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10 H  OMECOMING

Record numbers attend reunions and events for a weekend of fun

PRESIDENT’S REPORT ISSUE

MESSIAH COLLEGE ALUMNI MAGAZINE FALL 2016

12 F  INANCIAL REPORT

Review Messiah’s assets, charitable gifts, expenses, scholarships and more

Hope and Possibility

12 

Looking ahead as we highlight the 2015-2016 academic year


RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY


INSIDE LOOK

Students and volunteers help paint “The Lemoyne Passage,� a mural designed by Messiah Professor of Art Daniel Finch. Commissioned by the borough of Lemoyne, Pennsylvania, the mural depicts the history of transportation.


FA L L 2 0 1 6 , VO L . 1 0 8 , N O . 2

BRIDGE THE

PRESIDENT’S REPORT ISSUE

MESSIAH COLLEGE A LU M N I M AG A Z I N E

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Office of Marketing and Communications One College Avenue, Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 717.691.6027 | www.messiah.edu PRESIDENT

Kim S. Phipps V I C E P R E S I D E N T F O R A DVA N C E M E N T

Barry Goodling ’79

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF M A R K E T I N G & C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

Carla E. Gross EDITOR

Anna Seip C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Nancy Soulliard

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Carrie Barlup, Cindy Agoncillo ’09 DIRECTOR OF A L U M N I & PA R E N T R E L AT I O N S

Jay McClymont ’92 CONTRIBUTORS

Steve King ’06, Gabrielle Kurtz ’18, My Nguyen ’17, Myriam Pedercini ‘17

The Bridge (ISSN-0279-3938) is published quarterly by the Messiah College Office of Marketing and Communications for alumni and friends of the College, free of charge. Periodicals postage (USPS #342000) paid at Mechanicsburg PA 17055 and additional mailing offices. Please contact us at aseip@messiah.edu or 717691-6027. Items for the alumni news section should be identified by class year and sent to the Messiah College Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, One College Avenue Suite 3023, Mechanicsburg PA 17055. You may email them to alumni@messiah.edu or fax them to 717796-5371. Postmaster: Address corrections should be sent to the Office of Development, One College Avenue, Suite 3013, Mechanicsburg PA 17055.

10

F E AT U R E S

As its name suggests, The Bridge connects alumni, parents and donors with Messiah College. It also serves to build the College’s image with these audiences. It does this by publishing accurate news about the College and about alumni and by offering interesting feature articles that are issue- or College-related for readers’ continued education. Messiah College accepts news submissions from alumni and the broader community but reserves the right to edit or decline to print materials at its discretion. Messiah College is a Christian college of the liberal and applied arts and sciences. The College is committed to an embracing evangelical spirit rooted in the Anabaptist, Pietist and Wesleyan traditions of the Christian Church. Our mission is to educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership, and reconciliation in church and society.

15

At the heart of the President’s Report issue of The Bridge is the financial report.

See what Messiah’s faculty, staff and students have been up to during the 2015-2016 school year.

THE FINANCIALS

Messiah College does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, disability and national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other College-administered programs. © 2015 Messiah College

COVE R: The Bridge is printed on recyclable paper: 50/25 PCW EFC

12 Daniel Finch mural PHOTO: RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

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YEAR IN REVIEW


F R O M T H E E D I TO R IN OCTOBER, I HURRIED TO SIGN UP MY 10-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER FOR SATURDAY ART SCHOOL, FOUR SESSIONS HELD IN CLIMENHAGA THAT ARE TAUGHT BY MESSIAH’S ART STUDENTS.

The email I’d received sounded urgent: “Class size is limited and filled on a first-come basis.” Did I sign up soon enough? Would there be space for my child? Suddenly, these classes seemed very important. We got in with no problem. But it made me think about all the times I make space in the magazine for those who are featured in The Bridge, conveying to them that, yes, their stories are important. It’s like saying, “I saved you a seat.”

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30

D E PAR TM E NT S

ONLINE EXTRAS

4 FROM THE PRESIDENT

MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE

5 ON CAMPUS 5 Faces and Places 6

Heard Around Campus

7

Brain Waves

8

Campus News

9 Athletics

26

OUR ALUMNI

26

Alumni Profiles

28

Class Notes

32

From the Archives

Learn more about the College Honors Program. Watch the Homecoming 2016 video and check out the photo gallery. Watch Bethany Lambeth ’10 teach a cycling math class. Join The Bridge’s Facebook page.

When Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Science Paul Johns contacted me months ago with a story idea about two of his students, the four of us scheduled a meeting. Then we rescheduled. Johns called to make sure there was still time to get the story in this issue. “Yes,” I said, “I held space for you. There’s a page with your name on it.” (You can find that story on p. 7.) One of the students I interviewed for the article is Alyson Fair ’18, an art education major. Just a couple weeks after the interview, I saw her again. She was teaching at the Saturday Art School. I was able to reassure my daughter, “Oh, I interviewed her! She’s wonderful. She has a seat for you right over there.” And, we’ve saved you a seat for this President’s Report issue of The Bridge. By showing a mural in progress by Professor of Art Daniel Finch, we use art to convey past, present and future. We highlight the 2015-2016 academic year and the financial report while also “holding space” for the hope and possibilities to come. We hope you enjoy the “mural of the story” in this issue of The Bridge

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

A future of hope and possibility Around the globe, murals adorn buildings and cityscapes, serving as beacons of creativity, community and hope. One Messiah College professor is creating murals to enrich the greater Harrisburg area’s cultural landscape. Daniel Finch, professor of art—with the support of colleagues, students and community partners—recently created the majestic mural “Lady Commonwealth” for the Susquehanna Art Museum “as an image of beauty, hope and optimism about Harrisburg’s future.” He’s currently working on another ambitious mural commissioned by the borough of Lemoyne to celebrate its historic role as a transportation hub. (See below.) As we implement the College’s new strategic plan, I’m inspired by the words of another muralist, Jane Golden, director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, who told CNBC in a 2014 interview, “When you have success, it’s not a time to become complacent. It’s a time to become hyper-strategic. And people started to clamor for art because in that art ... they saw hope and possibility. ...” At Messiah College, we see hope and possibility as we seek to create a secure and promising future of significance. Together, we cast our shared vision onto a canvas of societal and educational change, confident in the saliency of our mission. The College’s strategic plan for 2016 – 2020, “Embracing Change as Opportunity,” emphasizes the importance of preparing undergraduate and graduate students to be faithful servant-leaders who promote the common good by serving as redemptive voices and change agents. We will continue to work for a common good rooted in a Christ-centered commitment to the dignity and welfare of humankind, expressed as love for neighbor. At Messiah, we educate reconcilers to be change agents

“Together, we cast our shared vision onto a canvas of societal and educational change, confident in the saliency of our mission.” in a time of national discord and division characterized by hyperbolic and poisonous rhetoric. The liberal arts and sciences, combined with our applied programs, nurture intellectual growth in our students along with expanding their capacity for empathy, hospitality and gratitude. Even as we express our love for God and neighbor in a changing culture, we are creating a future of significance by embracing the opportunities presented by a changing student body. Inclusive excellence and diversifying our campus community must be core priorities if our institution is to remain viable and, even more, for our institution to flourish. Inclusive excellence is essential to obtaining a more holistic understanding of our academic disciplines, ourselves and an ever-changing world. Times of great change compel each of us to do our very best work as together we create a future of significance by embracing change as opportunity. Author and columnist David Brooks described this high calling when he addressed a gathering of Christian college presidents last January: “You have what everybody else is desperate to have: a way of talking about and educating the human person in a way that integrates faith, emotion and intellect. From my point of view, you’re ahead of everyone else and have the potential to influence American culture in a way that could be magnificent.” Together, let us commit ourselves to the magnificent work of educating our students. Then this season of change will truly be a time of hope and possibility as we work together to make God visible to the world through the creation of a future of significance for Messiah College.

