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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Shelby Larsen by Sara Sanger. Clothes by Emily Melville. Hair by Ashley Allred. Makeup by Rochell Foust. Design by Kara Brown.


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reminder amid the proselytizing protesters at Guerneville’s Pride parade last weekend.

This photo was submitted by Stephen Gross of Monte Rio. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Sprouting Up An Arizona grocery chain wrestles into Santa Rosa BY NICA POZNANOVICH

T

he term “farmers market” immediately conjures images of wooden crates full of Gravensteins, verdant greens brimming over the edge of foldable tables and conversations with the people who grew them. It is also the name of the next big-box grocery store trying to call Santa Rosa home. Sprouts Farmers Market is a chain of natural food stores based out of Phoenix, Ariz. It has submitted a request to amend the city’s general plan to allow for a 30,000square-foot store at the corner of Mendocino Avenue and Bicentennial Way. Santa Rosa Community Market needs your help to show the planning commission that the corporate interests of these out-of-towners does not merit a change in the general plan.

A memorandum dated May 3, 2011, states that “the project proponents indicate that the proposed general plan amendment will allow a specialty grocery store not currently found in the surrounding market.” However, there are currently seven grocery stores within two miles of the proposed site: Safeway, Pacific Market, Community Market, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Lucky’s and Traverso’s. Three of these stores are locally owned, and two are technically natural-food stores. Organic produce and other natural products can be purchased at all of them. Despite these facts, the memorandum states, “Of particular note is the high demand for fruits and vegetables in this geographic area.” A Sprouts store at this location would only deprive other parts of the city access to healthy food and shift market share from existing businesses to itself, instantly negating the argument for increasing sales tax. For a detailed description of other issues please visit www.srcommunitymarket.com. There is a petition to sign and a sample letter we ask you to send to our city council representatives. We hope you will join us in our efforts to show the planning commission that there are no community needs being meet in this proposal. Please join us June 9 at 4pm to fill the seats of the Santa Rosa City Council chamber and ensure that our message is heard. Nica Poznanovich is the outreach coordinator for the Santa Rosa Community Market. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Barella, ella, ella, eh, eh, eh

Kudos to Peter Byrne and the Bohemian for running the investigative article about Petaluma’s Theatre District project (“Basin Street Blues,” June 1). It was well-researched and to the point, and is an example of the need for quality journalism in the community. Though I am glad that Petaluma finally opened a movie theater as part of the Theatre District, the way the developers left the city and its residents with the excessive costs is deplorable. Does no one remember that at the same time, KFC was offering to repair Petaluma’s potholes in exchange for advertising on the asphalt?

DENNIS EMERSON Petaluma

Why isn’t this story front page in the Press Democrat? Let me guess: Mr. Barella’s connections in Petaluma politics. Maybe someone like Mike Kerns, who was on the board of supervisors at the time of the vote for the quarry. Has anyone looked into that connection? Or Mike O’Brien?

enough to ride with me again. For now, I’ll drive her to childcare and ride from there. Ride on, Sarah!

SARA SUNDQUIST Redding

One Sick Country I know a traitor when I see one. It’s someone who doesn’t believe in paying taxes to support the common good. Republicans and many of their cowering Democratic brothers and sisters believe that they should not be responsible for the general welfare of their fellow citizens. These are the same people who have no trouble asking us (the poor, working class and middle class) to die for their “freedoms.” Of course, it’s really about their economic freedom to exploit us and the rest of the world. Apparently, our lives are a lot less valuable and precious than their dollars. It’s a very sick bunch of people who believe that dollars are worth more than people—and this has become one really sick country. It’s difficult for me to comprehend the moral blindness and stone-cold hearts of those who do not realize that the well-being of the country is tied to the well-being of all its people. So from now on, join me in calling these people exactly what they are—economic traitors to the United States of America.

SUSAN LAMONT Santa Rosa

‘BIRDIE’ Petaluma

Looking Sweet on the Seat Sarah Hadler’s article (“A Bicycle Built for Two,” June 1) articulated exactly how I felt when I was pregnant last year and riding my bicycle. So many people were concerned for me and my baby and couldn’t understand why and how I was still riding while pregnant. I felt great and didn’t see any reason to stop (I was able to pedal on my due date!). My midwife thought it was great and validated that I was building immunity for my baby. I did, in fact, have a healthy girl, and can’t wait until she is old

Dept. of Burden of Proof After running Peter Byrne’s story on North Bay Construction founder John Barella’s ties to Basin Street Properties (“Basin Street Blues,” June 1), we were pleased to see Mr. Barella, who did not return calls for our article, finally respond to the press. In this week’s Press Democrat (“Petaluma Urged to Investigate Theatre District Construction Deals,” June 7), Mr. Barella has a single statement, directed at the Bohemian: “All I can say [to them] is ‘prove it.’” Prove it?


THIS MODERN WORLD

Our article online at Bohemian.com links to several detailed PDFs proving not only Mr. Barella’s ties to Basin Street Properties as its single largest investor—which he swore to under oath—but also the cost overruns, the passing along of developer costs to the city, the promises by Basin Street Properties to take part in an assessment district to share in those costs and the final audit on the project after those promises were reneged upon. These are public documents from the Superior Court of the State of California, the city of Petaluma, Petaluma city inspectors and Basin Street Properties itself. The PDFs, produced by Peter Byrne, could not “prove it” more clearly. Friends of Mr. Barella who may be able to assist him in downloading the latest version of Adobe Acrobat, please get in touch.

THE ED.

Transferring the Onus

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

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5 Jolie Holland to play free set at Russian River Brewing Co. on June 16 at noon

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At the end of June, San Rafael resident Regina Carey will sail to the Gaza Strip on a ship with an Obama-esque name, The Audacity of Hope. She joins approximately 50 other Americans, including writer Alice Walker, on a “freedom flotilla,” an international delegation of 10 boats. They hope to draw attention to the blockade of Gaza, just a year after occupants of a Turkish flotilla violently clashed with Israeli soldiers, leaving nine protesters dead. The embargo, which has eased in the past year, was imposed after Hamas took control of the Gaza Strip and missiles were fired from Gaza at Israeli civilian population centers. The embargo’s stated objective is stemming the flow of weapons and weapon-making equipment to Gaza, though it has created a humanitarian crisis in Gaza.

FAST FORWARD GM’s Volt runs on a lithium-ion battery, technology developed by Sony in the Walkman era.

Charging Ahead For electric cars, it’s all about the batteries—and batteries are getting better BY RONALD BAILEY

B

atteries are now “part of the cleantech boom, with all the dewy and righteous credibility of thin-film solar and offshore windmills,” Seth Fletcher asserts in Bottled Lightning: Superbatteries, Electric Cars, and the New Lithium Economy. Righteous? Surely. Credible? Maybe.

As Fletcher tells it, the history of batteries over the past hundred years is essentially a series of failed efforts to power automobiles. For a century, we have been trying, with a mix of countless metals and chemicals, to achieve the perfect recipe for converting stored chemical energy into electrical energy. In his book, Fletcher begins with Thomas Edison, who launched a car-powering battery in

1903 “with a level of hype and overpromising that would do today’s most egregious vaporware vendors proud.” Electric cars in Edison’s day cost up to $5,000—about $130,000 in today’s dollars. Gasoline engines simply packed a lot more driving bang for less buck, and electric cars died out. Fast-forward to the 1970s, when the Arab oil embargo revived interest in electric cars. ) 11 Congress even tried to

“I am of firm belief that we have to stop using aggression and war and using people as chattel as a way to gain power and gain resources,” says Carey. “And this is one of the places right now where this is happening.” The flotilla will carry no supplies to Gaza. The cargo will consist simply of letters of support, written by Americans to Palestinians. With preparations for her flight to Athens beginning this week, Carey says she is only slightly nervous about the risks. “This action is completely peaceful and completely legal. And none of us is in support of any government or any faction,” says Carey. “We believe that people have a right to live in peace and have a right to a livelihood where they can continue to be responsible for the land they have, the crops that they grow, the education of their children, and the right to travel.”

—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978

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Who killed the electric car? The answer is an easy one: the batteries did it. The next electric-car misďŹ re was GMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EV1, developed in the 1990s in response to Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stringent airpollution regulations. The EV1, powered by massive lead-acid and nickel-hydride batteries, could go as far as 140 miles on a charge. GM built 800 of the cars, leasing them for $349 a month. But the batteries simply did not store enough energy, and cost $40,000 to $50,000. GM lost a billion dollars before canceling the program. The company was excoriated for its decision in the documentary Who Killed the Electric Car?, but the answer is an easy one: the batteries did it. As the EV1 was being junked, Toyota launched its Prius hybrid in the United States in 2000, a car with a gasoline engine assisted by a nickel-metal-hydride battery. (As of 2011, Toyota has sold more than a million Priuses in this country.) In 2003, Silicon Valley mogul Martin Eberhard founded Tesla Motors to build an allelectric car powered by lithiumion batteries, a technology developed heavily by Sony in the 1980s to meet demand for

11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

spur development by passingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; over President Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vetoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act in 1976. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s startling to be reminded that, in the 1970s, Exxon commercialized the ďŹ rst rechargeable lithium-ion batteries to power electric cars. But then oil prices collapsed, major petroleum reserves were discovered and Exxon sold off its battery division.

personal electronics. By 2006, the ďŹ rst Tesla was on the roadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; without incident. Once lithiumion batteries had been proven in automobiles, GM launched its own concept car, the Volt. American drivers suffer from range anxiety, the fear that electric cars will run out of juice and leave them stranded. The Volt was designed to address that concern. The Voltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-electric range is about 40 miles, though it can go up to 400 miles using its gasoline engine. President Obama has set a goal of having a million plug-in hybrids like the Volt on American roads by 2015, and is offering hefty tax credits to buyers. Even more generously, the 2009 stimulus package included $2.4 billion in government subsidies to start-up battery companies. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here before. Almost every president since Richard Nixon, who launched a program to produce, as he declared, â&#x20AC;&#x153;an unconventionally powered, virtually pollution-free automobile within ďŹ ve years,â&#x20AC;? has tried and failed to spur the development of an alternativeenergy car. Will Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s push work any better? Furthermore, will the United States be able to compete with Asian battery giants like Panasonic in Japan, BYD in China and LG Chem in South Korea? Even GMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Volt is powered with batteries built by an LG Chem subsidiary. Some worry that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to replace our dependence on foreign oil with a dependence on foreign batteriesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and foreign lithium. Bottled Lightning alleviates at least one worry: by taking us to the salt ďŹ&#x201A;ats of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lithium triangleâ&#x20AC;? in Chile, Bolivia and Argentina, Fletcher shows us the abundance of the metal and puts to rest any fears of â&#x20AC;&#x153;peak lithium.â&#x20AC;? But at $41,000 per car, the Volt may not interest most drivers. Even with the price of gasoline hovering at $4 a gallon, GM has sold only about 2,000 Volts. The fate of its gamble depends on the price of oil, yes, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also dependent on improvements in battery chemistry.

