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DECEMBER 6, 2013

FAT IS

GOOD! EVIL!

W

ithin reason, that is. Smack dab in the middle of 2013’s Eating Season may seem like a crazy time to run a front page story that fat is good, but then again, maybe it’s the perfect time. Health-conscious readers across Augusta may even now be gathering their pitchforks and torches to storm Medical Examiner world headquarters, but at least read this article before you attack. There are respected medical scientists and dietitians who say the obsession to eliminate fat from our diets has gone beyond healthful and has now advanced well into dangerous territory. Fat reduction is dangerous? Sound impossible? Last year an article in New Scientist (Issue 2873) said fat has been unfairly demonized, and doesn’t deserve the bad press it gets day in and day out. “Not a day goes by without an article in a newspaper or a magazine telling you how to reduce fat. Not a single article will say, look, not only is a certain amount of fat good, but it is essential to your well-being.” Granted, with obesity rates at all-time record highs in country after country, it may not seem like front-pageworthy news. But New Scientist reminded readers that strict diets can cause health problems when they zero in on fat as the enemy: “Supermodels tend to have a lot of liver fat,” said the publication, “which is unhealthy, even though their BMI can be as low as 15 to 16.” It would be healthier, says New Scientist, to have a BMI of 24. The key is where the body stores the fat. Here at the Examiner we learned a new term courtesy of New Scientist: “Tofi.” That’s how they spelled it; capital T. It’s an acronym for “thin on the outside, fat on the inside.” Tofi people are at heightened risk of certain diseases — like type 2 diabetes and heart disease — because like supermodels, they have fat deposits in and around internal organs even though they may appear slender. Yes, fat is not uniformly bad. What makes it good or bad is determined by two factors: how much of it there is and where it is in the body. Perhaps many of us could and should reduce our fat intake. However, keep this in mind in closing: “Fat...helps maintain homeostasis within the body. Fat controls and modulates fertility, your appetite and your mood. Your immune response will not work properly” without the right amount of fat. You might be surpised to read one particular word that New Scientist uses to describe body fat: “beautiful.” +

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old on just a cotton-pickin’ minute. Before we all jump on the fat is beautiful bandwagon, let us take stock of some promising — or perhaps we should say ominous — research. There is a growing suspicion that diabetes causes Alzheimer’s. Or that Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes are the same disease. Or that “each condition fuels the damage caused by the other.” The link is not fully understood and at this moment should be viewed as theoretical. Even so, there are compelling clues leading in that direction. Think about the basic facts: most people know diabetes rates are off the charts and growing. The latest figures: 270 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. It’s also not a secret that diabetes can cause circulation problems. We think of extremities (like feet), but diabetes can also cause “vascular dementia.” Simply put, diabetesfueled problem areas for circulation include the brain, with dementia as the result. That’s particularly unfortunate considering that diabetes, type 2 especially, is considered a “lifestyle disease,” typically caused by obesity, lack of exercise, and poor diet. Conversely therefore, it can also be prevented, alleviated and even cured by lifestyle changes: reducing obesity (that is to say, fat); increasing exercise; improving diet. So what may have sounded like bad news — Alzheimer’s and diabetes as a one-two punch — could actually be very encouraging news. Just imagine if you could eradicate the flu, and in so doing eliminate cancer too. That’s the promise that this suspected link holds: eliminate (or even reduce) diabetes and in the process automatically eliminate (or reduce) Alzheimer’s disease. What’s more (in our hypothetical example), think about how many cases of the flu are preventable through flu shots, hand-washing and other means. Each and every case that’s prevented is another patient that doesn’t have to face cancer. That might sound like a fantasy, but if the suspected link between diabetes and Alzheimer’s is confirmed by further research, that’s exactly what we’ll have: a disease with no real cure that can be halted in its tracks by putting the brakes on a second disease, one that is very preventable. Exhortations to live healthier often fall on deaf ears. Here’s another promising reason to listen up. +


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DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Information none of us need And, coincidentally, that all of us need The whole hand-washing thing is not a foreign subject to any of us, especially living as we do in a major healthcare center. Operating on the assumption that no readers are eating while reading this, we offer the accompanying CDC poster as Exhibit A. The number you’re looking at, 1 followed by twelve zeros, is 1 trillion. So we already have a trillion reasons to wash our hands. That hardly seems like enough, so here are a few more. When should you wash your hands? • Before, during, and after preparing food • Before eating food • Before and after caring for someone who is sick • Before and after treating a cut or wound • After using the toilet • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing • After touching an animal or animal waste • After handling pet food or pet treats • After touching garbage What is the right way to wash your hands? • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.

