Page 1

THE

THE PULSE MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2020

INVOLVED ON

CAMPUS

25

MAINTENANCE

SEMESTER

10

MENTAL HEALTH

6

STRESS FREE

13

FEAR LIVING IN

, ra ci al te ns io n, M en ta l he al th ic gl ob al pa nd em


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THE

SWINGING B R I DG E VOLU M E 1 1 2

EDITION 18

LETTER FROM THE

S E P T. 2 0 2 0

STUDENT DIRECTOR

ASST. STUDENT DIRECTOR

AMY LINT

EMILIE RUSH

look forward I always to being back on

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BRIAN SHERMEYER

campus, and despite all of the turmoil and changes, this year was no different. Being an extreme extrovert, I missed my friends and simply seeing people around campus. Despite all of the differences from past years, I am glad to be back.

MAGAZINE MANAGER CORINNE YOUNGBERG AUDIO & VISUAL MANAGER GENE BOONPIENPOL

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY SETH BOYER

STUDENT LIFE EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

KAITLIN MERLINO

JUDY KYEI-POKU

JULIA MARY REGISTER

BUSINESS MANAGER

BRAND MANAGER

WEB MANAGER

TAYLOR GIBSON

ANDRE FRUEH

WESLEY CHEAH

YEARBOOK MANAGER

DESIGN ASSISTANT

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

CAROLINE HOLMES

SHANNON BILLINGTON

CASSIDY BARLOCK

RADIO MANAGER

AUDIO & VISUAL ASSISTANT

MUSIC MANAGER

NOLAN HOGENBOOM

EDITOR

LIAM FITZSIMMONS

RAVI AHUJA

1 UNIVERSITY AVE SUITE 3058 MECHANICSBURG, PA 17055 (Downstairs South Wing of the Larsen Student Union) The Swinging Bridge Magazine is published through The Pulse: Messiah University Media Hub, run by students. The Pulse consists of Pulse Radio (90.7), The Clarion yearbook, and The Swinging Bridge Magazine. The Swinging Bridge staff strives to publish quality student writing, photography, and design.

THE HEARTBEAT OF MESSIAH UNIVERSITY

To learn about job and volunteer opportunities, email thepulse@messiah.edu.

With all of the rules and regulations on campus this year, there are a few things that I will miss more than others. At the top of that list would be wrestling with my best friends. Closely following that would be walking around campus, smiling and saying hi to all of you. Granted, I can still say hi, but sharing a big smile is one of my favorite things. Despite the changes, all of us at The Pulse and the Swinging Bridge are looking forward to interacting with everyone this school year. I am excited to continue to learn more about all of you and hearing your stories. Let’s take on the changes together. Soak it in,

Brian Shermyer Editor-In-Chief


TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

STUDENT LIFE 8

CULTURE 13

SPORTS & HEALTH 20

5

13

17

CAMPUS CLOSET COVID EDITION

6

STRESS FREE SEMESTER

EMBRACE YOUR CREATIVE SIDE

LIVING IN FEAR

FITNESS DURING COVID

WHEN PROTESTS MEET PANDEMICS

16

HAMILTON & CURRENT CLIMATE

SOCIAL JUSTICE: THEN & NOW

19

RECIPIE CHICKEN CURRY SALAD

8

20

STAYING CONNECTED DURING UNCERTAINTY

ON CAMPUS DINING CHANGES

A CHANGING COMMUNITY

10

INVOLVED ON CAMPUS

CHALLENGES THIS YEAR FOR THEATER & OUTDOOR CLUBS

DINING SAFELY

23

MENTAL HEALTH MAINTENANCE

26

DAILY WORKOUT

4

SEPTEMBER 2020


PU M A

C

T

S

C

STUDENT LIFE

BY JUDY KYEI-POKU

S LO E

In these times of quarantining and social distancing, many of us have opted out of dressing up in the mornings, preferring pajamas for lounging around the house or working remotely. At the same time, having a morning routine that includes getting dressed gives a sense of normalcy, especially during a time when it feels like everything is changing. As the school year starts, getting back into the rhythm of expression through what you are wearing can help boost your self esteem. Get a glimpse into the clothing choices of some students on campus. Each outfit is something that makes these students feel confident and comfortable during this season. “During these times, it is hard to take care of yourself and find motivation to do anything for yourself. So, I like to wear something that makes me feel good and empowered, while remaining comfortable and confident. I like picking outfits as an expressive and creative means. My go-to outfit is biker shorts and a baggy tee with high socks and Nikes. I like to get spicy and add three hoops and one cross, a dragon ring on my pointer finger, and two rings on my pinkie and thumb.”

-September Nguyen

“I like to dress extremely comfortably during COVID. I like the idea of waking up in pajamas and spending the rest of the day in them. I also love the feeling of not worrying about going somewhere and having to put something together. My go-to outfit is sweatpants and an oversized t-shirt.”

