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THE

20 COMMENCEMENT The Class of 2016 celebrates milestone

27 AIR & SPACE ALUM

MESSIAH COLLEGE ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Tim Grove ’89 works as chief of learning in D.C.

SUMMER 2016

10 

Expanding Grad Programs

Advancing the mission of Messiah College


INSIDE LOOK

ROBIN HOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

Steven Harpine ’11, pictured in the Lower Broadway Music District in Nashville, Tennessee, works for Capitol Christian Music Group. Part of his job as a digital marketing specialist is mentoring Messiah College student interns.


S U M M E R 2 0 1 6 , VO L . 1 0 8 , N O . 1

THE

office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

One College Avenue Suite 3020

M E S SMechanicsburg I A H C O L L EPA G E17055 A LU M N I M AG A Z I N E

717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Office of Marketing and Communications One College Avenue, Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 717.691.6027 | www.messiah.edu PRESIDENT

Kim S. Phipps V I C E P R E S I D E N T F O R A DVA N C E M E N T

Barry Goodling ’79 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF M A R K E T I N G & C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

Carla E. Gross EDITOR

Anna Seip C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Nancy Soulliard GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Carrie Barlup, Cindy Agoncillo ’09 DIRECTOR OF A L U M N I & PA R E N T R E L AT I O N S

Jay McClymont ’92 CONTRIBUTORS

Steve King ’06, Gabrielle Kurtz ’18, Maddie Waller ’18

The Bridge (ISSN-0279-3938) is published quarterly by the Messiah College Office of Marketing and Communications for alumni and friends of the College, free of charge. Periodicals postage (USPS #342000) paid at Mechanicsburg PA 17055 and additional mailing offices. Please contact us at thebridge@messiah.edu or 717-691-6027. Items for the alumni news section should be identified by class year and sent to the Messiah College Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, One College Avenue Suite 3023, Mechanicsburg PA 17055. You may email them to alumni@messiah.edu or fax them to 717-796-5371. Postmaster: Address corrections should be sent to the Office of Development, One College Avenue, Suite 3013, Mechanicsburg PA 17055.

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As its name suggests, The Bridge connects alumni, parents and donors with Messiah College. It also serves to build the College’s image with these audiences. It does this by publishing accurate news about the College and about alumni and by offering interesting feature articles that are issue- or College-related for readers’ continued education. Messiah College accepts news submissions from alumni and the broader community but reserves the right to edit or decline to print materials at its discretion. Messiah College is a Christian college of the liberal and applied arts and sciences. The College is committed to an embracing evangelical spirit rooted in the Anabaptist, Pietist and Wesleyan traditions of the Christian Church. Our mission is to educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership, and reconciliation in church and society. Messiah College does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, disability and national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other College-administered programs. © 2016 Messiah College

COVE R:

The Class of 2016, made of grad and undergrad students, open their minds to possibilty and wonder. The Bridge is printed on recyclable paper: 50/25 PCW EFC

DAN BEJAR ILLUSTRATION

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GRAD PROGRAMS

COMMENCEMENT

Messiah advances its mission with tremendous growth in the School of Graduate Studies. Check out our new facility, new programs and what’s to come.

The Class of 2016 celebrates its 107th Commencement with 798 graduating seniors and master’s program graduates.


F R O M T H E E D I TO R “ALL GROWN-UPS WERE ONCE CHILDREN... BUT ONLY FEW OF THEM REMEMBER IT.” – ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPÉRY, “THE LITTLE PRINCE”

On a sleepy, summertime Saturday morning, I walked downstairs to make a cup of coffee while the rest of the house was quiet. Groceries were on my mind—making a list for them, heading to the store to buy them, wondering where I’d put the coupons. Turns out, my 9-year-old was wide awake, curled on the couch, well into a Netflix version of “The Little Prince,” the French parable. She asked me to watch it with her. I hesitated. Was this a test? I knew this plot, how the adults in the story lose their sense of wonder. They’re called les grandes personnes—big people—rushing from one place to another without joy, with no idea of what they’re looking for. The groceries could wait. At the end of the movie, the word “Fin” floated on the screen. “‘Fin’ means ‘end’ in French,” I said.

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D E PAR TM E NT S

ONLINE EXTRAS

4 FROM THE PRESIDENT

MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE

5 ON CAMPUS 5 Faces and Places 6

Heard Around Campus

7

Brain Waves

8

Campus News

9 Athletics

27

OUR ALUMNI

27 Alumni News 27

Class Notes

28

Alumni Profiles

32

From the Archives

Listen to Jonathan Fuller ’16 discuss his Messiah experience. Learn more about the upcoming writing projects of author Tim Grove ’89 at timgrove.net. Check out the artwork of Zerflin design agency owner Benjamin Jancewicz ’04 at zerflin.com.

“Oh, like finish,” my daughter said. “Exactly.” The finish of the summer. The start of a new school year. As The Bridge staff compiled the summer issue, we noted many beginnings and endings of those profiled in the magazine. Our feature “Advancing By Degrees” takes a comprehensive look at Messiah’s graduate programs, profiling a variety of alums who pursued advanced degrees to get to the next step in their careers and to serve their communities. In our Commencement coverage, we interview seniors from the Class of 2016, all of them filled with a sense of wonder for the unknown, the next stage of life. We hope you enjoy this issue of The Bridge.

CORRECTION

In the print version of the Spring 2016 issue of The Bridge, the article about the Raptor Hand Project did not mention that the Collaboratory students ultimately settled on the Flexy-Hand 2 design by Steve Wood—not the Raptor Hand design. We regret the error.

A N N A S E I P, E D I T O R

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 3


FROM THE PRESIDENT

To our grads: What will you inspire in this world? This is an adaptation of President Phipps’ charge to Messiah College’s Class of 2016 at Commencement:

K I M S . PH I PPS, PRESIDENT

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

To all the members of the baccalaureate and graduate Class of 2016, you give us great hope for a promising future for church and society. As you graduate, I invite you to reflect on a question Sister Joan Chittister posed to another graduating class: “What will you inspire in this world?” You’ve already offered us a glimpse into your vision through the undergraduate senior class gift—“Light our Legacy”—that will enable Messiah College to light the Swinging Bridge. Today, I challenge you to create a living legacy of light and love. Inspire others to focus on the light—to see anew—to consider people through the radiance of Christ’s love. Without light, even a landmark like the Swinging Bridge is invisible. But strung with glistening bulbs, this bridge will boldly make its presence known. “The Message: The Bible in Contemporary Language” expresses Jesus’ charge to us: “You’re here to be light, bringing out the God-colors in the world” (Matthew 5:16). Our world is divided and often drably uninspired, devoid of the brilliance of God’s vision for creation. At Messiah, you have joined with educators and friends to learn about bringing out the God-colors in this world. You have begun to consider what it means to “do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God,” as Micah 6:8 (NIV)

calls us to do. You have studied truths revealed through the liberal and applied arts and sciences. You have come together in worship and discipleship. Inspired by the love of Christ, continue to be people of conviction who listen, respect, love and seek deep understanding. Your character flows from being firmly connected to Christ. Thousands of bulbs cannot illuminate the Swinging Bridge without a strong power source. Likewise, stay close to your Source through prayer, fellowship and meditation on God’s word. You are loved beyond measure and reconciled to God through Christ. Channel that love into building bridges of reconciliation. You’re called beyond the comfort of your own perceptions and understanding. Expand your personal and professional circles of favor and inquiry—and expect to be challenged and changed in the process. Finally, I challenge you to be people characterized by hospitality. Hear these words from Matthew: “…be generous with your lives. By opening up to others, you’ll prompt people to open up with God, this generous Father in heaven.” (5:14-16, MSG) Go forth in peace: secure in your identity as beloved children of God; filled with courage to work for justice and reconciliation; prepared to learn and grow in knowledge and wisdom; and grounded in humility. Most of all, go forth prepared to inspire a world beguiled by darkness that there is power, hope and health in the light. Go forth surrounded by family and friends, and living in the love and light of Christ.

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OUR

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGR APHY

FAC E S A N D P L AC E S

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGR APHY

MATTHEW TENNISON

Above and right: The Martin Commons seats 250 and serves as an addition to Lottie Nelson Dining Hall.