KEEP CALM AND

WASH YOUR HANDS

1,000,000,000,000 germs can live in one gram of poop (That’s the weight of a paper clip!)

WASH YOUR HANDS after using the toilet

• Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. • Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Alphabet” song from beginning to end twice. • Rinse your hands well under running water. • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. What if I don’t have soap and clean, running water? Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of germs on them. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcoholbased hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers are not as effective when hands are visibly dirty. How do you use hand sanitizers? • Apply the product to the palm of one hand. • Rub your hands together. • Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. — from the CDC +

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DECEMBER 6, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

The Short White Coat What’s by Caroline Colden

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or the past several weeks I have been on my Family Medicine rotation, and it has been wonderful. I am working at a Christian faith-based practice, and I couldn’t have been luckier in my assignment. The physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other nurses with whom I have been working couldn’t be nicer people. Nor could they be smarter. The thing about family medicine is that the care providers are medical jacks of all trades. They will have patients who come in for complaints as far-ranging as high blood pressure or diabetes management, to broken bones, skin rashes, women-specific issues, men-specific issues, or to anything, really. Some family doctors still practice obstetrics and deliver babies, but most defer that field of medicine to the OBGYN doctors. The practice where I am working has 2 pediatricians that handle all of the pediatric patients, but in theory family medicine would encompass

those age ranges even without pediatricians. So really, these family medicine care providers know pretty much everything about everything. Their fund of knowledge is extraordinary; it is incredible to watch them come up with solutions to almost any patient’s problem, or at least know how and when to refer them on to a specialist (which is in itself a large task, as the coordination of the patient’s care still rests within the primary provider). There is not much that medical students can truly do to be helpful because our repertoire of knowledge and understanding is still pretty scant, at least for me, and we are still learning how the medical system operates to its full extent. But we can help with taking patient histories, doing physical exams, and bouncing off differential diagnoses (which are often more farfetched than reasonable). I like each case that is presented with the patients I see though, because it continues to

– L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

!

your story?

A med student’s notebook highlight where my studies need work. Sometimes I will think I have finally mastered antibiotics, until a patient comes in with a MRSA infection and the doctor asks me, what would I prescribe? I won’t tell you what I suggested, but it was not the right answer. But now I know! And this is how it goes every day, with everyone patiently working with me, and I am learning more than ever. What I have also learned is that I especially enjoy working at a Christian clinic. I do not want to launch into a full-scale religious discussion, but I will say that it is very refreshing and wholesome feeling to be in an environment such as this one. The dynamic of the patient care, and the manners in which everyone conducts themselves, is indeed distinct. I believe patients who are receptive to prayer truly benefit from doing

Nearly all of us — even doctors and nurses — are sometimes patients. Perhaps you were recently injured playing your favorite sport, or years ago you somehow got hurt without even leaving your favorite recliner. Maybe you were diagnosed with a dreaded disease, mugged in a dark and lonely parking lot, or you stubbed your toe in the safety of your own bedroom. On the other hand, perhaps you needed medical attention 5,000 miles from home. Whatever your medical experience, we’d like to hear your story for our Medicine in the First Person feature. It can be frightening or funny, ordinary or extraordinary, just a few paragraphs long or quite a lengthy tale, bylined or anonymous. We’ll publish your encounters with the medical profession as often as we receive them. + Send your submissions for Medicine in the First Person to the Augusta Medical Examiner via e-mail: info@AugustaRx.com or to PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397. (The Medical Examiner reserves the right to accept, reject, or edit any submission at its sole discretion.)

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www.AugustaRx.com The Medical Examiner’s mission: to provide information on topics of health and wellness of interest to general readers, to offer information to assist readers in wisely choosing their healthcare providers, and to serve as a central source of news within every part of the Augusta medical community. Submit editorial content to graphicadv@knology.net Direct editorial and advertising inquiries to: STK #505003 and 512400

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(706) 860-5455 www.AugustaRx.com • E-mail: graphicadv@knology.net Opinions expressed by the writers herein are their own and their respective institutions. Neither the Augusta Medical Examiner, Pearson Graphic 365 Inc., or its agents or employees take any responsibility for the accuracy of submitted information, which is presented for informational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnosis and treatment, consult your doctor. The appearance of advertisements in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. © 2013 PEARSON GRAPHIC 365 INC.