K I M S . PH I PPS, PRESIDENT

Passages have been adapted from President Kim Phipps’ 2016 State of the College Address delivered at Community Day August 24, 2016. ABOVE: RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY, BELOW: RENDERING COURTESY OF DANIEL FINCH

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OUR

FAC E S A N D P L AC E S

GOING THE DISTANCE

Defined simply, biochemistry is a branch of science that studies life—taking it apart and seeing how it works at a molecular level. Study the life of Emily Reale ’17, and you’ll find a student who excels at scholarship and athletics. In the lab, this biochemistry major researches the design of a new protein as a catalyst for storing and using renewable energy. In the pool, she competes in the 1650— swimming 66 lengths of the pool, almost one mile. The opportunity to combine swimming with science was the deciding factor in Reale choosing to attend Messiah College. “I asked team members on my recruiting trips what they were studying and how the coach worked with their class schedules if there was a conflict,” said Reale. “When I visited here, 25% of the swim team was in some sort of science degree with a significant amount of lab time.” The coaches and professors at Messiah assured Reale she could do both. IN THE LAB When Assistant Professor Jesse Kleingardner was hired at Messiah’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry last year, Reale emailed him to see if she could work as a student researcher. She has been helping in the lab ever since. “Even though she excels at

MATTHEW TENNISON

BIOCHEM MAJOR EXCELS IN POOL, LABORATORY

MAC Swimmer of the Year Emily Reale ’17 is a biochemistry major researching how to design a new fuel source. what she does, I’ve never noticed the least bit of arrogance,” said Kleingardner. “The labs run a lot smoother with nice people in them. She’s like the glue. She brings people together.” For her research, Reale created a 3-D computer model of a protein to engineer. She then developed a plan to mutate, grow and purify the protein. “Our department found an instrument—fast protein liquid chromatography—that had never been used that would help me tremendously in purifying my protein,” said Reale. “Part of my job during the summer research was to get this instrument up and running. We were successful in that, and it has aided in this step of the project.” IN THE POOL As she gears up for her senior season, Reale already has made history. Last year, she was named the Middle Atlantic Conference (MAC) 2015-2016 Swimmer of the Year, a Messiah first. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Reale hits the pool for

6 a.m. practice. Afternoon practices are four times a week. “She’s a hard worker,” said Nancy Luley, head coach of swimming. “I’ve found swimmers are very good students. The discipline it takes to be a swimmer transfers over to their studies.” Although she grew up swimming shorter distances, Reale trusted Luley. “She wanted me to swim the mile at MACs,” said Reale. “It’s scary stepping up on the blocks knowing you are about to race a 17-minute event, but I love it. It gives me a chance to overcome my own mental game and the limitations my body thinks it has, because you have to push past all of it.” But, it’s hard to push past a growling stomach. Reale recalls a busy semester of classes, labs and practices her sophomore year that left no time for lunch. “Coach would make me a sandwich to take with me,” she said. Every day, Luley packs two lunches. “One kid each semester has a day when she doesn’t get a break,” said Luley. “Whatever I make myself, I make an extra and set it on my desk.” What’s next? A cross-cultural trip to an African hospital helped Reale realize a passion

for clinical care. “I plan on gaining clinical hours during a gap year [after graduation] that are necessary for applying to a medical program,” she said. An ambitious, long-range goal? It’s just the sort of challenge she’s used to. —Anna Seip HIGHLIGHT REALE 2015-16 season, junior • MAC Swimmer of the Year • MAC Champion 500 freestyle, 1650 freestyle, 400 individual medley, 200 freestyle relay, 400 freestyle relay, 400 medley relay, 800 freestyle relay 2014-15 season, sophomore • MAC Champion in 200 freestyle relay, 400 freestyle relay, 800 freestyle relay, 1650 freestyle • First Team All-MAC in 500 freestyle and 100 breaststroke 2013-14 season, freshman • MAC Champion in 1650 freestyle, 400 freestyle relay • First Team All-MAC in the 800 freestyle relay, 400 medley relay, 200 individual medley, 100 breaststroke

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OUR

HEARD AROUND CAMPUS

WHO HAS INSPIRED YOU AS A MENTOR? “My mentor is my field hockey coach, Coach Brooke Good. She always inspires us on and off the field to work hard and give 100 percent in all we do.” — Taylor Holt ’18

“When I was in Youth With A Mission, my team leaders Judy and Reto Gubler took me in with open arms and made it really easy for me to talk to them. They completely changed my life.” — Thomas Wood ’20

“My mentor is Pam Bader, someone who took me in when I was in high school. I still keep in touch with her

“I meet bi-weekly with Ron Hodge, a retired executive from General Electric. As we meet, we focus on two areas: the spiritual aspect—ways I’m growing, developing and the challenges—and then the professional aspect of how I’m doing here at Messiah. We meet at Brothers diner every other Thursday morning for about an hour and a half. It has been a little over a year now that we have been doing it.” — Andrew Babyak, assistant professor of management

“My mom has been my lifelong mentor. She encourages me in my ministry, motivates me in my academics and gives great advice on everything from relationships to recipes.” — Madison Mack ’18

and ask for parenting advice.” — Paula Hoffman, residence director, Witmer Hall

“My father. His constant wisdom spoken into my life and challenging words have made me who I am.” — Luke Gibson ’17

“My high school art teacher was a very good mentor to me. He encouraged me to pursue what I enjoyed— specifically photography. He taught me skills that I needed in order to grow in my creativity and to become a better artist. Besides that, he was also a mentor I could talk to when I struggled with things in life or school. Even as I’m in college now, he’s continued to support me and give me valuable advice.” — Jemi Lui ’20 6 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

“Jon Zander, my boss at Saranac Village—a Young Life camp—has been a huge mentor in my life. He taught me everything from technical skills to how to be a better man. He has poured into me and continued to push me in my faith.”

“My youth pastor’s wife Loren was very intentional with the time she spent. She really got to know me on a deeper level. She actually cared about what was going on and asked me the questions I needed to hear.” — Amy Karatka ’17

— Preston Griffin ’18

“I had a middle school music teacher, Ms. Young, who taught me how to play a violin. Unfortunately, she passed away from brain cancer, but I dedicate a lot of things in my life to her.” — Johannah Newman ’19


B R A I N WAV E S

Compassion’s route: a neurobiological trip INTERPERSONAL CONNECTIONS MIRROR CONNECTIONS GOING ON IN OUR BRAINS

MOVING BEYOND FEAR

Over the summer, students Dani Shover ’19 and Alyson Fair ’18 took this social sciences course and left with tools to practice— and to choose—compassion. Not that it was easy. “I had to look at the idea of self-protection and compassion in my own life,” said Shover, an HDFS major, “recognizing that something from my past could make this self-protective reaction come about. When you understand the brain science behind it, you can say, ‘Ok, I can choose this time to take the compassionate route instead.’” The compassionate route involves moving past fear. “Fear is a common response, triggered by what our amygdalae are telling us about our environments. And none of us wants to feel fear,” said Johns. “Empathy

is sharing the feelings of others. Compassion is taking that and wanting to alleviate their pain.” HEALTHY CONNECTIONS

What’s at the heart of compassion? Connections. The “social synapses” of our interpersonal relationships mirror the synapses of the neurons in our brains. “The extent that neurons are connected or disconnected can reflect health, just like the extent of connection or disconnection between human beings can reflect the health of the relationship,” explained Johns. That makes one’s relationship with God the ultimate connection. “We’re created so that God in Christ provides the deep sense of security in his love necessary to change us at a level that precedes thought,” explained Johns. “If we rest in our relationship with Christ, it goes right to the center of our brain, down to the limbic system and changes us from the inside out, so that we don’t need to be controlled by that protective instinct anymore.” DEALING WITH PEOPLE

How do you practice compassion with someone who is particularly difficult? For Shover, finding peace and security in her relationship with Christ is key. “When you’re free and amidst God’s love, in that moment,” she said, “you want freedom for that person so much that is masks the irritation you usually get from them.” An art education major, Fair echoes the sentiment. “Your knee-jerk reaction that

ISTOCK

As humans, our instinct is to protect ourselves from anything that feels threatening. But, what Johns if we could override that instinct by practicing compassion—a compassion brought about by resting in our relationship with Christ? Paul Johns, assistant professor of human development and family science (HDFS) at Messiah, is teaching his students to do just that in a class called “Relationships and the Brain.”

you should develop is, ‘God loves them.’ That sounds like such a simple answer, but it’s not,” said Fair. “It’s one of the hardest answers to develop as mature Christians. That person is as intricate of a being as I am. You have no idea what a person has gone through, but in that moment you can say, ‘You know what— God loves them’—even when they’re unlovable, because we’re all unlovable when it comes down to it.” BE SMART

Johns cautions that compassion should not be confused with foolishness. It’s one thing to make a reflective, wise choice to move

toward or away from someone, but it’s quite another to make the decision based solely on fear. “In the first scenario, you’re free,” said Johns. “In the second scenario, you’re not free. You’re just reacting. Part of this is counter-intuitive when it comes to compassion. When you try to achieve this level of freedom in Christ based on the security of his love, you actually become more reflective and more intentional, even if it involves moving away when you need to.” — Anna Seip

“YOUR KNEE-JERK REACTION THAT YOU SHOULD DEVELOP IS, ‘GOD LOVES THEM.’ THAT SOUNDS LIKE SUCH A SIMPLE ANSWER, BUT IT’S NOT, IT’S ONE OF THE HARDEST ANSWERS TO DEVELOP AS MATURE CHRISTIANS.” — Alyson Fair ’18

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CAMPUS OUR

CAMPUS NEWS

THE GARDEN: 10 YEARS LATER

During its 10 years of growth, the Grantham Community Garden has expanded to include the lower garden plot on Grantham Road with chickens and an apiary. 8 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

“THE GARDEN ALWAYS HAS BEEN AND CONTINUES TO BE THE GENERATIVE PRODUCT OF COUNTLESS STUDENTS AND THEIR TIRELESS EFFORTS AND IMAGINATIONS.” — Francis Eanes ’09, co-founder of the Grantham Community Garden

