENT

WINT

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Cartoonist-inResidence

Nov 10-Dec 4. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

P

Events

Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

ER IS COMIN G. WATCH T HIS

S KI H U

FIRST.

SANTA ROSA

Vintage Film Series Through December, classic films on the big screen. Nov 21 at 7 and Nov 23 at 1, “Dr Zhivago.”Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Worst in Show Join directors John Beck and Don R Lewis as well as several ugly dogs. Nov 10 at 7. $10. Boulevard Cinemas, Petaluma Boulevard at C Street, Petaluma. 707.762.7469.

Lectures Science Buzz Cafe Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with

) 32

WELLS FARGO CENTER FOR THE ARTS

THURSDAY, NOV. 17

7:30PM

SAN RAFAEL MARIN CENTER SATURDAY, NOV. 19 8:00PM TICKETING INFO:

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT Tickets available at Santa Rosa Ski and Sports, wellsfargoceterarts.org and the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts (707.546.3600).

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photographs and memorabilia. Tues-Sun, noon to 4. 1490 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.3757.


Arts Events

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | N OV E M B E R 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 5, 2 0 1 1 | B O H E M I A N.COM

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scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Nov 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Acoustic Explorations,â&#x20AC;? with Bart Hopkin. $3 donation. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

Readings Bean Affair Writing workshop with visiting poet Robin Ekiss. Hosted by Quill Ink Productions and Healdsburg Literary Laureate Stefanie Freele. Nov 9 at 10. $15. 707.696.1111. 1270 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Book Passage

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/PWFNCFSÂ&#x; Â&#x2026;.BUFFM$PNNVOJUZ$FOUFS 3FEXBZ $" 'SJEBZÂ&#x2026;,JDL0GG&WFOU Dell Arte Presents Mary Jane The Musical /$30 adv/$32 door/7pm doors/8pm show 4BUVSEBZÂ&#x2026;.BJO&WFOU Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Umbrella, Bayonics, Junior Toots, The Brown Edition, Sahra Indigo, To Life!, Ambush, Ngaio Bealum, Heather Donahue (Author of Growgirl) , The Fabulous Resinaires, Laxshmiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughters & more $20 suggested donation/11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1am/8pm show 4VOEBZÂ&#x2026;)FNQ'FTU'PSVN Featuring a panel of expert speakers organized by 707 Cannabis CollegesTopics will include: Humbolt County Medical Marijuana Ordinance; CA State Bill; Medical, Legal Dispensary Issues; Plus Media, Hemp & More!/FREE/1:30pm doors/2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm forum

Nov 9 at 7, Marilyn Howell, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honor Thy Daughter.â&#x20AC;? Nov 10 at 7, Lily Iona MacKenzie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All This.â&#x20AC;? Nov 11 at 1, Andrew Feinstein, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade.â&#x20AC;? Nov 11 at 7. Gregory Maguire, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wicked,â&#x20AC;? presents new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out of Oz.â&#x20AC;? Nov 12 at 1, Jennifer Reese, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Cook from Scratch.â&#x20AC;? Nov 12 at 4. Alan Kaufman, pioneer of Spoken Word movement reads from newest memoir, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drunken Angel.â&#x20AC;? Nov 12 at 7, Robbi Sommers Bryant, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Beautiful Evil.â&#x20AC;? Nov 12 at 7, Tony Horwitz, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid that Sparked the Civil War.â&#x20AC;? Nov 13 at 4, Scott Wallace, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Unconquered: In Search of the Amazonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Uncontacted Tribes.â&#x20AC;? Nov 13 at 7, Diana Cohen, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making Limonada: Memories of an Andalucian Village During the Last Years of Francoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fascist Spain.â&#x20AC;? Nov 13 at 6:30, Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Night Out: A Review of Books (Fundraiser with the Storks). Nov 13 at 1. Chris Van Allsburg, reads from new childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chronicles of Harris Burdick: 14 Amazing Authors Tell the Talesâ&#x20AC;? with contributions from Stephen King and Sherman Alexie. Nov 15 at 7, Robert Massie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman.â&#x20AC;? Nov 15 at 7, Daniel Polikoff, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Image of Orpheus: Rilke: A Soul History.â&#x20AC;? 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Stacy Carlson Stacy Carlson. Reading of latest

( 31

book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Among the Wonderful.â&#x20AC;? Nov 12 at 1. Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books, 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Depot Bookstore & Cafe Reading by Anne Marie Santos, daughter of Lu Anne Henderson who started Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady on their journey. Nov 9 at 7. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2665.

Dr Insomniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coffee & Teas Second Mon at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poetry Farm,â&#x20AC;? readings by local writers. 800 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.897.9500.