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DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Hope IS Possible

Helping others is all that matters   Helen Blocker-Adams

T

here are many times when I have received inspirational messages via email or Facebook that resonate in such a way that I have to share them with others. The one at the end of this column is one such message. For anyone who has followed my columns over the past five years or so, you already know Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. After moving to Augusta in 1975, my mother started a Thanksgiving tradition, still ongoing, of having dinner at her house. Relatives from all over the state join us on that special day with their favorite dish, and

the fellowship is breathtaking. Our family has grown so much over the years and it’s gratifying to spend time with the children. I love that day, and I hope yours was as enjoyable as mine. Thanksgiving isn’t as precious to many others in our community as it to me and you. And for that reason, there have been times I have joined hundreds of others and volunteered to serve others on Thanksgiving Day. This year I am happy to have assembled a group of 16 people, including young people, who served food and helped with clothing distribution at Greater Young Zion Baptist Church. It’s a pleasure to say what a blessed experience it was. Helping others is all that matters.

When we think about our shortcomings, lack of money, joblessness, bad relationships or health challenges, it’s easy to get caught up in ourselves and think no one else is having problems like you. Well, you’re wrong. There are millions of people all over the world who are worse off than you. Even closer to home, there are thousands in our community having a much tougher life than you and I are. God gives us a giving spirit and a giving heart. It’s up to us to turn on the switch and allow it to manifest itself. I urge you to try it. Of course, by the time you read this column, you will have already celebrated Thanksgiving and again I pray you had a wonderful, peaceful and happy day. Keep the spirit of thankfulness and gratitude alive in your heart every day, not just on Thanksgiving and not during the holiday season only. Please find encouragement in the following words from an anonymous writer. God bless you and your family and Happy Holidays. + Helen Blocker-Adams is Executive Director of the Southeast Enterprise Institute; mental health advocate; and youth advocate. You can reach her at hba@hbagroup-intl. com or visit her website at www. helenblockeradams.com

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Helping others helps you, at the very deepest level. Giving real value serves to create real value in your own life. By providing encouragement, you receive encouragement. When you teach, you learn.

Each day is rich with opportunities for you to make a positive difference in the lives of those around you. And it is through genuinely enriching the lives of others that you find true richness in your own. Right here, right now, there is a beautiful way to give of yourself, and to make the world a better place. Choose to do so, and immediately feel the benefits begin to manifest. You have the chance today to change lives for the better. It’s difficult to imagine anything that could be more fulfilling than that. Reach out, give a hand, make a difference, and offer a kindness. The lives you lift will most certainly include your own.





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DECEMBER 6, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT GENERICS

Looking for Likes in all the right places.

phone system dropped me. I had to call back to unfold my story again. “Oh no, $40 is wrong,” this man said. “Programing costs $50.” One hundred twenty-two dollars. For a car key. I didn’t tell him what I was thinking. My Mother would not have approved of my choice of words or inflections. But I did hang up. Most unceremoniously, I might add. Then I called Lowe’s. The man said, “Yeah, we make Pontiac keys. $2.08 for a generic key. We don’t do remote chip keys.” My wallet breathed a sigh of relief. The new key works just fine even though it cost me less than one-tenth of the dealer price. The only difference is that I don’t have a tripledigit, paid-for invoice from a dealership. Generic medicines work the same way: a cheaper price for the same basic mechanics. Who cares what color the pill is or what trade name might be on the pill itself? You are only interested in the effect the

AUGUSTA

M

y run-around-town car is a 2005 Pontiac. I love it. It is small, good on gas, and very reliable. Besides that it is paid for, a highly redeeming quality. The other day the plastic on the base of the key broke and my key fell off the chain. I was lucky. I found it without too much trouble. I called the dealership to get a new one. “It’s $32 if you want a plain, generic key,” he said. “But if you want a remote chip key, that will be $72.” “$72? You gotta be kidding me.” He was not. Nor was he done. “Then, you will have to go to Service Department to get it programed. That will be another $40.” My voice told him I was astounded. “$72 for a key that does not work? And then $40 more to make it work? Surely you can give me some sort of old codger discount.” He said that was not his department and shifted me to the Service Department. The

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Best medicine has on your disorder. Some people swear by generics, particularly those with employer-paid drug plans. Others swear at generics. These are the eternally skeptical among us, saying generics are cheap and probably don’t work. Which one is correct? There is no hard and fast answer. Years back, generic Lasix, a drug that treats fluid retention in patients with kidney or liver trouble or congestive heart failure, did not work as well as name brand Lasix. Physicians quickly figured that out and refused to prescribe FREE T AKE-H OME C OPY!