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Overcast Apple’s iCloud

BY DAEDALUS HOWELL

F

or Apple CEO Steve Jobs, when it rains, it pours. The lauded gadget guru qua rainmaker came out of medical leave this week to formally introduce attendees of Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference to a bevy of new products. Among them is the much anticipated iCloud, Apple’s own spin on so-called cloud-computing, which, sans the weather whimsy, simply refers to information stored in remote servers and accessible via your device of choice anywhere there’s a decent internet connection.

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Though the concept isn’t new (telephone companies once used the metaphor to describe their early forays into “virtual private networks”), its implementation in tech quarters gained real momentum in 2006, when Amazon introduced its Elastic Compute Cloud, a service that obviated the need for expensive server systems and paved the way for a bevy of startups. It was Google, however, that brought the cloud to civilians, with its suite of document creation tools (aimed squarely at Microsoft’s

bread and butter). Now, with iCloud, Apple has also entered the consumer cloud market, touting synchronization of one’s digital data—documents, email, calendars, iTunes library, videos and plans for world domination—among one’s MacBook, iPad, iPhone and beyond. And it’s free. Heretofore, one’s computer was like the sun in a private digital solar system around which all other devices orbited and depended for data through increasingly arcane synchronization rituals. Conceptually, iCloud collapses this solar system into a single celestial body accessible anywhere and anytime by whatever piece of gear happens to be in one’s hand. It’s like opening a wormhole into the fabric of one’s own virtual universe, integrating everything in a single service that’s hardware-agnostic. This is the crux of Jobs’ plan, “demoting” the PC and even his own company’s iconic iMac line to mere, as he explained on Monday, “devices.” Of course, to those who’ve eluded induction into the cult of Apple, the company’s products have always been mere devices. For true believers, however, devices are tantamount to religious talismans that signify belief in a higher being—namely, Jobs. His conceptual downgrading of his stock-in-trade might prove a revelatory moment. It takes the way we deal with data, the ones and zeroes that compose much of our quotidian experience and whole flanks of our self-concept, and moves them from the concrete to the abstract, from “there” to “everywhere,” in a manner analogous to going from the corporeal to the spiritual (which, by some accounts, Jobs might be soon doing). The device, like the body, is but a vessel. “We’re going to move the digital hub, the center of your digital life, into the cloud,” Jobs beamed. It’s not hard to imagine him hovering there too, lightning bolt in hand. Daedalus Howell is cloudy with a chance of meatballs at FMRL.com.


Young Love Teens launch Imagination Film Festival BY JULIANE POIRIER

S

eventeen-year-old Schuyler Schwartz is on a mission. With the help of adults and peers, Schwartz has launched a teen-to-teen, pro-action film festival highlighting injustices plaguing human and animal life. The cause closest to her heart is the plight of the dolphin.

“I’ve always been an animal lover,” says Schwartz, who last week graduated from University High School in San Francisco. “When I watched The Cove, I was really upset and wanted to get involved. So I looked on the website and talked to the head of my school’s community-service program about showing the film.” Not only did she bring the film to her school for peers to view, but she took it to other schools as well, and soon after found herself creating the Imagination Film Festival, which includes the

films No Impact Man, The Cove and Food Inc. “It kept evolving,” explains Schwartz. “The more I talked to people, the more they became interested.” According to Schwartz, some of the teens she spoke with told her they felt moved by the messages in documentaries but didn’t know what to do. So Schwartz and her teen colleagues came up with action steps. “Our goal is to educate people and make these films more widely known and, more importantly, to tell people what they can do after the film. Otherwise, it’s incredibly depressing,” explains Schwartz. “We made a Power Point presentation of 10 simple things you could do about each cause, and it leaves the audience members feeling excited and motivated.” Fundraising is part of Schwartz’s vision as well. At three San Francisco showings, Schwartz sold popcorn and donated the $300 proceeds to Earth Island Institute. “I really want to continue doing film festivals,” said Schwartz. “We made a promo video to try to get other high schools and more people involved, to get a grassroots thing going. It’s really a fun project to do. It’s a really positive experience.” The highlight for Schwartz was hearing that Richard O’Barry, trainer-turned-emancipator of dolphins, had agreed to appear in support of her festival. Although scheduling conflicts prevented his appearance this time, Schwartz was nevertheless thrilled. “He’s been kind of my idol for a while,” confessed Schwartz. “He was passionate about something and took action, and was able to accomplish a lot.” (Dolphin slaughter in Japan was allegedly stopped as a result of his filming The Cove.) When Schwartz takes her film festival to college with her this fall, maybe O’Barry will stop by and shake the hand of a fellow activist and friend of the dolphins. For more, see www.imaginefilmfest.com.

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Dining Gabe Meline

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SPEEDY DELIVERY Bistro 29’s Brian Anderson rushes his salted caramel ice cream to table before it melts.

Crystal Clear New variations on salted caramel take hold

W

hen Guy Daniels first heard about salted caramel, he was disgusted. Daniels was driving when a chocolatier appeared on NPR talking about her caramels, which she topped with a sprinkling of fancy sea salt. “I thought it was the dumbest idea ever imagined,” Daniels, owner of Santa Rosa’s Gandalf Chocolates, says. “I thought,

‘Who is this nut?’ That’s just insane, why would you put salt on chocolate?” He mentioned the idea to friends, who had the opposite response; they thought the sweet-salty combination sounded delicious, and urged him to try it. Six years later, Daniels’ dark chocolate caramels topped with sea salt are his bestselling truffles, and he regularly sells out of them at farmers markets. Daniels is one of the many Sonoma County chocolatiers and chefs who has experimented with salted caramel. The trend

BY SHELBY POPE

started in the kitchens of elegant restaurants in the early 2000s and spread to the taste buds of middle America by 2008 through Starbucks’ salted caramel hot chocolate, Häagen-Dazs’ Fleur de Sel caramel flavor and Wal-Martbrand salted caramel truffles. Although its national trendiness has since waned, salted caramel has evolved into a mainstay for many Sonoma, Marin and Napa eateries, cropping up on the dessert menus of pizzerias, sushi restaurants and bakeries. Local cupcake chain Sift featured the flavor combination for its March

specialty cupcake, the Stud Muffin, a beer cupcake with salted caramel frosting sprinkled with bacon. Salted caramel is especially common in French restaurants such as Sausalito’s Le Garage and Santa Rosa’s Bistro 29, since the flavor combination began when chefs from the Brittany region started folding local sea salts into their caramels. Bistro 29 owner Brian Anderson added a salted caramel ice cream to his menu after noticing the ubiquity of salted caramel lollipops in shops around Brittany. The gray sea salt he adds isn’t to give the ice cream an overwhelmingly salty flavor, he says, but to enhance the caramel. Although it poses a unique challenge—salt melts ice, so servers have to rush to keep the dessert from melting—it’s become the restaurant’s most popular ice cream. “Maybe it’s a food trend now,” says Anderson. “But I would stick with having it because we like it and our customers do, too.” Like any other food trend, some have already discarded it. Napa’s Morimoto had a miso caramel dessert for a while, but recently jettisoned it in favor of a blueberry and Earl Gray crème brûlée. Others have tweaked it. Julie Herson learned about salted caramel in culinary school, but when she started her own truffle company, Salt Side Down Chocolates, she chose to focus on the pairing of salt and chocolate. She’s combined her salt-topped truffles instead with mushrooms, umami and olive oil. “Salt and caramel just kind of go together nicely, [but] they’re not bringing out any different layers of flavor,” Herson says. Still, the combination of salt and caramel—delicious to some, boring to others—has proven to be intriguing to North Bay taste buds. As for Guy Daniels, he’ll keep making salted caramels as long as people keep buying them, even if he still doesn’t get what all the fuss is about. “It’s not something that I think, on the surface, makes a lot of sense,” he says. “But clearly it does. My customers love it. It really does have a following.”


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner Wed-Mon. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue. $$$. Southern-style and slowcooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Maguire’s Pub Irish pub. $-$$. Pub food–burgers, fish and chips, hearty salads. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch, Fri-Sun; dinner, Tues-Sun. 145 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.9800.

Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an old-fashioned patty. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Ravenous Bistro. $$. Eclectic menu. Try the smoked salmon and caviar appetizer, the house-made soups, and the vegetarian specials. Outdoor seating is like a comfy backyard. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 420 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1302. Simply Vietnam Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Sushi to Dai For Japanese. $$$. A temple of sushi cool. Regulars rave about the rolls, in particular the dragon roll. Lunch, Mon-Thurs; dinner, Mon-Sat. Two locations: 119 Fourth St, Railroad Square, Santa Rosa. 707.576.9309. 869 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.721.0392.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway

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Washoe House

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Dining

12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Open breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Cafe Gratitude Vegan. $$$. Mecca for vegans and raw foodists. Clean, light, refreshing food. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 2200 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.824.4652. Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mangoduck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Thur, Jun 9 7:15–11pm 7:15–8:45pm 8:45–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club New Dancer Class Plus Dancing

Fri, Jun 10 7:30–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise ChaCha Lesson and Ballroom, Latin & Swing Dance hosted by California Ballroom

Sat, Jun 11 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 11:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance 3–5:30pm The Fox and Moon: Summer Tea & Quartet Reservations call 415-375-0669 Sun, Jun 12 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am Zumba Fitness with Anna 1:30–3:30pm Vintage Dance 5:30–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Jun 13 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Jun 14 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African & World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. ) Lunch and dinner

Wed, Jun 8 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Dance Youth and Family 7–11pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

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1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com


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Dining ( 15

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daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Ladies Brew Too

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian.