-Gloria Houngbeke

“Because we must wear masks during COVID, I like to be sure to coordinate them with my outfit. Sometimes it is nice to dress down since we mostly stay inside, but other times, when I get the opportunity, I really like to wear something cute and put together. However, I have been wearing a lot of big t-shirts and shorts because of the weather. Whatever makes me feel best, I like to wear!”

-Sophie Stapleton THE SWINGING BRIDGE

5


STUDENT LIFE

STRESS FREE

Semester

EMBRACE YOUR CREATIVE SIDE BY KAITLIN MERLINO

These days it is hard not to feel like an overworked, overheated computer about to spontaneously combust. At the same time, there are some amazing ways to relieve that tension; you just need to know where to look. That is where I will be coming in. This school year, you and I are going to combat the crazy with some activities, movies, books and advice; whatever we can find to help us have a stress-free semester.

Since the beginning of quarantine, I have tried to find activities that make me feel productive without being overwhelmingly busy. Bullet journaling has fulfilled those boxes for me. I am able to settle into some good music and journal away for a few hours.

I like to blend creativity and practicality in my journal set-up. I have made calendar spreads that I use as a planner, where I can put to-do lists or reminders in the margins. I have also created a “Quarantine Favorites� page, where I logged some recipes I tried, the music I have been listening to and some TV shows that have occupied my hours. Now that school is starting up, I have my class schedule and assignment dates all logged away in one spot.

6

SEPTEMBER 2020


STUDENT LIFE

Basically, the possibilities are endless. If you have a creative bug, just crack open the pages, start doodling and see what happens. Or, if you do not really know where to start, there is plenty of inspiration on the internet. With the advent of COVID has come the rebirth of my Pinterest obsession; I have everything from page ideas and calligraphy examples to doodle ideas pinned away for when I want it.

Closing this first installment, I will leave you with a quote from the documentary that I found especially relevant to today’s new norm. Miranda said,

"

Real life is not a

LINEAR

Like I mentioned, I have been watching plenty of TV. Now, there is always the oddly addicting drivel (I’m looking at you, The Kissing Booth 2). But when you are in the mood to watch something that is more insightful and inspirational, I would suggest the documentary We Are Freestyle Love Supreme on Hulu.

NARRATIVE.

The documentary follows a band of friends, including Lin-Manuel Miranda and Thomas Kail of the Hamilton phenomenon, as they look back on their journey from college undergrads to Broadway performers. Their comradery and passion, both for the arts and towards each other, stand as a great reminder of the power of human connection, especially when many of us feel distant right now.

Everyday we are living that truth. I do not think any of us imagined that we would be going to college during a global pandemic, let alone living through one. Here is further proof that life consists of ups and downs. We need to ride those waves as they come, knowing that God will be there to push us back to shore.

"

Not only does the comedic band of rappers cast a ray of positivity, their perseverance rubs off on any viewer. If you are feeling creatively blocked or unmotivated because of the current climate, here is a reminder that beautiful things can come out of adversity when you have enough courage to face it head on.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

7


STUDENT LIFE

HOW MESSIAH'S COMMUNITY IS STAYING CONNECTED AMIDST UNCERTAINTY BY JOY HAMMOND

O

ne of the top factors that influence a person’s decision on where to attend college is the campus life, which can affect a student’s comfort and well-being. With its extracurricular clubs and events, Messiah University promotes a warm and welcoming community. “College events and activities are so important to have,” Student Activities Board President Morgan Zimmerman said. “They engage students and help foster relationships.” When COVID-19 cases began spiking in the United States in March of this year, colleges and universities across the country saw their student body finishing the semester remotely. Messiah’s own campus made the same decision in order to aid in flatten-

8

SEPTEMBER 2020

ing the curve. After seven months of fighting the virus, many states have begun to open up, and colleges face the decision to resume learning on or off campus for the 20202021 school year. Since releasing a statement in June announcing its campus reopening this fall, Messiah University has been working to ensure the health and safety of its students and staff as they arrive on campus this semester. Some of the steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 include:

• Pre-packaged food in Lottie Nelson Dining Area. • Accessibility to take-out orders. • Plexiglass on all the kiosks and registers. • Daily temperature the Falcon Health COVID-19 check in.

monitoring

using

• Hand sanitizer stations around the University campus. • Practicing social distancing when around other people.

• Allowing students to choose to attend classes on campus or remotely. • Signs on doors and stairs to signal one way in and out of buildings. • Requiring those on campus to wear a mask inside every building, except while inside a dorm room or apartment.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDRE FRUEH


STUDENT LIFE

One-way traffic through doorways and stairs is just

While some of these steps may seem like an inconvenience, it is important to remember the protection and health of everyone on campus. Messiah’s Covid-19 Community Promise said, “Together we can serve and protect our neighbors as well as ourselves and strive to keep our campus virus-free.” Even though many events have been canceled, such as sports games, homecoming and family weekend, Messiah University has found other ways for students to find community in campus life. Some of these alternatives include: • Alternative chapel options: online chapel, a podcast, devotionals and sixers. • Bible studies offered in-person or virtual. • Outdoor rec sports and activities are permitted with exception. • Limited access to the Falcon Fitness Center.