ANDREA FAUS ’16

Hoover, director of sustainability. “Students who have worked in the garden have gone on to pursue further education in food systems, started their own farms or are using food as a community development tool.” Olivia Mingora ’17, psychology major and student manager of the garden, said that the garden has taught her a lot of about hard work, determination and Jesus. “There is a quote by George Bernard Shaw we have on the back of the garden T-shirts, and it goes like this, ‘The best place to find God is in the garden. You can dig for Him there,’” said Mingora. “This has been immensely true in my life and, I know, in many others’. This is one of the most important aspects of the garden as it gives people another avenue to experience Jesus.” For the garden’s founders, it has been a dream come true. “There are many things that make me proud to see the garden mark its 10-year anniversary: watching new students catch the same spirit that inspired us all those years ago; seeing the garden grow and expand to new locations; and observing the garden’s integration into classes, coursework and individual research projects,” said Eanes. “It’s knowing that the garden continues to galvanize so many new personal connections and budding friendships, and showing the garden in its present form to my friends and family after all these years.” — My Nguyen ’17

CINDY AGONCILLO ’09

Ten years ago, Grantham Community Garden co-founders and English majors Francis Eanes ’09 and Dan Webster ’09, along with a group of fellow students, had an idea to start a campus garden. That organic idea took root and has turned into a teaching example of real-life concepts of sustainable agriculture at Messiah College. Thanks to a small triangle of land next to the greenhouse and the hard work of passionate students and other helpers, the garden prospered and became an essential part of holistic Christian stewardship. More than just an agricultural concept, the garden has become a means to educate students, faculty and the broader community about the environmental, social, nutritional and spiritual benefits of sustainable farming. “The garden always has been and continues to be the generative product of countless students and their tireless efforts and imaginations,” said Eanes. “Along with key faculty and staff who have steadfastly supported it over the years, the garden has survived and evolved directly because it is the result of ongoing collaboration and student initiative.” Throughout the years, the garden has benefited the campus in significant ways. “The garden has served as space for classrooms, a central part of service days and, because of its location, has been one of the most consistent landmarks on the south side of campus,” said Brandon

LEFT: DEVIN THOMAS-MANZULLO ’09, RIGHT: DANIEL CUSTER ‘09

SMALL PLOT OF LAND CONNECTS WHOLE CAMPUS


AT H L E T I C S

Professor wins mentor award RAEANN HAMON RECOGNIZED FOR WORK Berardo committee, wrote in the letter announcing the award that Hamon is “an inspiring and visionary leader, mentor and teacher who is fully committed to advancing students’ careers and maximizing their potentials... .” A former student echoes that sentiment. “It has been her ambition and genuine interest in constantly improving the experience of undergraduate education in family science,” said Mike Sturm ’99. “She embodies mentorship in that she is always one to challenge students while simultaneously providing opportunities for growth.”

MESSIAH COLLEGE ATHLETICS

Raeann Hamon, professor of family science and gerontology, received the Felix Berardo Scholarship Award from the National Council on Family Relations for excellence in mentoring junior colleagues and students. “I am sincerely gratified to know that my students appreciate my dedication and care for them,” said Hamon. “Receiving this award is definitely a highlight in my 30-plus years as a family science faculty member at Messiah College.” Lyndal Khaw, chair of the

— Myriam Pedercini ’17

Pitcher Courtney Allen ’16 and the rest of the softball team contributed 90 points to Messiah’s strong standing in the Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup.

CALEB BORNMAN ’18

MESSIAH LEADS STATE WITH STRONG LEARFIELD FINISH

Theatre major Zachary Smith ’19 and musical theatre major Hannah Arnold ’18 performed ‘Eurydice’ at Poorman Blackbox Theater Oct. 6-8, 2016.

The Messiah Falcons confirmed their status as the leading NCAA Division III athletics destination in Pennsylvania for the 16th-straight year. The ranking came via the Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup, a joint effort between the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) and USA Today, with points awarded based on each institution’s finish in up to 18 sports—nine women’s and nine men’s. The Falcons finished with 500.50 points, good for No. 29 overall among the 300-plus institutions that qualified for the list. Along with being the top-rated institution in the state, the

ranking placed Messiah in the top 35 for the 16th-straight year. Messiah wrestling and softball earned 90 points for finishing as the national runner-up in both sports, while women’s soccer and field hockey also contributed 83 and 70, respectively, thanks to NCAA tournament play. Women’s lacrosse; men’s and women’s tennis; and men’s indoor and outdoor track and field also scored points in the ranking. The Falcons’ point total also marked the fifth time in program history to reach 500+ points. —Steve King ’06, associate athletics director for communications and compliance

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CAMPUS OUR

HOMECOMING 2016

HOMECOMING BY THE NUMBERS

More than

2,400 attended Homecoming

1,056

meals redeemed in Lottie (and 700 snacks!)

130 65

Live Color Run and Falcon Fun Run participants

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Homecoming weekend events

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Clockwise from top left: The Singing Men, a group of alumni and non-alumni, kick off the weekend. Students and alums participate in the Live Color Run. Groups get ready for the Whiteout March to the men’s soccer game. Senior Eyas members lead the student body to Shoemaker Field. A future Falcon enjoys the day. Alums catch up at the Legacy Brunch.

LOOKING FOR MORE HOMECOMING NEWS? VISIT OUR VIDEO AND PHOTO GALLERY AT MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 1 1


F E AT U R E S T O R Y

President’s Report CONTENTS 14 Scholarships, Financial Aid

15 Timeline

16 Revenues, Expenditures, Donor Profiles

18 Net Assets

20 Lifetime Societies

22 New Heritage Society, Board of Trustees

24 Charitable Gift Allocation

RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

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A President’s Report foreword from Trustee Ken Moreland

HOPE possibilities INVESTING IN

and

fulfilled by Messiah College

In our world today, the dividing line between the “haves” and the “have nots” has never been greater. Honest, hard-working people are having a very hard time affording even the basics, like quality housing and health care for their families. On top of these pressures, educating themselves and/or their children can often require personal sacrifices, debt and significant emotional and financial pressures. Many struggle with embracing the hope and possibility of being able to afford a Christ-centered education from Messiah College. continued

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FINANCIALS

But God’s promises and the provision of manna for the Israelites, as depicted in Exodus, gives us a model as to how the Lord can have us provide hope and possibilities in the lives of others. Webster’s dictionary defines manna as “something needed that is received unexpectedly.” In speaking of God’s provision, Exodus 16: 17-18 (NLT) states: “So the people of Israel did as they were told. Some gathered a lot, some only a little. But when they measured it out, everyone had just enough. Those who gathered a lot had nothing left over, and those who gathered only a little had enough. Each family had just what it needed.” The trustees, and senior leaders, educators and staff at Messiah College are committed to the faithful stewardship and balancing required to delivering the highest quality Christian education experience at affordable cost. But the facts are that operating and facilities costs have been rising at a pace that exceeds the pace of growth of available resources from most of our students and their families. Thus, the only way that Messiah can maintain this precious balance is to seek and rely on the generosity of those whom the Lord has blessed financially to provide for those who have needs. There are many ways that we can give hope and fulfill the possibilities of the current and future generations of students desiring a Christ-centered education at Messiah College. The most direct way is to share our financial blessings through our financial giving, either to the Messiah College Annual Fund to be used for general operating needs, gifts to a specific Messiah College facility project, or through establishing a new or contributing to an existing endowed scholarship that will deliver direct financial support to deserving Messiah College students. Thank you, and may God truly bless you for your faithfulness and obedience to the calling to prayerfully and financially support Messiah College as we educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership and reconciliation in church and society. Ken Moreland – Trustee, Chair of Finance Committee

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV)

SCHOLARSHIPS THE FOLLOWING SCHOLARSHIPS, ESTABLISHED DURING THE 2016-17 ACADEMIC YEAR, ARE AN INVESTMENT IN THE LIVES OF STUDENTS THAT WILL YIELD FRUITFUL AND LASTING RETURNS. •D  r. Andrew T. and Lauren J. Babyak Endowed Scholarship •B  arnabas Endowed Scholarship Fund •B  igelow Family Endowed Scholarship •G  ary & Sylvia B. ’95 Emberger Research Endowed Scholarship •C  harles ’23 and Mary (Lenhert) ’28 Eshelman Scholarship •L  ester N. Fortney ’78 Family Endowed Scholarship Fund •F  rom His Bounty Art Endowed Scholarship •H  arry and Norma Hamsher Internship Endowment •H  arry and Norma Hamsher Career & Prof. Development Center Endowment

• Richard B. & Judith M. Hiler Music Education Scholarship • HOPE International Scholarship Fund • D. Ray Hostetter ’48 Memorial Leadership Grant • Leidy Family Oak Foundation Scholarship • Joshua S. ’02 and Heather L. (Clark) ’04 Manifold Endowed Scholarship • Tom and Linda Pheasant Endowed Scholarship • Briar K. Logee Stahl ’02 Scholarship Endowment in Business • Stuckey Family Endowed Scholarship • YongSoo Scholarship Endowment Fund

$35

G R OW T H O F F I N A N C I A L- A I D G R A N T S AT M E S S I A H

$30 $25 $20 $15 $10 $5

2002

2005

2008

2011

2014 2016

$0 AAP

MG

O O FR : INF

RCE

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in thousands

continued

SOU

P&L


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

2015-2016

YEAR IN REVIEW Take a look at what happened at Messiah College last year.