Beer and Ychromosomes might seem to go hand in hand, but women have a long history as brewers of hops and yeast. “We were squatting by the river doing fermentables in Egypt,” laughs Sonoma County Beerocrats member Cathy Portje. Portje has been homebrewing for two years and is one of the main organizers behind Women’s Brewing Day on Saturday, June 11, at the Beverage People in Santa Rosa. Hosted by the Beerocrats, the event will feature brewing demos by women brewers, raffles, barbecue and beer tastings. “We’d like to see more women in the craftbeer movement and the craft-beer industry,” says Portje, emphasizing that while women are the focus of the day, men are more than welcome to participate in the fun. The intent is to advocate and encourage women to embrace the art and science of beer making, says Portje: “We’re celebrating women who brew.” Grains and mash for all! Hops will roll at Women’s Brewing Day on Saturday, June 11, at the Beverage People. 840 Piner Road, Ste. 14, Santa Rosa. 10am– 5pm. Free. 415.686.5922.—Leilani Clark

$$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Paradise Bay Californian. $$. For tasty standards and vegetarian items. Also get a delicious curry here. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226. Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and

SMALL BITES

dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.


Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment.

SONOMA COUNTY Bartholomew Park Winery A scenic locale for something that sounds like it belongs in a Henry James novel. Sauvignon Blanc and Cab are kings here. 1000 Vineyard Lane, Sonoma. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 707.935.9511.

Foppiano Vineyards Over 100 years old, Foppiano produces wines that can be described as simple but delicious. 12707 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.433.7272.

Hauck Cellars Peach-tree state wine fans on a mission to be the “best Bordeaux house in Sonoma County” doing fine so far. Tin-roofed, 1948 Quonset hut off the plaza sports a long bar with plenty of elbow room. 223 Center St., Healdsburg. Friday–Tuesday, 11:30am–5pm; until 7pm, Friday–Saturday. $10 fee; one taste free. 707.473.9065. Iron Horse Despite the rustic tasting room, Iron Horse produces sparkling wine and Pinots for the elite. A brilliant view for winetasting. 209786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–3:30pm. 707.887.1507. La Crema Winery Stylish salon offers hip urbanites limited-release country cousins of the top-selling restaurant brand. Pop in for the Pinot, stay for the Syrah. 235 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–5:30pm. 707.431.9400.

Mercury Geyserville No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Stryker Sonoma Vineyards Off-thebeaten-path winery features beautiful views and spectacular wine, the best of which are the reds. 5110 Hwy. 128, Geyserville. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.433.1944.

Twomey Cellars Framed by the spacious environs, through a massive glass wall, a panoramic $10 million view of the Russian River Valley awaits tasters. 3000 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 9am–5pm. 800.505.4850.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am– 6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa.

Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

PlumpJack Winery Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.942.0809.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Ten Rieslings, Dry

H

aving taken some time to dry out, California Riesling is making a small comeback. More so than with Pinot Noir, vintners say, a cool climate is the key. We tasted a few of my local favorites, with some illustrative imports thrown in. Listed in order of group preference; stars awarded according to my own notes. Francis Ford Coppola Winery, Sofia 2009 Monterey County Riesling ($19) I hesitated to include this one when I saw the Rubenesque, novelty bottle, fairly suggestive of a cloying, unserious product. “I couldn’t imagine bringing this to a dinner!” said one. But blind-tasted from a carafe, it tantalized with apricot skin, white flower and sweet fruit aromas, while the restrained palate was briny, with greyhound-level acidity. There’s a little residual sugar, but great balance. ++++ Mahoney Vineyards 2008 Carneros Riesling, Las Brisas Vineyard ($18) Pine boughs and pound cake, white peach and honeycomb, lychee and coconut water—these are some of our favorite things about the tonic, interesting Mahoney. +++++ August Kesseler 2009 Riesling Kabinett, Rheingau ($12) Aromas of cotton candy, strawberry juice and spice, delivered with the famous—and often necessary—balance of acidity and sugar, from the homeland. ++++ Yalumba 2008 South Australia Riesling ($11) The scent of “mineral oil,” or more frankly, diesel fuel, is actually a desirable hallmark of some Rieslings. Described as both refreshing and unrefreshing by the same tasters, citrus at the center of a thick, oily palate. Strangely appealing. ++++ Davis Family Vineyard 2009 Santa Lucia Highlands Riesling ($NA) Jasmine, white flower aromas over a razor-sharp, piney palate. Winemaker Guy Davis says that it pairs unbelievably well with rib-eye off the grill. +++ Taft Street Winery 2009 Russian River Valley Riesling ($16) Apricot, guava and pink grapefruit, off-dry but nicely balanced. A leaner version of the familiar California Riesling. ++++ Davis 2008 Santa Lucia Highlands Riesling ($18) Pixie sticks and baked pear, with a trace of petrol and a body that’s reminiscent of the Yalumba. ++++ Davis 2008 Sonoma Coast Riesling ($18) Rosemary, wet plaster aroma with petrol influence; white grapefruit and bitter herbs on the back end. Varietal and very crisp. +++ Pey-Marin 2009 Marin County Riesling, ‘The Shell Mound’ ($26) Faint aromas of apple cider, jasmine, pineapple, wet stone. Every bit as subtle as it’s intended to be; for some, too subtle, like some ghost Riesling. Don’t be scared: only 11.9 percent alcohol. ++++ Banyan 2009 Santa Lucia Highlands Riesling ($17) While lively and lean, we thought it was undermined by hints of soggy cashew, spoiled fruit, wet fur. Past vintages have been more appealing. Two bottles sampled. +++—James Knight

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North Bay Haute Couture

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As the saying goes, fashion is where one finds it—but rarely do we think to look anywhere besides glossy Italian magazines or the runway at Bryant Park. The notion that top-level, high-fashion designers could be hiding in the hems of our very own region? Nonsense, some would say. Turn the page, we say. Inside, we take a look at designers working in small studios in places like Graton and Santa Rosa but who are turning heads in New York and London. You’ll meet Becky Kelso, whose jewelry has been worn by Cate Blanchett and Penelope Cruz; Emily Melville, whose clothing has been selected by Neiman Marcus; Merria Dearman, the hairstylist turned Broadway wigmaker to the stars; and, throwing a stitch to the guys, Dominic Chambrone, who’s personally sold his laseretched, sewn and altered shoes to Rick Ross, will.i.am and Justin Bieber.

Look inside, and try to tell us we ain’t the classiest act in town.

Model: Shelby Larsen

Photography by Sara Sanger | Hair by Ashley Allred | Makeup by Rochell Foust | Profiles by Leilani Clark

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Sharp Elegance Emily Melville’s timeless designs Like the emerald trees surrounding her Graton art studio, fashion designer Emily Melville creates clothing that is simple, elegant and timeless. Her dresses, skirts and coats are artfully built objects of beauty, imbued with the thoughtful dedication to craftsmanship that Melville herself holds dear. “It’s about creating heirlooms, creating timeless fashion,” says Melville, who finds inspiration in the elegance and poise of the 1950s and 1960s—but spins it with a modern sensibility. Not a girl who dreamed of going into fashion (“I didn’t know anything about it in high school,” she says), the University of Virginia graduate majored instead in . . . biology. After college, she moved to California, and it was then, after her apartment burned down and she lost everything, that the creative impulse took over. Her interest in design germinated creating costumes for Burning Man and reggae festivals, and eventually she refined her skills through classes in sewing and patternmaking at Santa Rosa Junior College. “I’m interested in the construction of clothes,” says Melville, who takes an architectural approach to her designs, much like one of her inspirations, Spanish designer Cristóbal Balenciaga. “The creation of form around the body is kind of a building. There is a science to it,” she says. Encouraged by her husband, Melville studied toward an MFA in fashion design from the Academy of Art in San Francisco. She debuted her senior thesis project, which took nearly a year to complete, on the runaway at Bryant Park during Fashion Week in New York. The same designs—structured wool coats and a sleek silk dress, all in one-of-a-kind prints—were later selected by Neiman Marcus for San Francisco’s Fashion Night Out.

Model: Victoria Cappuccio

A new baby has put Melville’s spring–summer collection on hold, but she continues to teach a class on fabric and form at the Academy of Art. Melville says she’s moving toward creating clothing that’s more wearable and a “little less artsy,” but her continued vision is to create clothing that’s custom-designed and intricately crafted—and to be handed down generation after generation. www.emilymelville.com.


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All That Glitters Becky Kelso’s handcrafted metal jewelry

Cate Blanchett, Penelope Cruz and Sandra Bullock have one thing in common: all three have worn the handcrafted earrings and necklaces of Sebastopol jewelry designer Becky Kelso. After graduating from the Fashion Institute of Design in Los Angeles, Kelso, then 21, escaped Southern California for Mexico. It was there, in San Miguel de Allende, that she began apprenticing under a silversmith. “I do much better with hammers,” she laughs, sitting among the saws, wire cutters, stones and metals in her Graton studio. Back in L.A., Kelso worked as an assistant curator at La Luz De Jesus while continuing to create the intricate, Moorish-influenced rings and earrings that would become her signature. In the mid-’90s, Kelso showed her pieces in New York. The response was immediate and enthusiastic. Mademoiselle put Kelso’s designs on the cover; before long, she was in Fred Segal and Nordstrom. In 2003, Kelso’s chandelier earrings became a sensation when worn by Penelope Cruz on the cover of British Vogue. Eight years later, her pieces have sold in Barneys, Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue, and she’s been featured in Instyle, the New York Times, Italian Elle and Martha Stewart Weddings. Kelso finds inspiration in travel to other countries, ancient jewelry techniques, natural phenomena and gardening, as well as medicine journals, where she studies the repetitive patterns of cells. “I’m inspired by jewelry that makes that connection,” says Kelso about her elegant, modern designs. Jewelry today tends to be designed on computers and pushed out into molds; Kelso creates all of her pieces by hand. “I like doing it myself. I’m not as good at delegating the creative process,” says Kelso. It’s that dedication which makes her pieces much harder to reproduce, giving them an intriguingly individual character—as smart and cultured as their creator.

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Model: Teresa Kabba

www.beckykelso.com


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TheShoeSurgeon Dominic Chambrone sits in the Santa Rosa garage that doubles as his workspace, stacked with sewing books, glue, expensive fabrics and leathers, and, of course, befitting someone known as “the Shoe Surgeon,” boxes and boxes of shoes ready to be dismantled. “I’ve always been known as the ‘Shoe Guy,’” he says, plainly. But last March, after Justin Bieber’s stylist ordered two pairs of custom-made Supra TK Societys and Skytops from Chambrone for the teen superstar’s U.K. tour, Chambrone’s renown as the “shoe guy” spread globally. With straps, zipper details, added material and metal studs, the shoes were a hit—and more Bieber orders followed. Now, in addition to a growing celebrity clientele, Chambrone fields frenzied emails and orders from Bieber-fevered fans across the globe.