• Virtual instead when possible.

of

in-person

events

one of the policies Messsiah has implemented to keep its campus safe.

As Messiah strives to provide opportunities for students to connect with their peers, the students themselves can also take their own initiative. Activities like playing card games, watching a movie, baking or doing a craft are great ways to engage with hallmates and classmates. SAB also plans on modifying their activity offerings to reflect the changes. “Students should be excited about some non-traditional SAB events like outdoor movies, music and fun,” Zimmerman said. “I would encourage students to continue to attend events safely, because you’re going to meet so many great people and create so many memories throughout the year!” Even though normal activities may not be resuming this year, the heart of Messiah life is still beating strong if you take a chance to look for it in other places.

• Learning and health support provided in-person or virtually (Counseling Services, Academic Coaching, Peer Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, Writing Center and Career and Professional Development Center appointments).

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

9


STUDENT LIFE

THE CHALLENGES FACING THEATER AND OUTDOOR CLUBS THIS YEAR BY KAITLIN MERLINO

W

ith over 70 clubs on campus, Messiah has always been a university rooted in student involvement, harnessing the bonds of shared interests or talents to create a community. In 2020, the schooling environment has experienced major changes because of COVID-19, as have the extracurriculars at Messiah. Students may find themselves unsure of how to experience campus with the current restrictions. However, there are still opportunities to grow closer together, while still being socially distant. Three opportunities or clubs that have been greatly impacted by the pandemic include theatre, the Loft and the Outdoor club. The Theatre Department has always promoted active storytelling and entertainment for everyone across campus. With performances based on connections between actors and their audiences, the department has had to harness their creative spirit to design experiences that are both compelling and safe for those involved.

10

SEPTEMBER 2020

The fall 2020 season will consist of two Greek plays: the comedy The Birds and the tragedy Antigone. The usage of masks and the physicality required of classical Greek theatre provides an interesting way to present shows within the current guidelines. Theatre Professor Daniel Inouye said, “We are leaning into that idea of ‘how do you tell stories without the ability to really use your face?’” One of the biggest changes in the execution of theatre this year surrounds audience involvement. With a very limited capacity allowed within the theaters, Inouye hopes that audience members take a different approach to viewing. “We are going to push for most of our audiences to engage with the productions we produce through live streaming,” he said. Regardless of their major, students across campus can audition for the upcoming shows during the first few days of classes. There are other chances to help out the department as well.


STUDENT LIFE

DANCING PRAYERS Directed by Gregg Hurley and performed at the Poorman Black Box Theater in Climenhaga in February 2019.

THE BOULDERING WALL at The

“There are opportunities for students to help with marketing and PR to drive the audience, to get the audience to be aware of and then come to the actual livestreams,” Inouye said.

Loft is typically open for students to use throughout the week. The new campus rules make it unsure of when it will be open again.

This new approach to theatre will help connect the campus together in support of the students of the arts.

KAYAK OUTINGS are hosted by The Loft regularly throughout the year and during Family Weekend, which has been cancelled for this year.

Inouye said, “The live streams will allow students to not only be there for their friends who are performing but also have the opportunity to sit down and watch a good show.” In addition to the department shows, Alpha Psi Omega (APO), a chapter of the National Theatre Society, will be creating and performing “New Works for a New World.” “We wanted to give Messiah students more opportunities to be a part of theater by providing as many positions as possible, as well as giving our aspiring playwrights a place to workshop their monologues and scenes,” Hope Trenkler, the APO President and creator of the new concept, said. “The showcase will be live-streamed as a full production later in the fall semester.” For those who prefer to create their own adventures, the Outdoor Club and the Loft provide plenty of opportunities for student involvement.

“The Outdoor Club provides opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts within the university community to have the chance to enjoy fellowship with others and develop stronger outdoor skills while maintaining a stable environment,” President Paige Benasutti said. “The club’s leadership works to integrate these aspects with the appreciation of God’s Creation through outdoor activities such as canoeing, kayaking, climbing, caving, hiking, etc.” Because of the changes stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic and the phasing out of the Adventure Education program, the Outdoor Club is experiencing a transitional year. However, the team is working to outsource their activities, and there is a possibility that some small off-campus events may be approved.

are going to " We push for most of our audiences to engage with the productions we produce through

"

live streaming.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

11


STUDENT LIFE

“At this time, decisions are still being made, but we are hopeful that there will be opportunities to get involved with the club this fall,” Benasutti said.

