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National Forest Week

September 20 to 26, 2015 | National Tree Day - September 23

Wildland Fire You can make a difference!

Wildland fire is a powerful natural force. Fire has shaped Canada’s forests, prairies and parklands for countless generations, and brings healthy renewal to diverse ecosystems. But some fires can have a devastating impact on public safety and property. Use FireSmart principles to help protect your family and property from wildfire damage: play a role in control.

for FAST, COURTEOUS, PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ON ALL SIZED VECHICLES call MARIO’S • All Major Heavy Recoveries • Serving Most Major Autoclubs/Insurance Companies

• ICBC Towing • Light & Heavy Towing • Boosting & Unlocks • Light & Heavy Towing

2676 Nicola Avenue • Toll Free: 1-888-292-1581 • www.marios-towing.com

• Serving All Interior Points • Mechanical, Automotive and Commercial Transport

250-378-9241 41


B2 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

Thank you to all of our friends in forestry who continue to maintain success and increase local value in the industry while thriving in our beautiful valley.

Service Excellence Since 1956

For 3 generations and 59 years we have been proudly serving Merritt, the Nicola Valley and surrounding areas. We are dedicated to ensuring you feel valued as a customer and receive great service—every time. 2865 Neilson Street, Merritt, BC V1K 1B8

ph:250-315-4748 fax: 250-315-4749 e-mail: hsilvey@shawbiz.ca


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B3

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

We can take care of all your forestry Glass needs

LOADERS, SKIDDERS, LOGGING TRUCKS, ETC.

Serving the Thompson-Okanagan for over 20 years

2663 Granite Avenue, Merritt BC, Located next to Fountain Tire

250-378-4531

Proud to support our forest industry

The fate of Merritt has long been tied to the lumber industry. That’s why National Forest Week is particularly important here in the Nicola Valley. With all of the ups and downs that occur within any natural resource based industry, it’s important to recognize some of the challenges that face it, and also get to know some of the people who deal with those challenges on a daily basis. The Herald spoke with some of the people who work in the forestry industry, and put together a summary of the upcoming timber supply review. We hope you will enjoy this glimpse into an industry that in some way — either directly or indirectly — affects all of our lives here in the Valley. And if you get a chance this week, don’t forget to thank a forester for everything they do. – David Dyck, editor

REASONABLE RATES, while using customers time efficiently

inc.

CALL 250-315-5074

NV Radiators Are Proud To Work With The Forestry Industry For All Of Their Radiator Needs

NICOLA VALLEY RADIATOR Picture: 8’ x 12’ radiator fixed in our shop!

Big or small we fix them all! s,OGGING MININGTRUCKSAUTOMOTIVE s!IRCONDITIONINGCOOLANTmUSHING s&ULLSERVICEREPAIROFAIRCONDITIONINGUNITS s2ECORERADIATORS s2EPAIRRADIATORS s#USTOMBUILTRADIATORS s(EATERCORESNEWANDRECORE s&LUSHINGPOWER

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Mesabi radiator authorized repair facility & sales. Air conditioning mobile unit. SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS. NO DISTANCE TOO FAR TO SERVE YOUR NEEDS! No heat? Try Flushing BEFORE REPLACING 2775 Marian Avenue, Merritt, B.C.

250-378-1366


B4 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

ANDREA INWARDS

Prou ud d to ackn no owlle edge ou urr Na attiio on na al Forest Week

Regulating, organizing, educating in the forestry sector David Dyck THE MERRITT HERALD

Like many Merritt residents, Andrea Inwards has built a career around forestry. Though while many are busy with the job of turning trees into lumber, Inwards is concerned with regulation. After obtaining her science degree in forest management from UBC, she became a registered professional forester for the provincial government. That was 24 years ago, and she hasn’t looked back. Her job has many different facets to it. Part of it is looking after wood lot licenses and cut control. But her favourite part of her job is community forestry. A community forest is an areabased license managed by a local community and its stakeholders. About 10 years ago, the B.C. provincial government changed the Forest Act to allow communities to hold forest licenses. “It’s about employing local people, diversifying what you get from the economy, safety and improving relations with First Nations,” Inwards told the Herald.