Dominic Chambrone’s footlight-worthy footwear

“I want to create something that’s high-quality and fits comfortably,” Chambrone explains, describing how he retrofits sneakers with an industrial sewing machine given to him by his father, using everything from leather to stingray to Swarovski crystals (another Bieber commission). He’s created a pair of fuchsia hightops for the L.A. based company Android Homme, which were worn at the MTV Video Music Awards by the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, and filled orders for Miami rapper Rick Ross. Justin Bieber’s latest contact was in ordering 10 more pairs of Chambrone’s custom-designed high-tops. But even as Chambrone jumped at the opportunity, the pressure proved intense, causing the 25-year-old to reassess his goals as a shoemaker. Currently apprenticing with Windsor cobbler Daryl Fazzio, the Shoe Surgeon is learning how to make a complete shoe from scratch, sole to tongue. Being a cobbler is an age-old American craft, notes Chambrone, and he’d like to see that craftsmanship return to a society obsessed with low-quality shoes usually made in China. “I feel gifted,” he says, sitting comfortably among the tools of his chosen trade. “Some people are stuck in a shitty job, but I’m a super passionate person and I need to be doing something amazing.”

www.theshoesurgeon.com


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Head toToe Merria Dearman’s wig and hairpiece artistry

The thing that Eva Gabor didn’t realize about a well-made wig is that is should be undetectable by the human eye. Rather than a platinum synthetic attack, the key lies in subtlety, with real human hair and finely crocheted lines. Merria Dearman, wig and hairpiece maker, quite understands this difference. (Compare model Teresa Kabba’s natural hair on p21 with the Dearman wig seen here.) Born and raised in Sonoma County, Dearman graduated from Santa Rosa High School and attended Vancouver Film School, majoring in film and television makeup artistry. Dearman thought she would learn how to do prosthetics for special affects. When a wig maker taught a lesson on mustache making in class one day, everything changed. Even while she trained as a stylist at Elle Lui salon in Santa Rosa, Dearman’s hairpiece- and wig-making skills grew. She studied with Amanda Miller, wig maker for Saturday Night Live. In addition to her work at acclaimed hair salon diPietro Todd and for the History Channel, Dearman recently did the hair for the entire cast of the Berkeley Rep’s production of American Idiot, the Green Day musical that went on to snare two Tony Awards on Broadway. In August, she and her new business, Dearman & Archbell, will move to New York. Eventually, Dearman plans to make quality wigs from well-sourced human hair suppliers for cancer patients. But for now, Dearman is planning her relocation to “mecca” while fine-tuning her work. “People don’t see hair as an art form, and it absolutely is an art form,” Dearman says. “To be able to trick the human eye, to be able to make people see something right in front of them that isn’t real, just by changing someone’s hair color? That’s an art, and I love it.” Model: Teresa Kabba

www.dearmanarchbell.com


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JJUNE UNE 18TH 8T H

B e st P Best Place lac e for f or Singles Meet S i ng les to to M eet

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®

COMING SOON! SONOMA-MARIN FAIR! WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22

TOWER OF POWER

TEEN EDGE p5)&-045#0:4 THURSDAY, JUNE 23

RICK SPRINGFIELD SENIORS’ SOCIAL CLUB FRIDAY, JUNE 24

THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND

WORLD’S UGLIEST DOG® CONTEST & DOG-LOVERS’ FESTIVAL SATURDAY, JUNE 25

BLUE OYSTER CULT & FOGHAT OPENING: PAT JORDAN BAND

SUNDAY, JUNE 26

FIESTA LATINA & !CANTA CON EL ALMA! DESTRUCTION DERBYpCELEBRITY CHEF: MICHAEL TUSK, QUINCE

EVERY DAY AT THE FAIR!

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featuring taiko, ballet, and more

KIDs’ Night

When you look good, we look good. The new, all-color North Bay Bohemian.


Crush S A N TA R O S A

Harmonic Convergence

In recent years, thanks to excellent lineups and more community involvement than ever, the teeming Harmony Festival has been vastly more populated than just about any other event at the fairgrounds—including the fair itself. This year should continue the trend, with headliners the Flaming Lips, Primus (below), Michael Franti, Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeroes, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals, Ghostland Observatory and others. A skateboard zone returns, and artists from the Handcar Regatta add a new feature this year with the “Steampunk Garage.” Be there Friday–Saturday, June 10–12, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. $45 per day or night; multi-day passes available. www.harmonyfestival.com.

N A PA

HEALDSBURG

CORTE MADERA

Rough Diamond

Jazz Ascension

Kiss the Cooke

In the years since John Prine inadvertently defined Americana in 1974 with his debut album, which showcased insightful, poetic storytelling in songs like “Sam Stone” and “Hello in There,” his stature has only risen. Like Dylan’s, even Prine’s minor albums harbor worthwhile chestnuts, but lately they’ve been all gold. Fair & Square, his last of original songs, won a Grammy, an award everyone knew was partially retroactive for his heavily influential back catalogue. Live, Prine plays with only a bassist and guitarist, and his stunning poetry and wry demeanor turn the hardest hearts into lifelong fans. He plays Wednesday, June 8, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 7:30pm. $55–$65. 707.259.0333.

Truly one of the great cultural treasures in the region, the Healdsburg Jazz Festival continues this year with a stellar lineup for its second weekend. Just as the absurd firing of founder Jessica Felix and a proposed change in direction by the festival’s former board of directors last year couldn’t take hold—the community reacted with understandable ire, Felix was reinstated, the board resigned and jazz won—the festival persevered against last weekend’s rain by moving outdoor events inside. This weekend sees Charles Lloyd, Charlie Haden, Bobby Hutcherson, Geri Allen, George Cables, Denny Zeitlin and many others. The festival runs through June 12; its full schedule is easily found at www.healdsburgjazzfestival.org.

As an O. Henry Award winner in 1997 and ’98, and with work anthologized in Best American Short Stories, Carolyn Cooke might be content to rest on her laurels. But the Point Arena author has hit another one out of the park with Daughters of the Revolution, the short-story writer’s first novel. Using the backdrop of a New England prep school in the throes of the social, political and sexual upheaval of the 1960s, Cooke demonstrates that the skill behind her first collection, The Bostons, is still in fine health in the long form. Cooke reads from Daughters of the Revolution on Sunday, June 12, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

Gabe Meline

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CULTURE

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The week’s events: a selective guide


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Stage

AGIT-VERSE Gertrude Stein’s forays

into theater: homage or vandalism?

Intense Nonsense The Imaginists tackle Gertrude Stein’s outrageous wordplay BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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onest to God Miss Williams I don’t mean to say that I was older.” “But you were.” “Yes I was. I do not excuse myself.” “I feel that there is no reason for passing an archduke.” It’s been nearly a hundred years since Gertrude Stein, the celebrated literary figure and art collector, wrote that slice of non sequitur from her deviously deconstructive “play” Ladies’ Voices. Equal parts poetry, performance art and practical joke, Gertrude Stein’s contributions to the stage were meant as an act of playful vandalism in which traditional sentence structures of human conversation are all but

eliminated. In their place, Stein wrote nonsense, often without punctuation. As a result, actors have little to work with—and everything to work with, since they’re free to interpret the text any way they choose. It’s no surprise that Santa Rosa’s fearless Imaginists Theatre Collective would eventually find its way to the plays of Gertrude Stein. What is unexpected is that the result would be so entertaining. In Gertrude Stein: 3 from Geography and Plays, directed with invention and dark humor by Brent Lindsay and Amy Pinto, the Imaginists tackle Stein’s murky musings with a gleeful appreciation for her comic experiments in bizarro absurdism. In Ladies’ Voices, the audience is encouraged to move about as three actresses “converse” inside a tiny teahouse, too small for the various suitcases and musical instruments the ladies have brought with them. There is dancing as well. The result is pleasingly silly, yet tinged with sadness—and extremely short. In What Happened, the actors use a larger performance space, stepping across the floor from painted spot to painted spot, as an assortment of befuddled party guests murmur odd observations— “A clever saucer is very likely practiced . . . and has toes!”—while playing games like Pin the Donkey on the Tail. And in the final piece, Turkey and Bones and Eating and We Liked It, the sidewalk and street in front of the theater become part of the stage, all seats turned to face the door as the actors come and go, eat vegetables with supremely intense emotion, drive cars—and exclaim things like “I do not understand electricity.” There is little to actually understand in any of this, but for those who are up for an evening of outrageous weirdness, the Imaginists excursion into the mind of Stein offers plenty to enjoy. ‘Gertrude Stein: 3 from Geography and Plays’ runs June 9–12 and 16–18 at the Imaginists Theatre Collective. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; Sunday, June 12, at 5pm. 461 Sebastopol Ave., Santa Rosa. $10–$15; pay-what-you-like days on June 9 and 16. 707.528.7554. www.theimaginists.org.


BRANDED Can Rotten Tomatoes stay neutral after a Warner Brothers buyout?

The Fray

Consensus-drunk on Rotten Tomatoes BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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ere are the numbers; identify the movie. Days before a film’s release, many eyes go to RottenTomatoes.com, the internet’s leading aggregator of movie reviews. In the early going, our mystery movie scores 100 percent on the Rotten Tomatoes meter. But one critic dissents; now the meter reads 98 percent. Alarm! The dissenter gets 120 comments, and the count keeps growing. Through fiber optics lattices, torrents of electrons shoot the message that shoots the messenger: “ur a dumb faghag.” Welcome to the eclectic, iconoclastic world of the fanboy. These slurs defend a movie whose theme about the importance of diversity couldn’t have been repeated more. Worshippers at the Tomato meter dream of the movie with a 100 percent rating, a rating

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Film

that goes unbroken forever: a drumbeat of approval, unanswered by counterpoint. They recall that sad day when contrarian Armond White of the New York Press dared to dislike Toy Story III, destroying that film’s perfect 100 percent. And now, a lowly Australian critic named Simon Miraudo has spoiled X-Men: First Class’ rating. “It was a good run . . . but we all knew this day would come,” notes “Tyler S” sadly. What can you do, replies another commentator: “Haters gotta hate.” But imagine a parallel universe in which Miraudo had never been born. Even there, though, on opening day, when the colder media weigh in—magazines and newspapers—X-Men: First Class’ perfect 100 percent was going to go down anyway. More opinions mean more dissent. Rank conformity isn’t completely the fault of blinkered fans; they’ve been raised to be consensus-drunk since birth. But this amping-up of critical scores and box-office totals is relatively new. Box-office results are trumpeted every Monday morning, as equal in importance to government policy decisions and climate crises. In an age when Americans feel encircled, they express patriotism by pumping their fists for what seems to be an American-made movie. (Your tax dollars at work: the U.S. Army spent some of its mega-million-dollar advertising budget linking the X-Men to its message: “It’s more than a uniform.”) Despite whatever consortium of international financiers actually owns a studio, despite how many foreign actors appear in it, one swells with patriotic feelings seeing starhaloed Mount Paramount, the Universal Globe and the Warner Bros. escutcheon. But if they’re symbols of the America that was, they’re no longer symbols of America that is. They’re just omens of the final war to come: the war of logos. In fact, Warner Bros. just bought Flixster, which owns Rotten Tomatoes. Whether this takeover helps or hinders independent commentary, time will tell.