Martin Commons makes debut 250-SEAT ADDITION TO LOTTIE EXPANDS OPTIONS FOR EVENTS Lottie Nelson Dining Hall just got a little bigger. The Martin Commons, a 250-seat addition to Lottie, opened its doors March 30. An alternative dining area for students, the space also serves as a venue for campus events and visitors. The generosity of Jim and Donna Martin, their family as well as

other donors to this vital project made the venue a reality. “The addition of the Members of the Martin family served as the speakers’ panel during the Messiah College Martin Commons not Business Alumni Breakfast in April. only gives additional space for students to cook-to-order stations. prepared foods. So many events gather at meal times, it provides In April, the venue hosted that we provide require the an aesthetically beautiful room several members of the Martin transport of equipment, service where the College can host family, for whom the Commons ware, food, beverages and supmany guests at various events,” is named, at a Messiah College plies to offsite locations,” said said Kathie Shafer, vice presiBusiness Alumni Breakfast. Mark Wirtz, director of dining dent for operations. Discussing the topic “Sustaining services. “It is wonderful that With the addition of this a Christ-Centered Business in we can serve an event of 250 space, catering and culinary a Changing World,” the family in-house.” options have expanded. “The talked about the processes, chalThe Commons is the first Martin Commons offers us a lenges and rewards of operating dining space that is directly con- phase in a two-step renovaa family business. tion process of Lottie, which nected to the kitchen, ensuring will include updates to several the highest quality of freshly — Maddie Waller ’18 MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 5

K ATE Y DAY ’ 16

Jim Martin and his wife Donna donated generously to the project.


OUR

HEARD AROUND CAMPUS

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO ON A RAINY DAY?

“Jump in puddles.” — Elyssa Terry ’18

“On rainy days, I like to go outside with a pizza box and slide down muddy hills.” — Dane Cornelius ’17

“Playing ultimate Frisbee is my favorite thing to do because if you dive for a Frisbee you can slide across the mud, and it’s a blast.” — Justin Baitinger ’17

“On a rainy day, probably stay in the house and watch TV, because I don’t get to do that very often.”

“I like to hang out with my — Wes Bower, postal clerk best friend Dane Cornelius and then after that is over, I “Well, sleeping like to go outside and run in is definitely around in the rain, but I try to good, big fan of sleeping in.” step between the raindrops.” — Valerian Curd, fire and safety systems coordinator

— Matthew Phillippy ’18

“I like to curl up with a good book.” — Kathy Gates, college receptionist

“Definitely go to the mall.” — Sarah Weber ’18

“Probably sit in my room and watch Netflix and drink some coffee.” — Justine Eldridge ’18

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“I like to be with friends and play board games.” — Martin Kolb ’19

“On a rainy day, I love to read books and drink hot chocolate or hot tea, depending on my mood. Movie nights with friends are always fun, too!” — Abbey Combs ’17


B R A I N WAV E S

“There are voices people need to hear outside of Frederick Douglass. ” — Emerson Powery, professor of biblical studies

Slave narratives’ use of Scripture examined in book PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL STUDIES EMERSON POWERY HIGHLIGHTS PASSAGES

In his second inaugural address, President Abraham Lincoln quoted from Scripture about the common faith of the North and the South. Professor of Biblical Studies Emerson Powery digs deeper and examines the importance of Scripture in the slave narratives in his book ‘The Genesis of Liberation.’

In his second inaugural address, as the end of the Civil War neared, President Abraham Lincoln spoke of the commonalities of the North and the South—two opposing groups who read from the same Bible. In his book “The Genesis of Liberation,” Professor of Biblical Studies Emerson Powery takes that idea a step further. “The abolitionists are saying, ‘Hey, Jesus never enslaved anyone.’ The other side is saying, ‘But Jesus didn’t say to stop slavery.’ But there’s still a voice that’s missing,” said Powery. It’s the voice of the slaves themselves. “There are voices people need to hear outside of Frederick Douglass,” said Powery. “He’s a prominent voice, but so many others need to be heard.” Through his research of the collection of slave narratives at the University of North Carolina, Powery and co-author Rodney Sadler noticed many references to specific Bible passages and focused on some of the lesser-known ones to highlight. One pivotal passage, 2 Kings 5, tells the story of Naaman, a Syrian general with leprosy who seeks out healing from Elisha in Israel. Trying to avoid the enemy general, Elisha tells Naaman to

wash in the water seven times. Naaman is healed and tries to pay Elisha, who refuses the money. But, Elisha’s servant Gehazi accepts the money and buries it. Elisha, feeling betrayed, declares Gehazi will now have leprosy “as white as snow.” “In the King James Version, which is what everyone read in the 19th century, it says he gets leprosy as white as snow,” said Powery. “So, in the slave narrative tradition, people pick up on that, because the conversation is about the origin of the races.” In keeping with the title, the book focuses solely on the narratives from the antebellum period. “The topics change within the slave narratives themselves after the war,” explained Powery. “Slave narratives were still being written, but the discussion around the Bible changes.” While the pre-war narratives carry a common thread of Scripture, Powery also found a second theme: a life beyond the plantation. “Everyone talks about escape in their narratives,” he said. “Everyone talks about their escape.” — Maddie Waller ’18

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 7


OUR

CAMPUS NEWS

Eco-friendly, efficient power MESSIAH DEDICATES NEW CCHP PLANT On June 1, the College dedicated its new combined cooling, heat and power plant (CCHP). Messiah and UGI HVAC Enterprises co-hosted a dedication ceremony and ribbon cutting for the contractors and business partners who collaborated on the project, along with local officials and local media. The new system will provide

year-round electric power, heat and cooling generated from a single fuel source–natural gas. Messiah’s recent conversion to natural gas and the use of the CCHP, a more efficient and environmentally friendly energy source than the previous propane and electric fuel sources, is estimated to provide emission reductions equivalent to removing 1,354 passenger vehicles from the road.

READ THE ABC 27 NEWS STORY AND WATCH A VIDEO ABOUT THE CCHP AT MESSIAH.EDU/ABC27.

ONE ABSORPTION CHILLER COOLS

550

DORM ROOMS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS = TO REMOVING

1,354 CINDY AGONCILLO ’09

CARS FROM THE ROAD

Clockwise from above: Director of Facilties Services Brad Markley and Messiah College President Kim Phipps (both holding the scissors) help cut the ribbon for the opening of the CCHP plant. Staffers and the media attend the dedication ceremony to learn more about the College’s eco-friendly conversion to natural gas for its year-round heating and cooling needs.

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MESSIAH COLLEGE ATHLETICS

AT H L E T I C S

Above: The team celebrates a record seaon. Right: Brooke Pompeo ’16, third baseman, was named All-Tournament in all three NCAA Tournament weekends.

MESSIAH SOFTBALL ENDS RECORD SEASON AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS When the dust settled on the final day of the NCAA Division III Softball Championships, Messiah’s four seniors removed their cleats, walked to home plate and left the shoes in a small pile. Truly, they left it all on the field, and that’s the only way the season could end. Messiah softball won eight games in the NCAA Tournament, including three games at the softball championships, before falling short of the national title to the University of Texas at Tyler. The loss to the Patriots left the Falcons as the national runner-up, an accomplishment bested only by their National Championship in 2009. “I’m very proud of our girls,” Head Coach Amy Weaver ’91 said. “They got our team as far as we could go, and being runner-up in the country is pretty incredible.” The Falcons’ run to the championship series started with three-straight wins at the Christopher Newport Regional and then two more wins over Haverford College in the NCAA Super Regional hosted by Messiah. Three of those five victories came by a single run to advance to the softball championships for the first time since 2011. At the championships, hosted in

Salem, Virginia, Messiah won their first three games. They slugged their way to a 9-6 win over Rowan University, pitched to a 3-1 decision over MIT on the second and beat Rowan once more, this time 9-1. “I wouldn’t have wanted to go through this with any other group of girls,” said third baseman Brooke Pompeo ’16, who was named All-Tournament in all three NCAA Tournament weekends. “We all wanted this to be the best ride for our entire team.” The team finished with a programrecord 47 wins. On their way to the runner-up finish, a number of players either reached statistical milestones or were recognized with distinguished awards. Pitcher Courtney Allen ’16 was named National Fastpitch Coaches Association Second Team All-American and CoSIDA Academic Division III All-American of the Year for Softball. Allen also was nominated for the annual NCAA Woman of the Year Award. At press time, she was one of two nominations from the MAC Commonwealth in consideration as a finalist from all of Division III. —Steve King ’06, associate athletics director MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 9


ILLUSTRATIONS BY DAN BEJAR

F E AT U R E S T O R Y

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ADVANCING DEGREES

by

GRADUATE PROGRAMS EXTEND MESSIAH’S MISSION BY ANNA SEIP AND MADDIE WALLER ’18

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 11


F E AT U R E S T O R Y

F

rom her home in Texas, hundreds of miles from Grantham, Pennsylvania, Suzanne Dell MA ’16 completed a Master of Music in conducting in July. That degree came from Messiah College.

