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HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS

AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER • FOUNDED IN 2006

JANUARY 10, 2014

THE

SIXTY-FOUR

REPORT

We look back at the best — and the worst — body parts of 2013

50 years ago tomorrow, on Saturday, Jan. 11, 1964, the United States Surgeon General released a landmark report directly linking smoking with disease and death.

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his is why you read the Medical Examiner. Because we take on the epic challenges. After all, there must be a couple hundred thousand body parts. Nobody knows them all, not even doctors. But that’s of no concern to us. If something is that obscure, it wouldn’t make this list anyway. Let’s begin with the top five Most Valuable Parts, the ones we simply could not live without. May we have the envelopes, please?

The MVP Awards • #1 The Buttocks You say butt, the next guy says keister, Forest Gump says buttocks, Brits say bum, your doctor says gluteus maximus. Then there’s rump, booty, glutes, tush, fanny, derriere, bottom, patootie and last but not least, badonkadonk. No matter the name, this was, for the umpteenth straight (and hopefully final) year, our Most Valuable Part. Our sedentary lifestyles use it way too much. And this muscle group is enjoying all-new uses in twerking. To “unseat” the rear from its ironic position (at the front) is a simple proposition: get up. Be active. Don’t stand for so much sitting. Aim for a period of

activity — walking, for example — at least every other day. Oh, and go easy on the twerking. Please. • #2 The Stomach The tummy actually gave the keister quite a run for its money, but came up just short. But not for lack of trying: the latest CDC stats say that 69.2 percent of us are overweight. Of that number about half (35.9 percent) are obese. What’s the difference? Without getting too technical, obesity is when someone’s weight gets to the point where it lugs illness, disability and death along with it, or at minimum increased risk of the above. To get technical about it, obesity begins with anything that’s more than 20 percent over the ideal weight for our height. What’s ideal? A six-foot guy with a medium frame should tip the scales in the 157-170 range. A 5’6” woman: 130-144.

Which of these match theone others?

If being alive is the kind of thing you find important, you might be interested to note that about 300,000 people in the US die every year from causes linked to obesity. Many more suffer from illness and disability. The cure: less filling. Check a chart for your height and ideal weight at medical-dictionary. thefreedictionary.com/obesity

• #3 Thumbs Put your hands together for fingers, too. Call it a tie (thanks to our opposable thumbs). Where would we be without around-theclock texting? We are more in touch than ever before. That is great! Even on a beach in Maui looking at a spectacular sunset or peering over the edge of the Grand Canyon, we’re looking at a little screen, texting and checking Facebook updates. The human family is now more tightly knit than ever. Good job! Whenever we post a picture of our ham

doesn’t

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know a man here in Augusta, an elderly man, who is a heavy smoker. He enjoys smoking which, given the drug he’s addicted to, is not particularly surprising. At this stage of his life quitting would probably be a wrenching ordeal. What I think is unusual about this man is that he views all the clinical and medical evidence against tobacco the way some people view NASA’s moon landings: as non-existent. The “evidence” is all smoke and mirrors, maybe some kind of vast left-wing conspiracy. What about that? We’ve all heard about the famous Surgeon General’s findings, still remembered after all these decades on cigarettepack warning labels. Many of us don’t know, however, the background of the report itself and the debate that preceded it. For starters, do you find it odd that a landmark report of this significance was released on a Saturday? That decision was made in part due to fears about the report’s effect on the stock market. Another surprise is that the report made the impact it did, but there was a key reason for that. More about that in a moment. No one even then would say connecting cancer and smoking was headline news. For more than a decade, respected studies had been establishing a clear link between tobacco and lung cancer. In 1952, for example, a Reader’s Digest article, “Cancer by the Carton,” caused a sharp decrease in US tobacco consumption. By 1954, the American Cancer Society was publicly warning smokers of their higher lung cancer risk. The tobacco industry fought back. “There isn’t a single shred of substantial evidence to link cigarette smoking and lung cancer directly,” said the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company in 1954. In a move that would set the tone for the industry stance

Please see MVP page 3

Please see SURGEON GENERAL page 2

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

SURGEON GENERAL… from page 1 for decades to come, tobacco companies issued a joint appeal called “A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers” that received wide publicity. Some of its main points: “1. Medical research of recent years indicates many possible causes of lung cancer. 2. There is no agreement among the authorities regarding what the cause is.

3. There is no proof that smoking is one of the causes. 4. Statistics purporting to link smoking with the disease could apply with equal force to any one of many other aspects of modern life. Indeed the validity of the statistics themselves are questioned by numerous scientists.” And so it went for decades. These efforts were coupled with

a massive advertising campaign in which they presented conflicting information, calling into doubt the accuracy of the Surgeon General’s report. Filtered cigarettes were heavily marketed, and doctors were hired as spokesmen or featured prominently in ads (see below), a practice that had been a tobacco industry staple for years. Between medical science

and big tobacco it was check, checkmate. While all of this was going on, however, tobacco companies were privately and secretly aware of the link between smoking and cancer, a fact that came to light when secret internal documents came to light years later. The next move was back in the hands of public health officials: in both 1957 and 1959, then-Surgeon General Leroy Burney issued official proclamations about the link between heavy smoking and lung cancer. Nobody was really listening. What was different in 1964 when Surgeon General Luther Terry made the world finally take notice? Part of the answer lies in the experts impaneled by Terry two years previously. Their commission was to examine all the available scientific and clinical evidence and issue a definitive report. At the time, Terry himself was a smoker, and he was not alone. Half of the ten member panel of expert scientists and public health professionals were also smokers. The tobacco industry was given unchallenged veto power over all panel nominees to prevent anyone from serving whom they believed to be unfairly biased. That may have seemed like a reckless nod to the power of the tobacco industry, but when the report was issued — conclusively and definitively establishing a clear link between smoking, illness, and death — it made the finding that much more forceful. Then and now You could be in your twenties today and still know that tobacco was everywhere in the 1960s and before. Watch just about any old movie you can see that people smoked everywhere all the time. Johnny Carson

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smoked on his TV show while conversing with guests. People smoked in their offices and on airplanes. Overall, 42 percent of adults smoked in 1964. There were early signs before ‘64 that smoking was not completely sacred. In 1953, North Dakota took the bold step of banning candy cigarettes. Within a year of the 1964 Surgeon General’s report, Congress passed legislation requiring cigarette packs to contain warning labels. In 1967, the FCC required TV and radio networks to provide free air time for anti-smoking messages, and then cigarette advertising was banned altogether in 1971. The Seventies also witnessed the beginning of restricting smokers to limited designated smoking areas in airplanes and other public places. That effort has never really stopped: new guidelines on the federal, state, county, city and corporate level continue to restrict public areas where smoking is permitted. The result of all the effort of the past fifty years and more is viewed with mixed emotions in the public health community. On the one hand, nearly half of all living adults who ever smoked have quit. The antismoking campaign is a major success with few parallels in the history of public health. It is being accomplished despite the addictive nature of tobacco and the powerful economic forces promoting its use. Even so, more than 45 million American adults still smoke, more than 8 million are living with a serious illness caused by smoking, and about 438,000 Americans still die prematurely each year as a result of tobacco use. You have to wonder if health officials of 1964 would have ever thought there would be so much work still to be done fifty years later. +

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DR. DAVID DOYLE, JR

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JANUARY 10, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

sandwich on Instagram, we’re one step closer to world peace. Who knew it would be this simple? • #4 Ears We are surrounded by an ocean of sound, a lot of it necessary, some of it potentially life-saving (hearing sirens and horns, for instance). At the other end of the spectrum are relaxing and soothing sounds like music and conversation with people we love. What elevated ears to MVP status? Keeping them fed with non-stop sound at every waking moment: ear buds, TV, radio. Faced with

a few moments of potential silence? Grab a cell phone instead and help keep ears in the Top Five MVParts. • #5 Quick, name a body part that before last year was seen only rarely, almost never in public, and even then, just maybe the tip of it for a fleeting split-second. Let’s all thank a certain singer for elevating this seldom seen body part to fame and full frontal status. Yes, #5 goes to the tongue. May we see less of it in 2014. Are we clear, Miley?