Donald & Shirley Kirkpatrick Journal readings by former Saudi Arabian International Schools educators. Nov 10 at 6:30. Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books, 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.9270.

Chris Matthews Host of MSNBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hardballâ&#x20AC;? reads from new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero.â&#x20AC;? Nov 9 at 7. 415.927.0960. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Occidental Center for the Arts Book launch and celebration of OCA Writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group first book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right to Writeâ&#x20AC;? with readings and book sales. Nov 13 at 4. 707.874.9392. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway., Occidental.

Jonah Raskin Raskin reads from his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marijuanaland,â&#x20AC;? followed by signing and refreshments. Nov 10 at 7. River Reader, 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2240.

Teen Writing Workshop Inaugural meeting of monthly writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; group. Nov 13 at 2. Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Theater A Carlin Home Companion Kelly Carlin presents loving, funny one-woman play about her famous father, George

Carlin. Nov 13 at 8. $18-$21. 142 Throckmorton Theater, 142 Throckmorton, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web Theatreworks USA presents classic kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tale as part of Clover Stornetta Family Fun Series. Nov 15 at 6:30. $12-$17. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Fully Committed Actor Dan Saski juggles 40 characters in 90-minute play. Nov 4-12; Fri at 8, Sat at 2 and 8; Thurs Nov 10 at 8. $20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Rapunzel All ages welcome for classic performance. Nov 11 at 7:30, Nov 12 at 1 and 3, Nov 13 at 3. $5. Steele Lane Community Center. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Sherlockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Case Pegasus Theater Company presents dark comedy written by Charles Marowitz and directed by Diana Grogg. Through Nov 20; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$20. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido. 707.583.2343.

Thoroughly Modern Millie A high-spirited musical romp that has all of New York dancing the Charleston. Nov 11 and 18 at 7:30, Nov 12, 13, 19 and 20 at 2. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

To Kill a Mockingbird Ross Valley Players present classic play, directed by James Dunn. Nov 11-Dec 11, Thurs at 7:30, Fri and Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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34

Astrology

FREE WILL

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

ART

G

A

L

L

E

R

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 9

Y

ROBERT BREYER PAINTINGS & PRINTS

Sept 25–Nov 12 Robert Bryer Talks About His Art Fri, Nov 4, 6:30–8pm

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) The title of this week’s movie is Uproar of Love, starring the Fantasy Kid and the Most Feeling Machine in the World. It blends romance and science fiction, with overtones of espionage and undertones of revolution for the hell of it. Comic touches will slip in at unexpected moments. When you’re not up to your jowls in archetypes, you might be able to muster the clarity to gorge yourself on the earthly delights that are spread from here to the edge of the abyss.

of French fries to freedom fries and French toast to freedom toast. The culminating moment in this surrealistic exercise came when Bush told U.K.’s prime minister Tony Blair, “The French don’t even have a word for entrepreneur”—unaware that “entrepreneur” is a word the English language borrowed from the French. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned, Libra: Make sure you know the origins of everyone and everything you engage with, especially as they affect your ability to benefit from entrepreneurial influences.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

How’s your relationship with your muse? Don’t tell me that you’re not an artist so you don’t have a muse. Even garbage collectors need muses. Even farmers. Even politicians. All of us need to be in touch with a mysterious, tantalizing source of inspiration that teases our sense of wonder and goads us on to life’s next adventures. So I ask you again: What have you and your muse been up to lately? I say it’s high time for you to infuse your connection with a dose of raw mojo. And if for some sad reason you don’t have a muse, I urge you to go out in quest of new candidates. (P.S. A muse isn’t necessarily a person; he or she might also be an animal, an ancestor, a spirit or a hero.)

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) The

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Funky pagan scientists at Zen State University have found that the regular consumption of Free Will Astrology can be effective in smoothing unsightly wrinkles on your attitude, scouring away stains on your courage and disposing of old garbage stuck to your karma. They’ve also gathered testimony from people who claim to have experienced spontaneous healings of nagging ailments and chronic suffering while under the influence of these oracles. If I were you, I’d try to take advantage of such benefits right now. You could really use some healing. Luckily, it looks like there’ll be an array of other curative options available to you as well. Be aggressive about seeking them out.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Given the lush and exotic astrological factors now coming to bear on your destiny, and due to the possibility that something resembling actual magic may soon make an appearance, I am taking a leap of faith with this week’s horoscope. Are you game? There is a hypothetical scene described by the English poet Samuel Coleridge (1772–1834) that would normally be too outlandish to take seriously, but I suspect it’s a possible match for your upcoming adventures. “What if you slept,” he wrote, “and what if in your sleep you dreamed, and what if in your dream you went to heaven and there you plucked a strange and beautiful flower, and what if when you awoke you had the flower in your hand? Ah, what then?”