“We are changing lots of things, and we are unsure of open events for canoeing and our high ropes course but be sure to be on the lookout for that,” Saunders said.

As a sophomore teammate at the Loft, Tacey Saunders says that the welcoming atmosphere inspired her to join.

For those interested in getting involved, the Loft’s Bible Study will still happen Mondays at 8:30 p.m., though it will look different to abide by the new rules on campus.

“After going to the bible study consistently, I went to a few of the open events and the Loft team members were very accepting,” she said. Saunders believes the Loft is a great place for teams to get to know each other and for leaders to blossom. “The Loft is a team that helps the student leaders grow in their leadership skills. The Loft team helps other groups and teams grow together, gain teamwork, and communication,” she said.

These are just a few of the clubs and activities that Messiah offers. Make sure to follow them on social media and sign up for emails to keep updated on any changes or opportunities coming up. Remember that, though the semester will look different, there are still opportunities to experience all that Messiah’s campus has to offer.

" The

restrictions on campus make it hard for the Loft to operate normally."

In a similar position to the Outdoor Club, the restrictions on campus make it hard for the Loft to operate normally.

DANCING PRAYERS Directed by Gregg Hurley and performed at the Poorman Black Box Theater in Climenhaga in February 2019.

TIGHTROPES Students enjoy outdoor activities at The Loft during welcome week 2019.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDRE FRUEH

12

SEPTEMBER 2020


LIVING IN FEAR

WHEN PROTESTS MEET PANDEMICS BY JUDY KYEI-POKU

CULTURE

There have been numerous issues pertaining to mental and physical health this year that have greatly affected us all. With the cultural tension, people of color have been especially affected. This year has caused a lot of mental health issues and stress related symptoms because of the rise in police brutality towards African Americans. There is an increasing distrust in the police which in turn is causing an increase in racial tension. Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin and Sandra Bland are some examples of people who have previously been affected by the ongoing display of police brutality.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

13


CULTURE PEACEFUL PROTEST IN ALLENTOWN Photo by student Rachel Held in Allentown

“When COVID first happened, I felt a lot of fear because of how people were reacting towards Asian Americans,” September Nguyen, a second year elementary education and special education major, said. “I was scared for my loved ones whenever they traveled, even if they were going to get groceries.”

This year, many witnessed the killing of George Floyd by Derek Chauvin, an officer who kept his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight plus minutes as Floyd exclaimed, “I can’t breathe.” Floyd and all of the others have been failed by the justice system in this country. This seemed to be the breaking point for many people across the nation. Protestors took to the streets shouting, “No justice, no peace,” “Justice for George Floyd'' and many other chants in order to have their voices heard. They wanted to make others realize that the policing system in this country needs rapid improvement. There was no more time to wait because people, like junior international business major LaVonne Alston, are living in fear. “A few weeks ago I was pulled over for the first time and was visibly shaking the entire time. After hearing so many stories where people are pulled over for simple traf-

"I had to take some time

off social media" 14

SEPTEMBER 2020

fic stops and they do not come out alive, I was scared I was going to die too,” Alston said. “I’m not sure I’ve really found a way of coping besides trying not to think about it, which really isn’t the healthiest thing to do, but when we can’t trust hospitals or police officers, it makes it hard to know if we’ll make it back home safe.” A world in which people can not trust those who swore to protect their fellow citizens is something nobody should have to deal with. The construction of a movement expressing the importance of black lives and the need for police reform was necessary. Micah Lawson, a sophomore athletic training major, felt like he needed to step up to protect others. He said, “This has caused the politicization of a man’s murder. Turning friends against friends, and family against family. As a person of color, there was no choice but to speak up.” With the rise of COVID-19 cases, there were people calling it the “Chinese Virus” and using the pandemic as an excuse to be racist towards Asians.

Nguyen is angry at the lack of effort and fight from the Asian community, especially the elder Asian community. This, however, gave her the opportunity to grow internally and gave her time to reevaluate her own biases that were passed down from her family. She found it difficult but necessary. All of this was also emotionally and mentally draining for her. “The fight felt hopeless and I had to take some time off social media and talking to people because I couldn’t get out of my bed,” Nguyen said. “I felt guilty and ashamed for not doing more to support our black brothers and sisters so I decided to take more action and felt passionate and driven to wholeheartedly stand beside black brothers and sisters”.


CULTURE Speaking up has forced people of color into an extremely uncomfortable position where others constantly ask them questions and expect answers for everything, instead of just educating themselves. Coping with all of this and keeping good mental health has been different and difficult for everyone. “Personally, I took a break from social media and began to focus on continuing to build up my closest relationships and draw near to those who would uplift me rather than tear me down,” Lawson said. “Also it has been good for me to read the Bible and come to God since he gives the greatest comfort.”