Now on to the always interesting LVPs, the Least Valuable Parts of the human body. Do you believe in evolution? Then get ready to kiss these parts goodbye. They’re growing more obsolete by the generation. These are the dregs of body parts. Let’s begin with the very least valuable body part, and work our way up the list. • The brain Kids, back in the old days there were people who were jokingly called “walking encyclopedias.” Ask them any question — what is the longest river in Upper Mongolia, for example — and they knew the answer. They knew the phone numbers of all their friends. By heart. Today those same people don’t even know their own spouse’s phone number. They aren’t walking encyclopedias anymore. That’s what Google and Wikipedia are for, silly. • Feet You’ve already read how much people use their keisters these days. It’s the #1 MVP. But there was a time when people hardly had time to sit down. They were on their feet all day long, working and walking, walking and working. Now we’ll drive around a parking lot (while seated) for ten minutes to avoid taking a few extra steps. Ironically, in trying to save a few feet, we’re making feet obsolete. In a few million years according to Darwinian theory, our feet will be no more, along with our legs.

• Muscles Change is the one thing that never changes; it’s ever-present. In this case, the change is work. Our ancestors would work with sledgehammers, axes, shovels, teams of oxen, horse drawn plows. They would wrestle huge logs, steel bars, and the occasional bear. Today work for many involves moving a mouse and occasionally clicking it. Who needs muscles? • Sweat glands The days of sweat are not completely behind us. We do have to cut the grass in the summer, after all. But imagine the days of yore, when a summer day with triple digit heat and humidity would descend upon us and not a house or car in all of Augusta had air conditioning. Today, the ones without A/C would be the exception. Sweat glands aren’t extinct yet, but they’re getting perilously close to becoming mere perspiration glands. Then they’ll be downgraded to sheen glands. Oblivion will ultimately follow. +

HEARING IMPAIRED EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETER WANTED Responsible for assisting students who are deaf/hard of hearing to understand what is being spoken; must have the ability to understand subject matter so student can accurately translate spoken language into sign language and interpret sign language into spoken language for classroom participation; must have strong listening, sign language and communication skills. (7hours/day, 180 days/year)

SEE PAGE SIX

What’s your story?

!

Nearly all of us — even doctors and nurses — are sometimes patients. Perhaps you were recently injured playing your favorite sport, or years ago you somehow got hurt without even leaving your favorite recliner. Maybe you were diagnosed with a dreaded disease, mugged in a dark and lonely parking lot, or you stubbed your toe in the safety of your own bedroom. On the other hand, perhaps you needed medical attention 5,000 miles from home. Whatever your medical experience, we’d like to hear your story for our Medicine in the First Person feature. It can be frightening or funny, ordinary or extraordinary, just a few paragraphs long or quite a lengthy tale, bylined or anonymous. We’ll publish your encounters with the medical profession as often as we receive them. + Send your submissions for Medicine in the First Person to the Augusta Medical Examiner via e-mail: info@AugustaRx.com or to PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397. (The Medical Examiner reserves the right to accept, reject, or edit any submission at its sole discretion.)

AUGUSTA

MVP… from page 1

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MEDICAL EXAMINER

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AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER

www.AugustaRx.com The Medical Examiner’s mission: to provide information on topics of health and wellness of interest to general readers, to offer information to assist readers in wisely choosing their healthcare providers, and to serve as a central source of news within every part of the Augusta medical community. Submit editorial content to graphicadv@knology.net Direct editorial and advertising inquiries to: Daniel R. Pearson, Publisher & Editor E-mail: Dan@AugustaRx.com Augusta Medical Examiner photography: H + D Photography www.handdphoto.com

High School diploma required; bachelor’s degree in any field and hold valid certification through the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf; or hold Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment at level 3.5 or higher; Georgia Professional Standards Commission License for Educational Interpreter, preferred. Salary commensurate with experience.

www.AugustaRx.com • E-mail: graphicadv@knology.net

For more information, please contact Special Services, Columbia County Board of Education, 4781 Hereford Farm Road, Evans, GA 30809 (706) 541-2723, ext. 5341.

Opinions expressed by the writers herein are their own and their respective institutions. Neither the Augusta Medical Examiner, Pearson Graphic 365 Inc., or its agents or employees take any responsibility for the accuracy of submitted information, which is presented for informational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnosis and treatment, consult your doctor. The appearance of advertisements in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised.

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© 2014 PEARSON GRAPHIC 365 INC.


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JANUARY 10, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Hope IS Possible

Start right where you are

Helen Blocker-Adams

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tart right where you are Really, is there any other option? A new year is here. I love the first day of a new year. There is something special about turning the page or a chapter of a previous year in anticipation of greatness forthcoming in the upcoming twelve months. For the most part, we can’t simply erase things in the past, but we shouldn’t allow ourselves to be so consumed with them that they stifle our potential in the future. Too many of us do that. We think we should have

lost 100 pounds, or found the love of our lives, or became debt-free, or made everyone happy. We want our lives to be perfect and yet that is impossible. We are considering making career moves, but we don’t think we are good enough, smart enough or good-looking enough. Too many of us are afraid that people will talk about us. And too many lack the God-sized faith we ought to have. Why do we put ourselves through this torture, year after year after year? And then when the new year comes around, we find ourselves in almost the same place as years past. Does this sound all too familiar? Isn’t it time to do something a little different? Make a commitment to fulfill a dream you’ve always had — big or small — and stick to it. No matter what that commitment is. Step into the deep end of the pool and plunge, versus submerging your big toe on the kiddie side of the pool. What’s the worst thing that can happen? You could fail, but at least

you tried. You could have people talk about you, but ask yourself, what did they do to make a difference? You might lose a few pounds or find that special someone (or be found by the right person), or you may just start that new business you’ve been considering for the past ten years. The opportunities are limitless and have no boundaries - except the ones we put on ourselves. A friend of mine sends me daily motivational messages and this one (right) came the day I was preparing this first column of 2014. I found it to be incredibly profound and in alignment with what I already had on my mind to share. Enjoy and Happy New Year! Helen Blocker-Adams is Executive Director of the Southeast Enterprise Institute; mental health advocate; and youth advocate. You can email her at hba@hbagroup-intl. com or visit her website at www. helenblockeradams.com

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Start where you are, and do what you can. Make use of what you have, in the time available to you, and there’s much you can get done. Don’t waste your time waiting for conditions to be perfect, for they will never be. Go ahead, with things as they are, and begin making real progress. The place to aim is as high as you can imagine. Yet the place to start is right where you are. Let go of any concerns about not having enough time, or money, resources or anything else. Focus instead on the great value and potential of what you do have and of what you can do right now. See the real treasure that exists in your opportunity and ability to make good, effective use of this moment. Claim that treasure by going ahead and putting forth your very best effort. Today is your day to achieve and to make your world a better place. Start where you are, and get yourself solidly on the way to wherever you wish to be. +

- Author Unknown

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JANUARY 10, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT MAKING PERFECT NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

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And don’t give me this “pray for world peace” or “stop the greenhouse gases” and “global warming” crap that everybody mutters about. Mark Twain had it right when he said, “Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does a damn thing about it.” Nobody should lie when they make New Year’s resolutions. After all, a resolution is a promise for the future, and God hears everything. So don’t lie to God. When dealing with God, if you say it, you gotta do it. (I wonder if that applies to sacred wedding vows. Maybe we should deal with that another day.) Anyway, rest easy, dear hearts. Disaster shall be averted. Have no fear. Bad Billy is here. You shall be saved by Bad Billy Laveau’s Near-Perfect New Year Resolutions Treatise. I have used it repeatedly and not once have I lied to God while using this list. I have thought about copyrighting it so I could get rich collecting royalties, but out of the goodness of my heart, I am providing it free for the betterment of mankind. So here it is:

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Best

e n i c i d ME

Bad Billy Laveau’s Sin Perfect New Year’s Resolution Proclamation. I hereby solemnly affirm and swear that for the next calendar year I shall resist, refrain from, and avoid at all costs the following:

• Snake Handling • Sky-Diving • Bungee Jumping • Believing everything politicians say • Eating considerably more than I ate last year • Setting my hair on fire to avoid haircuts • Intentionally overpaying my income taxes • Playing catch with live hand grenades • Juggling open straight razors • Licking frozen flagpoles and railroad tracks • Dyeing my wife’s hair green while she sleeps • Telling neighbors my granddaughter is ugly • Telling neighbors my

granddaughter is stupid • Joking with airport attendants about a bomb in my suitcase • Voting for Marion Williams for anything • Confusing dot Indians with feather Indians • Wearing a DAVID DUKES 4 PRESIDENT button to an NAACP rally • Wearing a BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL button to a KKK rally • Considering politically

AUGUSTA

ews flash: New Year’s resolutions come to mind this time of year. None of us were as good this past year as we had hoped. Therefore it is time to try once again to do better. Unfortunately most of us are the way we are because we want to be the way we are. That’s just human nature. We don’t eat sugar because it is white. We eat sugar because it provides energy … and it taste soooooo good. The same goes for ice cream, pineapple milkshakes, strawberry short cake, and divinity candy. I don’t need any of those things, but they are so very good just thinking about them my taste buds fibrillate. As I once heard, most of our private vices tend to be sinful, unhealthy, or fattening. And we enjoy them. So what are we to do when it comes time to making New Year’s resolutions that are supposed to make us better people? Or to make the world a better place to live? Or for that matter, to give up something for Lent? Or to promise God we will do (or not do) something if He will just get us out of the last stupid mess we got ourselves into?

correctness when deciding Right vs. Wrong • Ordering pig knuckles in a Kosher restaurant • Asking for a second glass of wine at Communion • Using the words “Honey” and “fat” in the same sentence • Using “damn” and God in the same sentence • Using Limburger Cheese scented underarm deodorant • Using Jalapeño juice eye water • Using Habañera lip gloss • Texting while driving through Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta Now, that was not hard, was it? While God might not think you heart was not into serious resolutions, at least you won’t be lying to Him. And that, dear hearts, is always a good thing. + Bad Billy Laveau is a retired MD with a pointed sense of humor. Bad Billy speaks and entertains at public and private events for audiences not subject to cardiac seizure secondary to overwhelming laughter and glee BadBilly@knology.net or 706306-9397 FREE T AKE-H OME C OPY!

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HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS

AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER • FOUNDED IN 2006

JANUARY 10, 2014

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The Short White Coat

JANUARY 10, 2014

by Caroline Colden

“This search for what you want is like tracking something that doesn’t want to be tracked. It takes time to get a dance right, to create something memorable.” – Fred Astaire The year 2013 was a momentous one for me. I completed my 2nd year of medical school in May, and spent the next several weeks after studying for my first board exam, which I took at the end of June. In July, I then began my 3rd year of school with an OBGYN rotation in Vidalia, GA. The 3rd year continued for me after that with rotations in Pediatrics, Pediatric Radiology, Palliative Care & Hospice, and Family Medicine. I believe I underwent a steady maturation process as the year progressed, or at least I hope I did. I believe that with each week and each step I took, I became a little better equipped to handle the next weeks and steps. Now, at the start of 2014, I have the second half of 3rd year to tackle and board exam #2 coming up

this summer; it is my hope that I continue to refine my studying habits and abilities to cope with stress as time goes by, week by week and step by step. Over the holidays, I went home for a few days. My mom and I got really into watching these old movies on TCM, and they were so cute! We watched “Meet Me in St. Louis” with Judy Garland, and the original black & white version of “Miracle on 34th St.” My mom says I was kind of like the little girl played by Natalie Wood when I was little, although I’m not sure I was ever as good at blowing bubbles with my bubble gum. Then we also had a lot of fun watching those classic Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers dancing movies like “Top Hat” and “Swing Time.” I have to say, if I could choose between

A med student’s notebook studying for school or being Fred Astaire’s dance partner, I would choose studying – it would be a thousand times more stressful and daunting to try to keep up with him on the dance floor than any test thrown at me! Although Ginger does indeed do a wonderful job dancing with him, which is why the duo is so enchanting to watch. And I’m sure at some point, too, in the pair’s early years, Ginger and Fred must themselves have undergone somewhat of a maturation process before they became the dynamic pair that they were. Just as students don’t become doctors overnight,

neither do movie stars instantly become such impeccable performers… At least that is what I think. I would be lying if I said I was not nervous about the year 2014. Because now the end of medical school has drawn one year closer; I have 1.5 more years - just 3 semesters - to go before I am a medical doctor (if I am fortunate enough to have all go according to my plans and hopes, that is). It is thrilling, but I am a little terrified. Is there any better motivation to study than contemplating this fact alone? But in all seriousness, I know it is best just to take everything as it comes and to keep working at it. Fred Astaire may have been born with natural and amazing talents with dancing, but he still had to work to cultivate and perfect it into the art for which he became so famous. I believe I can be a good doctor someday, but am definitely glad there is still a year and a half left for me to practice at the art of medicine. So greetings to you, 2014. May you bring many fruits to us all with each week and step we take. +

WE’RE BEGGING YOU We’re never too proud to beg. What we’re begging for is Medicine in the First Person stories. With your help, we’d like to make this a feature in every issue of the Medical Examiner. After all, everybody has a story of something health- or medicine-related, and lots of people have many stories. Send your interesting (or even semi-interesting) stories to the Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903 or e-mail to Dan@AugustaRx.com. Thanks!

“The cause was a mystery for a long time.” “And that’s when I fell.” nearest hospital “He doesn’t remember a thing.” “The was 30 miles away.” “I was a battlefield medic.” “He was just two when he died.”

“OUCH!”

“It was a terrible tragedy.” “She saved “I sure learned my lesson.” “I retired from medicine my life.” “It seemed like a miracle.” seven years ago.” “We had triplets.” “It was my first year “I thought, ‘Well, this is it’.” NOTHING SEEMED of medical school.” “They took me to the hospital by helicopter.” TO HELP, UNTIL. . “It took 48 stitches.”

ambulance crashed.” “Now THAT hurt!” “The “My leg was broken “I’m not supposed to be alive.”

“This was on my third day in Afghanistan.” in three places.” “I lost 23 pounds.” “Turned out it was just indigestion.” “At first I thought it was something I ate.” “The smoke detector woke me up.”

Everybody has a story. Tell us yours. Here’s our “No Rules Rules.” We’ll publish your name and city, or keep you anonymous. Your choice. Length? Up to you. Subject? It can be a monumental medical event or just a stubbed toe. It can make us laugh or make us cry. One thing we’re not interested in, however: please, no tirades against a certain doctor or hospital. Ain’t nobody got time for that.


JANUARY 10, 2014

Southern Girl Eats Clean

Bruschetta Quinoa Pasta

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Bruschetta Quinoa Pasta

Making the dish: Chop tomatoes and basil and set aside. Cook Pasta according to directions. While pasta is cooking, heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium to high heat and then add garlic to the skillet. Sauté until lightly browned, reduce heat to low, add tomatoes to the skillet and

Daniel Village Barber Shop 2522 Wrightsboro Road

This is an unbelievably flavorful pasta meal that I adore. Do not get this pasta confused with the typical heavy tomato sauce pasta. It’s very light and you can truly taste every ingredient in the dish. The balsamic and the basil completely make this pasta. I used to make a similar version of this recipe before my clean-eating conversion. That recipe had a lot of unnecessary and unhealthy ingredients such as processed mozzarella and white flour pasta and I served it with a side of garlic buttersaturated breadsticks. Once we changed our diets, I realized that I could easily change this recipe and make it healthier and cleaner. I substituted quinoa pasta for regular white flour pasta. Quinoa is an amazing super grain and it adds nutrition as well as being delicious. It cooks up perfectly al dente. I also left off the cup of processed cheese from the original recipe and chose to add a dab of high quality grass-fed cheese parmesan to the top instead. This is super simple and easy dish to prepare. The hardest part is chopping the fresh Roma tomatoes, but I totally believe that you must use fresh tomatoes instead of canned. It simply makes for a more fabulous dish. I hope you’ll give this recipe a try and start your clean eating convert this year.