“Getting my master’s was always something I had wanted to do,” said Dell, a director of the Blue Raider Band for the L.D. Bell High School in Bedford, Texas. “I did not, however, want to leave my job or my home to pursue it as a full-time student. The mix of online and onsite instruction was perfect for my work and family situation.” What makes a busy professional seek out a degree program so far from home? The

convenience of an online program is certainly a draw, but many colleges and universities offer remote instruction in today’s pluggedin society. Why did Dell choose Messiah, specifically? “We talk a great deal about knowledge, skill and character,” said Rob Pepper, dean of the School of Graduate Studies. “Society is looking for people with a strong knowledge base, with strong relevant skills and those of high character. These same threads that shape and mold the undergraduate experience are woven throughout our graduate program, as well.” EXTENDING THE MISSION

Committed to stellar undergraduate academics for more than 100 years, Messiah launched its graduate programs seven years ago through a strategic effort. Supported by the Board of Trustees, the movement was championed by President Kim Phipps and Provost Randy Basinger while also fully vetted through the College’s strategic planning

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and budgeting process. Phipps said it was important for Messiah to expand its curricular offerings to include graduate programs for two key reasons. “First, our region and the broader world need Messiah graduates in every profession and discipline at every level of leadership. Institutionally, we were ready to fulfill our mission in this new context,” said Phipps. “Second, the changing demographics of fewer high school graduates in the Mid-Atlantic compelled us to be innovative and pursue new student audiences.” The tremendous growth of graduate programs has resulted in the formation of its own school—the School of Graduate Studies—that includes more than 600 students; multiple degrees, certificates and program options; the College’s first doctoral launch; and even a new facility. “In creating the School of Graduate Studies,” said Pepper, “we adopted a centralized organization model that focuses on graduate programs while preserving the identity of the strong undergraduate


Advancing the mission of Messiah College, the School of Graduate Studies educates students for a lifetime of intellectual exploration, ethical leadership and exceptional professional practice within a complex world.

programming.” One component of that identity includes the new Winding Hill facility, a 32,000-squarefoot space two miles from the main campus. It houses the allied health graduate programs: occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), counseling and the dietetic internship. The facility offers specialized classroom and lab space, an onsite café and many other amenities specifically relevant to graduate students and faculty in these programs. With the exception of the OT and PT degrees, students conduct the bulk of their studies through Canvas, the College’s online learning management system. There are synchronous sessions—where the entire class logs on at the same time—and asynchronous, when students log on at their convenience individually. “The way we conduct synchronous classes sessions is similar to Facetime or Skype and provides the opportunity for students and faculty to engage in real time, regardless of the distance,” said Pepper.

COUNSELING AND CONDUCTING

Launched as one of the first graduate programs with 66 students in 2009, the Master of Arts in counseling has grown to be the largest graduate program at Messiah with nearly 300 enrolled last year. Messiah has the only online, faith-based, Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)-accredited master’s in counseling program in Pennsylvania and one of the only CACREP-accredited, online, faith-based programs in marriage, couple and family counseling in the U.S. Students with a variety of undergraduate majors can pursue the degree, which has concentrations in clinical mental health counseling; marriage, couple and family counseling; and school counseling. “We have students who are coming right out of their undergrad and then we have other students who are coming back for their second or third career,” said Heather Barto, director of the program. “It provides a way for those interested in becoming a counselor

to do so while still balancing the rest of their life.” Stacy Masshardt MA ’16 graduated from the program and now operates Sacred Ground Counseling in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, as a marriage and family counselor. The online program suited her busy schedule as a professional. “Balancing a full-time job, life, family and studies was difficult,” she said. “It took me four years to complete the program and there were a lot of sacrifices along the way. I was motivated to do my best in the classes to make the sacrifices worth it.” The counseling degree is a prime example of the knowledge, skill and character tenets of Messiah’s mission. “Effective counselors must know counseling theory, refine their skills as counselors and practice ethically,” said Pepper. “That’s the reputation we’re building on.” Also introduced in 2009, the Master of Music in conducting is one of the first and only online programs of its kind in the U.S. “Our program is very specifically designed

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F E AT U R E S T O R Y

“What I really hope people understand is that online does not mean easy.” –Louann Zinsmeister, director of the graduate nursing programs

to meet the needs of working public school music educators who seek to hone their skills and master the craft of conducting,” said Bill Stowman, director of the program, which includes three tracks: choral, orchestral and wind conducting. Although the ability to apply conducting techniques remotely was unheard of years ago, music professors now use a program called VoiceThread, which critiques students in real time. “They can watch somebody conduct, and they can insert comments into different points during it,” said Pepper. “So, you’re saying, ‘Your right hand is now too low, it should be up higher.’” Students get to know each other through synchronous learning sessions and in-person summer intensives, sharing ideas and stories. “The networking aspect of the program has far exceeded anyone’s expectations,” said Stowman. “Also, I’m surprised by how many come to campus for Commencement. The degree clearly means a great deal to them.”

NURSING

To meet the growing trends and needs in healthcare, students who already have a bachelor’s degree in nursing can choose from two graduate programs at Messiah: a Doctor of Nursing Practice: family nurse practitioner (post-BSN to DNP-FNP) or a Master of Science in Nursing: nurse educator (MSN). “Nursing meets a lot of the things we want to do at Messiah College in terms of educating people in leadership, service and reconciliation,” said Louann Zinsmeister, director of both programs. “Our graduate programs take that to the next level.” Nurse practitioners, part of a growing field, provide direct primary care to patients. The DNP, Messiah’s first doctorate-level program, requires four to six years of study. The first cohort of 19 students began classes in August. “The curriculum is built for the future,” said Zinsmeister. “The nurse practitioner is fulfilling a need of our society. There are going to be more and more in the older age group who require some kind of primary care

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that isn’t necessarily done in a hospital.” The MSN, on the other hand, is a two- to three-year program for those who want to become nurse educators, teaching future students to become competent nurses. Zinsmeister explained that the nurse educator workforce is retiring rapidly and new educators are needed to fill the gaps. The first cohort of nine women graduated from Messiah’s MSN program in May. One of them, Nancy Frank MSN ’16, is Messiah’s clinical liaison placement coordinator for the undergraduate nursing program. “At the end when we looked back, it was amazing how all of our learning experiences had built on each other to transform our perspectives into that of nurse educators,” said Frank, who is now working toward a Ph.D. at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Both Messiah programs are conducted primarily online, allowing students to complete coursework on their own time. Clinical hours are completed at a variety of healthcare and higher education settings.


2

square-foot facility

miles from main campus

32,000 square feet of space

OCCUPATIONAL AND PHYSICAL THERAPY

The Master of Occupational Therapy degree is a full-time, 80-credit-hour program that runs year-round for 25 months. Admissions is currently accepting 30 students into the program, which begins in July of 2017. “Things like brushing your teeth, getting dressed and going to work are all occupations,” explained Darlene PerezBrown, the program’s director. “When a person has a disability and is unable to carry out their daily routine occupations, it is our work to help them to be able to perform their functions and carry out their roles.” In addition to classes and labs, occupational therapy (OT) students will complete onsite

fieldwork in settings such as schools, homeless shelters and other environments to apply their skills to help those in need. “We are basing our model on the mission of the college, so we’re looking to develop the intellect and Christian character in preparation for lives of service and leadership,” Perez-Brown said. As Messiah’s second doctoral program, the Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT) will launch in the fall of 2018. While OT focuses on performing everyday tasks of life, physical therapy concentrates more on movement. “Traditionally, a physical therapist is looking at movement disorders,” said Valerie Olson, program director. “This may be due to a developmental disorder or a trauma or a disease process. The goal is to get them functional and moving in the environment they are going to be involved in.” Classes and labs will be primarily onsite at Winding Hill with some online work. Offsite clinical-level experience will be implemented throughout the program, as well. Olson says she is looking to make a

• Full-size apartment with universal design for activities of daily living • Pediatrics lab with sensory integration equipment, climbing wall and indoor play gym • Multipurpose room (for occupational analysis, splinting, and assistive technology) • Musculoskeletal lab • Modality lab

i n cl u d es

“It’s very self-directed. You’re doing clinical hours and classwork.” said Zinsmeister. “What I really hope people understand is that online does not mean easy. Our main goal is to build quality programs so that we can serve the needs of people.”

• Cardiac lab • Cadaver lab • Café where students can grab breakfast or lunch • Occupational and physical therapy offices • Dietetic internship offices • Counseling offices

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CODY WANNER ’09

W I N D I N G H I L L FAC I L I T Y


F E AT U R E S T O R Y

faith-based global impact with the program, planning a mission trip as part of the curriculum. “I think the thing that led me here is the freedom to be a Christian, to carry out the mission,” said Olson. “The fact that you can pray during a test or talk about the spiritual aspects of rehab is key.” DIETETIC INTERNSHIP

Launched in 2015, Messiah’s graduate-level dietetic internship requires completion of 1,275 supervised practice hours in a 10-month period. Students must complete these hours through rotations at a variety of settings while also being responsible for their online work in the form of discussions, reports and projects. “Messiah’s internship also completes a component of food insecurity [access to food limited by a lack of money or resources] issues as well as faith-based service leadership coursework and discussions, which sets it apart from other internship opportunities,” said Michelle Sanford ’93, director of the program.