PROTESTS IN LANCASTER Photos by student Seth Boyer

Lawson felt like these issues are all intertwined with each other. “I will explain it in this way; Esther Choo, an emergency physician who is also a professor at Oregon Health and Science University, tells one of her past experiences that she had only a few weeks ago. She explains how a black man was rushed to the hospital in bad condition. His family, rather than spending time to fully explain the situation, took their time to paint him in the best light possible,” Lawson said. “They explained how he had a high position at a well known company, that he was respected by his community, and that he was a good brother and son. A sad reality for people of color, as seen by Dr. Choo, was racism also affects the treatment and care that people of color receive even while in the hospitals.”

No choice but to

With a lack of trust in the police and medical systems, people of color are constantly living in fear. It will take a collective effort to change the hearts and minds of people across the country, but it should start in our own communities.

he past few months have been full of change as we have all had to adjust to a new way of life during this pandemic. Throughout all of the chaos, one thing has remained constant and that is the unwavering love of our God.

"Trust in the Lord with all your heart

speak up T Change & Trust BY CAMRYN WIMBERLY

As we enter a new semester, one that looks very different from our usual at Messiah, we can take comfort in the fact that God is using this experience for the good of the Kingdom.

and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to Him, and He will make your paths straight.” (PROVERBS 3:5-6) While it might be difficult and even a little scary to deal with the changes happening on and off campus, it is helpful to look at these changes as opportunities to strengthen our relationships with God and our brothers and sisters in Christ. We are blessed to be able to put our trust in God and know that no matter what happens, He is going to take care of us.

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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CULTURE

&

HAMILTON CURRENT CLIMATE SOCIAL JUSTICE: THEN & NOW BY JOY HAMMOND

When George Floyd died from asphyxia at the hands of a Minneapolis Park police squad during his arrest this year on May 25, the world looked on in horror and disgust. The tragic event shook the public into recognizing the need for change on a political, economic and social scale. “There had been a lot of push for racial equality, but this year there have been so many protests,” Judy Kyei-Poku, a sophomore social work major, said. “Just like in Hamilton, people are fighting to have their voices heard and to be treated as equals because things aren’t fair for all races.” Hamilton is a Broadway musical that had its film released in 2020 on the streaming platform Disney Plus on July 3, although it was written and produced in 2015. One of the main conflicts of the musical Hamilton is the Revolutionary War to gain freedom and equality from British rule. The musical itself follows the life story of Alexander Hamilton and the founding of the United States of America.

16

SEPTEMBER 2020

Some of the ways they do this is by attending peaceful walks around the neighborhood, protests, sending in donations, and signing pledges.

“I knew about as much as anyone. He [Alexander Hamilton] was on our $10 bill and I knew that he died in a duel,” the writer and producer of the musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda, said. Alexander Hamilton was an immigrant from the Caribbean, who through the event of a hurricane and a letter, sailed to North America to create a better life for himself. During his life, Hamilton sought out injustices and used his words, knowledge and actions to fight them. Since viewing Hamilton and seeing Floyd’s death, people have been trying to practice cultural competence and awareness by evaluating the United States’ past and present actions. People across the globe have been participating in events that spread awareness to the issue of inequality. The black lives matter movement focuses on the fight for equality against police brutality, discrimination and systemic racism.

“The most common thing that people are going for is posting on social media, educate before you post. Make sure that whatever you say is rooted in truth, respect and humility.” Tyler McNair, a senior Christian ministry major, said. “Try to refrain from playing the victim yourself with the ‘but what about me?’ mindset and really listen to other people and their story.” One of the most important aspects of fighting for social justice is to seek out reliable sources of information when discussing hard issues that affect lives. Education is a key component to helping others grow in empathy and awareness of the community around them. With Covid-19 changing how the world’s health and safety procedures are being done, it is important to acknowledge that the fight for social justice has always existed and has never stopped. It is our turn now to take our shot and be a part of the narrative that is fighting against injustice.


SPORTS & HEALTH

FINDING YOUR FIT: FIGURING FITNESS DURING COVID-19 BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

“If your expectations and goals for exercise are the same as what you had before COVID-19, you have to realize life will be a lot different and more difficult,” Ogden said. “It helps to reframe and come up with an alternative goal, like I’m going to exercise or move three to four times a week and give myself options. If the gym is closed or maybe I’m not feeling like working out with a mask, I’ll take a walk outside and tell myself there are tons of mental and physical benefits for that.” Alexa Gladfelter, graduate assistant within campus wellness and recreation, also wants to encourage students not to give up fitness just because things will look different.

f you are anything like me, finding motivation to exercise during this pandemic has been a struggle. At-home workouts often feel tedious and tiresome and exercising by yourself can feel lonely. As Messiah students return to campus, many of us are looking to regain that drive to make fitness a priority again. Messiah University’s fitness center is here to help. Kevin Ogden, director of campus wellness and recreation, urges students to get back into working out but this time with a different mindset.