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e n i c i d ME

the generic. That problem has been solved, so now either one works well. Metformin for diabetics is sold both under a trade name and as a generic. Some people have diarrhea when they take the generic. For those, we must prescribe the trade name, Glucophage. Talk to your physician and pharmacist about the use of generics. Follow their advice. They know which ones work and which ones don’t work. If a generic works, then using the trade name only strokes your ego and lightens your wallet while enriching the manufacturer. If it does not

work, then it matters not how much you did or did not pay. Use what works. If you go quail hunting and your dog points a covey of quail, you got what you wanted and if you are a good shot, you can have fried quail for supper. Having pedigree papers for your dog at home will not make the quail bigger or better or tastier. It only matters that your dog did his job and pointed a covey of quail. If your medication — whether generic or brand name — cures your illness, only your banker will know the difference. + Bad Billy Laveau is a retired MD with a pointed sense of humor. Bad Billy speaks and entertains at public and private events for audiences not subject to cardiac seizure secondary to overwhelming laughter and glee BadBilly@knology.net or 706306-9397

SHORT WHITE… from page 3 so with their doctors. They receive medicine for the mind, body, and soul at their doctor visits. I like this practice very much, and I support this approach wholly if the patient’s health is bettered by it. Nevertheless, I understand that it is not every patient’s preference. I am only saying what I feel toward those who prefer this option in their care. And it is very good for me to get exposure to medical practice of this kind, as someday I will hopefully be shaping a method of practicing medicine of my own sort. In short, I am gaining much insight into the field of medicine with this rotation, especially within the scope of how patient care can be managed in a whole-body approach. Family medicine is extremely diverse in its patient population and the breadth of knowledge required to provide good care. I have been fortunate to gain exposure to how a medical practice can be run outside of MCG, and it has helped broaden my horizons and my views of medicine. I am excited for these last few weeks of the rotation and cannot wait to see what I will learn next! + — Author Caroline Colden is a 3rd year medical student from Atlanta, GA. You may contact her at carolinecoldenswc@gmail.com

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“You have a little cancer”

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DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

hose were the words I heard from my urologist about my prostate in November 2006. Having a “small” amount of cancer did not console me. Prostate cancer was something that only happened to old codgers, and no matter what age I am, codgers are always older than I. I went in to discuss treatment options and the urologist presented almost all the options available to me. At the time I didn’t know it was almost all the options. I almost decided on brachytherapy, but something in the back of my mind told me to think about it for a few days. I immediately went into research mode. Because I tend to not automatically accept anyone’s word about anything related to my health,

2nd, 3rd and 4th opinions are in order. I downloaded a number of citations from MEDLINE and began reading about prostate cancer and its treatment. The next night, during a break from reading, I emailed a friend and told him that I had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and would be making a decision on treatment in a few days. Ten minutes later he called and said “You need to talk to my dad.” Two years prior his dad went to Loma Linda, CA to be treated for prostate cancer. I remembered that he had done so, but at the time I figured he was getting the same treatment he could have received anywhere else.

After ending the conversation with my friend I immediately did an online searc using the terms “Loma Linda” and “prostate cancer” and discovered a treatment modality not mentioned by my urologist, called proton beam therapy. Not wanting to rely on information obtained through a simple internet search, I returned to MEDLINE and downloaded citations on proton beam therapy. What I discovered was a form of radiation which more precisely targets the prostate, while minimizing the radiation delivered to the healthy tissue of the body. I also learned that the side effects would likely be minimal and transient. The next day I called my friend’s father to hear about his experience with proton beam therapy. Everything