What you’ll need: • 1 Box of Ancient Harvest Quinoa Pasta • 2 Tbsp. of organic coldpressed extra virgin olive oil • 1 small bulb of garlic, crushed (Yes, the whole bulb. If you must decrease.... go ahead.) • 8-10 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced • 1/4 Cup of fresh basil, cut into 1/4 inch strips • 1/2 Cup of dry white wine (I used Pinot Grigio) • 3-4 Tbsp. of high quality balsamic vinegar • 1/2 Tsp. of ground pepper • 1/2 Tsp. of Real Salt or sea salt • 1/4 Cup of grass fed cheese, parmesan, grated

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Wrightsboro Road

Daniel Field

Augusta Mall



We’re on Wrightsboro Rd. at Ohio Avenue.

THERE IS NO “U” IN MEDICAL EXAMINER.

the next 4 ingredients. Simmer on low for 5-7 minutes until ingredients are heated through. Do not overcook the tomatoes.... Make sure that they are still a bit firm and not mushy. Add salt and pepper to taste. Drain pasta and place in a pasta bowl. Pour tomato mixture over pasta; sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Serve immediately with sprouted grain bread, toasted with extra virgin olive oil and garlic. +



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Alisa Rhinehart writes the blog www.southerngirleatsclean.com She is a working wife and mother living in Evans, Georgia. Visit her blog for more recipes and information on clean eating.

AND IF YOUR AD ISN’T ON THESE PAGES, THERE IS NO “YOU” EITHER.

Try our Pot Head Blend Currently available at Inner Bean on Davis Road.

“Coffee is good medicine.” — J. Perkins Brewster III.

Our next issue date: January 24, 2014

Anytime you see the Scrubs of Evans ad on our front page, that issue’s randomly chosen Mystery Word Contest winner gets the usual haul plus a $40 gift card from Scrubs of Evans!


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P harmacy 411

OUR NEWSSTANDS Medical locations:

Plus... 500+ doctors offices throughout the area for staff and waiting rooms, as well as many nurses stations and waiting rooms of area hospitals.

Not too sure about Obamacare? ParksCare will sort it all out for you and answer all your questions. Stop by today.

P

ARKS

HARMACY

and number of medicines you have to take, the better on your kidneys. Decongestants are also not indicated if you are on an antidepressant medicine called an MAO inhibitor. There is one main cough suppressant available in overthe-counter products. It’s called dextromethorphan and is usually (but not always) abbreviated DM. There are two ways to look at a cough. It is a troublesome nuisance that keeps you awake at night and is an annoyance to you and others during the day. However it is also serving a purpose in that the cough process helps keep chest congestion broken loose and moving so that the congestion can come up and out of the chest. That is a good thing. It prevents the congestion from hardening and turning into pneumonia or other serious conditions. DM comes with the same MAO inhibitor warning discussed above. Remember the downside to constantly and completely suppressing a cough in that it cannot keep chest congestion moving. A good compromise is to suppress the cough at night and then only partially suppress during the day so we keep the good effect of coughing. A product called guaifenesin helps coughs loosen up chest congestion. It is the active ingredient in Robitussin and is the over-the-counter medicine with the least warnings. This medicine thins congestion, making it easier to get up and out of the chest. See your pharmacist for a recommendation for this product. Let’s review: congestion is easily self-treated with over-thecounter medications, but that’s not always the best course. Any congestion lasting over seven days, or congestion that becomes worse or moves from clear or white to yellow or green should be a sign to see your doctor. + Questions about this article or suggestions for future columns can be sent to us at cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net Written for the Medical Examiner by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson (cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net )

Boardwalk to Bark Place Kennnel & Daycare welcoming dogs 40 lbs and under

S

elcome To Pharmacy 411! Today we are going to look into when an over-the-counter cough or cold medicine may not be recommended. Let’s begin by saying that you should read all the manufacturer’s warnings on the package of any overthe-counter medicine. Be sure to ask your pharmacist or physician if you have any questions about what you and reading. As we all know, there is a huge assortment of products available to help treat the symptoms of colds and flu, sore throats and allergies. But does that mean that a given medicine is helpful in all situations? No. So let’s look at just a few of the don’ts when it comes to taking these medicines. As always, this is not intended to replace a good talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Those with allergies are familiar with an antihistamine. It is used to dry up and prevent the watery allergic congestion. Seems simple enough, dry up the congestion and the congestion goes away. Great, in theory. But it doesn’t always work. If you have congestion in your chest, you want to avoid antihistamines for the most part unless recommended by your physician. The reason is that if you try to dry congestion in your chest you could cause a more serious situation, like pneumonia. Also if you have kidney problems, be careful with antihistamines since they are filtered by and notoriously rough on the kidneys. We don’t want to cause kidney failure just to treat a mild case of congestion. Decongestants are used to treat the sinus congestion where you have facial pain and pressure. This is characterized by thick mucus and often sinus headaches. The downside is that decongestants can elevate your heart rate and blood pressure, so if you have hypertension or if you are being treated for a heart-related condition, avoid self-medicating with these products. Also, patients who happen to be diabetic should use decongestants with caution. There is also a kidney warning on these products just like on the antihistamines. Remember that the kidneys filter almost all medicines, so the lower amount

N ES

W

FIT

• Barney’s Pharmacy, 2604 Peach Orchard Rd. • Birth Control Source, 1944 Walton Way • GRU Summerville Student Bookstore • Blue Sky Kitchen, 990 Broad Street • Columbia County Library, main branch lobby, Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans • Enterprise Mill (North Tower), 1450 Greene Street, Augusta • Daniel Village Barber Shop, Wrightsboro Road at Ohio Ave. • Hartley’s Uniforms, 1010 Druid Park Ave, Augusta • International Uniforms, 1216 Broad Street, Augusta • Marshall Family Y, Belair Rd, Evans • Mellow Mushroom, 12th and Broad Streets, Augusta • Parks Pharmacy, Georgia Avenue, North Augusta • Southside Family Y, Tobacco Road, Augusta • Surrey Center, Surrey Center Pharmacy, Highland Avenue, Augusta • Top-Notch Car Wash, 512 N. Belair Road, Evans • Wild Wing Cafe, 3035 Washington Road, Augusta

WHEN SHOULD I NOT TAKE MY COLD MEDICINE?

5873 Huntington Drive Grovetown, Georgia (706) 840-3141 (706) 556-8127 www.boardwalktobarkplace.com

t ha n Less

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a million people can’t be wron g.

Advertise here companies who already support us !

Around town:

Very little if anything about healthcare is inexpensive, and that includes medicine. Tiny pills can command large prices. Over-the-counter medications may be less expensive, but are they also less effective? Find the answers to lots of your drug store questions in this column written by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson exclusively for the Medical Examiner.

+

s of the ten Join

• Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr, 15th St., Main Entrance • Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Uptown Div., Wrightsboro Rd., main lobby • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, ER Lobby Entrance • Eisenhower Hospital, Main Lobby, Fort Gordon • George C. Wilson Drive (by medical center Waffle House and mail boxes) • GHSU Hospital, 1120 15th Street, South & West Entrances • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Parking Deck entrance • GHSU Hospital, Emergency Room, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Children’s Medical Center, Harper Street, Main Lobby • GHSU, Laney-Walker Boulevard transit stop, Augusta • Select Specialty Hospital, Walton Way, Main entrance lobby • Trinity Hospital, Wrightsboro Road, main lobby by elevators • Trinity Hospital Home Health, Daniel Village, main lobby • University Health Federal Credit Union/ University Hospital Human Resources, 1402 Walton Way, Main Lobby • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Emergency Room lobby area • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Outside Brown & Radiology/Day Surgery • University Hospital - Columbia County, 465 N. Belair Road, Main Lobby • University Hospital Prompt Care, 3121 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta

JANUARY 10, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

437 Georgia Avenue, North Augusta, SC

803-279-7450 parkspharmacy.com

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JANUARY 10, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Ask a Dietitian

PAPER OR PLASTIC?