AUGUST 2015

MESSIAH LAUNCHES THE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING INITIATIVE (ELI), integrating internships, service learning, off-campus programs, leadership and undergraduate research into the curriculum for all undergraduate students in preparation for career, service and graduate studies. THE COLLEGE’S FIRST DOCTORAL PROGRAM—a post-BSN Doctor of Nursing Practice degree with a family nurse practitioner track is approved and marketed.

THE OFFICE OF COLLEGE MINISTRIES introduces a new chapel program model with a variety of teaching, worship, educational and small group experiences.

OCTOBER 2015 NEW YORK TIMES JOURNALIST NICHOLAS KRISTOF AND WASHINGTON POST EDITOR BOB WOODWARD deliver keynote lectures in Parmer Hall as part of the High Center season.

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 1 5


FINANCIALS

2 0 1 6 2 0 1 5 2 0 1 4

REVENUES (IN 000S)

DONOR PROFILE

Student tuition and fees Less, financial aid Net tuition and fees Governmental grants and appropriations Gifts and grants Capital gifts Endowment return designated for operations Investment income Other sources Auxiliary enterprises Total operating revenues

93,411 (37,894) 55,517 1,118 3,724 1,508 7,148 637 3,946 21,065 94,663

90,254 (36,039) 54,215 982 2,848 2,179 7,075 643 3,516 21,656 93,114

88,024 (34,186) 53,838 862 3,094 2,622 6,803 997 3,692 20,693 92,601

35,016 9,512 17,718 2,617 15,230 14,148 94,241 422

32,402 9,438 16,944 2,273 16,696 14,191 91,944 1,170

32,994 9,013 16,181 2,396 17,023 13,530 91,137 1,464

EXPENSES (IN 000S)

Instructional Academic support Student services Public service Auxiliary enterprises General institutional support Total operating expenses Net operating income

N O N O P E R AT I N G R E V E N U E S , E X P E N S E S A N D OT H E R C H A N G E S ( I N 0 0 0 S )

Endowment and life income gifts 2,078 Endowment investment returns, net of amount designated for operations (8,265) Change in value of beneficial interest in perpetual trusts (292) Other non-operating income - Investment return on trusts and gift annuities (70) Change in value of split interest agreements (Trusts and CGA’s) (79) Total nonoperating revenues, expenses and other changes (6,628) Total changes in net assets Net assets, beginning of year Net assets, end of year

(6,206) 244,291 238,085

1,501

3,210

(7,824) (174) - 17 (364) (6,844)

9,969 578 (38) 1,673 (1,567) 13,825

(5,674) 249,965 244,291

15,289 234,676 249,965

ANN B. BARSHINGER GENEROSITY OF SPIRIT Ann B. Barshinger is a highly respected and beloved philanthropist throughout the south central Pennsylvania region. She and her husband Richard lived very generous lives in their joint giving efforts. She has faithfully carried on that legacy in a variety of ways since her husband’s passing, and she has had a tremendously positive impact on our community. Barshinger funded the Barshinger Scholars Program at Messiah College where students receive scholarship support for all four years of their education. This wonderful program ensures that those students with the greatest academic promise but with limited or no financial resources can still obtain a high-quality education at Messiah College. Barshinger is a remarkable testament to the profound influence that kindness and generosity can have on the lives of neighbors and on the local and regional community. She is directly helping to support the future of countless talented young leaders.

Expenses

2015-2016 fiscal year

3%

Public service

Revenues

2015-2016 fiscal year

15% 19% Supporting Student services, services institutional support 10% 16% Academic Auxiliary support enterprises

8% Endowment return

designated for operations

59%

Net tuition and fees

1 6 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

22%

Auxiliary enterprises

37%

Instructional

4% Other sources 3% Operational gifts and grants 2% Capital gifts 1% Government grants and appropriations 1% Investment income


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

MORE THAN 1,800 ATTENDED HOMECOMING 2015, featuring a dedication ceremony for the new lacrosse field and lights.

NOVEMBER 2015 VOLLEYBALL HEAD COACH JUDI TOBIAS wraps up her 20-year career by leading the team to its best season in program history and garnering the conference’s Coach of the Year honor for the third time in five seasons.

DECEMBER 2015

MESSIAH WOMEN’S SOCCER completes an incredible season with a run to the NCAA DIII Final Four. They finish with a MAC Commonwealth title and an unbeaten record of 22-0-3 for the second-straight season.

JANUARY 2016

MESSIAH STRUCTURES ITS GRADUATE PROGRAMS into a new School of Graduate Studies and appoints Rob Pepper ’92 as assistant provost/dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF honor the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by participating in the greater Harrisburg MLK Day of Service.

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 1 7


FINANCIALS

2 0 1 6 2 0 1 5 2 0 1 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE NET ASSETS

S U M M A R Y S TAT E M E N T O F E N D OW M E N T F U N D S ( I N 0 0 0 S )

Donor endowment Board-designated endowment Total endowed funds Endowment percent change

34,422 91,627 126,049 -3.87%

33,266 33,242 97,858 103,523 131,124 136,765 -4.12% 10.72%

$ millions 250

ASSETS (IN 000S)

Cash and cash equivalents Notes and accounts receivable, net Promises to give, net Interest receivable Inventories Prepaid expenses and other assets Investments, gift annuities and trusts Loans receivable - students Deposits with trustee under debt agreements Beneficial interest in perpetual trusts Property and equipment, net Total assets

10,464 13,210 14,809 1,761 1,687 1,602 4,219 4,736 5,080 190 163 156 546 591 804 1,548 1,360 767 144,056 146,684 154,435 2,854 2,787 2,855 14,526 595 3,901 3,704 3,995 4,169 145,320 134,981 131,272 329,188 310,789 319,850

200

150

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS (IN 000S)

Liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Student deposits Funds held in custody for others Deferred revenue Annuities payable Funds held in trust for others Long-term debt U.S. government grants refundable Other liabilities Total liabilities Net assets: Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets Total change in net assets

8,963 1,595 51 1,243 6,272 819 66,916 2,435 2,809 91,103

6,260 1,613 146 1,109 7,341 1,499 43,372 2,410 2,748 66,498

5,517 1,682 123 1,130 7,788 1,819 46,839 2,383 2,604 69,885

189,870 196,812 203,213 13,878 14,896 15,219 34,337 32,583 31,533 238,085 244,291 249,965 329,188 310,789 319,850 (6,206) (5,674) 15,289

Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted

100

50

0

2008

2010

“One person gives freely, yet gains even more; another withholds unduly, but comes to poverty. A generous person will prosper; whoever refreshes others will be refreshed.” Proverbs 11:24-25 (NIV) 1 8 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

2012

2014

2016


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

FEBRUARY 2016 BRIAN SWARTZ, CHAIR OF MESSIAH’S ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, receives the 2016 Young Engineer of the Year Award from the Central Pennsylvania Engineers Council. RENOVATIONS BEGIN ON THE NEW WINDING HILL SITE with custom-designed classroom, lab and office space to house graduate programs in counseling, the dietetic internship, and future programs in occupational and physical therapy. MARK SAMELS, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER OF PBS’ “AMERICAN EXPERIENCE,” delivers the keynote address, “A True Story,” for the Spring Humanities Symposium. ROBIN COLLINS, CHAIR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY, receives a three-year, $217,000 grant from the John Templeton Foundation for his project, “The Fine-tuning for Scientific Discovery.”

MARCH 2016

WRESTLING COMPLETES THE MOST SUCCESSFUL SEASON IN PROGRAM HISTORY with a national runner-up team performance at the NCAA Division III National Championships with Lucas Malmberg ’16 and Ben Swarr ’18 named individual national champions. Head Coach Bryan Brunk is named NWCA National Coach of the Year for the second time in three seasons. Assistant Coach Craig Hogan ’13 is named NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year. M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 1 9


FINANCIALS

6.3%

Organizations

SU PPORTERS OF MESSIAH COLLEGE

29.5%

Community friends

20.6%

Trustees

14.7%

Alumni

13.1%

1.7%

10.3%

Sponsorships and government grants

Current and former Foundations parents

0.2%

Churches

3.6%

Corporations

LIFETIME SOCIETIES M E S S I A H L E G AC Y

Lifetime cumulative giving totaling $10,000,000 or more Leonard Fry† Calvin G. & Janet C. High* Abram† & Gladys† Mellinger MESSIAH TRUST

Lifetime cumulative giving of $1,000,000 to $9,999,999 Vernon E. & Faye R. Anderson Ernest L.† ’48 & Kathryn G. (Tyson) ’46 Boyer Brethren in Christ - Cooperative Ministries Covenant Fund Conestoga Wood Specialties Norman & Elizabeth M. Hahn* Harold H.† ’37 & Mary Elizabeth (Hoover)† ’40 Engle Charles F. † & Ann E.† Frey* Emerson C.† ’57 & May† Frey* Larry E. & Lois A. Gladfelter* Harry R. Hitchcock† William M.† & Lucille M.† Hollinger David G.† & Beatriz A.† Howe 2 0 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