See ‘Community’ Page B5

Sept. 20th to 26th

APPRECIATING THOSE IN THE FOREST INDUSTRY

FOR ALL THEY DO, AND THEIR CONTINUED

SUPPORT!

Like us on

Andrea Inwards has spent the past 24 years working in the forestry sector for the provincial government. Submitted photo

DOWNTOWN MERRITT: #120 1700 Garcia St. Railyard Mall

250-378-5217

Proud Supporters of National Forestry Week!

Log Hauling • Forestry • Silviculture The Upper Nicola Band's vision for their Traditional Territory is: to implement Suxwtxtem principles in order to take care of the resources within the Traditional Territory in a manner which is socially acceptable, economically viable, ecologically sustainable and meets present needs without compromising the options of future generations"

Upper Nicola Band Forestry

Off: 250-350-3342 www.uppernicola.com

Aspen Planers Ltd.

2399 Quilchena Ave., Merritt

Invest Today for Jobs Tomorrow

250-378-9266


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B5

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

Community forests are Thanks

FOR ALL YOUR HARD WORK! FROM

Inwards’ passion

Ideally, the forest is managed to reflect the values of the people in that area. From Page B4 She helped set up a bunch of them in the Southern Interior Forest Region, including Princeton, Lumby, Clinton, Kaslo and Slocan, to name a few. “We would give them an area of land, and they would be responsible for all the planning, but they would also get the revenue from the wood,” explained Inwards. “They pay an annual rent on the land based on their annual allowable cut, and then they pay a stumpage for what they cut.” That stumpage rate — or what they pay the Crown for the wood — is exceptionally low. In some cases they’re managed by the municipality — in others, they’re managed by special interest groups. Inwards’ job is to meet with the community initially and tell them about the program and what the expectations are. Then she’d walk them through the application process. Ideally, said Inwards, the forest is managed to reflect the values of the people in that area. “Some of them are super cool, the one in Likely — it’s a tiny little place, but they do amazing things for their community,” said Inwards. Likely is a small community located in the Cariboo. “They deliver firewood to the shut-ins and the single moms and stuff like that — it’s really cool.”

She said the meetings in Cherryville include home made ice cream. “It’s pretty fun, because it’s a different client base,” she said. “So now we’re dealing with little community groups, or city managers who don’t know any forestry stuff.” Of course, much of her job involves dealing with other members of the forestry industry — loggers, mill managers, consultants, or “people who do the actual work,” she laughed. But she said she doesn’t mind that, either. “The community of forestry is really nice in this area,” she said. “There isn’t a ton of change. They’re starting to get more young people in as older people move out. I’ve been dealing with the Tolko guys since day one and they’re a super group, and Aspen has lots of really good people.” Inwards serves on the local forestry committee, a group that gets together to enhance the image of the forestry sector and try to educate people on the industry. It has representatives from government and industry on it. “We do tree planting with the grade fives, we do a golf tournament in the spring, we’re doing a ball tournament [soon] — basically it’s just getting everybody out together,” she said. They also give out bursaries and do a poster contest. She said one of the things she enjoys most about the job is the people. “The community of forestry is really nice in this area,” she said.

Call us for information on Special Occasions Tel 250-315-1022 Open Sun to Wed: 11am-12am Thu-Sat: 11am-1am 3701 DeWolf Way, Merritt, BC (Take Exit 290 off Hwy 5)

Merritt Machine Works Ltd. For all your machining & welding.

Proud to be of service to the forest industry since 1975

Phone: 250-378-5326 Fax: 250-378-4606

1120 McFarlane Way, Merritt

A big

Thank You

from

Where friends meet to eat

A big thank you to all for your support and continued patronage. We would like to recognize all the hardworking men & women in the forestry industry.

2101 Quilchena Avenue, Merritt

250-378-0331


B6 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

THE TIMBER SUPPLY REVIEW

The T he Forest Industry Supports our Familiess

in a nutshell — part 1 Started in 1992 to update the understanding of timber supply in each of the province’s 38 timber supply areas (TSAs). British Columbia’s chief forester determines the allowable annual cut (AAC), based on a review of a management unit.