Q: My new year’s resolution is to lose weight by eating healthier, but I haven’t been successful in my previous diets. What can I do differently this year? Answer: Weight loss tends to be a popular new year’s resolution every year. However, the challenging part for most people is sticking with a weight loss plan. You may have tried numerous diets before and have not seen the results you wanted, but it is still possible for you to lose weight and eat healthier. There are many factors to consider when trying to lose weight. The true key is making lifestyle changes. Here are a few basic concepts that can help you get started on your weight loss resolution. Before you sign up for a gym membership or run to the grocery store to purchase healthy foods, first figure out what you really want to accomplish. Sometimes people get into the excitement of the New Year and jump into a diet plan without mapping out a goal. Setting a goal can help you get focused and motivated. Make sure your goal isn’t too general, like “to eat better.” Aim for a goal that is specific, like “lose 5 pounds in 1 month by limiting sugary drinks to 1 cup a day and walking 4 times a week.” With this example, you know what your goal is (to lose 5 pounds) and how you plan to achieve it (exercise and limit sweet drinks). You also know when the goal should be complete (in 1 month). Make sure your goal is realistic. For instance, you cannot lose 30 pounds in 30 days. It can be helpful to set small goals every week or once a month that will work toward achieving your ultimate goal,

such as losing 50 pounds within a year. This way you can break your goal down into easy steps. Nutrition will play a major role in your weight loss plan. There are so many diets out there that it may be hard to figure out which one is right for you. Also, you may know of success stories and want to follow diet plans others have tried. However, what worked for someone else may or may not work for you, especially if you have a medical condition that requires a special diet. Consult with a local registered dietitian for nutrition counseling and for a meal plan that can meet your dietary needs. Overall, there isn’t one magical diet that will cause you to lose weight and lose it fast. Technically, you are already on a diet. The foods and beverages you consume daily are your current diet. You can make changes in your existing diet that will help you shed some pounds. For example, you can eat baked chicken instead of fried. You can increase your water intake to 6-8 cups a day. One issue that people may have is figuring out which foods are healthy. Here are tips to avoiding some common diet mistakes. • It is good to limit salt, fat and sugar in your diet. However, be careful with diet foods labeled “low” or “reduced.” A food product that’s low in fat may be high in sodium. You will have to read the Nutrition Facts to determine if the product is right for you.

• Be aware of diets that guarantee quick results. They tend to be short term, and they do not help you establish good eating habits in the long run. Also, beware of diets that eliminate a food group, such as banning grains. Including each food group in your diet will give you the variety of nutrients that your body needs. • Even though you plan to lose weight by dieting, exercise is important too. Being active has the benefit of burning calories and increasing your energy. Research has shown that people who diet and exercise could lose 30 percent more weight than people who only diet. • According to the WeightControl Information Network (WIN), it is recommended to get moderate aerobic exercise for 150 minutes a week and strength exercises at least twice a week. If you’re not in physical shape to start, then set a workout goal that you can reach right now and then increase your activity. Overall, don’t get discouraged. Weight loss is a process that may involve trial and error. In the meantime, enjoy the process of developing a healthier lifestyle. +

If you prefer paper, we’re all over town. If you like our digital version, it’s always available on your favorite device at the Medical Examiner blog (www.AugustaRx. com/news) or online at www.issuu.com/medicalexaminer. You can easily view back issues, too. +

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MEDICAL EXAMINER IS ONLINE •

— by Rachel Hollomon, East Central Health District, Richmond County Health Department.

When you grow your website you

• www.AugustaRx.com/news •

GROW YOUR PRACTICE Meaningful video gives patients a reason to visit your website, and gives you an opportunity to inform and educate.

Documentary Video Productions LLC (803) 645-8370 “Fact-based no-hype video creativity” You’ll like what we do for you or it’s free.

FOUNDINGS

They say the camera adds ten pounds. What if instead it added ten patients?

Former Trinity Hospital CEO Bill Atkinson’s book on the behind-the-scenes tales of twelve Augusta healthcare institutions.

NOW AVAILABLE AT AMAZON.COM Proceeds from the sale of this book benefit dementia research


+ 10

JANUARY 10, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Follow the Medical Examiner between MED ICARE issues at MATTERS our blog MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS +

by Trisha Whisenhunt

+

AugustaRX.com/news

and all the usual places

M

edicare Advantage Plans are another Medicare health plan choice you have as part of Medicare. Medicare Advantage Plans, or Part C, are offered by private companies approved by Medicare. If you enroll in a Part C, you still have Medicare. You will get your Part A (hospitalization) and Part B (medical insurance) coverage from the Medicare Advantage Plan, not Original Medicare. Advantage plans cover all Medicare services to include emergency and urgent care.

These plans must cover all of the services that Original Medicare offers except hospice and some care in qualifying clinical research studies. Advantage plans may offer extra coverage for vision, dental and hearing which Original Medicare does not cover; however, caution is advised when considering an advantage plan for the additional services as they may be limited. Although the cost of a Medicare Advantage Plan is often covered by your Part B monthly premium, there are situations

Parents, Teachers, Caregivers: Tired of fussing and nagging? ORGANIZE YOUR KIDS THE CHART MART WAY! AVAILABLE AT: Columbia County Library Cafe AGC Teacher Supply Dixie Dawgs at Saturday Augusta Market

where an individual may have to pay an extra premium. Medicare pays a fixed amount for your care every month to the companies offering Medicare Advantage Plans. These companies must follow the rules set by Medicare. Each Medicare Advantage Plan can charge different out-of-pocket costs and have different rules for how you get services, i.e., whether you need to visit a primary care physician, need a referral to see a specialist or use facilities or suppliers that belong to the plan for nonemergency or non-urgent care. The rules can change each year. The plan must notify you about any changes prior to the start of the next enrollment year. There are different types of Medicare Advantage Plans such as Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), Preferred Provider Organization (PPO), Private Fee for Service Plans (PFFS), Special Needs Plans (SNP) and HMO Point-ofService (POS) Plans. There is also a Medical Savings Account Plan (MSA) which combines a high deductible health plan with a bank account. Medicare deposits money into the account in an amount that is usually less than the deductible. You can use the money to pay for your health

care services during the year. Consult your Medicare and You handbook for details on each plan or call Medicare at 800633-4227. Medicare’s annual open enrollment runs from October 15th through December 7th. During this period, you may also enroll in or dis-enroll from a Medicare Advantage Plan. There is an additional annual enrollment period which runs from January 1st through February 14th. During this time, the only action that may be taken is the dis-enrollment from a Medicare Advantage Plan and returning to Original Medicare. You may not move into an advantage plan or switch to a different advantage plan. Make sure you understand how a plan works before you join. If you would like more information about a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can call any plan and request a “Summary of Benefits” (SB) document. Contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) at 800-866-5524464 for help comparing plans. Trisha Whisenhunt, Certified Medicare Counselor, CSRA Agency on Aging Resource: Medicare & You handbook, January 2014 +

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BUT WHEN I DO I REALIZE I’M TOTALLY MISSING OUT WHEN I DON’T. STAY HEALTHY MY FRIENDS. WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM/NEWS


JANUARY 10, 2014

The blog spot – Posted Nov. 11, 2013 at acountrydoctorwrites.wordpress.com

HIPPOCRATES’ FIRST APHORISM “Life is short, and Art long; the crisis fleeting; experience perilous, and decision difficult. The physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also to make the patient, the attendants, and the externals cooperate.” Hippocrates was a wise man. In an era where the causes of most diseases, even the functions of many organs, were unknown, he made detailed and astute observations that allowed him to become a master of prognosis. His first aphorism is not often quoted in its entirety. When I first read it, I was struck especially by the last two words, “externals cooperate.” It makes me think that perhaps doctoring a few thousand years ago might have been a lot like today. We aren’t the first physicians to deal with demands beyond those of the clinical circumstances, the patient and his or her family. I can only imagine who the externals were in Hippocrates’ time, but I am thoroughly familiar with who they are today: They are insurance company doctors and executives, pharmacy benefit managers and others who say yes or no to our diagnostic and treatment plans. They are the ghosts in the exam room when patients and doctors try to make plans together. The phrase “experience perilous” seems to imply that the gaining of experience is fraught with danger, but an alternate interpretation is that relying only on one’s own experience can be misleading. Hippocrates often emphasized the need to apply the known science to the practice of medicine. The central point is that it takes time and effort to learn the art of medicine, which is sometimes glossed over in our fast moving society. The volume of known science has obviously multiplied since Hippocrates’ time, and we can each know only a small fraction of it. But with all the available information now instantly searchable, we can become dangerous to our patients if we apply things without knowing them well through education and experience. So, in the spirit of Hippocrates:

Doctoring now may not be that different.