he told me matched what I room top notch, the attention read in the articles obtained to the patient outside the through my MEDLINE treatment room is matched search. Further research by no other institution. The and input from a physician/ opportunity to interact with pathologist (with a specialty other guys in treatment in cancer biology and tumor was a major blessing. Each immunology) who chose Wednesday there was a proton beam therapy for his support/education group prostate cancer treatment led lead by the Director of Special me to the decision that proton Services. The first time I beam therapy was for me. attended the meeting, it was Fast forward a few months difficult for me to stand up and I began treatment in to introduce myself without March of 2007 at Loma Linda tearing up, as I was still torn University Medical Center up inside about the fact that (LLUMC) in Loma Linda, I had cancer. I was welcomed California. I went to Loma and assured that I was in the Linda thinking that I was right place for my treatment. going there to be treated for What was the treatment prostate cancer. That was like? With the exception of true, but after I arrived I the initial two treatments discovered I was going there when the set-up was being for so much more. determined, each treatment The mission of LLUMC is session lasted about 15 captured in the words “To minutes. I felt nothing. Make Man Whole.” On the There was no pain. In fact LLUMC campus these words sometimes I wondered if are seen on buildings and they were really turning in print everywhere, and for that machine on. Side effects good reason. The people at during treatment were LLUMC are not there just to minimal. I had increased treat the disease, but to treat urination at night and some the whole person. Not only is fatigue. I had one treatment the service in the treatment Please see FIRST PERSON page 7

WE’RE BEGGING YOU We’re never too proud to beg. What we’re begging for is Medicine in the First Person stories. With your help, we’d like to make this a feature in every issue of the Medical Examiner. After all, everybody has a story of something health- or medicine-related, and lots of people have many stories. Send your interesting (or even semi-interesting) stories to the Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903 or e-mail to Dan@AugustaRx.com. Thanks!

“The cause was a mystery for a long time.” “And that’s when I fell.” nearest hospital “He doesn’t remember a thing.” “The was 30 miles away.” “I was a battlefield medic.” “He was just two when he died.”

“OUCH!”

“It was a terrible tragedy.” “She saved “I sure learned my lesson.” “I retired from medicine my life.” “It seemed like a miracle.” seven years ago.” “We had triplets.” “It was my first year “I thought, ‘Well, this is it’.” NOTHING SEEMED of medical school.” “They took me to the hospital by helicopter.” TO HELP, UNTIL. . “It took 48 stitches.”

ambulance crashed.” “Now THAT hurt!” “The “My leg was broken “I’m not supposed to be alive.”

“This was on my third day in Afghanistan.” in three places.” “I lost 23 pounds.” “Turned out it was just indigestion.” “At first I thought it was something I ate.” “The smoke detector woke me up.”

Everybody has a story. Tell us yours. Here’s our “No Rules Rules.” We’ll publish your name and city, or keep you anonymous. Your choice. Length? Up to you. Subject? It can be a monumental medical event or just a stubbed toe. It can make us laugh or make us cry. One thing we’re not interested in, however: please, no tirades against a certain doctor or hospital. Ain’t nobody got time for that.


DECEMBER 6, 2013

Southern Girl Eats Clean

Cranberry Chutney.... A Clean Accompaniment to Your Holiday Meals

Cranberry sauce is a given for all of your holiday meals, right? I have always loved the tartness of the cranberries with turkey and dressing every Thanksgiving and Christmas. My mother used to make a cranberry relish with orange zest and walnuts. It was delicious, but it took a while to prepare and it had a good bit of sugar in the recipe. I have to be honest....I even used to love the jellied canned stuff that has loads of sugar. Yep....You know? The kind you slice? I actually read the ingredients in a can of that stuff last year and decided that I must make my own so that we had a healthier version of cranberry sauce to go with our turkey breast. When we lived in England, I went to a Christmas bazaar at the church in our village and bought a jar of homemade cranberry chutney. It was SO amazing and had tons of flavor. I wanted to try and duplicate that particular cranberry chutney. I had no idea what the exact recipe of the chutney that I bought at the bazaar included, but I knew that it had walnuts, apples and whole cranberries. So....I just winged it and came up with this recipe. My recipe has very little sugar and all organic, real ingredients with no artificial flavors or preservatives so I feel good about serving it as the perfect accompaniment to complete our healthy holiday meals.