We P W Proudly dly S Support pp the h F Forest IIndustry d y 1964 Quilchena Avenue • 250-378-2215

The AAC is the maximum amount of timber that the chief forester determines is reasonable to harvest from the TSA. The chief forester’s job is to determine the AAC for each TSA every ten years, or, as in the case of the upcoming Merritt TSA, whenever it is deemed necessary. The last TSA done in Merritt was in December of 2010. The chief forester at that time said that as the mountain pine beetle was wrapping up its attack on the district, he wanted to get back sooner than the typical 10 year period. Some of the things that go into the chief forester’s decision on what to set the annual allowable cut at are forest composition and management, and objectives for that land base, the region, and the province.

Email: reception@carrieware.ca

Recognizing our local forest workers and their important role forestry plays in our community. Thomson’s Truck Parts & Sales

250-378-8266 2172 Douglas Street

Recognizing our First Nations Forest Contractors WINTER IS COMING ARE YOU DUE FOR A NEW SET OF WINTER TIRES THIS YEAR?

Stuwix Resources Joint Venture Ph:250-378-2277

www.stuwix.com

You’ll want to have your winter tires installed long before the first snowfall, when the pavement starts to cool down. Why not play it safe and have them installed not just early, but on time, when the temperature averages 0 to 7 C in your area?

TALK TO KAL About specials & rebates 2601 NICOLA AVENUE

250-378-5141


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B7

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

THE TIMBER SUPPLY REVIEW in a nutshell — part 2 The review process varies depending on the complexity of the information or issues, but there are three general stages that take place. STAGE 1: Information sharing and gathering. A data package, which descirbes the inventory and management information and timber supply analysis assumptions that are believed to best reflect current forest management is produced and made public. STAGE 2: The timber supply analysis. This generally follows the data package, but will differ based on input from the public and First Nations, or new information and analysis.

SHOP

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STAGE 3: The determination. The chief forester considers the information from the data package, timber supply analysis, information, objectives and uncertainties that were unavailable or could not be quantified. He or she then announces the new AAC with a rationale document explaining the decision. WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR MERRITT? The chief forester will make her decision by the end of this year, and depending on what she sets the AAC at will determine how active the mills in the area will be.

Fengate thanks the individuals of the forest industry for their efforts and sacriďŹ ce during this trying year.

Merritt Green Energy Project, BC

Trusted partner. Experienced investor.

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B8 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK WINNER OF THE 2015 MIKE MORRISON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

A brief look at the Tsilhqot’in Nation Aboriginal title case By Jennifer Dustin “It only took 150 years, but we look forward to a much brighter future. This without question will establish a solid platform for genuine reconciliation to take place in British Columbia.� – Grand Chief Stuart Phillip (as quoted by CBC, 2014) On June 26th, 2014, for the first time in Canadian history, the Supreme Court of Canada declared Aboriginal title to a Canadian First Nation. The Tsilhqot’in Nation Aboriginal Title Case Decision (also referred to as the William Case Decision) resulted in Aboriginal title to nearly 1,900 square kilometers in south central British Columbia. Aboriginal title designates primary control of land — including the right to enjoy and profit from the land. Stemming from a series of cumulative legal proceedings spanning over two decades, the Williams Case Decision resulted in a landmark decision that is sure to change the future of land claims and economic development for Canadian First Nations. Motivated to protect traditional territory from over-logging and what the Tsilhqot’in believed was improper use of the land by provincial and federal governments, the Tsilhqot’in Nation began a formal legal battle with the British Columbia and Canadian governments to assert indigenous rights over an area roughly 4,300 square kilometers near the city of Williams Lake.

In November 2007, Judge David Vicker of the British Columbia Supreme Court ruled that the Tsilhqot’in had demonstrated Aboriginal title over a portion of the land in dispute, but stopped short of making a formal judgment of title: “While the BC Supreme Court decision did not find Aboriginal title because of an issue related to the pleadings of the case, it did express its opinion that the Tsilhqot’in Nation could prove Aboriginal title to parts of its claimed traditional territory.� Based on this decision, the Tsilhqot’in Nation filed an appeal, ultimately resulting in the Canada’s first legal declaration of Aboriginal title. There are two primary gains in achieving aboriginal title: “the right to control the land� and “protection from government jurisdiction.� Specifically, Aboriginal title trumps the Forest Act, which allows government and private companies access to “Crown� resources. The Tsilhqot’in, now with Aboriginal title, are granted control of formerly recognized Crown land/ recourses (Tsilhqot’in National Government, n.d.); they have regained the right to decide what developments occur on the land (economic, social, culture, etc.). The Canadian government can intervene, however, in exceptional circumstances; they must either have express consent from the First Nation, or have strong justification — proven in court — before the intervention.