Richard† & Louise K.† Jordan* Josiah W. & Bessie H. Kline Foundation The Kresge Foundation Ralph S.† & Dorothy Larsen* Lilly Endowment Inc. Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe James A. & Donna F. Martin* McCormick Family Foundation W. Edwin† & Miriam† Naugle George A. & Barbara J. Parmer* D. S.† & Helen† Poorman Maurice E.† & Dorothea I.† Shaffer John E.† & Ida† Sollenberger The Stabler Foundation Donald B.† & Dorothy† Stabler LeRoy M. ’55† & Eunice (Frey) ’58 Steinbrecher* The Whitaker Foundation John L.† & C. Jeanette† Witmer World Vision Inc. Anonymous Donors (4) THE PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE

Lifetime cumulative giving of $250,000 to $999,999 Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Pennsylvania M. Louise Aughinbaugh Quentin Berg Trust

Francis H. Berg† John A. Blessing Foundation Marion Barker Burr† David E.† ’61 & Jean Byer Charlie B. ’56 & Miriam (Nissly) ’56 Byers Asa W.† ’16 & Anna E. (Kipe)† ’16 Climenhaga J. Harold Engle ’58* Melvin E.† ’48 & Vivian Eyster* Richard F. Fake† ’37 C.J.† & Harriet† Fredricksen S. Johannah Gearhart† General Electric Foundation HARSCO Corporation Scott A. ’89 & Gaye Y. Heintzelman* The High Foundation Evert C.† & Mildred S.† Hokanson Charles B. & Sally Hoober George C.† & Patricia† Hoopy Lowell D. † ’40 & Dorcas (Alderfer) † ’39 Hoover Clyde W. & Barbara A. Horst* D. Ray † ’48 & Audrey (Fisher) ’50 Hostetter* Clarence W. Hottel Sr.† Lawrence L. & Julia Z. Hoverter Charitable Foundation Randall B. ’66 & Judy G. Inskip Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Richard E. ’70 & Sharon N. Jordan W. M. Keck Foundation W. Wayde† & Glenda Kelly


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

CONSTRUCTION BEGINS ON A NEW FITNESS CENTER that will house weight lifting, cardio training and group fitness space, along with renovations to Sollenberger Sports Center to include a new competition gymnasium and improved natatorium. THE COLLEGE UNVEILS MARTIN COMMONS, a much-needed addition to Lottie Nelson Dining Hall. MESSIAH EDUCATORS PUBLISH A VARIETY OF BOOKS in areas of their research and expertise, including works by Crystal Downing, Emerson Powery, Keith Quesenberry, David Weaver-Zercher and Cynthia Wells.

APRIL 2016

MESSIAH LAUDS D. RAY HOSTETTER, the College’s longestserving president, with a campus memorial. The Student Government Association (SGA) announces the Hostetter Memorial Leadership Grant in his honor.

DAVID VADER, PROFESSOR OF ENGINEERING, receives the 2016 Alumni Appreciation Award, recognizing his numerous academic and service contributions to Messiah. MESSIAH’S OPERA WORKSHOP, DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE AND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA present a fully mounted production of Aaron Copeland’s “The Tender Land.” M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 2 1


FINANCIALS

Allen F. Knouse ’68 Leon E.† & Margaret M.† Kocher Jeffrey F. ’74 & Leslie (Lustig) ’75 Lehman Wayne A. & Martha G. Marcho* Aaron J. ’48 & Jean Martin Stephen W. ’78 & Jana M. (Shultz) ’77 McBeth Jacob & Ada Miller Trust Kenneth V. & Renee A. Moreland* William L.† & Geraldine† Murray Paul W. Nisly* Galen M. ‘48 & Beulah L.† (Buckwalter) ‘49 Oakes* P.B.S. Coal, Inc. Jeannie Pascale Pew Memorial Charitable Trusts

Harry W.† & Nancy R. Preis Marlin & Nancy† Riegsecker Maynard & Carolyn Sauder Sawyer Products Oscar F.† & Pauline M.† Shafer Jerry Tyson† & Hilary M. Simpson L.B. Smith Estate Foundation Inc. Robert H.† ‘42 & Marilyn L. (Byer) ‘51 Smith John B.† & Mary V.† Sollenberger Ellis R. † & Louise P.† Speakman The John Frederick Steinman Foundation Stover Family Foundation John Templeton Foundation Marlin H. & Doris Ann Thomas* Kermit Thomas†

Turkey Hill Dairy Daniel Vollmer† Franklin H. & Ruth L. Wells Foundation Amelia C. Winter† Leslie K. & Marian H. Witmer* Kenneth E.† & Minta Wolfe Anonymous Donors (4) *M  essiah College thanks the parents of our current and former students who continue to generously support the College’s ongoing education mission. † Messiah College gratefully acknowledges the generosity of donors who are deceased.

N E W H E R I TAG E S O C I E T Y M E M B E R S

Andrew T. & Lauren J. Babyak Ivan E. Beachy ’60 & Martha (Kuhns) 57’ Eshelman Lynn & Karen Bigelow Thomas & Kathleen Cole Gary & Sylvia B. ’95 Emberger Peter K. ‘97 & Laurel J. (Steinweg) ‘00 Greer Richard B. & Judith M. Hiler Yong J. & Soo Kyung Lee Joshua S. ’03 & Heather L. (Clark) ’04 Manifold

Thomas & Linda R. Pheasant Mynette J. Satoris Larry L. ’76 & Carol Y. Sollenberger Matthew J. ’01 & Tiffany L. (Bower) ’02 Stuckey Steven E. & Diana M. (Hoffman) ’68 Vellines Louis M. & Donna R. Walters David Weidemann Rowland A. Yeo

2 2 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

CALEB BORNMANN ’18

Thank you to those who became members of the Heritage Society, now with 565 members, during the 2015-2016 fiscal year. The Heritage Society was established to appropriately thank those who have included Messiah College in their wills, created a deferred gift arrangement or established an endowed fund. Their dedication is greatly appreciated.

B OA R D O F T R U S T E E S | 2 0 1 6 –2 0 1 7

George A. Parmer chair Harrisburg, Pa. Dr. Craig E. Sider vice chair Secaucus, N.J Heidi G. Bingaman ’80 secretary Kreamer, Pa. Rim A. Hinckley ’83 treasurer New York, N.Y. Barbara Avery Safety Harbor, Fla. Larry Bashore Mechanicsburg, Pa. Wendy L. Cole

Winfield, Pa. Richard L. Godshall Souderton, Pa. Anthony H. Hahn ’93 East Earl, Pa. Scott A. Heintzelman ’89 Mechanicsburg, Pa. Joachim J. Huerter Annville, Pa. Linden K. Hustedt Placida, Fla. Richard E. Jordan II ’70 Mechanicsburg, Pa. J. Gary Langmuir Manheim, Pa.

Dr. Emerson L. Lesher ’74 Mechanicsburg, Pa. James A. Martin Chambersburg, Pa. Stephen W. McBeth ’78 Camarillo, Calif. Kenneth V. Moreland West Friendship, Md. Barbara G. Moses Sicklerville, N.J. Rodney L. Musser ’83 Pomona, Calif. Edward Nevin Finksburg, Md. Linda R. Pheasant Wormleysburg, Pa.

Marlin Riegsecker Upland, Calif. Dr. Alan Robinson Dillsburg, Pa. Anthony J. Schiano Duck, N.C. Eunice F. Steinbrecher ’58, Greenville, Ohio Dr. Kimberly C. Thornbury ’93 New York, N.Y. John C. Wagner Jr. Phoenix, Md. Dr. Jerry L. Wenger Bird in Hand, Pa.


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

ENTHUSIASTIC AUDIENCE MEMBERS, JUDGES AND COMPETITORS PACK PARMER HALL for the second annual Impact Venture Challenge—a “Shark Tank”-style competition—awarding $10,000 to student/alumni entrepreneurs.

TWO WIN FULBRIGHT HONORS. Alum Tim Sensenig ’15 receives a Fulbright U.S. Student Grant to teach English as a second language to students in Germany. Student Christina McIntyre ’16 is awarded a Fulbright research scholarship to pursue graduate study at the University of Toronto, researching urban housing policy as a means of poverty de-concentration.

1,455 FOR SERVICE DAY, 1,455 Messiah volunteers participate in more than 26 projects on campus and throughout the region.

MAY 2016

ANGELA HARE IS NAMED DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND HEALTH, and receives the Barnabas Award at the 2016 Employee Recognition Reception for her work with the Collaboratory in Burkina Faso. MESSIAH COLLEGE FINALIZES ITS STRATEGIC PLAN FOR 2016-2020: “Embracing Change as Opportunity,” with focal points of advancing the College’s mission, expanding enrollment, promoting educational excellence and investing resources effectively.

500+

MESSIAH SOFTBALL FINISHES ITS OUTSTANDING SEASON as the NCAA Division III runner-up, with Head Coach Amy Weaver ’91 reaching 500+ career wins.

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 2 3


FINANCIALS

C H A R I TA B L E G I F T S A L LO C AT E D BY P U R P O S E F O R 2 0 1 5 ( F I S C A L Y E A R)

“And do not forget to do good and to share with others, for with such sacrifices God is pleased.”