Cranberry Chutney What you’ll need: • 3 Tbsp. of water • 1 Tbsp. of organic pure cane sugar • 1 Gala apple, chopped, peeling left on • 1 can of organic whole berry cranberry sauce • 1⁄4 Cup of finely chopped walnuts • 1⁄2 Cup of Pinot Noir wine Making the dish: In a saucepan place 2 Tbsp. of water and 1 Tbsp. of pure cane sugar over medium to high heat. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. Add chopped apple and cook until softened. Approximately 5-8 minutes. Add Cranberry sauce to pan along with wine and walnuts. Stir well to mix all ingredients. Reduce heat to low and simmer on stove top until the mixture reduces and the sauce thickens. Stir often to prevent sticking. After approximately 15 minutes, remove from heat and cool

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

FIRST PERSON… from page 6 each day, five days per week, for a total of 44 treatments. The rest of the time was spent sightseeing and playing golf several times a week. Believe it or not, one of the best and unexpected aspects of the whole Loma Linda experience was not being able to come home every weekend. That forced me to invest myself in the community and in the lives of the other guys in treatment. My wife was able visit me a couple of times while I was there. Having her attend the Wednesday night meeting was important in assuring her that I was in the right place. What about post-treatment life? My lifestyle hasn’t changed in the least. No catheter, no diapers and no Viagra. Everything that worked on me prior to treatment still works. I did have a little rectal bleeding beginning one year posttreatment. I take medication about three times per week. One year after treatment my wife and I rode our bikes from Buffalo to Albany along the Erie Canal, a distance of about 400 miles. We have plans for a cross-country bike tour in 2016. I learned some things along this journey. I learned that I must take charge of my health. No physician, no insurance company or bureaucrat will look after my health like I will. I also learned I will not get all the information I need for my health from my physician. In fact, no one person will give me all I need to know. Talking to people who have experienced what I am experiencing, or am about to experience, is essential. I learned that second, third or fourth opinions from various medical professionals may be in order at times, and that I should not hesitate to seek those opinions. I learned I needed to take my wife with me on the journey. She is my number one cheerleader. Finally I learned to sit still and listen for a word from God – and sitting still means . . . sitting still. + — submitted by Paul Gustafson, PhD, RKT Martinez, Georgia

is now

completely. Place in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Serve chilled. NOTE: If you would like a sweeter sauce... add a bit more sugar. I did not since the canned cranberry sauce already has a bit of sugar in the ingredients. +

She is a working wife and mother living in Evans, Georgia. Visit her blog for more recipes and information on clean eating.

Alisa Rhinehart writes the blog www.southerngirleatsclean.com

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+8

Ph arm acy 411

OUR NEWSSTANDS Medical locations: • Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr, 15th St., Main Entrance • Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Uptown Div., Wrightsboro Rd., main lobby • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, ER Lobby Entrance • Eisenhower Hospital, Main Lobby, Fort Gordon • George C. Wilson Drive (by medical center Waffle House and mail boxes) • GHSU Hospital, 1120 15th Street, South & West Entrances • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Parking Deck entrance • GHSU Hospital, Emergency Room, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Children’s Medical Center, Harper Street, Main Lobby • GHSU, Laney-Walker Boulevard transit stop, Augusta • Select Specialty Hospital, Walton Way, Main entrance lobby • Trinity Hospital, Wrightsboro Road, main lobby by elevators • Trinity Hospital Home Health, Daniel Village, main lobby • University Health Federal Credit Union/ University Hospital Human Resources, 1402 Walton Way, Main Lobby • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Emergency Room lobby area • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Outside Brown & Radiology/Day Surgery • University Hospital - Columbia County, 465 N. Belair Road, Main Lobby • University Hospital Prompt Care, 3121 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta

Very little if anything about healthcare is inexpensive, and that includes medicine. Tiny pills can command large prices. Over-the-counter medications may be less expensive, but are they also less effective? Find the answers to lots of your drug store questions in this column written by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson exclusively for the Medical Examiner.

MY PRESCRIPTION COSTS WHAT???