Continued on next page

Relax,

at our comfortable Ramada Limited Merritt hotel Located off exit 290 of the Coquihalla Highway, our pet-friendly hotel is the perfect place to spend a weekend by the lake. We serve a free deluxe continental breakfast each morning and offer free Wi-Fi Internet access so you can look up local attractions or check conditions on the lake from your newly updated hotel room. Swim in our heated indoor pool with two-story waterslide, workout in our gym or soak away your cares in our hot tub and sauna. We offer guest laundry facilities, free oversized-vehicle parking and 24hour front desk service for your convenience. Handicapped-accessible and non-smoking rooms are available and kids 17 and under stay free with an adult.

tXXXSBNBEBDPN 3571 Voght Street, Exit 290 off Highway 5, Merritt, BC Phone: 1-250-378-3567

PROUD TO SUPPORT OUR FORESTRY INDUSTRY!

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First Location

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Second Location /0%.$!),9;GJG 3623 DeWolf Way, Merritt

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THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B9

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK WINNER OF THE 2015 MIKE MORRISON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP From Page B8 In a wider context, the granting of Aboriginal tile is significant to First Nations across Canada, many of whom are engaged in ongoing land disputes. Aboriginal title extends indigenous rights to allow the First Nation primary control of the land. The William Case Decision opens the door for other First Nations to be granted title of traditional lands beyond the previous “postage stamp� system that permitted plaintiffs extended rights to isolated areas that were proven to be used extensively for traditional purposes. In addition, the William Case Decision adds to ongoing negotiation/translation between Western colonial and First Nations ways of knowing/ruling. One academic article by Weir outlines how, in 2007, Judge Vickers stopped short of declaring full Aboriginal title in part because he was unable to meet his own aspirations: “In order to truly hear the oral history and oral tradition evidence . . . courts must undergo their own process of decolonization.� The Williams Case required the Tsilhqot’in Nation to prove the historical use of the land, however, “proof � is a culturally constructed concept that required “translation� between the oral histories of the Tsilhqot’in and the contemporary Canadian judicial system. The William Case Decision is only one example of the dynamic relationship between Canadian and First Nations’ cultures, but one that has changed the way First Nations can protect and maintain their relationship with traditional territory. The decision has implications to non-indigenous people as well; where once sources of economic development were accessible, today they may no longer be, or require extensive negotiation or sanctions. John Loxley, a long respected academic and advocate in community development and economics, recognizes the tension between competing economic and cultural interests, and argues that Canadian and First Nations governments need to work together toward in

order to achieve relevant and sustainable development. “Together with this highly developed sense of stewardship over land and natural resources, Aboriginal communities maintain a value system which appear to be singularly relevant to the search for a more sustainable form of economic existence.�

In support of National Forestry Week FRANK’S MECHANICAL SERVICES Quality Auto Service & Repairs for your Car or Light Truck

Owner Frank Douthwright

Ph: 250-378-1322 2026 Mamette Avenue, Merritt V1K 1B8 We offer a

CLASS A GAS FITTER in the Merritt area!

Servicing all commercial needs in the foreset industry.

Jennifer Dustin is currently completing her second year of the PhD program at McMaster’s School of Social Work in Hamilton, Ont. Jennifer received her BA in English and a Bachelor of Social Work from Thompson Rivers University before moving to Hamilton to complete her MSW at McMaster University. Jennifer’s social service experience includes work with children, youth and families in non-profit agencies, community development work, and post-secondary instruction - all of which, Jennifer recognizes are linked to her deeply supportive and encouraging upbringing in her hometown of Merritt, B.C. Largely informed by her practice experience, Jennifer’s doctoral studies explore the relationship between media representations of social work, and public understandings of social work practice. Submitted photo

Nicola Plumbing & Heating has been proud to have supported the foresty industry and their needs for the last 30 years. We look forward to working with the forest industry indu in dust stry ry y iin n th the e fu futu future. ture re.