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The Green Issue Be a leader and show your expertise in our growing world of sustainable living Special Issue: June 15 Deadline: June 9

Film

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Bride Flight (NR; 130 min.) Three women emigrating from Holland to marry awaiting fiancés in New Zealand become friends on the flight and meet a handsome chap who falls for one of the new friends. At the Rafael Film Center. (NB)

Incendies (R; 130 min.) At the reading of their mother’s will, twins learn their father still lives and they have a brother they never knew existed. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer (PG; 91 min.) Third-grader Judy’s

BECOME A Sonoma County Regional Son

PARKS P AR A MEMBER! Ann Annual Membership Includes: D Day-use ay-use par parking pass, Free Map to all 46 Parks, Pr Program ogram Discounts D Merchandise Discounts, Invitations to Member events, In v P Parks ar Member window decal “A park is a place to get away from the daily stresses of life, to clear the mind, and to take comfort in the beauty of nature.” ~ Shirlee Zane, Sonoma County Supervisor, former therapist, Parks Member Get your your Membership Memb emb at: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org, staffed staf fed e park park entry entry stations, CVS/Pharmacy stores in Sonoma County, Coun nty, REI Santa Rosa, Ro osa, and many man ny other locations

sonomacountyparks.org son nomacoun ntypa ypark ks.org g 70 707/565-2041 7/565-2 2041

Forks Over Knives (PG; 90 min.) An acclaimed documentary that examines the claim—and evidence—that our meat-based diet is responsible for most of our ailments. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

Queen to Play (NR; 101 min.) Kevin Kline

The Hangover Part II (R; 102 min.) This time the boys are in Thailand to quietly celebrate the wedding of Stu (Ed Helms), but things of course go terribly, terribly wrong. There’s a funny monkey! Co-stars Zach Galifianakis and Bradley Cooper. (NB)

stars as an American ex-pat in Corsica who tutors a middle-aged chambermaid (Sandrine Bonnaire) in her newfound obsession with chess. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) may have escaped a train wreck witnessed by teens making a Super 8 movie in this film written and directed by the very busy J. J. Abrams. Produced by Steven Spielberg. (NB)

These Amazing Shadows (NR; 88

Come Com me pla play y ...g get et hea healthy alth hy . . . or just rela relax! ax!

The First Grader (PG; 120 min.) Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl) directs the story of an 80-year-old Kenyan man determined to learn to read after the government institutes the nation’s first public school system—and the parents and school officials who don’t want resources wasted on him. Based on a true story. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

boring summer turns adventurous when kooky Aunt Opal comes for a visit. Based on the popular children’s books by Sebastopol author Megan McDonald. (NB)

Super 8 (PG-13; 112 min.) Something creepy

phone: 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

The Double Hour (NR; 102 min.) A retired cop in Turin falls for a Slovenian maid, but their romance is endangered when her dark past is exposed on a trip to the country. In Italian with English subtitles. At the Smith Rafael Center. (NB)

min.) Actor Peter Coyote joins filmmakers Paul Mariano and Kurt Norton in a showing of their documentary about the National Film Registry and the cultural significance of movies. Shows June 19, 7pm, at the Smith Rafael. (NB)

The Tree of Life (PG-13; 138 min.) Sean Penn and Brad Pitt co-star in Terrence Malick’s ambitious new film that follows the eldest son of a Texas family as he wrestles questions of life and existence. At the Rafael. (NB)

ALSO PLAYING Bridesmaids (R; 125 min.) Hangover for the girls. Hilarious Kristen Wiig co-stars with Maya Rudolph in raunchy-ish chic flick about a Vegas bridal party that goes too far. Directed by Paul Feig of Freaks and Geeks fame and produced by Judd Apatow. (NB) Cave of Forgotten Dreams (NR; 90 min.) This documentary from the great Werner Herzog takes viewers inside France’s Chauvet Cave, site of the oldest known human art, created over 30,000 years ago. At Petaluma’s Boulevard Cinemas. (NB)

The Cove (NR; 92 min.) A special showing of the award-winning documentary benefits Earth Island Institute’s Save Japan Dolphins fund. Includes discussion with filmmakers Ric O’Barry and Louie Psihoyos, and a live performance from Bob Weir. June 21 at 7pm. (NB)

Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG; 95 min.) Jack Black is back voicing Po, panda warrior, who must protect the Valley of Peace—and the art of kung fu itself—from a new danger. Also features the voices of Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Seth Rogen and Jackie Chan. (NB) Midnight in Paris (PG-13; 100 min.) A screenwriter writing a first novel in Paris is transported to the city’s rich 1920’s culture in the latest from Woody Allen. Co-stars Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Kathy Bates and Adrien Brody. At Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa and CineArts in Mill Valley. (NB) Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (PG-13; 137 min.) Number four in the franchise follows Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow on a quest for the Fountain of Youth. New perils on this journey include mermaids, zombies and the dread pirate Blackbeard. Also in 3-D. (NB)

Thor (PG-13; 130 min.) The summer season kicks off early with fantasy-adventure based on the Marvel comic. Directed by Kenneth Branagh and starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman and Anthony Hopkins as Thor’s pop, Odin. (NB) Water for Elephants (PG-13; 122 min.) A veterinarian (Robert Pattinson) is saved by the circus during the Great Depression, where he falls for the star of the horse show (Reese Witherspoon), wife of the sadistic animal trainer. (AD) X-Men: First Class (PG-13; 140 min.) A trip down memory lane shows us the early work of noble mutants Professor X and Magneto as they fight to stop a nuclear holocaust. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Benefit John Courage & the Great Plains, Raw Geronimo, Ferocious Few, Talismanz and many others help venue acquire a nonprofit bar and PA system. Jun 11 at 7. $7-$25. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Backyard Concerts

Winery. 4155 Wine Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 800.447.3060.

Harmony Festival The Flaming Lips, Primus, Michael Franti, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals, Ghostland Observatory, Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, skate area, Steampunk Garage, speakers, eco-friendly seminars, pizza, dreadlocks and more. Jun 10-12. $45 per day or night. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valey Rd, Santa Rosa. www.harmonyfestival.com.

Bring your low-back lawnchairs for an evening of music, food and drink Thurs at 6. Jun 9, Steve Lucky & the Rhumba Bums, Miss Kitty & the Big Dogs. Free. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. www.krsh.com.

Fred Koller

Dead Ahead

Hip-hop legend hosts Monday Night Edutainmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10-year anniversary celebration. Jun 13 at 9. $15-$20. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Grateful Dead tribute features Melvin Seals and Jimmy Tebeau of the Jerry Garcia Band. Jun 9 at 9. $15. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.822.6666.

Fishtank Ensemble Eclectic and eccentric folk rock. Jun 10 at 8. $20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Friday Night Music Live music weekly, Fri at 5. Jun 10, Cahoots (rock). Jun 17, Carlos Herrera (Latin jazz). $5. Michel-Schlumberger

Singer-songwriter with a gruff sweetness writes tight, folksy songs. Jun 11 at 8. $25. Studio E, address provided with tickets, Sebastopol, www.northbaylive.com.

KRS-One

Landmark Concerts Free live music and winery activities Sat, 1 to 4. Jun 11, Adam Traum (Americana). Landmark Vineyards, 1 01 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0053.

Shollenberger Shindig Benefit concert for Friends of Shollenberger Park with music

MARIN COUNTY DjangoFest Festival celebrates music and spirit of Gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt with performances by Jazz Gitan, Hot Club of Detroit, Fishtank Ensemble and many others. Jun 9-10 at 8; Jun 11 at 3 and 8; Jun 12 at 7. $25-$130. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt Veteran singer-songwriters team up for intimate acoustic concert. Jun 9 at 8. $49.75$89.75. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.7000.

NAPA COUNTY Tommy Emmanuel Absolutley stunning fingerstyle guitarist from Australia. Jun 10 at 8. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Healdsburg Jazz Festival Jazz makes a triumphant return with a weekend of top-notch talent including Charlie Haden, Bobby Hutcherson, Charles Lloyd and many ) others at venues

32

an essential part of the Open Studios tour Open Daily 11am to 6pm 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, CA 95472

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com LONESTARS Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt tell stories and swap songs on June 9 at

the Marin Center. See Concerts, above.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

by Foxes in the Hen House, the Rivereens, Three Legged Sister, Gabby LaLa and Guillermo Garcia. Jun 14 at 6. $20-$100. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 415.516.3673.


Music ( 31

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throughout Healdsburg. Jun 8-12. www.healdsburgjazzfestival.org.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Maraca

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

McNear’s Dining House Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak FRI 6/10 • 7:00PM DOORS • $26 • 21+ ROCK

GUITAR PLAYER MAGAZINE PRESENTS

MONTROSE LIVE IN CONCERT MICHAEL LEE FIRKINS FRI 6/17 • 7:30PM DOORS • $19 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ WORLD/AFRO-BEAT/FOLK/REGGAE

AN EVENING WITH

THOMAS MAPFUMO

& BLACKS UNLIMITED TUE 6/21 • 6:30PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

MARK BROUSSARD PLUS MATT HIRES &

CHIC GAMINE THUR 7/28 • 8:00PM DOORS • $15 ADV/$17 DOS • 21+ SONGWRITER

LANGHORNE SLIM WED 8/3 • 7:00PM DOORS • $22 ADV/$25 DOS • 21+ ROOTS/REGGAE

THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS THUR 8/4 • 7:00PM DOORS • $17 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ BLUES

MATT SCHOFIELD THUR 8/11 • 8:00PM DOORS • $17 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ COUNTRY/PSYCHEDELIC/ROCK

THE SADIES AND JESSE SYKES FRI 8/12 • 7:30PM DOORS • $13 ADV/$15 DOS • 18+ SUBLIME TRIBUTE BAND

4OZ TO FREEDOM SUBLIME TRIBUTE No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

Afro-Cuban band led by flautist Orlanda “Maraca” Valle. Jun 14 at 8. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

John Prine Greatest Americana singersongwriter alive. Jun 8 at 7:30. $55-$65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0333.