“Everything on campus is going to look different but that doesn’t mean it’s bad. There are still ways to workout, have fun, be with friends and experience those physical and mental health habits that won’t be interrupted by COVID,” Gladfelter said. Ogden gave many examples of physical fitness benefits that students can continue to work towards within their workouts. “As for the benefits for working, all the benefits that did exist are still there, which are heart health, lung health, overall body composition, increased energy, increased

focus and increased self-esteem,” Ogden said. “Going for a walk or a run or a workout can have a great benefit on mind, body and soul and can help even more than normal right now.” Just like every other area of campus life, the staff at the fitness center is working hard to adjust to the new procedures and precautions mandated by COVID-19. Masks will be required during workouts, the machines will be placed 6 feet apart and sanitization will be increased. It is vital that students follow the guidelines in place in order for the fitness center to remain open. Before entering the fitness center, students are expected to have filled out the daily health screening located on the Falcon Link and have properly sanitized their hands. Students are also required to sanitize their equipment in the fitness center before and after use. As a recent graduate of Messiah University, Gladfelter understands the difficulties COVID-19 has placed on students. “Definitely wear your mask and stay separate from other people in order to stop the spread. I know it’s hard to stay separate in a community like Messiah because we really value our community and those friendships,” Glatfelter said. “We

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

17


SPORTS & HEALTH

It is important now, more than ever, to take care of your physical health. Maintaining healthy haBits can help keep you and others around you safe. don’t want to hinder that at all but just be aware of yourself and if you’re feeling sick, stay in and take that responsibility.” A new limiter the fitness center is adding in order to monitor student traffic are online reservations. Reservations can be made using the ImLeagues app, which is also used for rec sports and group exercise classes. Students are allowed two 50-minute sessions per calendar day. These two sessions can be back to back or spread out throughout the day. The fitness center is also adjusting the way they conduct group exercise classes so students and employees can continue to enjoy them this semester. “Group exercise classes will be free to students so they won’t have to pay, which will be a benefit, hopefully, for some. We’ll be using those to have an outlet and way to exercise when they might not want to exercise indoors,” Gladfelter said.

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SEPTEMBER 2020

Indoor group exercise classes will continue like normal, just with masks and social distancing. However, outdoor exercise classes give instructors more freedom with how they lead their students. “We’re utilizing the pit basketball court to teach a number of classes out there like Zumba, high intensity interval training and a jump rope class we’re excited for,” Ogden said. There will also be virtual live classes available through zoom or Instagram live. Students who chose to do classes remotely or students who would like to avoid exposure to others can opt for online classes streamed from anywhere. It is important now, more than ever, to take care of your physical health. Maintaining healthy habits can help keep you and others around you safe.


SPORTS & HEALTH

Quick and easy lunch or dinner recipe that can last up to a week. Customize to your preference and enjoy a delicious meal on the run. This recipe is full of protein and pairs well with greens or your choice of carbohydrate.

INGREDIENTS: 3 chicken breasts (boiled) Mayonnaise to taste (approximately 5 tablespoons)

Optional add-ins: celery, almond slivers, hard boiled eggs, olives, grapes, or cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon curry powder

THIS MONTHS HEALTHY RECIPE:

CHICKEN CURRY SALAD BY JULIA MARY REGISTER

1.

Boil chicken, shred into bite-size pieces and toss into a medium sized bowl.

2.

Add mayonnaise, curry powder and optional add-ins into the chicken.

3.

Taste chicken salad and adjust if needed.

4.

Mix thoroughly and serve on salad, toast or whole grain wrap.

*Note: store in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for lasting freshness

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

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SPORTS & HEALTH SPORTS & REC

DINING SAFELY THE CHANGES BEING MADE TO ON-CAMPUS DINING THIS YEAR BY BRIAN SHERMEYER

A

s one might imagine, during the time of a pandemic like COVID-19, some changes have to happen across campus in order to keep students safe. Changes have included heightened cleaning and sanitation practices, enforcing social distancing and wearing masks. Dining regulations are no different and are at the forefront of the battle to slow and stop the spread of COVID-19. “Dining services at the university came together and proactively came up with a plan before quite a few other colleges.” Todd Christopher, the manager of Lottie Nelson Dining Hall, said. “We saw how this was going to affect our daily operations. So we have tweaked all of our operations to still offer really good food, great variety and good value, but offering it in a way that maintains legality both with the commonwealth and the guidelines set by the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention).”

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SEPTEMBER 2020 PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDRE FRUEH


SPORTS & HEALTH

" WE CAN'T FAIL."