7.4%

Messiah Fund

26%

Endowment

21.4%

Building projects

16.6%

14.9%

4.6%

Restricted Unrestricted gifts and bequests grants

Government grants

0.8%

Deferred gifts

Hebrews 13:16 (NIV)

0.5%

Budgeted restricted

7.8%

Designated budget

DONOR PROFILE

A LU M N I C O U N C I L | 2 0 1 6 –2 0 1 7

DAVID ’88 AND BONNIE (RAPP) ’90 MILLARY A FAITHFUL LEGACY David ’88 and Bonnie (Rapp) ’90 Millary met while students at Messiah College. They have three children: Rachel, Thomas and Nathan, a current student at Messiah. David Millary, who grew up in Lusaka, Zambia, heard about Messiah College through family friend, Andrew Samuel ’84. During his senior year of high school, he also had the opportunity to meet Professor Martin Schrag, who spoke at some local churches. For the couple, the lure of a Christian college that also could provide a first-class education was intriguing. The Millarys have a great appreciation for Messiah’s well-rounded education that opened their minds to new ideas and world views. They also value the role models of professors and administrators who live out their faith both in and beyond the classroom. Messiah also has offered them the ability to build lifelong friendships. They greatly value Messiah’s impact on the local and international communities and the way the College fosters a genuine caring for others and a deep desire to be a reflection of 2 4 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

Christ’s love to all people. They credit their connections to Messiah in helping them to be servant leaders. They choose to contribute back to Messiah to continue and to enhance the legacy of Christ-centered development of young people who can impact the world for the greater good. They want to help students to learn, grow, change and be challenged to pursue passions and to reach goals. We are deeply grateful for their commitment to their alma mater and for the way they are reflecting the love of the Gospel in their own lives.

George M. Book ’97, M’16 Ray Chung ’04 Doris (Heisey) Crider ’60 Rudyard L. Crider ’71 Ethan J. Eshbach ’14 Craig C. Flemmens ’93 Elizabeth S. Gallo ’16 Gina (Blyther) Gilliam ’83 Mark D. Hopkins ’94 Bryan Ji Yang Leong ’16 Scott D. Martin ’91 Louisa T. MfumMensah ’12 Michael B. Miller ’68 Kurt S. Shook ’92 Sean R. Sims ’08

Jacob P. Specht ’11 Charles R. Starr ’68 Martha L. (Brubaker) Starr ’68 A. Kenneth Stern ’68 Lois E. (Brandt) Stern ’70 Kathleen J. (Winger) Stuebing ’59 Ulysse Toussaint ’08 Bonita (Kline) Troxell ’71 Lawrence P. Williams ’11 Gerald N. Wingert ’47 Gerald F. Wolgemuth ’58 Ruth A. (Bryan) Wolgemuth ’60


2015 -2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

TOP

10

MESSIAH COLLEGE IS RECOGNIZED in the top 10 on the “Best Disability Friendly Colleges and Universities in the U.S.” list by College Choice.net. MESSIAH COLLEGE CELEBRATES ITS 107TH COMMENCEMENT, conferring degrees on 798 graduating seniors and master’s program graduates. Commencement Speaker Peter Greer ’97 reminds grads, “Look to Jesus, the One who perfectly shows us what audacious and fearless love looks like in practice.”

THROUGH A $400,000+ GRANT, the Lilly Foundation will fund the first four years of a theological institute, FaithWorks, for high school youth at Messiah. This weeklong summer program will launch in July of 2017.

JUNE 2016

FOR THE FOURTH YEAR IN A ROW, MESSIAH EXCEEDED ITS ALUMNI GIVING CHALLENGE GOAL, with more than 620 alumni donations. A total of $1.5 million (105 percent of the goal!) was raised for fiscal year 2016 for the Messiah Fund, including student scholarship aid. THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE EXCEEDS ITS OVERALL FISCAL YEAR 2016 GIVING GOAL at 115 percent, raising a total of $8.2 million.

THE LILLY FELLOWS PROGRAM NAMES NICHOLAS SOOY ’16 as one of 10 national Lilly Graduate Fellows in the U.S.

THE COLLEGE HOLDS A RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY to dedicate its new combined cooling, heat and power plant (CCHP), a sustainable system providing efficient year-round electricity generated from natural gas at a significant projected cost savings.

TO VIEW THE COMMUNITY DAY VIDEO, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 2 5


ALUMNI OUR

ALUMNI PROFILES

Honors program grads find careers in higher education

N I C H O L A S ZO L L E R ’ 0 3

As associate professor of mathematics, Zoller works with honors students.

MATTHEW TENNISON

COURTESY OF SOUTHERN NAZARENE COLLEGE

SEVERAL MESSIAH ALUMS NOW TEACH OTHERS

KERRY HASLER- B ROOKS ’05

An alum and a Messiah College employee, Hasler-Brooks builds on her honors experience an as American literature assistant professor.

2 6 | FA L L 2 0 1 6 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

The Messiah College Honors Program fosters an intellectually rigorous Christian worldview, one that has led several of its alumni to pursue careers in higher education. Devin Pohly ’08, in his first semester at Wheaton College as an assistant professor of computer science--which also was his undergraduate major at Messiah--says the honors program provided a mix of classroom offerings and extracurricular cultural activities, such as visiting the Harrisburg Symphony. “Each provided a venue for us to engage with a topic from any field of human experience,” he said. A mathematics major with a teaching certification, Paul Bernhardt ’08 works as an assistant professor of statistics at Villanova University. He says many of the concepts he learned through the honors program apply to his career. “The metacognitive and rational thinking skills that I acquired are now necessary in my current work as a statistician,” he said. To get into the program, students must have a 3.9 high school GPA or above and an SAT score (critical reading and math) of 1360 or an ACT composite of 29 or higher. Students also are evaluated on the basis of high school activities, leadership and awards. The curriculum includes credit-bearing interdisciplinary honors courses, additional learning opportunities outside the classroom and a senior capstone project. Founding director of the Messiah College Honors Program Dean Curry, who began working with the program in 1997, says he

sees the impact of the program throughout the entire campus. “The presence of nearly 400 students in the College Honors Program has enriched the academic and co-curricular culture of the college,” said Curry. “It is also exciting to see these students, upon graduation, impact our world in so many important ways.” Another graduate of the program, biology major Alexandra Smith ’03, works as an attending physician neonatologist at the Floating Hospital for

“It is a profound educational, intellectual and spiritual opportunity.” — Kerry Hasler-Brooks ’05

Children at Tufts Medical Center and as an assistant professor of pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine. She says she learned how to incorporate her faith into a career in sciences because of Messiah College. “The College Honors Program exposed me to different seminars and opportunities that allowed me to blossom in areas of my career and my faith and showed me how the two fit together beautifully,” said Smith. For mathematics major Matthew Wright ’06, the program introduced him to a book—“The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind” by Mark Noll—that led to his current career. “This book was instrumental in shaping my views on higher


COURTESY OF TUFTS MEDICAL CENTER

ALEX ANDR A SMITH ’03

An assistant professor of pediatrics and an attending physician neonatologist, Smith combines faith and science.

teach at Messiah. For Kerry Hasler-Brooks ’05, an assistant professor of American literature at Messiah, the program combined learning and career in a new way. “The Honors Program was a constant reminder that I was part of a learning community where ideas, ways of thinking and ways of reading held as much value as careers and job placement. It is a profound educational, intellectual and spiritual opportunity.”

MATTHEW TENNISON

education,” said Wright, who works as an assistant visiting professor of mathematics at St. Olaf College. “Noll’s book, along with other readings and discussions as part of the honors program, helped cultivate my design to study, teach and research advanced mathematics.” Nicholas Zoller ’03, an associate professor of mathematics at Southern Nazarene University, says being an honors student graduate makes it easier for him to relate to current students in the honors program where he works. “I know about their more rigorous coursework,” he said, “and the opportunity to network with other students who enjoy the life of the mind.” Some honors graduates now

—Gabrielle Kurtz ’18

TO WATCH A VIDEO ABOUT THE HONORS PROGRAM, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/HONORSVIDEO.

Dean Curry founded and continues to serve as the director of Messiah’s College Honors Program.

COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM BY THE NUMBERS

3.9

HIGH SCHOOL (OR ABOVE) GPA

1360

(OR HIGHER)

SAT SCORE

CRITICAL READING AND MATH

29

(OR HIGHER)

ACT COMPOSITE

377

CURRENT COLLEGE HONORS STUDENTS

FOUNDED IN

1997

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 2 7


ALUMNI

OUR

CLASS NOTES

IN MEMORIAM

CHARLES FREY 1926-2016

Within the ice cream industry and throughout central Pennsylvania, Charles Frey was perhaps best recognized for his leadership of Turkey Hill Dairy and Turkey Hill Minit Markets. With family, he helped expand the company into an industry leader and a supportive community member. Today, the name Turkey Hill is synonymous with quality and innovation. Within the Messiah College community, Frey was recognized for his generosity. Whether it was the support of him and Ann, along with Emerson and May, for the Frey Hall of Science, student missions, scholarship endowment, the High Center for Worship and the Performing Arts, or the Brethren in Christ Archives, he was the epitome of gracious generosity. He also invested in the mission of Messiah College as a faithful member on the Board of Trustees from 1991 to 1999. He brought the same vision for

excellence to Messiah that characterized his leadership in business. Beyond policy and strategic decisions, the trustees’ leadership is integral to the shaping of tomorrow’s Christian leaders. As a successful businessman who gave willingly of his leadership gifts to Messiah, he showed true leadership must co-exist with service. He was also a Messiah parent and grandparent, having sent two children and a granddaughter to the College. Further, in honor of their meritorious service to Messiah, he and Ann, along with Emerson and May, were recognized with the Engle Service Award in 2009. We are profoundly grateful for the multiple ways that he helped to advocate for Messiah. Solid Christian leaders who possess a heart of service are vital to successfully lead our churches, families, businesses and educational institutions into the future. When the path grows dim and the future uncertain, a leader with the heart of a Christ-like servant will provide the guidance necessary to regain direction and security. “Charles was an exemplary model of Messiah’s mission and demonstrated to all who were fortunate to know him how service is at the core of true Christian leadership,” said Messiah President Kim Phipps.