Messiah is one of the few Christian colleges preparing registered dietitians. The program, which started with eight students, has grown to 10 this fall. It was created, in part, to meet the national shortage of internships. “Wellspan Hospital’s clinical nutrition manager approached Messiah College about the possibility of beginning an internship, using Wellspan facilities as a clinical site. Wellspan had been approached by other institutions; however, they came to us,” said Pepper. “The history that I get to build on and the reputation of Messiah College make it easy. When I approach someone in an applied health setting, school or business, everyone says, ‘Oh, we’ll hire any Messiah alum. They’re so good at what they do, and they are great to work with.’” When students complete the internship, they earn a certificate of completion from Messiah College, which includes an ACEND (Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics) form showing completion of all requirements and 19 graduate credits. Once the internship is

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complete, students then sit for their exam to be a registered dietitian (R.D.) EDUCATION AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Advancing with the knowing, being, doing triune of excellence, Messiah offers two education graduate degrees that prepare professionals to work with everyone from kindergartners to college students. The Master of Arts in higher education prepares graduate students to begin or advance a career at a college or university. Conducted primarily online, grad students can choose from concentrations in academic support services, college athletics leadership, strategic leadership and student affairs. Or, they can create their own course of study. The program integrates faith and learning while also equipping students for jobs in a secular environment. “I think our students have to be prepared to work in multiple places in a multitude of types of colleges and universities,” said Dottie Weigel, director of the program. “Get them to think outside that


“I think the thing that led me here is the freedom to be a Christian, to carry out the mission. The fact that you can pray during a test or talk about the spiritual aspects of rehab is key.” —  Valerie Olson, director of the physical therapy program

GRADUATE DEGREES AT MESSIAH BUSINESS • MBA • Digital marketing • Management • Organizational and strategic communication • Social entrepreneurship • Strategic leadership CONDUCTING • M.M. • Choral • Orchestral • Wind COUNSELING • M.A. • Clinical mental health • Marriage, couple and family • School counseling DIETETIC INTERNSHIP

box of Christian higher education.” Marcus Washington ’05, MA ’14 completed the program two years ago and now works as an assistant director of residence life at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pennsylvania. “The program is designed in a way that you have meaningful, impactful discussions with your classmates that allow you to develop personal relationships,” said Washington. “I owe my advancement in my career to my degree in higher education.” The Master of Education, geared predominantly toward educators teaching K-12, offers three degree tracks in special education, a track in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)and a track in curriculum and instruction. The program also offers numerous certification and certificate options, including a certificate in autism spectrum disorder. In 2015, the program was ranked No. 8 in Best Online Programs by BestColleges.com. “We are committed to providing the highest level of academic programming and teaching,” said Nancy Patrick, program

director. “In exchange, we expect our students will engage fully in the curriculum and give their best to the learning process.” For Lilian Schultz M.Ed. ’16, an administrative assistant in Messiah’s Early Learning Center, the M.Ed. with a concentration in TESOL was more than a professional accomplishment. The degree has strengthened her ties to the community. “I teach ESL [English as a Second Language] part time and volunteer as a director of an ESL program in Harrisburg,” said Schultz. “This program has opened up many doors for me in the community, where I see myself as a resource and an advocate for English language learners.”

EDUCATION • M.ED. • Curriculum and instruction • Special education • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Language (TESOL) HIGHER EDUCATION • M.A. • Academic support services • College athletics leadership • Individualized concentration • Strategic leadership • Student affairs LEADERSHIP • M.A. • Strategic leadership NURSING • DNP, MSN • Family nurse practitioner: BSN to DNP • Nurse educator: BSN to MSN • Nurse educator: RN to MSN

BUSINESS AND LEADERSHIP

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY • MOT

For the busy professional, Messiah also offers a Master of Arts in strategic leadership and a Master of Business Administration (MBA). What makes the programs unique is the emphasis on Christian faith and how it’s applied in the marketplace. “Our faith integration

PHYSICAL THERAPY • DPT

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 17


ENROLLMENT BY PROGRAM 300

LOCATION OF STUDENTS

626 34

73%

DEMOGRAPHICS

27%

GRADUATE PROGRAM GROWTH

from Pennsylvania

male

250

26% from 32 other states

female

73%

1%

from 8 other countries

200

150

AVERAGE AGE

students as of June 30, 2016

100

years old

COUNSELING

50

CONDUCTING

EDUCATION HIGHER EDUCATION

NURSING

2009 -2010

2012-2013

2014-2015

emphasis is something you don’t get at most graduate and business leadership schools,” explained Kristopher Cravey, director of both programs. “We view business and leadership through the lens of faith, which gives it deep meaning, value and purpose. It has the power to transform our perspective, to see the common good businesses and organizations can have in the world through the products and services they create.” The 30-credit-hour master’s in strategic leadership degree enhances a broad range of undergraduate degrees and can be completed in 18 months. Many enter the program to develop stronger leadership and communication skills or to enhance their effectiveness within their organizations. “My master’s has better equipped me to be a well-rounded leader in the workplace, church and community,” said Lauren Seneca ’12, MA ’16, associate director of annual giving at Messiah and recent graduate of the strategic leadership program. “As part of the annual giving team, I am challenged to match our donors’ passions with the needs of the

College in order for us to better the Messiah experience for students. My ability to think critically, analyze and research—all skills I have developed through the program—is an essential part of this process.” Unlike the M.A. in strategic leadership, the MBA program requires students to have an undergraduate background in business. The degree offers several concentrations—digital marketing; management; organizational and strategic communication; social entrepreneurship; or strategic leadership. The first students from the MBA program will graduate in May. “Some are entry or mid-level managers who are looking to sharpen their skills to lead teams and organizations effectively and grow in their career,” Cravey explained, “Others are fresh out of an undergrad program who are saying, ‘I really need to seize the opportunity now to prepare for a life of influence and service.’” Continuing with Messiah’s long-standing tradition of academic excellence, top faculty members provide both a mix of academic

18 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS DIETETICS 2015-2016

credentials and professional business experience to offer students the best in theory and practice. Both degrees culminate in a capstone project—similar to a thesis—which a student completes with a faculty member for a semester-long mentoring process. “We’re really focused on the practical piece of it,” said Cravey. “It’s not just about having knowledge of the content areas. It’s about being able to take that knowledge and apply it in a real-world setting to make an impact.” THE FUTURE

While Messiah continues strengthening its current graduate programming, new programs will be added—with thoughtful deliberation. ““We have to discern our strengths and our capacity for the new programs. We have to answer the question, ‘Is there a need for this program?’” said Pepper, when discussing the process of adding new programs. “We build off the strength and history and tradition of who Messiah has been and the needs of the world.” B

0


CINDY AGONCILLO ’09

From left: Graduate student Sarah Dillon and Dottie Weigel, director of graduate programs in higher education, first met at the University of South Carolina. Dillon, now pursuing an M.A. in higher education at Messiah, is reunited with her mentor.

USC TEACHER, STUDENT REUNITE AT MESSIAH LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, NATIVE SARAH DILLON BEGAN GRADUATE STUDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA (USC) IN THE FALL OF 2012. SHE WORKED AS A GRADUATE ASSISTANT IN THE OFFICE OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT, SUPERVISED BY DOTTIE WEIGEL. LITTLE DID THE TWO WOMEN KNOW THAT LIFE—AND A CANCER DIAGNOSIS—WOULD LEAD THEM BOTH TO MESSIAH COLLEGE.

After completing her first semester of graduate school in the fall of 2012, Dillon was walking across the USC campus when she felt a sharp pain in her back. Out of breath, she made her way to a bench, thinking she had a pulled muscle. It was actually a collapsed lung. “Dottie was the first one to the ambulance that day, and the first one next to me in the hospital,” said Dillon of her supervisor. “She stayed with me until my parents could get a flight from Pennsylvania. She never left my side.” Through weeks of biopsies and scans, Dillon learned she has medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. She withdrew from USC and returned home to Pennsylvania in February of 2013. While under the care of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, she eventually went to work at Lancaster Bible College as the assistant director of athletics. In the fall of 2015, she was ready to return to grad school, this time pursuing an M.A. in higher education at Messiah. Then one year later, Weigel left USC to become Messiah’s director of the graduate

program in higher education. “The idea that I will finish my degree work under the leadership of Dottie gives me goose bumps,” said Dillon, who plans to graduate in May of 2017.