LEO (July 23–August 22) I was musing on how slow I am to learn the lessons I need to master—how hard it can be to see the obvious secrets that are right in front of me. But I felt better after I came across the logo for the Jung Institute in San Francisco, which is dedicated to the study of psychology and psychotherapy. The symbol that it has chosen to embody its ruling spirit consists of four snails creeping their way around a center point—a witty acknowledgment of the plodding nature of the human psyche. I bring this to your attention, Leo, because it’s important for you to give yourself credit for how much you’ve grown since the old days—even if your progress seems intolerably gradual. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

It will be a good week to have nice long talks with yourself—the more, the better. The different sub-personalities that dwell within you need to engage in vigorous dialogues that will get all their various viewpoints out in the open. I even recommend coaxing some of those inner voices to manifest themselves outside the confines of your own head—you know, by speaking out loud. If you feel inhibited about giving them full expression where they might be overheard by people, find a private place that will allow them to feel free to be themselves.

Cunnilinguistic Dicktionary defines the newly coined word “mutinyversal” as “rebellion against the whole universe.” I think it would be an excellent time for you to engage in a playful, vivacious version of that approach to life. This is one of those rare times when you have so many unique gifts to offer and so many invigorating insights to unleash, that you really should act as if you are mostly right and everyone else is at least half-wrong. Just one caution: As you embark on your crusade to make the world over in your image, do it with as much humility and compassion as you can muster. In Mongolia, there’s a famous fossil of two dinosaurs locked in mortal combat. Forever frozen in time, a velociraptor is clawing a protoceratops, which in turn is biting its enemy’s arm. They’ve been holding that pose now for, oh, 80 million years or so. I’m shoving this image in your face, Sagittarius, so as to dare you and encourage you to withdraw from your old feuds and disputes. It’s a perfect time, astrologically speaking, to give up any struggle that’s not going to matter 80 million years from now. (More info: tinyurl.com/ DinosaurFight.)

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “In your experience, who is the best-smelling actor that you’ve worked with?” TV host Jon Stewart asked his guest Tom Hanks. “Kevin Bacon,” replied Hanks. Why? Not because of the bacon-as-a-delicious-food angle, although that would be funny. “He smells like a mix of baby powder and Listerine,” Hanks said. Keep this perspective in mind, Capricorn. I think you should be engaged in a great ongoing quest to put yourself in situations with pleasing aromas. I mean this in both the metaphorical and literal sense. To set yourself up for meaningful experiences that provide you with exactly what you need, follow your nose. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) According to my reading of the omens, Aquarius, you can finally take advantage of a long-standing invitation or opportunity that you have always felt unworthy of or unready for. Congratulations on being so doggedly persistent about ripening the immature parts of yourself. Now here’s an extra bonus: This breakthrough may in turn lead to you finding a lost piece to the puzzle of your identity. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

My acquaintance Bob takes a variety of meds for his bipolar disorder. They work pretty well to keep him out of the troughs, but he misses the peaks. Last time he saw his psychiatrist, he told her he wished he could stop taking the complicated brew of drugs and just take a happy pill every day. The psychiatrist told him that if he ever found such a thing, she’d love to take it herself. Wouldn’t we all? I’m pleased to report that you are now very close to locating the next best thing to a happy pill, Pisces. It may require you to at least partially give up your addiction to one of your customary forms of suffering, though. Are you prepared to do that?

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SPIRITUAL

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Sunday School & Service 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. General program and introductory class: Tues A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 & Weds evenings: 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:45pm. www.UnityofSantaRosa.org Lunch Time Meditations: Every Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Beginning Nov 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dec 21. Use your lunch hour Encountering God during Advent: to nourish your spirit with a mid-day meditation An Invitation to the Contemplative Gifts of the Season (Free Workshop) An introduction to the on the Heart Sutra, Buddha`s precious teachings on the true nature of existence. Donations Advent season and to new ways of approaching it that will enrich your spiritual journey. Sun, according to your ability and wishes are acNov 20, 7-8:30p, Journey Center, 707-578-2121, cepted. www.journeycenter.org. Prayers for World Peace: Sun - 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:45am Everyone is welcome.

Napa Mediation Class:

304 Petaluma Blvd, N, Petaluma 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org.

Universal Love and Compassion. Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30 PM at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in; no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org/ Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa, CA 707.257.2350 www.jesselgallery.com

Self Realization Fellowship Santa Rosa Meditation Group 795 Farmers Lane #22 Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 www.srf-santarosa.org

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