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2064 Coutlee Ave Ave., P P.O. O Box 2999 2999, Merrit Merritt, B.C. V1K 1B8

Fax: 250-378-8801

Phone: 250-378-4943

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2ECOGNIZINGTHEHARDWORKING FORESTRYEMPLOYEES 7ETHANKYOU

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B10 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

National Forest Week

LETTING IT

BURN

Although much of this summer the BC Wildfire Service was kept busy putting out fires, there are actually some benefits that come with letting some of them burn, or starting fires of their own. “When a wildfire comes through, depending on the intensity of that wildfire, it can definitely have benefits to the local ecosystem,” said BC Wildfire Service information officer Kayla Pepper. “We call it ecosystem restoration.” Sometimes the centre will set off low intensity controlled burns — especially at the shoulder ends of the fire season — if an area could benefit from an ecosystem restoration. The fire will move through an area and reinvigorate the local ecosystem by opening up pinecones so new trees can grow, clearing away some of the debris and falldown, and eliminating the mountain pine beetle. The same goes for grasslands. “Burning for example in an area with sagebrush, the sagebrush may be getting too thick,” explained Pepper. “When they do those burns we could see native plant species returning, and as those plant species return, in turn we see a return of local wildlife in the area, as they have more grazing areas.” Morals and mushrooms also often sprout up after a fire, attracting mushroom pickers. “We do see often the landscape does grow back a lot lusher, a lot more vibrant, as we’ve gotten rid of that dead matter,” she said. David Dyck/Herald

September 20 - 26, 2015

Cascades District Staff Salute all the hard working men and women who make up the Forest industry. www.for.gov.bc.ca/dcs

378-8400

3840 Airport Rd. PROUD TO ACKNOWLEDGE

National Forestry Week!

SEPT. 20-26

STORE HOURS 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM 7 Days a week DRUGStore™ Pharmacy Hours Monday - Friday 9:00 AM - 8:00 PM Saturday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sunday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

2760 Forksdale Avenue, Merritt

(250) 378-1841

Proud Supporters of National Forestry Week! HIS

AD OF T GET A LO

Put Your SMILE Forward

Serving the Nicola Valley since 1960.

PROUD TO SUPPORT OUR FOREST INDUSTRY

Forests are fundamental to our economy, culture, traditions, history, and to our future. thank you to everyone in the forest industry for their continued support.

NEW PATIENTS ALWAYS WELCOME!

DID YOU KNOW?

Stoyoma Dental is Merritt’s newest Dental Clinic. We are a Not For Profit Society serving all residents of Merritt and the surrounding areas. If you are covered by Status, Healthy Kids, Disability, Ministry or the Emergency Plan you are fully coverd for eligible services & no additional funds will be required of you!

You can build better with wood when it’s sitting on concrete! OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

1301 Nicola Ave.

250-378-5121

1999 Voght Street, (next to the Credit Union) PO Box 3090, Merritt, BC V1K 1B8

Call: 250-378-5877


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B11

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

Colour Me & Win

WIN

$50

REPLY COUPON NAME: _________________________________________________ ADRESS: _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ________________________________________ RULES: Complete the sentences found in each ad by matching a possible answer provided, with the incomplete sentence. Drop your entry form off at the Merritt Herald, 2090 Granite Ave. before 5 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 24. Winner will be drawn 9 a.m. Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. Employees and family members of the Merritt Herald are not eligible for this contest. DON’T DELAY, FILL IT OUT...DROP IT OFF FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $50!

YOUR HOMETOWN Hospitality Specialists

FULL PUB MENU, COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF BEER & WINE CALL US FOR ALL YOUR CATERING NEEDS

PROUDLY SUPPORTING OUR LOCAL FORESTRY INDUSTRY S d

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Proudly serving the forest industry since 1985.