The staff is intently involved in what the National Association of College and University Food Services (NACUFS) is doing to gauge what other college dining services are doing. “By doing this, our goal is to go back to being normal as soon as possible, but we don’t know when that is going to be, but I guess nobody does,” Christopher said. “We don’t like it and we want to be back to a regular food service.” Other dining spots on campus, such as The Falcon and The Union, are following similar guidelines to Lottie. However, these places will not look much different than usual. “They’re just in a different situation,” Christopher said. “People are more used to grabbing something to go at The Falcon or at The Union.”

Student worker and senior English major Christina Lamoreux does not mind the changes in Lottie’s procedures. “The changes are actually making work easier for employees,” she said. “There are less messes for us to clean up because everything is to go. We do have to sanitize everything, but we had to do that before.” Lottie is asking students to continue following social distancing protocols and wearing their masks. Their goal is to get students in and out as fast as possible in order to limit the amount of time that students spend around each other and touching items in the serving area. In order to accomplish this, Lottie staff needs student compliance. “We are trying to get people done as fast as possible and into the dining area,” Lamoreux said. “So when people stop and chat in the

serving area, it kind of interrupts the whole six feet apart thing.” Christopher would like to see Lottie back in its former glory of being an all-youcan-eat buffet, but is taking it one step at a time until then.

All dining facilities on campus are limited to 50% occupancy, which will make any of these locations look noticeably different from years past. This puts Lottie on the same level with the other dining options on campus.

“I don’t see it happening. Our goal is to go back to regular Lottie,” he said. “At this point, we are relying on guidance from authorities due to occupancy restrictions and the science behind the COVID-19 disease.”

LOTTIE NELSON Student workers serve food at Lottie following the new Messiah COVID-19 protocols.

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SPORTS & HEALTH “They’re going to all be very similar with just doing the takeout and not really having a lot of indoor seating available,” Lamoreux said. With the changes, specifically to sanitation, Christopher anticipates an influx of job openings for students in campus dining. “We have drastically reorganized our labor for sanitation,” he said. “That’s the number one priority to make sure we have people in those key positions to be constantly sanitizing, wiping and disinfecting.” To make things easier for student and faculty dining workers, Lamoreux and Christopher would appreciate student cooperation. “Please follow the rules that we put in place. They’re there for a reason,” Lamoreux said.

“Have grace,” Christopher said. “We’re doing the best that we possibly can. We’re in the middle of a pandemic so we’re trying to still offer that same quality that we’ve been known for and won awards for, but we’re trying to do things as safely as possible.” Students who are looking for a more traditional dine-in experience are encouraged to take their food to the Brubaker balcony and Brubaker B for overflow seating once the 50% limit is reached in Lottie. Christopher believes that dining services is one of the main amenities that must have the proper procedures in place in order to keep students safe during COVID-19. He simply said, “We can’t fail.”

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SEPTEMBER 2020


SPORTS & HEALTH

Mental Health

Maintenance RESOURCES TO KNOW YOU'RE NOT ALONE

BY JULIA MARY REGISTER “80 percent of college students say the Covid-19 crisis has negatively affected their mental health,” the Chronicle of Higher Education in a recent article on COVID-19 and student’s mental health said. Feelings of stress, anxiety, sadness and loneliness have been commonly seen in students in the last six months. For some students, the pandemic increased pre-existing feelings, and for others they are brand new. How will Messiah University address the mental health struggles happening this semester? The Engle Center’s counseling services have been a great help to students long before COVID-19 came about. The counselors at the Engle Center help students deal with hardships and challenges that are commonly associated with the stress of being a full-time student. Counseling services at Messiah treats roughly 15% of the student body each year for frequent concerns, such as anxiety and depression.

Grace Carpenter, a sophomore biology student, has used the Engle Center’s one-onone counseling sessions to help her adjust to life on campus. “The counseling sessions gave me an outlet to discuss different stressors and worries I had and talk through them as they came up,” Carpenter said. “My counselor also helped me organize myself and make my first year of college as healthy as possible. For me, it was really just a safe place where I could talk about anything that was bothering me.” The counselors available at the Engle Center are as professional and experienced as counselors you can visit outside of the university.

"For me, it was really just a

safe space."

“I have been to several different counseling places outside of the Engle Center and I can gladly say that the Engle Center has hands down been the best place I’ve received counseling thus far. My counselor was extremely kind and there wasn’t a moment where I did not feel heard or misunderstood,” Carpenter said. However, because of the increase in demand in students struggling with mental health challenges and safety concerns that come along with COVID-19, the Engle Center has had to make some changes to the way they conduct counseling sessions this semester. Eleanor Muir, director of counseling and health services at the Engle Center, believes it is important for students to understand how the counseling services have adapted to life during COVID-19. One of the changes that recently happened was the change in location for the counseling services offices.