The artful practice of medicine requires understanding of the science, technical mastery of the craft, and wisdom. and Facts can be learned by anyone; experience is earned through years of practice; wisdom is granted to us only if our hearts and minds are open, in our practice of medicine, and in our lives. + Speaking of blogs, the Medical Examiner’s blog is found at www.AugustaRx.com/news It features new content daily. Please visit!

This could be yyou. The Medical Examiner can be delivered right to your door! Use the handy form on page 13

11 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

From the Bookshelf Here is another excellent book that pulls the curtain back on the practice of medicine. When many of us who are not medical professionals think about the life of a physician, we may only skim the surface: we fantasize unrealistically about their high incomes; we think about their sometimes amazing ability to save lives or their esteemed standing in our society; or we take the negative approach and bash them for mistakes we think they’ve made; some people think many doctors are arrogant and egotistical. Dr. Reilly’s book is a pretty effective antidote to that. It’s an open record of the life of “one doctor,” warts and all. For example, he tells very frankly of a case where he misdiagnosed a patient, failing to figure out the real issue in time to save the patients’ life. Every physician can relate to the regret and guilt and secondguessing Reilly describes in the aftermath of such a case, but for the rest of us it’s a reminder that physicians are neither superhuman nor infallible, nor should we expect them to be. A little empathy goes a long way — on both sides of the stethoscope. We can peek over

Reilly’s shoulder as thorny medical issues stubbornly refuse to be accurately diagnosed, and gain a new appreciation for how difficult it is to be a physician, even with the array of diagnostic tools at their disposal. On the other hand, by virtue of his years practicing medicine, Reilly also has developed a keen appreciation for what it feels like on the patient side of the healthcare equation, and he writes at length about what worked for medicine in days gone by, and what’s not working so well anymore. He offers informed opinions about where medicine is headed and where it should be headed. The core of this book,

however, is summarized in the subtitle: Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine. There is an undeniable fascination many have in vicariously experiencing the medical adventures and misadventures of others. This medical voyeurism explains the popularity of books like this one, medical dramas on TV, and the wide choice of Discovery Channel-style medical reality shows. We can’t seem to get enough, and the focus of this book is on patients, not Reilly. He gets personal with what he calls a “you are there” style of writing, recording the progress of cases in real time, as they happen, perhaps none more poignantly than the care of his own aging parents. In their nineties, Reilly knows that all of us, if we live long enough, will follow the same path eventually. When we do, one thing is certain: we won’t be treated by “one doctor.” But one doctor can make a difference. +

One Doctor: Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine, by Brendan Reilly, M.D.; 464 pages, published in September 2013 by Atria Books

Research News The magic pill! Medical science has finally come up with the long-awaited magic pill that prevents, cures, and treats cancer, heart disease, inflammation and more — and it’s safe and free! Forgive us for placing this on page 11 instead of page 1. As a nation we spend $350 billion each year on prescription drugs, but even people well below the poverty line can afford this pill. It would be criminal to withhold it or not recoomend taking it. It’s practically medical malpractice to not prescribe this pill in every possible application. What’s the magic pill? Here’s a quote from the past president of the American College of Sports Medicine: “Exercise has benefits for every body system; it is effective both as a treatment and for prevention of disease. It can improve memory and concentration, lessen sleep disorders, aid heart disease by lowering cholesterol and

reducing blood pressure, help sexual problems such as erectile dysfunction, and raise low libido. Exercise does it all. Even with cancer, particularly colon and recurrent breast cancer, the data show clearly that exercise is a deterrent. Newer studies on a glycoprotein called Interleukin 6 suggests that general body inflammation, a factor in almost every chronic disease, is reduced by regular exercise.” Can a person overdose on this pill? It’s possible. The greater danger is not using it at all. Here’s your excuse Are you one of those people who is habitually late? This is by no means official, but a UK researcher has identified what is being called Chronic Lateness Condition, and is associating it with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Other researchers have identified chronic lateness as a subtle form of rebellion, a behavior that says, “Nobody is

going to tell me when I have to be someplace.” Chronic Lateness is not recognized by the American Psychiatric Association. Many of us could use some improvements in the puncuality department. Here are three tips designed to improve puncuality. 1. View deadlines as non-negotiable, no ifs, ands, or buts. Consider it to be completely unacceptable to arrive anywhere late. 2. Monitor your time expenditures. Just as a person who spends money freely may not realize how much cash he blows, many of us don’t realize how much time we spend on regular tasks. Keep a diary for a week, recording how long it takes to do regular tasks, to drive to regular destinations, etc. You might be surprised to discover that they take considerably longer than believed. 3. Always plan to be early. And if you are, you’ll have a few minutes to relax. +


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JANUARY 10, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE EXAMiNERS

THE MYSTERY WORD

+

Did you write this article in the Medical Examiner I sure did. about flatulence? Do you like it?

by Dan Pearson

It’s interesting, but why use a jacket to illustrate the story?

You coulda fooled me. What is it?

That’s not just any old coat.

A wind breaker.

The Mystery Word for this issue: FESTINS

© 2014 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

ACROSS 1. Middle name of the U.S. Senate’s 1st President pro-tem 6. Color of an Augusta goose 10. Balkan inhabitant 14. Sports venue 15. City in Italy (and Georgia) 16. Hip bones 17. Rod, Australian tennis star 18. Month on the Jewish calendar 19. With 6-A, cyanosis clue 20. _____ Got A Secret 21. Swing music 23. Pictures 25. Forbidden in Berlin 27. Red dye 28. Changed 29. #1 TV cop show (abbrev) 30. Mr. Hogan 32. Asian nation, for short 33. Make lace 34. Otherwise 35. Preface to a book 38. Movie/game box color 39. Take away by force 40. Adult male deer 41. Synonym for 6-A 42. It can be green or black 43. Excavate 44. Augusta’s _____ Park 45. Take apart in a lab 49. Augusta’s _____ Building 51. Spine segment 52. The Terminator 53. _____ Corner 54. Large 55. Turmoil, confusion 56. _____ of Palms 58. Frosting 60. Labyrinth 61. Bright star 62. Rope used to guide a horse

BY

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Click on “Reader Contests”

QUOTATION PUZZLE 30

33

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VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM TO ENTER!

13

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved

59

DOWN 1. Spit 2. Journey 3. Return to a former condition 4. Single unit 5. Spice rack jar 6. Dared 7. Shade of green 8. Kill Bill star 9. Strangest; creepiest 10. Paul’s companion during missionary travels 11. Adjective some some bachelors 12. “Ready to eat?” measure 13. Type of fiddle or drum 22. Agenda entry 24. Disorderly crowd 26. Stephen Vincent _______ 29. Did possess

— Flannery O’Connor

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may be used only once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

63. Lyric poems 64. Adam and Eve’s home 65. Yard tool

Y E T H A S O E M A C B O L T H G C O O U T H R D A E S R N T T R N T O A C C I I I N D T G U O H

I O T T

48

31. ___ profit 33. Famous Turner 34. Efface 35. Non-medical doc 36. Georgia _______ Bank of yore 37. Arrange 38. Floyd with Augusta ties 39. Mosquito-borne virus 41. Small fish 42. Make weary 44. Grand ___ 45. Debase 46. Refluent 47. Cower 48. Graffiti artist 50. Burrowing animals 51. Flow controlling device 52. Bullets, BBs, etc. 57. ____ buster 59. Source of liver oil

E

6 3

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

U D O K U

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Solution p. 14

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle. All the listed letters following 1 are the 1st letters of each word; the letters following 2 are 2nd letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues or numbers with minimal choices listed. A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

E 1 2 3 4 1

2

3

1 2 H 1 2 3 4

W 1 2 3 4 1 2

N 1 2 3 4

1 2 1

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1

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3

M 1 2 3 4 4

5

1 . W W W W W W T U M B I 2 . S S H H O O E E A I U 3 . TA A N S E R M 4 . S T T T T E 5 . T

SAMPLE:

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

O 2

V 3

E 4

I 1

S 2

B 1

L 2

I 3

N 4

D 5

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved

WORDS NUMBER

1

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!