Bases in Hope and Merritt, BC Toll Free: 1-877-869-2131 info@valleyhelicopters.ca www.valleyhelicopters.ca


B12 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK ENGRAVING & AWARDS • Promotional products • Corporate branded apparel • Embroidery • Silkscreening • Signs • Engraving • Trophies Ask for

Susanne

at

1951A Garcia Street, Merritt, BC Phone: 250-378-6808 • Fax: 250-378-2025 • Toll Free: 1-800-561-8338 merrittprinting@telus.net

Jackson’s Welding

u “Yo e’ll t, w i k a bre x it.â€? ďŹ

In business since 1967

SPECIALIZING IN REPAIRS

Thank You for your continued patronage from Jackson’s Welding.

ALL SERVICES PORTABLE.

• WELDING • FABRICATING • PRESSURE WASHING

• SAND BLASTING • ALUMINUM WELDING • EQUIPMENT REPAIRS

250-378-4332

1750 Hill Street, Merritt

DID YOU KNOW? Many fires occur in spring and early summer when human activity increases. Grass burning and spring cleanup fires occasionally escape control and result in wildfires. When summer arrives, the number of people in the woods increases and as they travel, recreationalists can accidentally cause fires. PREVENTION CONSIDERATIONS: • Do not burn in windy conditions. • Do not discard smoking materials from vehicles, use interior ashtrays. • Lawn & farm equipment should have properly working spark arresters to prevent sparks from exiting through the exhaust pipes. • All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) produce an enormous amount of heat and can ignite brush from their exhaust systems.

Merritt0=E:7<513<B@3 BVO\Yg]cb]]c`4]`Sab`g7\Rcab`gE]`YS`a

9[X^M \^YYX[]N[\ XO 7J]RXWJU /X[N\][b @NNT PUBLIC BOWLING Starts Sept. 11 - Every weekend LEAGUE BOWLING Starts Sept. 10 - Ladies, Mixed & Seniors YOUTH BOWLING Starts Sept. 21 - Mondays after school

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KAMLOOPS: 471 Okanagan Way

250-372-2233

MERRITT: 1690 Voght Street

250-378-4432

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE THANKFUL FOR ALL THAT THE FOREST INDUSTRY WORKERS DO, WHO HELP OUR COMMUNITY AND ECONOMY WHICH IS WHY WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE PROUD TO SUPPORT...

NATIONAL

FOREST WEEK September 20 - 26, 2015

We would like to extend a warm thank you to all our forestry industry workers for contributing to their community.

MERRITT HERALD Ph: 250.378.4241 Fax: 250.378.6818 Advertising: sales@merrittherald.com Publisher: publisher@merrittherald.com Editorial: newsroom@merrittherald.com www.merrittherald.com 2090 Granite Avenue, P.O. Box 9, Merritt, B.C.

Hours: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., 7 days a week

250-378-5564 Find us at the Railyard Mall (Garcia Street)

The Merritt National Forest Week Committee would like to thank all participants that entered the

Mike Morrison Memorial Bursary - 2015

The Candidates were judged on Community Involvement and Volunteer History as well as written essay submissions.

Congratulations

Working Towards a Healthy Forest Economy

LUMBER LTD., MERRITT BC

to Jennifer Dustin We look forward to the 2016 participants

2770 Pooley Ave., Merritt

Call 250-378-9201


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ B13

www.merrittherald.com

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

ALEESHA RIELLEY Young forester harvesting a wealth of experience Michael Potestio THE MERRITT HERALD

In forestry terms, Aleesha Rielley is just a sapling, but her responsibilities with Aspen Planers are an integral part of how that company does business. Rielley, 22, has lived in Merritt her whole life and obtained a diploma in environmental and natural resource technology at the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology, graduating from the two-year program last May. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really fortunate that I was able to get a job really quick and get on with Aspen [Planers],â&#x20AC;? she said. Before being employed by Aspen, she began working with a forestry consultant in cruising â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which involves determining the volume of wood in a foresterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cut block, the tree species and the health of the forest. In July 2014, Rielley started working with Aspen Planers as a planning technician and compass man alongside one of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cruisers. Her job involves gathering information to determine how much