Romantic Chanticleer Men’s choir sing from the heart. Jun 11 at 8. $20-$44. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Theater Jun 9, Homeless benefit with Shaya, Semi-Evolved Simians, Eyezon, Guy Henry and more. 11, Arlene Francis benefit (see Concerts). 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jun 9, Inner Riddim with Sky I. Jun 10, Boris Garcia. Jun 11, Groove Merchants. Jun 12, the Moonbeams. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Chrome Lotus Jun 9, Jr Reid & the One Blood Family. Jun 10, DJ Billy Ruckus, DJ Sykwidit. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. www.chromelotussr.com.

Flamingo Lounge Jun 10-11, UB707 (R&B). 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Every Wed, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). Every Tues, blues with Sonny Lowe and friends. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Highland Dell Jun 10, Commander Cody. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hopmonk Tavern Jun 9, Juke Joint with West County Boogie Ensemble. Jun 10, McKenna Faith (country). Jun 11, Comedy Showcase (see Comedy). Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with KRS-One (see Concerts). 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. )

34

One Eyez Open South African artist Eyezon leads homeless benefit Born in Soweto and raised on his uncle’s hip-hop mix tapes, the rapper Eyezon learned the principles of cadence and rhythm before he learned proper English in South Africa. Now splitting his time between Sonoma County and San Francisco, Eyezon’s given back to the great mix-tape ocean that originally inspired him. Machine Gun Pop is not nearly as political as Eyezon’s earlier material—nor is it as agitating as its title may imply. Between the breezy pop production of “U Imagined It All” and the come-hither play of “I Will Be Your Friend,” Machine Gun Pop reveals Eyezon the romantic, Eyezon the flirt. Then there are tracks like “Be Free,” which align more with the life story of the kid whose father was AWOL and whose mother was exiled to Germany: “Times have changed but the struggle goes on,” he raps, “Children into soldiers, they die, so wrong / Entire generations is tryin’ to hold on.” Eyezon—to whom comparisons to Somali musician K’naan are inevitable—also lends time on Machine Gun Pop to causes such as global warming and the aftermath of war. But homeless services have always been dear to the rapper, and his show this week supports just that. Joining him on the refreshingly varied bill is rapper Shaya, punk band Semi-Evolved Simians, pop/R&B singer Bri Anne Michelle, quirky folk artist Guy Henry, Italian tango trip-hop artist Naresh Michael and more. It’s all happening on Thursday, June 9, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $5; bring canned food. 707.528.3009.—Gabe Meline


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NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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the last day saloon nightclub & restaurant

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT. & ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES, BANQUETS, FUNDRAISERS AND OUTSIDE PROMOTERS 707.545.5876

6/8

7:30 PM | $5/8| FOLK ALL AGES

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

Girls & Boys + Javier Montiel 6/10

8:30 PM | $10/13

ultimate 60'S & 70's ROCK

A Piece of My Heart featuring Julie Medeiros + H.O.T.S.

6/11

9:30 PM | $15/20 | 70'S-NOW

Wonder bread 5 6/15

7:30 PM | $5/8| FOLK ALL AGES

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

The Blushin' Roulettes + Heather Van Cleve 6/23

9:30 PM | $5 | ROOTS ROCK

The Marshall House Project + Hillside Fire + Mercuryville + Brett Fenex 7/1

9:30 PM | $10 | ROCK COVERS

ADD/C (AC/DC Tribute Band)

7/2

9 PM | $20 | 80'S DANCE HITS

Tainted Love 7/21

8:00 PM | $10 | ROCK

Faster Pussycat + bAD bOY eDDIE + rOAD cREW

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7 PM $1.50 pbr, $2 domestic beer, $3 import/draft beer, well drinks, wine, & appetizers all shows are 21+ unless noted for reservations: 707.545.5876

707.545.2343 120 5th st. @ davis st. santa rosa, ca

lastdaysaloon.com

Music ( 32 Hotel Healdsburg Jun 10-11, Sylvia Cuenca Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 8, Royal Deuces. Jun 9, Critical Measures Trio. Jun 10, Jason Bodlovich. Jun 11, Jinx Jones. Jun 12, Sorentinos. Jun 14, Shollenberger Shindig (see Concerts). 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Jun 10, A Piece of My Heart, HOTS (classic rock). 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Schoenberg Guitars

Commandos. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Jun 10, Rick Ruskin. 106 Main St, Tiburon. 415.789.0846.

MARIN COUNTY George’s Nightclub Jun 10, Petty Theft (Tom Petty tribute). Jun 11, the Edge. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Jun 8, Alison Harris & the Barn Owls. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Jun 11, San Francisco Starlight Orchestra. Jun 12, Krische Band. 19080 Riverside Dr, Sonoma. 707.938.9910.

Jun 8, Dead Winter Carpenters. Jun 10, Freddie McGregor (reggae). Jun 11, Vinyl, Monophonics. Jun 12 at 5, Dave Getz (jazz); at 9, Buddy Owen. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Jun 10, the Gentlemen Soldiers. Jun 11, Larry Carlin’s Mostly Simply Bluegrass, Dr Elmo & Wild Blue. Jun 12, Sean Carscadden & Marty O’Reilly. Jun 14, Third Party. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Jun 8, Miracle Mule. Jun 9, Gabe Diamond-Ortiz. Jun 10, Hillside Fire. Jun 12, female singer songwriters. Jun 14, Happy Idiot, Deborah Crooks. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Little Switzerland

Mystic Theatre Jun 8, Donavon Frankenreiter, Seth Pettersen (see Concerts). Jun 10, Montrose, Michael Lee Firkins (rock). Jun 11, Beatles Flashback, Pacific Empire Chorus (a cappella). 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Rancho Nicasio Jun 10, WTJ2. Jun 12 at 4, BBQ on the Lawn with Riders In the Sky. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Smiley’s Jun 9, Hung Like a Nun, Pure Cane. Jun 10, Emma Lee Project (folk rock). Jun 11, Maka (reggae). 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Jun 8, Philip Claypool & the Smokehouse Band. Jun 9, Michael Lee Firkins Band. Jun 10, Bell Brothers. Jun 11, Alvon Johnson. Jun 14, Taylor Brown (acoustic). 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Jun 9, Ralph Woodson. Jun 10, Charles Wheal Band. Jun 11, Jinx Jones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Silo’s Wed at 7, jam session. Jun 9, Duran Duran Duran. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Jun 9, Smokin’ Joe & Steelhead (blues). Jun 10, Nate Lopez Trio. Jun 11, Jack Pollard & Party of Three. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Phoenix Theater Jun 10, Skylark, 14 Planets, Out to Lunch, Conceive and Leave, Push, Happy Tension. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jun 11, Conrad & the Real Diehl. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Russian River Brewing Co Jun 11, Steve Pile Band. Jun 12, Lucas Ohio. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Stout Brothers Jun 8, Robert Herrera. Jun 11, Stony Point Band (rock). Jun 15, Cassidy Crowley. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Toad in the Hole Pub Jun 12 at noon, Mostly Python III (see Events). 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Jun 8, Commandos. Jun 9, Unidentified Power. Jun 10, Honey Dust. Jun 11, Pulsators. Jun 12, Bobby Voltage. Jun 14,

San Francisco’s City Guide

Death Cab for Cutie Once-towering indie troupe settle into suble electronica, tepid reviews of new album. Jun 9 at the Fillmore.

RuPaul Legendary drag queen with new digital-only release, “Glamazon,” appears in signing. Jun 11 at Amoeba SF.

Black Lips Who else has rocked a Tijuana house party . . . and a luxury cruise? Jun 11 at Great American Music Hall.

Impulse! Mondays Series celebrates iconic jazz label. This Monday, Shirley Scott tribute with Sundra Manning. Jun 13 at Yoshi’s SF.

Barbara Manning She sang about Dock Ellis’ no-hitter on LSD long before the viral animated video. Jun 14 at the Hemlock Tavern.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.


INNA STYLE DJs Jacques and

Guacamole, holding it down.

Monday Milestone Ten years of ‘Edutainment’

BY GABE MELINE

T

he name ‘Edutainment,’” says DJ Jacques, “to me, is serious.”

It’s Monday night and the 36year-old DJ, born Jacques PosellWilson, is in his Sebastopol studio. Records fill the room in every corner, posters cover the ceiling, and a cobbled-together computer serves as a modern-day Jamaican sound system where Posell-Wilson prepares for the night’s set. Holding the record for the longest running weekly dance club night in the North Bay, Monday Night Edutainment, which PosellWilson shares with DJ Guacamole, is coming up on its 10-year anniversary. Its longevity can be traced to not just excellent taste in music, predominantly reggae, but in that word “edutainment,” an apt portmanteau of “education” and “entertainment.”

Monday Night Edutainment celebrates its 10 Year Anniversary with headliner KRS-One on Monday, June 13, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $15–$20. 707.829.7300.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

“I tell guest DJs,” Posell-Wilson says, “I say, ‘Please don’t play what you think people want to hear.’” So yeah, you might hear “Bam Bam.” You might also hear brandnew dubplates, underground remixes or an all-Wu-Tang set. You might also hear soul, jazz or salsa. It’s all indicated by the shelves of vinyl in Posell-Wilson’s room. “That’s jazz, that’s hip-hop, those are the classics,” he says, pointing to various shelves. “And this is funny—that small section, right there? That’s reggae.” The diversity fits. The grandson of the principal bassist in the Cleveland orchestra, Posell-Wilson grew up in Boston, bouncing around in group homes, rootless, but finding his situation reflected in the albums of Boogie Down Productions—and especially in the lyrics of KRS-One. He moved to California and, with a Fisher-Price record player, got hooked on old records, mostly jazz and soul (he keeps his James Brown LPs closest to his turntables). He met his future partner, DJ Guacamole, and filled in at Jasper O’Farrell’s when the regular Monday-night guitar player went on a Florida vacation. The guitarist never came back from Florida. The rest is history. In the 10 years since, MNE has moved across the street to the Hopmonk Tavern and cultivated more than a dance scene. Guest DJs bring their crates. Headliners like Gyptian, Capleton and Ky-Mani Marley drop in with a live band. The overall sense is open-mindedness and positivity. Some call it a vibe. Others call it family. Posell-Wilson calls it “absolutely bananas.” For MNE’s 10-year anniversary, the headliner couldn’t be more fitting: KRS-One himself, whose album Edutainment inspired the name. Posell-Wilson is thrilled. “When we started it, we didn’t want to have just another weekly dance party. There are parties that play some similar music,” he twinkles, “but you can’t get this vibe in the city.”