“I NEVER WOULD HAVE PREDICTED THE EVENTS OF THE PAST THREE YEARS. WE HAVE GOALS AND DREAMS, BUT WE KNOW THAT GOD’S HAND IS IN ALL OF THIS.” As for her prognosis? She lives symptom-free and has never undergone treatment. Doctors predict she has had the slow-growing cancer for 13 years now. If it hadn’t been for the collapsed lung, the cancer might have gone undetected. “I am monitored a handful of times a year with lab work and scans,” said Dillon. “I never would have predicted the events of the past three years. We have goals and dreams, but we know that God’s hand is in all of this.”

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 19


2016 COMMENCEMENT

“I TRULY BELIEVE THERE ARE GREAT THINGS IN STORE.” —C  OMMENCEMENT SPEAKER PETER GREER ’97

20 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGR APHY

MESSIAH COLLEGE CELEBRATED ITS 107TH COMMENCEMENT MAY 14, CONFERRING DEGREES ON 798 GRADUATING SENIORS AND MASTER’S PROGRAM GRADUATES. IN HIS COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS, ENTREPRENEUR-INRESIDENCE PETER GREER ’97 REMINDED GRADS TO “LOOK TO JESUS, THE ONE WHO PERFECTLY SHOWS US WHAT AUDACIOUS AND FEARLESS LOVE LOOKS LIKE IN PRACTICE.”

TO VIEW MORE PHOTOS FROM COMMENCEMENT, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/COMMENCEMENTPHOTOS.

Honors presented during the ceremony included the following: • Nicholas Sooy ’16 received the Donald and Anna Zook Alumni Merit Award. The Lilly Fellows Program also named Sooy ’16 as one of 10 national Lilly Graduate Fellows in the U.S. • Kevin Villegas, director of student involvement and leadership programs, received the Outstanding Cocurricular Educator Award for his positive impact on students. • Associate Professor of Accounting James Krimmel and Professor of Psychology Charles Jantzi received the Dr. Robert & Marilyn Smith Awards for Outstanding Teaching, which are awarded to Messiah faculty members who have demonstrated a commitment to their students and the content they teach. • The inaugural Harry & Nancy Preis Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award was given to Carol McGinnis ’16. “Class of 2016, you give me great hope for a promising future for the church and society,” said President Kim Phipps. “You are ready. You are prepared to make a difference. Go do it!” TO VIEW THE COMMENCEMENT VIDEO, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/COMMENCEMENT. MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 21


2016 COMMENCEMENT

SENIOR CLASS CLOSEUPS

Their names are known to the Messiah Community well before Commencement. These students have spent four years studying (in Grantham and around the globe), honing their skills, serving their communities and transforming their faith. The Class of 2016 is no exception. The seven seniors profiled here have won prestigious honors, such as Fulbright research and Boren scholarships. They have demonstrated leadership as presidents of the student body and the Black Student Union. One traveled to Croatia to complete an art project based on the stories of war survivors. Another is a high school valedictorian who turned down offers from Ivy League schools to attend Messiah. They have interned in the parliaments of South Africa and Malaysia. In short, they’re pretty amazing.

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGR APHY

EACH YEAR, THE BRIDGE PROFILES SEVERAL OUTSTANDING SENIORS, MEN AND WOMEN WHO HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR SCHOLARSHIP, SERVICE AND CHARACTER.

LEONG IS ONE OF THE FIRST STUDENTS FROM MALAYSIA TO GRADUATE FROM MESSIAH AND NOW WORKS AT DELOITTE CONSULTING IN MECHANICSBURG.

P O L I T I C S A N D P S YC H O LO G Y

BRYAN LEONG ’16 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA One of the first students from Malaysia to graduate from Messiah, Bryan Leong ’16 sought out many opportunities to make the most of his College experience—even if that meant occasionally leaving the Grantham campus to hop over an ocean or two. In the fall of his junior year, he studied abroad at Oxford University in Oxford, England. For a double major in psychology and politics with a concentration in international relations, it was a dream come true. “Oxford has produced more than half of the British prime ministers,” explained Leong. “Every day, there are lectures by Nobel Laureates, famous professors, musicians, entertainers. It was a joy being there.”

He also returned to Malaysia for a summer to intern for one of the few Christian members of parliament. He noted how she paid for things out of her own pocket to help others. After observing a true public servant at work, he chose to serve in a similar way as the president of Messiah’s Asian Student Association. “I was able to run my office that way,” he said. “I treated it as a functional, active group.” When Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, he pioneered club fundraising events on campus to send aid through MercyCorps. He also found time to take a dance class. “I needed credit for an activities course, and that was on my bucket list: to learn how to ballroom dance,” he said. He now works as a human capital solution developer at Deloitte Consulting in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. The sum of his Messiah experiences prepared him well.

“MY LONG-TERM GOALS ARE TO GO BACK TO MALAYSIA AND RUN FOR PUBLIC OFFICE.” – Bryan Leong ’16 22 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


STILES STUDIED ABROAD FOR A YEAR AS A BOREN SCHOLAR IN CHINA. HE ALSO SPENT A SEMESTER IN SPAIN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BARCELONA.

C H I N E S E , P O L I T I C S W/ S PA N I S H M I N O R

JEFFREY STILES ’16 AREQUIPA, PERU

NURSING

HANNA LAZIO ’16 PATCHOGUE, NEW YORK When Hanna Lazio ’16 was named valedictorian of her high school class of 800+ in Patchogue, New York, she applied to 14 colleges—many of them Ivy League—but the only Christian one of the group was Messiah. Although she had applied as an engineer everywhere else, she knew Messiah had a great nursing program. “I got tons of emails from colleges but didn’t look at any of them,” she said. “I was put in this position of being in the spotlight. I felt called to come to Messiah. When you honor God’s decisions, God’s going to use that in ways you can’t even imagine.” Through her courses and clinicals, she said her professors supported her and understood her holistically—“They saw me at my worst and still saw the potential”—and, in turn, she began to understand her patients the same way.

“God looks at us and sees our potential and beauty,” said Lazio. “That’s how I’ve learned to look at patients and people in general.” After Commencement, she returned home to New York for the summer to study for and pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). She returned to Pennsylvania in July to work at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. “While I miss the beaches on Long Island and my family, I look forward to starting life on my own with a solid foundation of values, leadership skills and nursing education,” said Lazio. “I feel prepared for a bright future thanks to Messiah College!”

“I FELT CALLED TO COME TO MESSIAH. WHEN YOU HONOR GOD’S DECISIONS, GOD’S GOING TO USE THAT IN WAYS YOU CAN’T EVEN IMAGINE.”

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 23

MATTHEW TENNISON

MATTHEW TENNISON

China. Spain. Italy. South Africa. For a boy who arrived in the U.S. from Peru at the age of 8, Jeffrey Stiles ’16 made the most of Messiah’s education abroad opportunities while double majoring in Chinese and politics with a concentration in international relations. He also happens to have a minor in Spanish. “I was looking for a Christian college with a Chinese program,” explained Stiles. “Very few Christian colleges have that.” Not only did he study Chinese, he immersed himself in it, spending an entire academic year as a Boren scholar in China. In addition to taking language classes 36 hours per week, he also enjoyed confusing the locals. “I’d hear people say things about me, and then I’d answer them [in Chinese],” he said. “That was one of my favorite things, surprising people.” He also spent a semester in Spain, taking classes in economic policy at the University

of Barcelona. Classes were taught in Spanish and Catalan, a mix of French and Spanish. He brushed up on his language skills by watching Spanish television with the elderly couple who provided his housing. From Spain, he was off to Italy for a 10-day tour with the Messiah College Concert Choir. “Singing in a 12th-century church is something you don’t get to do in America,” he said. In the summer of 2015, he interned with a parliament monitoring group in Cape Town, South Africa. Since there are no public records of committee meetings, his job was to record the meetings and then write summaries of them. “I was an arm’s-length away from Nelson Mandela’s grandson,” he said. After work, he checked off some bucket list items, including bungee jumping and cage-diving with great white sharks. While he was studying abroad, he also found time to campaign for—and win—the title of homecoming king. What’s next? He’s leaving soon for Samoa through the Peace Corps. “I don’t want to tie myself down to one thing,” he said.


MILLER COMPLETED AN INTERNSHIP IN CROATIA AT THE EUROPEAN CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WAR AND PEACE.