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Class Notes 1970s Lamar Dourte ’72 joined the Susquehanna Chorale and recently performed in Messiah’s Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts. James ’74 and Jane (Zercher) Stauffer ’74 completed 33 years as pastoral couple at Paramount Brethren in Christ Church in Hagerstown, Md., and now live in Elizabethtown, Pa.

1980s Christine (Johnsson) Dearden ’82 is a before and after school enrichment aide for the YMCA of Central Maryland in Reistertown, Md. John Oliphant ’87 published two articles in the Journal of Values-Based Leadership: “Leadership of Humanitarian Organizations Working in Less Developed Countries: A Best Practices Analysis” and “Applying Kouzes & Posner’s Leadership Concepts to Poverty Alleviation Work in the Developing World.”

1990s Tracy (O’Mara) Whitney ’90 works as the social media manager for Creating a Family in Pennsylvania. Tricia Mae Whitcomb ’92 and Col. Carter Price married in April of 2009. They have two children, Magnolia and Travis. James Foust ’93 and Karen Fuller married May 4, 2016.

Tina (Horst) Maxwell ’94 is the clerical assistant of human resources for UCP of Central Pennsylvania in Camp Hill, Pa. Jonathan Bowers ’97 is a pastor at Newberrytown Church of God in York Haven, Pa. He is married to Michele (Blunt) Bowers ’98. Their daughter Mary was born March 19, 2002. Carmen McCain ’99 is an assistant professor of English at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, Calif. She finished her Ph.D. in African languages and literature at the University of Wisconsin in 2014 and taught at Kwara State University in Nigeria last year.

2000s Stephanie (Zugates) ’01 and Stephen Major ’99 announce the birth of their daughter Sophia Ajani, May 18, 2016. Kelly (Sensenig) Janke ’04 completed prerequisite work at Millersville University and then medical school at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2010. She works as a general surgeon at Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health Physicians Surgical Group. She, her husband Bryan and their three children Olivia, Benjamin and Nicholas live in Lancaster County in Pennsylvania. Bethany (Burk) Kistler ’04 and her husband Scott announce the birth of Sabrina Mai, Feb. 25, 2016, and the adoption of Alisha Marie, June 2, 2016.

Collette (Adams) Jakubowicz ’05 and her husband Chris announce the birth of Claire, July of 2016. Andrew ’07 and Kristin (Yost) Orr ’06 announce the birth of Daniel, July 20, 2016. Brittani (Benedict) Blachford ’07 recently published a biblically-based curriculum titled “The Social Curriculum” and another titled “The Courage and Confidence Curriculum.” Rachel (Ashbaugh) Imhoff ’07 and her husband Nathaniel announce the birth of Fiona Elizabeth, April 13, 2016. Maris Hufnal ’08 is the chaplain and bereavement coordinator for Brandywine River Valley Hospice in Oxford, Pa. She completed clinical pastoral education chaplaincy residency at Christiana Hospital in Newark, Del. Tim Benner ’09 and Amanda Chopas ’11 married Nov. 9, 2013. They announce the birth of Ramia Michelle, Dec. 31, 2015, and Callen Nicholas, June 1, 2016. She works as a sourcing agent for Sinclair Broadcast Group in the Baltimore, Md., area. Alexandra (Steed) Van Kuiken ’09 works as the chaplain at Ann Klein Forensic Center in West Trenton, N.J. Elaine (Mills) Wantz ’09 and her husband Brad announce the birth of Annmarie Dawn, October 22, 2014.


“Messiah taught me the values of spiritual exploration, spontaneity, effective studying, problem solving and personal confidence.”— Dave Smith ’10 DAV E S M I T H ’ 1 0

From pilot to potato rolls At Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, a five-airplane fleet meets the daily demands of consumers who enjoy the company’s potato rolls and other products. Aviation supervisor Dave Smith ’10 keeps it all running smoothly and safely. However, his path to Martin’s was neither quick nor simple. While working toward an engineering degree at Messiah, Smith completed the Army ROTC program offered through Dickinson College. After graduation, he joined the Pennsylvania Army National Guard, which led to flight school in Fort Rucker, Alabama. He then worked for the Navy as a system engineer, which led him to the Pittsburgh

Institute of Aeronautics (PIA). After graduating from PIA’s 16-month program, Smith heard about an opening at Martin’s for an aviation mechanic. After applying to several jobs and receiving offers, he and his wife Katrina (Campbell) ’10 prayed about the decision. “God has proven that we made the right choice,” he said. “Over the last year and a half, amazing doors have opened that my wife and I never imagined possible.” Aviation mechanics inspect aircraft while also performing and supervising preventive maintenance. For Smith, the best parts of the job are troubleshooting and coordinating the hangar operations. “It’s a gratifying feeling to

COURTESY OF DAVE SMITH ’10

ENGINEERING ALUM MAINTAINS MARTIN’S PLANES

Engineering major Dave Smith ’10 completed flight school with the Army National Guard before landing at Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe as an aviation supervisor.

get into the books, test various aspects of a system and pinpoint the root of the problem,” said Smith. “It is immediate feedback to see how my work is making a difference.” Even after all Smith has accomplished, he says Messiah’s engineering program was one of the most challenging things he has ever done. He said, “Messiah taught me the values of spiritual

K I M B E R LY FA L K ’ 9 0

ACTING LIKE A PATIENT AT WORK

COURTESY OF KIMBERLY FALK ’90

NURSING ALUM USES THEATRE BACKGROUND TO PORTRAY ILLNESSES FOR HER STUDENTS

A simulation support educator at the University of Pennsylvania, Kimberly Falk ’90 teaches nursing students.

Wearing a purple wig, Kimberly Falk ’90 walked into the simulation lab at the school of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, playing the role of a teenage patient. For a simulation education specialist, it’s all in a day’s work. At her job, Falk mentors new instructors, writes scenarios for nursing students to portray in their simulation classes and “acts” as various patients. Her career began as a nursing student at Messiah College. “The good thing about nursing is, there is so much you can do with a general nursing degree,”

said Falk who went on to receive an MSN in adult health at the University of Pennsylvania. A background in theatre also has helped Falk as she portrays all sorts of patients—from child to octogenarian, with various maladies—to help her students gain real-life experience in medical scenarios. As a student, she was a member of Messiah College’s Players, a group for students who enjoyed theatre but weren’t majoring in it. Although she loved acting, she never imagined incorporating it into her profession as a nurse. “It’s one of those weird things

exploration, spontaneity, effective studying, problem solving and personal confidence.” He continually sharpens his skills as a pilot and mechanic with dreams of one day serving as a missionary pilot, helping with humanitarian relief with his wife. “If the past 10 years are any prediction, God is preparing us for something big,” he said. —Gabrielle Kurtz ’18

where it’s a small part of your life, but it’s something you enjoy,” said Falk of her theatre experience. “It’s kind of neat how God knew that and wrapped it into my job. I didn’t know how much I was missing that.” In her free time, Falk serves at her church, teaching Sunday school and participating on the missions committee. She says she integrates faith into her work simply through daily interactions with those around her. “It’s just a part of who I am and my colleagues know that,” said Falk. “I don’t pray before my classes en masse, but that doesn’t mean I don’t pray for my students on my own. I think it’s very easy in nursing to have a strong faith, because it’s very help oriented.” — Myriam Pedercini ’17

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ALUMNI

OUR

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

CLASS NOTES

— Albert Einstein BETHANY LAMBETH ’10

Math + bikes = success ALUM ADDS PHYSICAL FITNESS TO CLASSROOM

COURTESY WAKE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS/PAUL CORY

Bethany Lambeth ’10, a math teacher at Martin Middle School in Raleigh, North Carolina, noticed her students were restless. For 7th- and 8th-graders, there is little opportunity to release pent-up energy during the day. As a result, a significant portion of a teacher’s time in class is spent redirecting disruptive behavior. What could she do about it? “Messiah taught me to think deeper, dig deeper and figure out the root of a problem,” said Lambeth, who majored in elementary and special education. Students needed a way to expend some energy. Last year, Lambeth learned about a new device that was being installed in classrooms and workplaces to increase productivity and focus—DeskCycles. Similar to a stationary exercise bike, it allows students to pedal while sitting at their desks. She knew it was a solution, but how could she afford one for every desk? She got creative. She applied for a county grant that supports teachers who incorporate creativity, collaboration, Math teacher Bethany Lambeth ’10 helps students exercise their bodies and brains in her classrooom.