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days A Week Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

June 10

WTJ2

Featuring Wendy Fitz 8:00pm / No Cover

SINGER/SONGWRITER SERIES June 16 Hosted by Lauralee Brown Thur

7:00pm / No Cover

Fri

June 17 Fri

June 24

77 EL DEORA Rancho Alternative Country/Americana Debut! 8:30pm / No Cover FIREWHEEL

Roots Rock 8:00pm

JOHNNY VEGASAND THE HIGH ROLLERS June 25 High Energy Rock & Soul Review Sat

8:30pm

JUNE BBQs on the Lawn Gate Open at 3:00pm • Music at 4:00pm

RIDERS IN THE SKY June 12 “America’s Favorite Cowboys” Sun Sun

Father’s Day with

Sun

THE PETER ROWAN BLUEGRASS BAND AND VERY

June 19 PABLO CRUISE Sun -RITE BOYS June 26 BIG SANDY & HRISEDFLY MEAT with special guests ## # 4TH OF JULY WEEKEND ## # July 3

SPECIAL GUESTS THE ROWAN BROTHERS 4 THE ZYDECO FLAMES July 415.662.2219 Mon

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet


Arts Events

SSILLY ILLY PPEOPLE EOPLE TTAKE AKE TTO O TTHE HE SSTREETS TREE TS TO TO BE BE SSILLY ILLY

Galleries OPENINGS Jun 9

JJUNE UNE 12 12 â&#x20AC;˘ NOON NOON ttoo 6:0 00 0 the 116 1 16 FI FIFTH F TH STREE STREETT â&#x20AC;˘ SANTA SANTTA ROSA ROSA ((OLD OL D R RAILROAD AILROAD SSQUARE) QUARE)

TTHETOADPUB.COM H E TO A D P U B . C O M

LIGHTING â&#x20AC;˘ KITCHEN TOOLS â&#x20AC;˘ ARCHITECTURAL â&#x20AC;˘ GLASS

From 5 to 7pm. Finley Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Tyson Barbera. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737. â&#x20AC;˘ FURNITURE â&#x20AC;˘ FRUIT LABELS â&#x20AC;˘ GARDEN ANTIQUES â&#x20AC;˘

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got your BACK

TOYS & DOLLS â&#x20AC;˘ ARTS & CRAFTS â&#x20AC;˘ POST MODERN

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Great Prices! Coffee too!

Antique Society 2661 Gravenstein Hwy So. (Hwy 116) on Sebastopolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Antique Row Open daily! 707 829.1733 www. AntiqueSociety .com

From 5 to 7pm. Guayaki Mate Bar, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk with Pride,â&#x20AC;? photo exhibition documenting gay pride marches. 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Jun 10 From 11am to 8pm. Towers Gallery, new cooperative galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first exhibition features fine art, wearable art and antiques. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331. From 5 to 7pm. Occidental Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Light,â&#x20AC;? work by various artists. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. From 6 to 8pm. Marin Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop Art,â&#x20AC;? exhibition by TeamWorks teachers and students, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zero Breast Cancer Hat Collection,â&#x20AC;? hats by Plexus Arts Group. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael..

Jun 12

3

Rialto Cinemas

TM

at Sixth Street Playhouse

The Met Summer Encores

Madama ButterďŹ&#x201A;y 7i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; ÂŁĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äÂ&#x201C;

Rialto Cinemas Film Festival

Mon June 13 1pm 3pm xÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŤÂ&#x201C; BEST DOCUMENTARY Winner /Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â?

Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iÂ&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x201C;xÂ&#x2021;{n{ä Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iÂ&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E; Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x201C;xÂ&#x2021;{n{ä

From 2 to 4pm. Marin Society of Artists, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Creatures Great and Small.â&#x20AC;? 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561. From 2 to 6pm. Bodega Landmark Studio, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Etchings of the West,â&#x20AC;? new work by Stephen McMillan. 1 7255 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3477. From 4 to 7pm. San Geronimo Community Center, work of Kathleen Piscioneri and Deanna Pedroli. 6350 Sir Francis Drake

Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. From 5 to 7pm. Matanzas Creek Winery, mixed-media collage by Sherry Parker. 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

documents gay pride marches around the world. Closing reception, Jun 9, 5 to 7. 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Figments for a Warrior,â&#x20AC;? work by Catherine J Richardson. Artist talk, Jun 11, 6 to 9. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 139 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

SONOMA COUNTY Bodega Landmark Studio Jun 12-Jul 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Etchings of the West,â&#x20AC;? new work by Stephen McMillan. Reception, Jun 12, 2 to 6. Ongoing, fine arts and crafts by west Sonoma County artists. Fri-Sun, 11 to 5. 17255 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3477.

Charles M Schulz Museum Jun 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cartoonist-inResidenceâ&#x20AC;? (see Events). Through Jun 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Browns and the Van Pelts: Siblings in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanuts.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Through Jul 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Philosophies.â&#x20AC;? Jun 8-Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Change of Scene: Schulz Sketches from Abroad.â&#x20AC;? $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Finley Center Through Aug 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life,â&#x20AC;? recycled metal sculptures by Tyson Barbera. Reception, Jun 9, 5 to 7. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Jun 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect,â&#x20AC;? a unique exhibition of portraits by Becoming Independent artists. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jul 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Explorations,â&#x20AC;? prints, etchings and paintings by Rik Olson; also, photography by Ann Gaughen and oil paintings by Lisa Skelly. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Guayaki Mate Bar Ending Jun 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk with Pride,â&#x20AC;? photo exhibition

Through Jun 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art in the Gardenâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tins of Imagination.â&#x20AC;? Daily, 11 to 6. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Local Folkal Ongoing, co-op artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work. Tues-Sun, 10 to 5. 117 NCloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.8920.

Matanzas Creek Winery Through Jul 14, mixed-media collage by Sherry Parker. Reception, Jun 12, 5 to 7. Daily, 10 to 4:30. 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jul 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Light,â&#x20AC;? work by various artists. Reception, Jun 10, 5 to 7. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Pelican Art Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masters of Today,â&#x20AC;? artwork by Carole Gray-Weihman and Nobee Kanayama. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Jul 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond: Visions of Planetary Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? traveling Smithsonian exhibition of over 50 NASA photographs. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Phantom IV Gallery Through Jun 30, work by Robin Burgert and William Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keeffe in previously empty Windsor Town Green storefront. 9077 Windsor Rd, Windsor. 707.527.5447.


Willow Older

Marin Society of Artists Jun 12-Jul 11, “All Creatures Great and Small.” Reception, Jun 12, 2 to 4. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

‘FOUR CUPCAKES’ Acrylics by Willow Older join many other artists’ works in ‘Pop Art’ at Marin Arts in San Rafael. See Openings, adjacent. Quicksilver Mine Company Through Jul 4, “Winter Landscapes,” paintings by Jerrold Ballaine. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

SoCo Coffee Through Jun 30, paintings by Ed Coletti. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.433.1660.

Sonoma County Museum Ending Jun 12, “People at Work,” photography from permanent collection. Through Jun 26, “Zone of Focus,” a juried exhibition of photography by high school students. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Eternity: A Love Story,” work by Richard Lang and Judith Selby Lang. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Art Works Downtown Through Jun 17, “Love + Pleasure,” work of Susan Danis and Livia Stein. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Jun 11-Jul 31, work by Wolfgang Bloch, Lawrence La Bianca, Stephen Galloway and Michael Porter; also, “The Last Wooden Schooner Built in Bolinas: The Elizabeth Muir.” Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Donna Seager Gallery

Through Aug 28, “Six Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: Original Etchings by David Hockney.” Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Through Jun 18, “Kay Bradner: On Water.” Tues-Wed and FriSat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. 851 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.4229.

Tea Room Cafe

Ending Jun 15, “Daniel Tousignant: Recent Paintings.” 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Through Aug 1, “Broken Cups,” drawings by Mark Grieve. 316 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.765.0199.

Towers Gallery Jun 10-Jul 31, new cooperative gallery’s first exhibition features two- and three-dimensional fine art, wearable art and antiques. Reception, Jun 10, 11 to 8. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY

Gallery Bergelli

Gallery Route One Through Jun 26, “Finding My Way: Maps, Grids, Signs,” work by Will Thoms; also, “The Left Coast: California on the Edge,” work by Alex Fradkin and Tim Graveson. Through Jul 3, “Seventh Street Studios,” a group art exhibit. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Marin Arts Council Gallery

Through Jun 30, “From Here to

Jun 10-Jul 15, “Pop Art,”

Through Jun 30, “Beautiful Dissolution: OHCA’s eighth Annual Wabi-Sabi Exposition,” and “Mixed-Media Works by Jeff Hvid.” Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jun 28, work of Kathleen Piscioneri and Deanna Pedroli. Reception, Jun 12, 4 to 7. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery Through Jun 30, “Figurative Sense,” paintings by Bobbie Burgers. Open daily, 10 to 6. 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755.

Mumm Napa Cuvee Through Nov 13, “Signs of Life,” photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jul 16, “Wanderlust: Journeys with Napa Valley Photographers,” featuring photos by seven artists; also, “A Year in Flowers,” work by Joanne Youngberg and Nina Antze. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Preservation Napa Valley Through Jun 30, “Memory Bank: A Discovery of Old Hands, Old Faces and the Way It Was,” photographic and film documentation of local old timers. 1400 First St, Napa.

St Supery Winery Through Jun 30, “Mountains,” paintings by Wayne Thiebaud. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. ) 707.963.4507.

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37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

exhibition by TeamWorks teachers and students, and “Zero Breast Cancer Hat Collection,” hats by Plexus Arts Group. Reception, Jun 10, 6 to 8. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael.


38

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Comedy

noon. $5-$15. Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.823.8991.

Comedy Showcase

Fairfax Festival

Stand-up comedy extravaganza. Jun 11 at 7:30. $8. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

This year’s theme “Staying Local” celebrates community with live music by Chrome Johnson, Beso Negro, Monophonics and others plus arts, activities and parade Sat at 10am. Jun 10, 10 to 5; Jun 12, 11 to 6. Free. Downtown Fairfax, Bolinas Road, Fairfax. www.fairfaxfestival.com.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance

( 37

Gardening Workshops Jun 12 at 11am, “Ornamental Grasses.” Jun 15 at 11am, “Kids Veggie Gardening.” Free. Cottage Gardens, 3995 Emerald Dr, Petaluma. 707.778.8025.