Aspen Planers stands to earn from logging a cut block, how they will go about logging the trees, as well as information about the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My job, solely, is around collecting the data in order for them to make those decisions,â&#x20AC;? Rielley said. Before cruisers venture out, layout crews are sent in to find a cut block and give a general overview of the area, including looking for riparian areas and any endangered species that might be living there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have to go in there and they have to look at things like slope, grading for roads,â&#x20AC;? Rielley said, noting that cruising is the more detailed version of this planning process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every hectare we have a plot, and in our plot we use whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called a prism, and that will tell us how many trees are actually within our plot,â&#x20AC;? Rielley said. They check the height of the trees and look for any pathogens they may have, such as conks. Cruising is a government mandate, Rielley said.

PROUDLY SUPPORTING

OUR FOREST INDUSTRY 2049 NICOLA AVE MERRITT,BC

4"-&4  t4&37*$&  

See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rielleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Page B14

The City Of

is proud to support...

-26 September 20

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B14 • THURSDAY,

www.merrittherald.com

September 17, 2015

NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

Rielley’s work isn’t just in the forest — she also volunteers on the forestry committee

CITY FURNITURE IS PROUD TO ACKNOWLEDGE

National Forest Week

From Page B13 “The government needs to know what’s going on in there, so before the loggers can log it, we need to know how much money we’re going to make from this block, and ideally if it’s worth going in and logging and that’s what the cruise helps do,” Rielley said. Rielley will sometimes be given the responsibility to walk a cut-block’s boundary, streams and roads with a GPS unit, the data from which is digitized to build maps. Some of the forests Rielley works in include the Lower Nicola area near Logan Lake, the Jura area near Princeton, as well as the Elkhart and Murray Lake areas. “We have a pretty wide area that we pull from,” Rielley said. Her feet barely wet from her year working in the industry, Rielley also volunteers as a member of the local forestry committee. This non-profit group consists of members from various forestry organizations, and they aim to educate the community on the industry and give back. Some of the ways they do that is host a tree planting for elementary school students on the science of planting trees, doll out bursaries and conduct fundraisers.

Thank You All!

SEPT. 20-26

Hours:

MAIN LOCATION & CLEARANCE CENTRE

Monday to Friday 9 am - 6:00 pm Saturday: 9:30 am - 5:30 pm Closed Sundays & Holidays

2025 Coutlee Ave., Merritt

123 456 789

Phone: 250-378-2332

M.L. BROWN LUMBER LTD. M.L. Brown & Sons

Stump to dump contractor since 1964 Mechanical since 1988

Proud to be part of our local forest industry. Submitted photo

Phone: 378-5524 or 378-2928 P.O. Box 1077, Merritt, B.C. V1K 1B8

A Special Salute to All our hard working Forestry Employees. PH: 250-378-5959


THURSDAY, September 17, 2015 • B15

www.merrittherald.com

LOWER NICOLA INDIAN BAND Natural Resources Department & Shulus Forest Enterprises Inc.

Proudly Celebrating NATIONAL FORESTRY WEEK SEPT. 20-26, 2015 TIMBER DEVELOPMENT • Block Development • Timber Cruising • GIS • Full Phase Timber Planning & development

SILVICULTURE • Re-forestation • Slashing • Mistletoe Management • Fuel Management

RESEARCH • Archaeological Assessments • Mule Deer Grazing

Lower Nicola Indian Band Natural Resources Department and Shulus Forest Enterprises Inc. workforce is comprised of a Registered Forest Technician, as well as forestry graduates from NVIT. The majority of staff is of aboriginal ancestry and is certified in Resources, Information and Standard Certification for quality, control and consistency in the data collection and analysis involved in dealing with First Nations Forestry Referrals. The company also has its BC Forest Safety Council SAFE Company Certification.

TThank You to All of Our Employees & Clients for Your Hard Work & Support Contact: Todd Chamberlain, RFT e-mail: nrdeptmanager@lnib.net

Lower Nicola Indian Band 181 Nawishaskin Lane, Merritt, BC V1K 0A7 Tel: 250-378-5157 Fax: 250-378-1385






  

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www.TOLKO.com

September 17, 2015

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B16 â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, www.merrittherald.com

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