JANUARY 10, 2014

THE BEST MEDICINE ha... ha...

A

n unemployed mime is visiting the zoo one day and attempts to earn some money as a street performer. As soon as he starts to draw a crowd, though, the zookeeper notices, grabs the mime and drags him into his office. “Can you keep a secret?” he asks the mime. “Sure,” says the mime. The zookeeper explains that the zoo’s most popular attraction, a gorilla, has died suddenly. He fears attendance at the zoo will drop. He offers the mime a job to dress up as a gorilla until they can get another one. The mime takes the job. The next morning before the crowds arrive, the mime puts on the gorilla suit and enters the cage. He discovers that it’s a great job. He can sleep all he wants, play and make fun of people, and he draws bigger crowds than he ever did as a mime. But eventually the crowds tire of him and he gets bored just swinging on tires. He begins to notice that people are paying more attention to the lion in the cage next door. Not wanting to lose the attention of his audience (or his job), he climbs to the top of his cage, crawls across a partition, and dangles from the top to the lion’s cage. Of course, this makes the lion furious, but the crowd loves it.

Attendance is the highest in zoo history. At the end of the day the zookeeper comes and gives the mime a raise for being such a good attraction as a gorilla. This goes on for some time. The mime keeps taunting the lion, the crowds grow larger, and his salary keeps going up. Then one terrible day when he is dangling over the furious lion, he slips and falls. The mime is terrified. The lion gathers itself and prepares to pounce. The mime is so scared that he begins to run round and round the cage with the lion close behind. In sheer panic the mime starts screaming, “Help! Help me!” At just that moment the lion pounces. In one second the mime finds himself flat on his back looking up at the angry lion. Quietly the lion hisses, “Shut up, you idiot! Do you want to get us both fired?” A doctor and a lawyer were talking at a party. However, their conversation was constantly interrupted by people describing their ailments and asking the doctor for free medical advice. After yet another such exchange, the exasperated doctor asked the lawyer, “How do you stop people from asking you for legal advice when you’re out of the office?” “I don’t,” replied the lawyer. “I give it to them, and then I send them a bill.” The doctor was surprised, but agreed to give it a try. The next day, despite feeling a little hesitant about it, the doctor prepared bills for all the people he advised at the party. When he went to place them in his mailbox, he found a bill from the lawyer. +

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STATE

ZIP

Choose ____ six months for $16; or ____ one year for $32. Mail this completed form with payment to Augusta Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta GA 30903-0397

The Patient’s Perspective by Marcia Ribble

I

may or may not have told you that my granddaughter who is 16 came to live with me this past August. I thought that because her folks and friends live in Michigan, it might be a good idea to get her a dog. So one early fall weekday just after school started, as soon as she arrived home we went out to Columbia County’s Animal Control and took our time checking out dogs. We finally settled on a sweet, shy dog Rebecca named KC and took her home, stopping on the way to buy dog food and other necessities. Before we even got home I noticed that KC was limping and favoring her back right leg. By then it was too late: we were already in love with KC. That started several months of vet visits to get her rabies and other shots, get her spayed, and have her back leg and hip x-rayed. The x-ray showed that she had broken her leg, but that it was healing very well all by itself, and that she’d have a bit of a limp the rest of her life. Soon KC was no longer in pain and the limp became less noticeable. This was quickly followed by mad runs around the back yard, which is dog for physical therapy. Then came digging with both front and back legs, to further exercise her healing leg. Those activities were followed by leaf chasing, palm tree eating and carrying palm fronds around as though she is some ancient queen of Egypt on a pilgrimage to her relatives’ tombs to pay her respects. KC is a border collie with all of the applicable traits of loyalty and care-giving and herding. She sleeps quietly and deeply, and rarely snores or farts, unlike some other dogs we have known and loved. Even now, while I am writing she is nearby,

Talk is cheap. Not talking can be deadly.

guarding me, only slightly less aware than if she were totally awake, and at any sound of movement from me, her head lifts and she checks out the environment to make sure I am OK. Then she will yawn broadly enough for me to see her tonsils, shake her head slightly and lie back down to sleep some more. I have long known that there is a medical benefit for seniors who have dogs, and I assumed that same benefit might apply to teenagers who need a warm body to hug. Very, very shy when she arrived, Rebecca has been blossoming and becoming more willing to just sit and chat with me. She has only to sit down for a moment and KC is at her side, on top of her, and snuggling with her, following her if she gets up for any reason. On many levels, a dog can be the family’s therapist, acutely aware of our moods and attentive at all hours of the day and night. KC does not care if Rebecca is in a quiet mood. Instead, she jumps right up and greets Rebecca when she arrives home from school, a tail-wagging heap of gratitude for Rebecca’s existence. + Marcia Ribble received her PhD in English at Michigan State and retired from the University of Cincinnati. She taught writing at the college level and loves giving voice to people who have been silenced. She is now teaching again at Virginia College in Augusta. She can be reached with comments, suggestions, etc., at marciaribble@hotmail.com.

DOING RESEARCH? The Medical Examiner website has a zillion links to useful and informative sites of all kinds. Visit www.AugustaRx.com/StudyHall.html


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JANUARY 10, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE MYSTERY SOLVED The Mystery Word in our last issue was: STIMULANT

...cleverly hidden (in the tail light) in the p. 3 ad for KIA OF AUGUSTA Congratulations to LISA CAMPBELL, who scores a $20 Wild Wing Cafe gift certificate, two free movie passes courtesy of Health Center Credit Union, a Scrubs of Evans gift card, and a free Top Notch Car Wash gift card. Win this stuff! The new Mystery Word is on p. 12. Start looking!

The Celebrated MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then be the first to find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries you’ll score our goodie package: gift certificates from Wild Wing Cafe, Top Notch Car Wash, and movie passes from Health Center Credit Union! SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (Winners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

EXAMINER CLASSIFIEDS HOMES, APARTMENTS, ROOMMATES, LAND, ETC.

baths. Floor to ceiling windows, fenced yard. Partially furnished! 120k OBO. 803-507-6621.

FOR RENT 2 bdrm 1 bath unfurn upstairs condo. Carport, pool, outside laundry. Country Club Hills condos, Milledge Road near GRU/ASU. $700/mo + $500 dep. We furn water, you pay electric. 706-736-7167 Email: ronst79@gmail. com

Augustagahomesearch.com Foreclosures • Rentals • MLS Roman Realty 706-564-5885

ROOMMATE WANTED! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath house with pool, 2 minutes from colleges. Perfect for medical or grad students. $425+share utils. 706.993.6082 WEST AUGUSTA House for rent. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1500 sqft, 1-car garage, 3024 Sterling Road, located off Stevens Creek at Riverwatch Pkwy. $850/mo. Call 678467-7187. FOR SALE: GORGEOUS, immaculate, never occupied townhome located mins from Medical District. 2 bed, 2 bath, master en suite, walk-in closets, office. 1450 sq ft. hardwood floors throughout, fabulous upgrades, custom kitchen and

SERVICES VIDEOS-FOR-THE-WEB SERVICE Documentary style interview or demonstration shot HD with pro audio and basic edits, 3-min. finished video uploaded to your account. Complete package $250. Please call David: 803-645-8370. Documentary Video Productions, LLC – Aiken, SC. BIBLE BY PHONE - Free daily Bible readings; for Spiritual Encouragement and Growth. Call 706-855-WORD (9673) FULL-SERVICE MOVER Anthony’s Professional Moving, 28 years serving the CSRA moving hospital equipment, offices, homes, apartments, etc. Estimates are FREE. Call 706.860.3726 or 706.814.8141

BUSINESS ASSISTANCE Ridiculously affordable and highly visible advertising available through the pages of Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper, aka the Augusta Medical Examiner. Have you heard of it or seen a copy? Rates can be reviewed at AugustaRx.com. Questions? Send an e from the site, or call the publisher directly: Dan Pearson at 706.860.5455. E: Dan@AugustaRx.com

TELL A FRIEND ABOUT THE MEDICAL EXAMINER!