2016 COMMENCEMENT

P E AC E A N D C O N F L I C T S T U D I E S W/ U R B A N S T U D I E S , S T U D I O A R T M I N O R S

Finding her way to Messiah was a smooth journey for Esther Miller ’16. As a Lancaster high school student researching which colleges offered peace and conflict as a major, her brother—who was already a student at Messiah—informed her, “They have that at my school.” Then she found a childhood photograph that showed the two of them playing in the Yellow Breeches. It was meant to be. So, after a gap year with Mission Year, an urban ministry program, she enrolled at Messiah, looking to combine her faith perspective with her major and two minors—one in urban studies and another in studio art. She completed an internship close to campus at the Makespace, a Harrisburg row home that provides studio and gallery space to artists. “I designed posters and fliers for

events, organized artist events and taught children’s art classes,” she said. “I love doing art that brings people together.” Her second internship took her to the European Center for the Study of War and Peace in Zagreb, Croatia. She took classes, worked at the center and completed a commissioned art piece based on the narratives of war survivors. “I enjoyed the communal culture,” said Miller. “It’s a very relaxed atmosphere. The people would stand very close in line. When I got back to the U.S., I had to remember to stand back from people in line.” What’s next for Miller? She says she hopes to apply to Eastern University’s master’s program in urban studies with a concentration in studio art. “I’m learning more about how I want to live the rest of my life than how I want my career to look,” said Miller.

MATTHEW TENNISON

ESTHER MILLER ’16 LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA

“EVEN THOUGH THERE MAY NOT BE STEADY GROUND TO STAND ON, I KNOW I’M SUPPOSED TO BE STANDING THERE.” C H R I S T I A N M I N I S T R I E S , H I S TO R Y

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGR APHY

JONATHAN FULLER ’16 BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA When Christian ministries and history major Jonathan Fuller ’16 visited Messiah during his college search, the Burlington, North Carolina, native knew he’d found the right place. “If you can fall in love with Messiah on a cold February morning, you can love it anytime,” he said. Although he was in the right place, it wasn’t easy. Homesickness set in and he almost didn’t return after his first semester. Then he formed some solid friendships outside the classroom, began working in the student ministries office and served as student body chaplain. “God met me at so many places along the way,” said Fuller, “showing me that I don’t have to do it on my own.” So, he took a leap of faith and traveled to Uganda his sophomore year, 24 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

which challenged—and solidified—his faith. “I had to wrestle some assumptions of my faith,” he said, of traveling to Africa. “I also grew to appreciate how communal they are culturally. It’s the cultural norm to prioritize other people. You have to be able to listen, and that’s something I needed to be stretched in.” As a senior, he was named Student Body President. “It’s challenging to find the balance between doing this important work and being a student,” said Fuller, “but I get to serve my peers and work with amazing student leaders and administrators.” He is pursuing a Master of Divinity at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C. “Moses and Mary received specific calls from God. Most of us aren’t privileged to a burning bush experience,” Fuller explained. “Even though there may not be steady ground to stand on, I know I’m supposed to be standing here.” TO WATCH A VIDEO OF FULLER’S MESSIAH EXPERIENCE, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE


HENRY IS PURSUING A MASTER’S IN MUSIC THERAPY AT TEMPLE UNIVERSITY.

M U S I C W/ P R E - C O U N S E L I N G A N D T H E R A P Y M I N O R

When Naomi Henry ’16 was visiting colleges as a high school student, she wanted a place that felt like home. Her mother urged her to visit Messiah, just two hours from their hometown of Philadelphia. “The faculty was so much more welcoming than all of the other colleges where I auditioned,” said Henry, a music major with a minor in pre-counseling and therapy. Her piano teacher and advisor, Professor of Music Patrice Ewoldt, had the biggest impact, continuing that initial warmth and hospitality throughout Henry’s college career. “She takes a great interest in the well-being

of her students,” said Henry. “She’ll do extra lessons or spend time just talking to you.” Henry emerged as a leader, becoming the director of the campus gospel choir, United Voices of Praise. She also served as president of the Black Student Union. This fall, she began pursuing a master’s in music therapy at Temple University. “I want to merge my two interests,” she said. “I can be a musician and still be a counselor.” What advice would she give to a high school student considering Messiah? “Not only did I get my degree, I had a good experience behind it. If you’re looking for a place with a strong community, friendships made here are very strong,” said Henry. “You end up growing a lot as a person and as a Christian.”

MATTHEW TENNISON

NAOMI HENRY ’16 PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

“I CAN BE A MUSICIAN AND STILL BE A COUNSELOR.” – Naomi Henry ’16

McINTYRE RECEIVED A FULBRIGHT RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP TO PURSUE AN M.A. IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. P O L I T I C S A N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E L AT I O N S , S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y S T U D I E S

MATTHEW TENNISON

CHRISTINA McINTYRE ’16 STREET, MARYLAND It’s tough to find someone more passionate about urban housing policy than Christina McIntyre ’16, a double major in politics and sustainability studies with a concentration in community and urban development. “We need to reform the structures that perpetuate the barriers,” she explained. “Place shouldn’t determine the opportunities someone can have. As an undergrad, she spent time in the SALT House in Harrisburg, becoming interested in local, city and state policy. “The city of Harrisburg has been a big part

of my Messiah experience,” said McIntyre. “Harrisburg has all of the challenges a large metro area does, but its disparity is very evident. Lower-income communities in Harrisburg have less access to banking, which has become a function of private wealth.” After her time in Harrisburg, she spent a summer learning about federal policy in Washington, D.C., interning at the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services. While she worked with the housing and urban policy committee, she served on the affordable housing team at her church. “Access to affordable housing, quality housing—that’s what it should be about,” she said. “As Christians, that’s what we should be committed to. Your research isn’t going to matter if you’re removed from your brothers and sisters.” McIntyre is pursuing an M.A. in political science at the University of Toronto on a Fulbright research scholarship. Her thesis will compare low-income housing policy in Canada and the U.S. B

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 25


Messiah College invites you to the

Calvin and Janet HIGH CENTER for WORSHIP and PERFORMING ARTS

2016-2017 SEASON Ballet Magnificat! Friday, Sept. 9, 2016 9/11 Memorial Concert Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016 Sleepy Man Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 Snarky Puppy Friday, Oct. 28, 2016 Fauré Requiem Friday, Nov. 11, 2016 Ken Burns Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 Earl Lewis Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016 Messiah College Christmas Concert Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016 Susquehanna Chorale Christmas Concert Friday, Dec. 16, 2016

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Thursday, Feb. 2Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017 Kate Aldrich Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017 Michelle Alexander Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 David Kim and the Messiah College Symphony Orchestra Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Tim Warfield and His Organ Band Friday, April 7, 2017 Franz Joseph Haydn, The Seven Last Words of Christ Tuesday, April 11, 2017 Messiah College Choral Arts Society Spring Concert Handel’s “Messiah” Sunday, April 23, 2017 Susquehanna Chorale Spring Concert Saturday, May 6, 2017

For more information: Additional details on the 2016-2017 season of the Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts may be found at messiah.edu/highcenterseason.


OUR

ALUMNI NEWS

Messiah alum works as chief of learning at National Air and Space Museum Tim Grove ’89 has a passion for history—and for sharing it with others. He recently published his second young adult book, “Milestones of Flight,” to coincide with the opening of an exhibit of the same name at the National Air and Space Museum, where he works as the chief of museum learning. As a museum educator, Grove also has worked at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. Since he is based in Washington, D.C., he has managed interns from the American Studies Program, where many Messiah students spend a semester. At the Air and Space Museum, he continually works to find new ways to make history accessible to millions of people,

showing them it’s so much more than memorizing names and dates. “It seems like the world comes through our doors,” said Grove, “and trying to find ways to engage and teach many types of audiences is an ongoing challenge.” As a result, he helped start the History Relevance Campaign, an attempt at starting a national conversation to raise the profile of history in society. Messiah Professor of American History John Fea recently joined the steering committee as a way to get involved with the campaign. Writing books for young adults is another way this journalism major shares the excitement history has brought to his life. His first two books, “First Flight Around the World” and “A Grizzly in the Mail”

1960s

2000s

Harriet Sider Bicksler ’68 was reappointed as the editor of the Brethren in Christ Historical Society.

Stephanie (Kneeland) ’01 and Dave Sieling ’01 announce the birth of Zara Marie-Juliette, April 7, 2016.

1970s James Stauffer ’74 recently became a pastor at Paramount Brethren in Christ Church in Hagerstown, Pa.

1990s Michele (Marshall) ’90 and Chi Ly ’89 announce the adoption of Ana Maria from Colombia, Dec. 2, 2015. She was born Feb. 18, 2007.

Shaun Slusser ’02 and Erica King married Aug. 29, 2015 in York, Pa. Anna (Schiffer) ’03 and Nicholas Crofoot announce the birth of Elias Cooper, Feb. 11, 2016. Virginia (Sverduk) ’03 and Matthew Hemmler announce the birth of Laurel Ann, March 31, 2016. Deborah (Light) ’04 and

BRIAN SCHNEIDER

TIM GROVE ’89 SHARES HISTORY WITH MILLIONS

Tim Grove ’89 is a published author who works at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

bring stories of the past to life. “First Flight” was a finalist for the 2016 Young Adult Library Services Association’s Award for Excellence in Nonfiction. Grove says he would like to continue his career in writing.