Napa Valley Ballet

Harmony Festival

Dance company performs “Jeux D’Enfants,” “Napa Valley Romanza” and “The Firebird.” Jun 12 at 6. $10-$15. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Three days of earthy, colorful, healthy fun with live music by the Flaming Lips, Primus, Michael Franti and Spearhead among others. Also, catch Harmony’s Burning-Manesque Techno-Tribal community dance Sat evening. Jun 10-12. $45 per day or night. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. www.harmonyfestival.com.

Events Antique Market Outdoor market offers abundance of local foods and antiques from around the world. Jun 12, 9 to 3. Free. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.7000.

Mostly Python III

Art at the Source

Novato Festival of Art, Wine & Music

Open studio tour throughout Sonoma county. Jun 11-12, 10 to 5. Free. Various locations around Sonoma County. www.ArtAtTheSource.org.

Cartoonist-inResidence Jun 11 at 1, “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” author and illustrator Jeff Kinney. Free; ticket required at museum. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Creativity Jam Day of family fun with DIY art stations throughout grounds and live music by 5 Cent Coffee and Cosmos Percussion Orchestra. Jun 12, 11 to 3. $10$15. di Rosa, 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. www.dirosaart.org.

Deepak Chopra Spiritual leader discusses recent book “The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes” with son Gotham. Jun 12 at

Silly people take to the streets to be silly, with live music by Crazy Famous and others. Jun 12, noon to 6. Free. Toad in the Hole Pub, 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.TOAD.

Sips, bites and entertainment by Volker Strifler, Wonderbread 5, Carlene Carter and others. Jun 11, 10 to 7; Jun 12, 10 to 6. Free. Downtown Novato, Grant Avenue, Novato. 415.897.1164.

Peggy Sue’s AllAmerican Cruise Shiny cars, chili cook-off, beer, winetasting, golf tournament, “cruise-in” and more. Jun 9-12. Place to Play Park, 2375 W Third St, Santa Rosa. www.peggysuescruise.com.

Sunday Drive Community car show with live music by Rocketz, Henchmen and Infamous Swanks. Jun 12, 6 to midnight. $5-$10. Forestville Club, 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.591.3205.

Sufi Symposium Weekend of conversation, spiritual psychology, Sufi music and poetry reading. Jun 11-12,

9 to 6; Music by Taneen Sufi Music Ensemble and Riffat Sultana, Sat at 5. $15-$75. Dominican University, Guzman Hall, 50 Acacia Avenue, San Rafael. 415.382.7834.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Through Nov; Sun, 10 to 1:30. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.522.9305.

Sonoma Farmers Market Fri, 9 to noon. Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Also, Through Sep; Tues, 5:30 to dusk. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Taste of Bauman Open house an evening of nutrition, health and delicious food. Jun 10, 6 to 9. Free. Bauman College, 10151 Main St, Ste 128, Penngrove, RSVP required. http://baumancollege.org.

Wednesday Night Market Farmers market and street fair features live music and entertainment every Wed, 5 to 8, through Aug 31. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa. www.srdowntownmarket.com.

Windsor Farmers Market Sun, 10 to 1, through Dec. Thurs evenings, 5 to 8, through Aug. Summer Thurs night market features produce, al fresco dining and live entertainment (see Concerts). Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor. 707.838.1320.


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Bilingual Full Moon Hike Scenic twilight hike. Jun 14, 8 to 10:30. Free. Montini Open Space Preserve, available by tour only, Sonoma. 707.996.0712, ext 111.

Mayacamas Hikes Bring lunch and liquids for day hikes at all levels. Jun 12 at 9:30am, discover rare blooms at Red Hill. Free. Mayacamas Sanctuary, Pine Flat Road, off Highway 128, Healdsburg. 707.829.7234.

Salt Point Walks Meet at Gerstlle Cove visitor center, walk the bluffs, explore coastal trails on two-hour hike. Free. Jun 12, 10 to noon. Salt Point State Park, Highway 1, Jenner. 707.847.3437.

Film Coppelia Encore presentations of ballet filmed live at Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Jun 8 at 6:30. $12$18. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

The Importance of Being Earnest Live theater in film format, Oscar Wilde play beamed from Broadway to Sonoma County in high def. Jun 14 at 7. $15$22. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9771.

Judy Moody & the Not Bummer Summer Film premiere of children’s book and pre-movie chat with creator and author Megan McDonald. Jun 12 at 11am. $7. Boulevard Cinemas, Petaluma Boulevard at C Street, Petaluma. 707.823.8991.

Film Night in the Park Family films in plein air now showing at parks throughout Marin county, Fri-Sat at 8pm. Jun 10, “Fantastic Mr Fox.” Free. Central Field, Broadway and Bank streets, Fairfax. www.filmnight.org.

Monday Night Movies Every Mon at 7, enjoy a classic film. Jun 13, “Cat Ballou.” Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292, ext 116. )

40

Say No More

‘Mostly Python III’ fills the block with frivolity “Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!” This rallying cry for high school geeks and British comedy lovers everywhere will be on full display—along with “the Argument Clinic,” “Four Yorkshire Men” and “the Dirty Fork”—at Mostly Python III on Sunday June 12. Paul Stokeld, co-owner of the Toad in the Hole Pub, says the idea came about to do something “silly and English and eccentric.” And Python definitely fits that bill. The all-day event, with the blessing of the city, takes over the entire block of Fifth Street in front of the pub. Hay bales, live bands, bangers, Black Sheep beer served in Holy Grails and silly walks will fill the street. The skits will be performed by the Toad Players, a group of pub regulars who have done some acting and are willing to do ridiculous things out in public. “A few are in local theater groups, but mainly they’re all just doing it for fun,” says Stokeld. The musical lineup includes Tabaltix, Robert Herrera, the Crux, Mr. December and Crazy Famous, and juggling will be in effect. What about those who just don’t get the comedy of the renowned British comedy troupe—you know, those Grim Reaper types who don’t think funny walks are all that funny? “They can just drink,” says Stokeld. Or partake in the Argument Clinic. Mostly Python III takes to the street on Sunday, June 12, at the Toad in the Hole Pub. 116 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. Noon–6pm. Free. 707.544.8623.—Leilani Clark

39 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Field Trips


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 8-14, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events Rialto Film Festival Independent gems shine on the big screen. Jun 13 at 1, 3, 5 and 7, “The Topp Twins: Untouchable Girls.” $8-$10. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. www.rialtocinemas.com.

Vanishing of the Bees Film follows commercial beekeepers as they strive to keep their bees healthy and fulfill contracts. Jun 11 at 1:30. Free. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.663.1542.

Lectures A-List Series Basketball star Alvin Attles in conversation with Bruce MacGowan. Jun 8 at 7:30. $12$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Burbank Lectures Monthly garden and history lectures Tues at 7. Jun 14, “The Pleasure of Garlic” with author Chester Aaron. $10. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Science Buzz Cafe Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Jun 9, “The Implausible Return of Human Function” with Len Ochs. $3 donation. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

Readings Borders Jun 11 at 1, “Traversing Regression” with Elizabeth Donaey. 2825 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.569.0991.

Book Passage Jun 8 at 7, “The Sweetness of Tears” with Nafisa Haji, and “Online News: Redefining Journalism?” with Simon Frankel. Jun 9 at 7, “The Sisters Brothers” with Patrick DeWitt. Jun 10 at 1, “Joy for Beginners” with Erica Bauermeister; at 7, “The New Biographical Dictionary of Film” with David Thomson. Jun 11 at 1, poetry reading; at 4, “Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle” with Thor Hanson; at 7, “Nobility of the Robe” with Colette

( 39 Obrien, and “The Happiness of Pursuit” with Davis Phinney and Austin Murphy. Jun 12 at 1, “Naked in the Nursing Home” with Harold Lustig; at 4, “Handy Dad” with Todd Davis; at 7, “Daughters of the Revolution” with Carolyn Cooke. Jun 14 at 7, group flash fiction reading with Molly Giles, Peg Alford Pursell and Meg Pokrass, and “Thoughts without Cigarettes” with Oscar Hijuelos. Jun 15 at 7, “Ten Thousand Saints” with Eleanor Henderson. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 8 at 7, “Christian Mystics” with Matthew Fox. Jun 13 at 7, “The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Fresh Water in the Twenty-First Century” with Alex Prud’Homme. Jun 15 at 7, “The Whole-Brain Path to Peace” with James Olson. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Theater The Drowsy Chaperone Roustabout Theater presents a musical tale about a follies starlet giving up the stage for love. Ending Jun 12; Fri-Sat at 7:30, Sun at 3:30. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Gertrude Stein 3 from Geography & Plays Three short performance pieces by Gertrude Stein. Through Jun 18, most shows Fri-Sat at 8; Jun 15 at 5. $10-$12. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Hairspray Beloved John Waters musical about a teenage dancer who rallies against racial segregation in 1962. Through Jun 19; Sat-Sun at 2. $30-$40. Sidney B Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, Mt. Tam, Mill Valley. 415.383.1100.

The Laramie Project Dramatic play based on interviews with citizens of Laramie, Wyoming following ‘98 murder of Matthew Shepard. Jun 11-12 and 16-18 at 8. $15-$20. Larkspur American Legion Hall, 500 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.827.1373.

Lend Me a Tenor When the actor playing Othello

calls in sick, two others take his place, each unaware of the other. Jun 10-18; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.2214.

The Mystery of Irma Vep Gothic, melodramatic spoof where music takes on a role of its own. Through Jun 26; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Picasso at the Lapin Agile Steve Martin’s comedy about a fictional meeting between Pablo Picasso and Albert Einstein at a Paris bar in 1904. Through Jun 19; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 3. $15-$19. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Shirley Valentine Disillusioned housewife finds adventure, hope and love. Through Jun 12; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Stalag 17 Humorous and suspenseful play depicts day-to-day survival of 13 US airmen held captive during World War II. Through Jun 12; Thurs at 7:30, Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $8-$21. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Steam Train Comin’ Theatre Lunatico brings absurdity and pathos of silent movies. Jun 10-11 at 8; Jun 12 at 4. Free-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Tiny Alice Edward Albee’s theatrically innovative play examines man’s relationship with God. Through Jun 26; Tues and Thurs-Sat at 8, Wed and Sun at 7:30. $32$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it by email to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Please DO NOT SEND e-mail attachments. The BOHEMIAN is not responsible for photos. Events costing more than $35 may be withheld. Deadline is 2 weeks prior to desired publication date.


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Sunday School & Service 10:30am. Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707-542-7729 Afternoon with Allan Hardman Author of The Everything Toltec Wisdom Book, spiritual teacher for 20 yrs, and 10 yr personal apprentice of Don Miguel Ruiz. Sun. Jun. 12, 1-4pm, $35 “The Transformational Power of Self Forgiveness”

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