2010s Brittany Claridge ’10 and her husband Harry announce the birth of Charlotte Elizabeth, May 14, 2016. Alicia Brown ’11 and Timothy Harbison married April 25. 2015. They announce the birth of Preston Reed, April 20, 2016. She earned a medical degree from Lake Erie

College of Osteopathic Medicine May 29, 2016. She will complete a family medicine residency at the Guthrie/Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pa. Kelsey (Myers) ’11 and Nathan Weaver ’11 announce the birth of Alanna Christine, July 2, 2016. Jason Berry ’12 is an ACE-certified personal trainer. He recently

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published the book “Workout to Reach Out.” Chloe Hockley ’12 and Tim Reddick married July 2, 2016. She works as an early childhood teacher for Cincinnati Country Day School in Cincinnati, Ohio. Hannah Kooistra ’14 and Joshua Srour ’14 married Sept. 5, 2015. They live in Bel Air, Md.

communication and critical thinking into their classrooms. Since installing the cycles, she has seen a positive impact on academics and behavior. “I have noticed an increase in the quality and quantity of the student work,” said Lambeth. “I noticed a 50 percent decrease in the amount of missing work for my struggling students.” Students look forward to coming to Lambeth’s classroom, the only place where they can use the cycles. “I’m not spending as much time redirecting their behavior, because it’s being met in a different way,” said Lambeth. There’s also the added incentive of positive future behavior. Students know they must get their work done if they want to continue using the cycles. “I would recommend this to other schools, hands down,” said Lambeth. “Some days, the students come in with a lot of energy, stressed or frustrated and they know that spending a period pedaling will help them out.” —Gabrielle Kurtz ’18 TO VIEW A PHOTO GALLERY AND VIDEO ABOUT THE DESKCYCLES, PLEASE VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE.

Eric Bull ’14 and Christine Gale ’15 married July 2, 2016. He works as an occupational therapist for Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital in Malvern, Pa. Rachel (Sherman) Roach ’14 works as a music educator at Northern York County School District in Dillsburg, Pa. She is married to Jason Roach ’13.


Emily Marker ’15 and Ryan Peterson married May 21, 2016.

Alexandra (Coonradt) Hall ’16 works as a marketing strategist at SDPcreative in Millersburg, Pa.

Frances Miller ’15, a social media marketer at HEX Performance in Baltimore, Md., attended a retreat organized by Southwest Collective in Portugal.

Service Notes

Sarah Byrd ’16 is a lead teacher for The Goddard School in Gaithersburg, Md.

Alex Swan ’16 is serving in the U.S. Peace Corps in Botswana.

Julia DeNardo ’16 is serving in the U.S. Peace Corps in Namibia.

Elizabeth Gallo ’16 is the communication coordinator for West Shore Chamber of Commerce in Camp Hill, Pa.

A LU M N I E N G AG E M E N T S U R V E Y

CALLING ALL ALUMS! Looking for ways to engage with Messiah College, no matter how far from campus you live? Fill out our brief alumni engagement survey online at MESSIAH.EDU/INVOLVEMENT to tell us how you would like to enrich your alma mater! Alumni are an important resource to our campus and students, serving as career mentors, networking contacts, class reunion volunteers and more! We value you and would love to have your assistance with college events and programming.

Earn your

Messiah College’s graduate program in education offers master’s degrees and non-degree options in curriculum and instruction, special education* and TESOL* that will advance your career and enhance your abilities as an effective educator, leader and collaborator. Our program is designed for working professionals—with the flexibility to complete most degrees and certificates fully online.

Discover if you qualify for a tuition discount at messiah.edu/graddiscounts

*option of pursuing Pennsylvania Program Specialist/Teaching Certification

Experience the academic distinction of a nationally ranked Christian college.

NOW ENROLLING

see anew

717.796.5061 messiah.edu/education Online | Flexible | Affordable

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 6 | 3 1


ALUMNI

“My freshman year, it was held in Hershey so we hit up Chocolate World first and took pictures by the ginormous Christmas tree. People thought we were part of something really important!”

OUR

FROM THE ARCHIVES

—Tasha Becker ’16

Celebrating Christmas

“I

loved Christmas Tradition! I was a student at Messiah from ’97-’01, and I didn’t miss one the four years I was here. They were all held at the Hershey Hotel, with a dinner and dance that were in the same large room. They just cleared the tables and opened up the dance floor after. There was always a DJ, and I remember great music and having a fun time dancing with friends.” — Meg Jones Hoover ’01

“M

y freshman year, it was held in a hotel in Harrisburg and the theme was the ’20s. A lot of people were enthusiastic about the theme and came in costume, including myself and my friends who dressed as flappers!” – Ashlyn Miller ’17

“C

hristmas Tradition was usually held on campus, and they decorated Brubaker Auditorium with tables and lovely centerpieces. It was more of a banquet with a concert because, at the time, dancing was not allowed at the College. My favorite memory is my first Christmas Tradition in 1981. The person I went with had been trying to convince me to eat dinner with him in Lottie almost every Tuesday and Thursday after Concert Choir rehearsal for the entire semester. So when I finally relented, we found out we really clicked. Soon after, he asked me to the Christmas Tradition. I wore a cinnamon-colored longer full skirt and matching vest with a cream-colored tie blouse – an outfit that I had sewn myself, which was lovely for the time but which I shudder to look back on to this day. When Jon ’85 arrived to pick me up on

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MESSIAH COLLEGE ARCHIVES

Christmas at Messiah College has always been one of joy, lights and celebration. One of the most popular celebrations of the season is the annual Christmas Tradition dance organized by the Students Activities Board. Students have the chance before finals to dress up in formal wear and spend a glamorous evening among their peers. Below are some Christmas Tradition memories from current students and alumni: Christmas Tradition, a student dance and banquet, has a long history at Messiah.

Old Main third floor —YES, it was a dormitory back then—I remember he was worried because the corsage from the florist looked a little more like a small Christmas centerpiece than something to wear. Jon and I dated all four years in college, and now we’ve been married more than 31 years!” —Nance (Leitzel)

banquet hall, the food was even better than usual, and the entertainment was great. The first year we went featured a comedian. The second year, we enjoyed one of my all-time favorite artists, Phil Keaggy, who was absolutely amazing. Getting to relax and enjoy time with friends before finals was great.”

McCown ’85, associate professor and co-chair of the Department of Communication

— Mark Templeton ’91

“I

went to Christmas Traditions in ’87 and ’88, both held in Lottie during my time at Messiah, and really enjoyed them. I wore a suit and tie, while my wife Dawn (Snyder) ’91—who was my girlfriend then—wore a nice dress. The thing I enjoyed most was that the dining hall was transformed into a beautiful

“I

t was fun to have a chance to de-stress with close friends before finals, and it’s never a bad thing when you get to wear a sparkly dress.” —Bree Whitelock ’17


CALENDAR OF EVENTS DECEMBER 2016–MARCH 2017

Grace Pollock Dance Studio Climenhaga Building An evening of entertainment created and presented by theatre and dance department seniors MON. DEC.

5 United Voices of Praise Concert 8 p.m., Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

WED. DEC.

7 Musica Nova Concert 7:30, High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SAT. DEC.

10 Guitar Ensemble Concert 1:30 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SAT. DEC.

10 One College Ave Concert 4 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 9, 10 Senior Series Poorman Black Box Theater Climenhaga Building An evening of entertainment created and presented by theatre and dance department seniors

FRI. JAN.

13 Erik Forst Faculty Percussion Recital 7 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SAT. JAN.

21 Damian Savarino Faculty Voice Recital 8 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

JAN. 21–MARCH 10 Art Education Senior Exhibition Aughinbaugh Gallery Climenhaga Building Artwork from Messiah College’s art education seniors SUN. JAN.

22 Jacob Mandell Student Senior Saxophone Recital 4 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

FEB. 2–5 & 9–12 The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Miller Theater Climenhaga Building Story by C.S. Lewis; dramatized by Joseph Robinette Directed by Daniel Inouye

FEB. 3–MARCH 10 Judy Kirpich, The Conflict Series

JONATHAN ISAAC ’17

DEC. 2, 3 Senior Series

Christmas at Messiah SUN. DEC.

4 Messiah College Christmas Concert 8 p.m., Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SAT. FEB.

4 Kate Aldrich, Mezzo Soprano Performing Arts Series 8 p.m., Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SUN. FEB.

5 Kate Aldrich Masterclass 6–8 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

FRI. DEC.

16 Susquehanna Chorale Christmas Concert 8 p.m., Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SUN. FEB.

26 Kuhlman Competition 7 p.m., Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

SUN. MARCH

5 Samantha Duhe Student Horn Recital 2 p.m., High Foundation Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

Aughinbaugh Gallery Climenhaga Building

FOR A FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/EVENTS.


office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

One College Avenue Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg PA 17055 717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

IN CLOSING

RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

This unfinished section of “The Lemoyne Passage” mural is a reminder that we’re all works in progress. Spiritual maturity is a slow, gradual process that develops throughout a lifetime.


Messiah College's The Bridge magazine: President's Report issue - Fall 2016