Anthony Velez announce the birth of Helen Rose, Jan. 23, 2016. Jill (Jerzorski) ’07 and Adam Kullman ’05 announce the birth of Luke Rhys, Nov. 16, 2015.

2010s Trevor Brunsink ’00 and Nicole Shanahan married June 25, 2016. Christine (Lohne) Parenteau ’09 and husband Brandon announce the birth of Madalynn Rose, June 2, 2016. Christine is the owner of Lilly Pad Daycare in Amston, Conn.

“I’ve enjoyed learning the publishing scene and keep having one idea after another,” he said. “I’m convinced that anyone can learn to enjoy some aspect of studying the past.” — Gabrielle Kurtz ’18

Elaine (Mills) Wantz ’09 and husband Brad announce the birth of Annmarie Dawn, Oct. 22, 2014.

Brittany (Peashey) ’13 and Kyle Lentz announce the birth of Wesley, March 9, 2016.

Bridgette (Todd) ’11 and Abraham Smith announce the birth of Luke Abraham, Feb. 25, 2016. Their first child, Madelyn Elyse, was born May 20, 2014.

Service Notes

Sushannah (Sorensen) ’12 and Jeremy Laurange announce the birth of Lincoln, April 18, 2016. Kristen Listor ’12 and Michael Proksch married Sept. 13, 2015 in New Paltz, N.Y.

Brent Silliman ’00 and his son provide soccer camps to children in Haiti through their organization, Freedom FC. Gabriela Paniagua-Stolz ’10 and Ben Stolz ’10 have organized and co-led a racial reconciliation group in their home for the past year through Resurrection Clinton Hill Church in Brooklyn, N.Y.

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 27


OUR

Artist, designer, entrepreneur ALUM BUILDS ZERFLIN, A GLOBAL DESIGN FIRM As a college student, Benjamin Jancewicz ’04 looked for a Christian college with a solid engineering program. As a sophomore at Messiah, however, he soon realized that art and design always had held a special

place in his heart. The child of missionaries, he’d grown up in Kawawachikamach, a First Nations village in northern Quebec. With little to do, he spent time filling his sketchbooks and playing around with the Microsoft Paint program on his father’s computer. One professor who encouraged Jancewicz to follow his passion was Angela Hare, dean of the School of Science, Engineering and Health. “I’ve taught thousands of Messiah students over the years,” said Hare. “Benjamin is one whose passion and character stands out.” Once he switched his major, he had to catch up on the necessary design classes. He also started

his own design agency, Zerflin, which continues to this day. “I had to hustle to get everything for a graphic design major,” said Jancewicz. “That work ethic stayed with me as I kicked Zerflin into higher gear.” As a new business owner, he connected with new clients by offering his services for a small fee—or even for free. He even met clients in the dining hall between classes. “Whenever I was assigned a project where I had to invent a company to design for, I did my best to find an actual company that would let me do

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN JANCOWICZ ’04

ALUMNI PROFILES

Country music legend Dolly Parton autographs a piece of art by Benjamin Jancewicz ’04.

their designs for free in exchange for classwork,” he said. Today, Zerflin and its staff of 10 offer many services such as branding, print pieces and Web. “We’ve redesigned government websites, built national branding

Ruwe at his sixth-grade band concert with his grandfather in ’08

Creating a legacy at Messiah College – Planning a gift through your will or trust is a simple way to make a difference for a lifetime. A gift in your will does not affect your current cash flow or assets, but you will have the benefit of knowing your legacy gift will provide a lasting impact to future students. How can I make a legacy gift to Messiah College? • Make a provision through your will or trust • Add a codicil to an existing will • Name Messiah as beneficiary in a qualified retirement plan • Designate Messiah College as beneficiary of a life insurance policy • Sample language to add Messiah to your will:

MATT RUWE ’18

Music Performance 28 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

I, [name], of [city, state, zip] give, devise and bequeath to Messiah College, situated in Grantham, Pennsylvania [written amount, description of property or percentage of the estate] for its unrestricted use and purposes.

Visit messiah.edu/createalegacy for more information.


— Maddie Waller ’18

“I HAD TO HUSTLE TO GET EVERYTHING FOR A GRAPHIC DESIGN MAJOR. THAT WORK ETHIC STAYED WITH ME AS I KICKED ZERFLIN INTO HIGHER GEAR.” —  Benjamin Jancewicz ’04

FROM ZOO TO LIBERTY BELL GINA GILLIAM ’83 MANAGES PR AT PHILLY’S NAT’L PARK How do you go from being a zookeeper to the keeper of the Liberty Bell? Ask Gina Gilliam ’83. The new public affairs officer at Independence National Historical Park—which includes the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, attracting 4.3 million visitors annually— performs a host of duties. Various events, which can range from large wedding photo shoots to military ceremonies, are held at the park. It’s Gilliam’s job to manage all of them. In addition to hosting events, the park also has celebrations of its own, such as Flag Day. This year happens to be the 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service, which will include a Founders’ Day event, plaque dedication and concert. Gilliam is in charge of the event logistics—writing speeches, taking photos, communicating with the media, checking the sound system and even figuring out how many chairs are needed. It’s a group effort. “I’m part of a great team of public affairs and events experts,” said Gilliam. “There is help from other parks and areas of the agency for very large events.” Although she’s been on the job only a few months, her goal is always to provide information and to help. The oddest inquiry so far? A member of the media once called to ask her if parts of the park were haunted. (Gilliam says they are not.) After graduating with a degree in biology, Gilliam worked as an animal keeper at the

Philadelphia Zoo. After moving on to the National Wildlife Federation to coordinate its urban environmental education plan, she realized she had a knack for public affairs—event planning, building partnerships and working with the media. She eventually landed her job at the Independence National Historical Park. As a student, Gilliam revived the Black Student Union at Messiah, eventually becoming its president. “While at Messiah, I was also

able to enhance my leadership skills and learn to get along with people very different from myself,” said Gilliam. She also honed her faith at Messiah, something that she carries in her current position and conveys to her staff. “I try to treat people as Christ would and remind myself that as His representative,” said Gilliam, “I am to treat people right, try to help when I can and stay in prayer.” — Maddie Waller ’18

“While at Messiah, I was also able to enhance my leadership skills and learn to get along with people very different from myself.” — Gina Gilliam ’83 Gina Gilliam ’83, pictured with National Park Trust mascot Buddy Bison, works at the Independence National Historical Park.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GINA GILLIAM ’83

campaigns, designed and built apps and have had our work sent around the globe,” said Jancewicz, whose artwork has been sold to companies in France, Sweden and the U.K. The majority of the company’s income comes from large consulting companies or real estate businesses that don’t have their own graphic design departments. The rest of the client base comes from small shops, independent artists, musicians and entrepreneurs. Outside the agency, Jancewicz works on his own art, which has been shown at more than 140 venues and 17 galleries, all in a span of little more than two years. His personal art is interrelated with Zerflin’s, with an emphasis on typography. “I’m hoping we can continue to grow the company to the point where we can sustain more people financially and do more pro bono projects,” he said about the agency’s future. “Doing work for free has always brought me great joy, and I’d love to have the company to the point where I’d be able to design for those in need, still have my bills paid and have the freedom to create more art. It’s a lofty goal, but I think we’ll get there.”

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 29


OUR

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

Carl Erikson Assistant Professor of Engineering Carl A. Erikson, Jr. died May 29, 2016. With degrees in electrical engineering from Rutgers University

and Purdue University, he joined the Messiah College faculty in 1989 and helped develop the four-year Bachelor of Science engineering program. His legacy continues today in the core values of the Collaboratory. For years, he and his wife Jocilyn hosted an annual picnic for engineering majors and faculty. Erikson’s talent for administration was evident in his thorough preparation for the ongoing Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET) evaluations, the national quality standard for engineering programs.

“Carl dug into this preparation in a gifted way and was always successful,” said Robert Clancy, a Messiah professor of engineering and colleague of Erikson’s for 25 years. “These tests enable the program to prosper and grow; allow graduates to leave campus with a confirmed level of excellence; and let incoming freshmen arrive confident in the excellence of the education they will be receiving.” Erikson also was instrumental in creating a culture of engineering as service at Messiah. “He understood that there were many people

in the world loved by God yet so poor they could never afford to hire an engineer to bring them clean water, energy, transportation and communication technologies and more,” said David Vader, professor of engineering. As Messiah organized student project teams to serve Christian mission and community development ministries, that important work eventually became the Collaboratory. In the early 2000s, Erikson founded the Collaboratory’s water ministry to aid a community in Guatemala. Later, he worked with Elizabethtown Crystal

Pure Water, to launch the Village Water Ozonation System (VWOS) project team. VWOS continues to help communities today. “Today, there are hundreds of engineering alumni and dozens of Collaboratory project teams who think differently about our profession because Carl Erikson had the courage to let Christ lead him and become Professor Erikson,” said Vader. Erikson taught at Messiah until his retirement in 2013. Memorial contributions in his honor may be made to the Collaboratory.