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SPORTS & HEALTH

Schedule appointments by phone:

(717) 796-5357

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SEPTEMBER 2020


SPORTS & HEALTH “Counseling services offices are now in the Climenhaga Homestead building, which is near the covered bridge. The Climenhaga Homestead is the counseling services ‘hub’ this year, with some counselors who have offices in the Hoffman building as well,” Muir said. Students can still schedule appointments with counselors by phone at 717-796-5357 or stop by the Climenhaga Homestead. “Another important change students should know about is that the university has temporarily allowed us to waive all fees for counseling visits and we’re very grateful for that,” Muir said. “By waiving the fees, the university recognizes that the pandemic presents more widespread and significant mental health challenges.” While the counseling services will be following all COVID-19 protocols the university has in place, such as spacing chairs six feet apart and wearing masks indoors, they have adapted an online platform as well.

"it could make a big difference

in how you feel." Telehealth appointments are available to residential students, commuter students, and students who are completely remote this semester. Students have the option for more accessible counseling while not having the risk of viral exposure. The Engle Center has been working hard to be ready for the many students who may request counseling by adding another counselor to staff and giving thought to the possibility that more counselors may be needed at a later time. The counselors love to assist students and want students to continue coming to sessions. Counselors also want Messiah students to feel that they can come see them about anything. All of the Engle Center’s health or counseling services are 100% confidential and respectful to student’s privacy.

“Sometimes students misunderstand that and think that if they talk about something that violates the code of conduct or something similar, we would tell someone about it, which is absolutely not true,” Muir said. “The university respects privacy and doesn’t push us to give up that kind of information. They know how important it is for students to have a safe place to talk about mental health concerns, relational concerns, or physical health concerns. We really can offer a safe, nonjudgmental, welcoming place that is confidential for students.” Muir wants to encourage students to keep coming to counseling sessions as things get hectic with the beginning of the semester. “It is extremely important for everyone to be engaging in positive mental health maintenance practices right now and boost, not just our physical immune system, but also our mental health immune system,” Muir said. Carpenter recommends other students take advantage of the Engle Center’s counseling services. “I would encourage anyone who feels the stress and pressures that can come from college life and even just life in general to consider making an appointment to talk with someone from the Engle Center about it,” Carpenter said. “I am aware that for many people this could be a scary or uneasy concept but I would challenge anyone who feels this way to just give it a try because it could make a big difference in how you feel.”

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SPORTS & HEALTH

DAILY WORKOUT Beginner Core Exercises BY JULIA MARY REGISTER COVID-19 has changed the way we do everything in our lives, including working out. With the new restrictions at the fitness center, such as the requirement to wear masks and make reservations, students may be less likely to make their physical fitness a priority. Setting aside time in the day for physical fitness has been proven to increase quality of life in multiple areas. By spending 30 minutes a day moving and strengthening their body, students can have a happier and healthier semester that will lead to more success in academics. Taking time to be active will also help students strengthen their immune system and fight off any illnesses threatening their semester. Kevin Ogden, director of Messiah University’s fitness center, provided a dorm friendly core workout for students to use in order to maintain physical activity. The beginner and intermediate exercises give students the option to complete a core workout based on their level of fitness. Students can start with the beginner workout and push themselves to reach for the intermediate level.

1) Traditional Plank – 30 seconds as a goal

2) Hip Bridges – 10x with a 2-3 second hold

3) Lying Side Bends or "Penguins" – 10 to 15 each side – slower the better!

4) Slow 3 Way Sit Ups – start with 6 to 8 each direction (middle, side, other side). Pause at the top for 1 second for an extra challenge

5) 45 Degree Side to Side Taps or "Russian Twists"" – 10 each side

“A lot of times people choose to do core in one movement – the sit ups or the plank. The five exercises above challenge all of the muscles of the core,” Ogden said.

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SEPTEMBER 2020


SPORTS & HEALTH Intermediate Core Exercises

“To make a core exercise more difficult we add an aspect of instability, like lifting a leg, or slowing it down, like the slow bicycles,” Ogden said. “Any exercise where both heels are off the ground will be harder as well, but it is key to make sure your low back stays in contact with the mat. Arching the low back while straining to finish the exercise could lead to a lot of pain.”

1)

Plank with Leg Marches (if you are feeling extra strong try and march opposite leg and arm at the same time) – start with 30 second and build up to 90

2)

Slow Bicycles – Keep your feet off the ground the entire time- 15 each side

3)

Side Plank with your top leg lifted – 30 seconds each side

4) Flutter Kick – 45 seconds

5)

Slow 2 way pendulums or "Windshield Wipers"

These beginner and intermediate exercises are a great way to strengthen your core in order to excel in other forms of exercise. A strong core can help students have better posture and alignment in cardio and weight training. Working out in your dorm can also decrease a student's exposure to germs and increase social distancing between those in the fitness center, so grab a roommate and start strengthening that core!

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pulse.messiah.edu @MessiahPulse Open Hours: Monday - Friday, 1 - 5 pm thepulse@messiah.edu | 717-691-6081

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