SENDING US A CLASSIFIED? WHAT’S YOUR DRUG OF CHOICE? USE THE FORM BELOW AND MAIL IT IN, OR GO TO WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM AND PLACE & PAY CONVENIENTLY AND SAFELY ONLINE. THANKS!

(OURS IS COFFEE)

Augusta Medical Examiner Classifieds

NOTICE! ATTENTION! If any current or past employer has failed to pay you min. wage or time and a half overtime pay, you may be entitled to an order from US Federal Court awarding you twice the amount of your unpaid wages plus atty. fees. For info, call Arthur H. Shealy, Attorney at Law, 803-278-5149, 1010 Plantation Rd, North Augusta SC 29841. You may be entitled to a similar award for unpaid wages if your employer required you to perform duties during your lunch hour, before clocking in, or after clocking out.

THE PUZZLE SOLVED S

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM Name Address Work number (if applicable) ( ) Home phone ( ) Category of ad (leave blank if unsure):

A V

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SEE PAGE 12

QUOTATION

In case we need to contact you. These numbers will not appear in the ad.

QUOTATION PUZZLE SOLUTION: Page 12: “The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.”

AD COPY (one word per line; phone numbers MUST include the area code):

— Flannery O’Connor .25

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The Sudoku Solution 9

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COFFEE IS GOOD MEDICINE

(Copy this form or continue on additional sheet if more space needed.)

Send this form with payment to:

AUGUSTA MEDICAL EXAMINER, PO BOX 397, AUGUSTA, GA 30903-0397 Total ad cost by number of words as shown above: $

VISIT DRUGOFCHOICECOFFEE.COM

WORDS BY NUMBER “Time is what we want most but what we use worst.” — William Penn

Multiply by number of times ad to run: x Total submitted: $

The Augusta Medical Examiner publishes on the 1st and 3rd Friday of every month. Your ad should reach us no later than 7 days prior to our publication date.

Thanks for reading!

www.AugustaRx.com


JANUARY 10, 2014

15 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Colder Weather Brings Burn Risks With temperatures dipping into the teens, the chances of getting burned start to climb. “Every year, we see patients who were just trying to stay warm, but ended up getting burned,” said Dr. Fred Mullins, president of Joseph M. Still Burn Centers, Inc., and medical director of the Joseph M. Still Burn Center at Doctors Hospital in Augusta, Ga. “With a little extra precaution and preparation, most people could have a safer winter.” At the root of many of the cold weather-related burns and fires is heating equipment. The easiest precaution is creating a three-foot safety zone around the heating unit that is free of any flammable materials. The “safe zone” will also keep children at a safe distance. Often, the surfaces are hot and can cause a serious, painful

burn. “Always remember: Just because something is not touching a heater does not mean that item can’t catch fire,” said Dr. Mullins. Other tips for avoiding heating hazards include: • Have the heating unit serviced by a professional before its first use. • Check to make sure all equipment, like the fireplace damper, is working properly. • Make sure the chimney is clean and clear of obstructions. • Keep space heaters away from combustible items, including clothes, furniture and curtains. • Buy only recommended fuel from reputable sources. • Use a screen to control sparks from the fireplace. • Don’t use an accelerant to start a fire in a fireplace or wood-burning stove.

• Do not overload the fireplace or wood-burning stove. • Make sure ashes and other debris from fireplaces and wood-burning stoves are safely disposed of far from buildings. • Always make sure fire and carbon monoxide detectors are working. • Do not use a space heater to help dry clothes or other items. • Never, ever use gasoline to start a fire in a fireplace. • Never leave a fire, space heater or other heating source unattended. • Make sure a fire extinguisher is available. • If you have a natural gas fireplace, check all connections and lines before use. • On space heaters, make sure electrical cords aren’t damaged. Getting burned by fire is not the only risk when temperatures drop. Frostbite,

which occurs when body parts are exposed to extremely cold temperatures, can cause serious damage – even amputation. “You can’t be too cautious with frostbite,” said Dr. Mullins. “If you have a question about it, get checked out. Often, the earlier it can be treated, the better the outcome.” There are some simple steps to avoid frostbite, including: • Limit the amount of time you’re outdoors when temperatures are dangerously low. In very cold, windy weather, exposed skin can develop frostbite in a matter of minutes. • Dress in several layers of loose, warm clothing, including undergarments that wick moisture away. + — from a Doctors Hospital press release

ROLLED SANDWICHES • SOUPS • SALADS

EAT AND YOU WON’T BE

3626 Walton Way Extension (Walton’s Corner) Phone: 706.736.1099 Fax: 706.736.4401

OrderRolyPoly.com

+

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY ALLERGY

DERMATOLOGY

Tesneem K. Chaudhary, MD Allergy & Asthma Center 3685 Wheeler Road, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

CHIROPRACTIC Poppell Chiropractic Clinic 1106-A Furys Lane Martinez 30907 706-210-2875 Most insurance plans accepted

DENTISTRY Dr. Judson S. Hickey Periodontist 2315-B Central Ave Augusta 30904 706-739-0071

DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICS Karen L. Carter, MD 1303 D’Antignac St, Suite 2100 Augusta 30901 706-396-0600 www.augustadevelopmentalspecialists.com

DRUG REHAB Floss ‘em or lose ‘em!

Jason H. Lee, DMD 116 Davis Road Augusta 30907 706-860-4048 Evans Dental Group 4250-2 Washington Rd Evans 30809 706-860-3200 www.evansdentalgroup.com

YOUR LISTING HERE Augusta Area Healthcare Provider Prices from less than $100 for six months CALL 706.860.5455 TODAY!

Georgia Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center 2283 Wrightsboro Rd. (at Johns Road) Augusta 30904 706-733-3373 www.GaDerm.com

Steppingstones to Recovery 2610 Commons Blvd. Augusta 30909 706-733-1935

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Group & Benefits Consultants Inc. 3515 Wheeler Rd, Bldg. C Augusta 30909 706-733-3459 www.groupandbenefits.com

FAMILY MEDICINE Urgent MD Augusta: 706-922-6300 Grovetown: 706-434-3500 Thomson: 706-595-7825 Primary Care Rates

HOSPICE

...PHARMACY

Alliance Hospice 3685 Old Petersburg Rd. Suite 145 Augusta 30907 706-447-2461

LASER SERVICES Ideal Image 339 Fury’s Ferry Rd Martinez 30907 1-800-BE-IDEAL • www.idealimage.com Schedule a FREE Consultation

OPHTHALMOLOGY Roger M. Smith, M.D. 820 St. Sebastian Way Suite 5-A Augusta 30901 706-724-3339

OPTICIAN

SENIOR LIVING Augusta Gardens Senior Living Community 3725 Wheeler Road Augusta 30909 SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 706-868-6500 www.augustagardenscommunity.com

SLEEP MEDICINE Sleep Institute of Augusta Bashir Chaudhary, MD 3685 Wheeler Rd, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

VEIN CARE

Murphy & Robinson Phil Harris 1571 Walton Way Augusta 30904 706-737-2020

Parks Pharmacy 437 Georgia Ave. N. Augusta 29841 803-279-7450 www.parkspharmacy.com

O P T I C I A N S

PHARMACY Medical Center West Pharmacy 465 North Belair Road Evans 30809 706-854-2424 medicalcenterwestpharmacy.com

Vein Specialists of Augusta G. Lionel Zumbro, Jr., MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI 501 Blackburn Dr, Martinez 30907 706-854-8340 www.VeinsAugusta.com

WEIGHT LOSS PHC Weight Loss & Wellness Centers 246B Bobby Jones Expwy Martinez: 706-868-5332 Thomson: 706-597-8667 www.phcweightloss.com


+ 16

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

JANUARY 10, 2014


Jan10 14  

A look back at the Most (and Least) Valuable Body Parts of 2013; the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General's 1964 report on smoking; med s...

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