Earn your

Are you looking for a rewarding career in a rapidly growing health care field? Messiah College offers a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) program to prepare you to be a competent, in-demand occupational therapist and a leader in your field.

Visit an open house on Oct. 1 or Nov. 2.

• 80-credit, full-time program that can be completed in 25 months; cohort-learning model • Curricular focus on community service and leadership development

Experience the academic distinction of a nationally ranked Christian college. 30 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

see anew

717.796.5061 messiah.edu/MOT


W E LLN E S S C A M PAI G N

Fitness center construction starts WELLNESS CAMPAIGN NEARS ITS GOAL Working toward a successful completion of Messiah’s Campaign for Wellness, co-chairs Trustee Rick Jordan ’72 and D. Kelly Phipps are ensuring that the College reaches its fundraising goal. The project broke ground this spring, and the proposed order of the construction of the indoor facilities is as follows: • Fitness center addition • Expansion of Brubaker gymnasium providing two basketball courts and office space • Renovation of Hitchcock Arena into the new home court for volleyball and basketball.

To date, the campaign has raised more than $5.9 million of the $6 million fundraising goal—which is 98%! There is still time to participate in the campaign. These wonderful new facilities will open in the fall of 2017.

14,544 sq. ft. FITNESS CENTER

FURTHER INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: MESSIAH.EDU/CFW.  ATCH OF VIDEO TOUR OF W THE PROGRESS SO FAR AT: MESSIAH.EDU/CONSTRUCTION.

6

1,530 sq. ft.

1

NEW WRESTLING SPACE

NEW GYM (WITH 2 COURTS)

ADDING

12,305 sq. ft.

250

NEW LOCKER ROOMS NEW SEATS IN

NATATORIUM VIEWING AREA

98% TO FUNDRAISING TARGET GOAL

August 2017 EXPECTED COMPLETION

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • SUMMER 2016 | 31


COURTESY OF THE MESSIAH COLLEGE ARCHIVES

OUR

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Move-In Day welcomes all THE CLASS OF 2020 ARRIVES ON CAMPUS

After check-in, students are directed to their dorms to move in. That’s when the Messiah hospitality really kicks into high gear. Upon arrival, each car is engulfed by a group of student and employee volunteers, who welcome the first-years and carry their things—mini fridges, bigscreen televisions and luggage— directly to the designated rooms. “My favorite part of freshman move-in is how everyone is pitching in to help everyone,” said Erika Hufford ’18. “All these upperclassmen are just super excited to see you and help you move in. It’s fun.”

Arriving from overseas? Messiah volunteers will meet you at the airport. “It was really nice to have someone from Messiah show up and pick me up instead of me trying to get to Messiah,” said Vy Ho ’18, who was traveling from Vietnam. As evening arrives, the new first-years and their families assemble into Hitchcock for the Candlelight Ceremony, a Messiah tradition. During worship, the candles are lit and the room joins in a chorus of praise. This ceremony will be bookended four years later during a final candlelight gathering at Baccalaureate. —Maddie Waller ’18

The mindset of the Class of

2020

COREY LAQUAY ’18

The Messiah College Class of 2020 arrived on campus for Move-In Day Aug. 25, with boxes of belongings and hopeful parents.

The tradition of Move-in Day is common thread for all first-year students, whether they began their Messiah journey decades ago (top) or just last month (above).

THE INCOMING FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS WERE BORN PRIMARILY IN 1998. WHAT WAS GOING ON THAT YEAR?

IN THE NEWS IN 1998:

HIGHEST-GROSSING MOVIE

“Saving Private Ryan” THE COST OF A GALLON OF MILK

$2.86

THE COST OF A GALLON OF GAS

$1.03

WORLD SERIES WINNERS

New York Yankees

SUPER BOWL CHAMPS

DENVER BRONCOS

32 | SUMMER 2016 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

THE FIRST PORTABLE MP3 PLAYERS WERE AVAILABLE IN STORES.

“Seinfeld”

POPULAR “Friends” TV SHOWS

“Veronica’s Closet”

TOP POP ARTISTS The Backstreet Boys, Celine Dion, Madonna, Usher, Shania Twain

 OOGLE WAS G FOUNDED ON SEPT. 4, 1998, Larry Page and Sergey Brin filed for incorporation of a privately held company named Google.

T HE XVIII WINTER OLYMPICS WERE HELD IN NAGANO, JAPAN.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

2016 Homecoming Please join us for Homecoming Weekend. Below are just a few of the many events we have planned. Visit messiah.edu/homecoming for a complete schedule and registration. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16

Golden Grad Reception and Luncheon Eisenhower Campus Center, Martin Commons 11 a.m.–2 p.m.

Live Color Run Starry Athletic Fields Complex 10 a.m. Alumni Field Hockey Game Anderson Field 10 a.m.

Golden Grad Social Eisenhower Campus Center, Martin Commons 2:30–3:30 p.m.

Oakes Museum Open House Jordan Science Center, Oakes Museum 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Class of 1966 Reunion Oakes Museum, Watering Hole 3:45–5:30 p.m.

Issachar’s Loft Reunion Celebrating 25 Years The Loft (Great Room) 10:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Academy Class of 1956 Reunion Eisenhower Campus Center, Private Dining Room 3:45–5:30 p.m. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17

Homecoming Check-in/ Registration Eisenhower Campus Center 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Falcon Fun Run, Live Color Run Check-in/Registration Eisenhower Campus Center 8-10:30 a.m. Eyas Coffee & Conversation Eisenhower Campus Center Lobby, 8:30–11:30 a.m. Falcon Fun Run Starry Athletic Fields Complex 9:30 a.m.

Celebrating the Legacy Brunch Boyer Hall, Howe Atrium 10:30 a.m.–12 p.m. 25-Year Reunion (Class of 1991) Martin Commons 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. 30-Year Cluster Reunion (Classes of 1985, 1986, 1987) Hostetter Chapel 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. 40-Year Cluster Reunion (Classes of 1975, 1976, 1977) McBeth Conference Room/Patio 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Powderpuff: Seniors vs. First Years Rec Field #1 11 a.m.

Alumni Baseball Game and Reunion Baseball Field 11 a.m.

15-Year Cluster Reunion (Classes of 2000, 2001, 2002) Hollinger Lounge 2–4 p.m.

Sustainability Tour Departs from Eisenhower Campus Center Lobby 11:30 a.m. (1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.)

20-Year Cluster Reunion (Classes of 1995, 1996, 1997) Hostetter Chapel 2–4 p.m.

Li’l Falcon Zone Larsen Student Union, patio and lawn 12:30–4 p.m.

Department of Theatre and Dance Cabaret Poorman Black Box Theater 3 p.m.

Varsity Field Hockey vs. Arcadia University Anderson Field 1 p.m. Departmental reunions Various locations 1-2 p.m. Powderpuff: Championship Game Rec Fields 1:30 p.m Department of Theatre and Dance Facilities Tour Departs from High Center, lower lobby 2–3 p.m. Department of Visual Arts New Facilities Tour Departs from High Center, lower lobby 2–3 p.m. Young Alumni Reunion (Classes of 2006-2015) Eisenhower Upper Lawn, Tent 2–4 p.m. Children’s Book Reading and Craft Oakes Museum 2–2:30 p.m.

Paint the Covered Bridge Climenhaga Painting Studio (C115) 3–4:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer vs. Albright College Shoemaker Field 3 p.m. 0-Year Reunion (Class of 2016) Lower Starry (The Swinging Bridge) 3:30-5 p.m. Concert Choir & Alumni Concert Parmer Hall (H190) 4-5 p.m. Eyas White-Out March Hostetter Chapel 5 p.m. Men’s Soccer vs. Albright College Shoemaker Field 6 p.m. SAB Homecoming Coffeehouse Eisenhower Campus Center, Brubaker Auditorium 9 p.m.


office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

One College Avenue Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg PA 17055 717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

KEITH WEI LUEN LIM ’18

LAST LOOK

As their senior class gift, the Class of 2016 raised money to light the iconic Swinging Bridge. In her Commencement address, President Kim Phipps said, “Inspire others to focus on the light—to see anew—to consider people through the radiance of Christ’s love.” May we all be inspired by the Class of 2016’s example to light the world around us!

Profile for Messiah College

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine - Summer 2016  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine - Summer 2016  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...