W

e all know inflation is an ugly word and prices only go up, but recently healthcare costs have gone through the roof. Prescription prices have been no small part of that increase, and even the tried and true generics that have been around for thirty years and have always been a cheap alternative to newer medicines have been subject

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Around town: • Barney’s Pharmacy, 2604 Peach Orchard Rd. • Birth Control Source, 1944 Walton Way • GRU Summerville Student Bookstore • Blue Sky Kitchen, 990 Broad Street • Columbia County Library, main branch lobby, Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans • Enterprise Mill (North Tower), 1450 Greene Street, Augusta • Daniel Village Barber Shop, Wrightsboro Road at Ohio Ave. • Hartley’s Uniforms, 1010 Druid Park Ave, Augusta • International Uniforms, 1216 Broad Street, Augusta • Marshall Family Y, Belair Rd, Evans • Mellow Mushroom, 12th and Broad Streets, Augusta • Parks Pharmacy, Georgia Avenue, North Augusta • Southside Family Y, Tobacco Road, Augusta • Surrey Center, Surrey Center Pharmacy, Highland Avenue, Augusta • Top-Notch Car Wash, 512 N. Belair Road, Evans • Wild Wing Cafe, 3035 Washington Road, Augusta

Plus... 500+ doctors offices throughout the area for staff and waiting rooms, as well as many nurses stations and waiting rooms of area hospitals.

DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

3626 Walton Way Extension (Walton’s Corner) Phone: 706.736.1099 Fax: 706.736.4401

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lately to astronomical price increases for no apparent reason. So let’s look at what might be causing these price increases and how some people are working around the high prices. Doxycycline and digoxin, just to name a couple, have gone up five to ten times their usual price overnight. Rising oil prices are partly to blame, but there are several other theories about why this market segment has seen such wild price changes. One theory is that Obamacare is the culprit. How is that possible if price controls were built into the healthcare law to limit price increases? The problem is that these price controls, to become law in 2014, were made public knowledge. As a result, drug makers are raising prices this year to get around next year’s limits. While this might explain a modest increase in prices for all medicines, it doesn’t explain increases over 1000%, as in our two examples. So what else is happening? There have been mergers of generic drug manufacturers, and the blended companies are choosing which drugs

We may not have a cure for the common

COLD but people still say they get a nice WARM FEELING when they stop in.

P

they are going to produce. This means that fewer manufacturers of any given generic drug are present in the marketplace. A manufacturing problem or a material shortage for one manufacturer could lead to a major backorder situation, and that is when prices can jump. It’s simple supply and demand. Sometimes the FDA shuts down a factory or bans a company’s importation of any medicines. That has happened several times recently since the manufacture of medications overseas is more and more common. When you have fewer manufacturers and add import bans with little or no warning you can see a shortage can occur quickly. This can lead to profiteering by the manufacturers left in the marketplace. So what can you do about high prices? Try to get insurance with good prescription coverage to help offset high prices. This is not as easy as it sounds. Insurance costs are going up, both in terms of premiums and copays. Medicare Part D is a good option only if you can get assistance with your out-of-pocket costs from Medicaid or Social Security. Otherwise the coverage

gap will eat up a large amount of money. Check on manufacturer assistance programs with brand name medications and ask your pharmacist about alternatives to the prescribed medication. There may be a cheaper alternative. Some brand-name manufacturers have patient assistance programs to help low-income patients and most all have copay assistance cards for their blockbuster brand name drugs. Some people try to get around high prices by ordering their medicines shipped from online Canadian pharmacies. This is illegal, and a certain percent of these shipments will be caught by U.S. Customs. Keep in mind that ordering from a foreign country is raises the chance of getting a counterfeit drug. The U.S. has the safest drug supply in the world, and even Canada is less secure than we are. So use all legal means at your disposal to keep your prescription costs at a reasonable level. + Written for the Medical Examiner by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson (cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net If you have any questions, comments or article suggestions, please email us at cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net

5

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DECEMBER 6, 2013

9+

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Boardwalk to Bark Place

Ask a Dietitian

Kennnel & Daycare welcoming dogs 40 lbs and under

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Navigating the Safety and Efficacy of Dietary Supplements approaches may be beneficial when used with traditional medicine. The biggest pull towards CAM comes from natural dietary and herbal supplements. According to NCCAM, in 2007, 17.7% of Americans said they had used a natural product (a non-vitamin/non-mineral supplement) in the past year or currently. No wonder the dietary supplement market (including vitamins, minerals, herbs, and other supplements) is a fivebillion dollar industry. With all the confusion surrounding the market for dietary supplements, it is important to seek out reputable information regarding the safety and effectiveness of these products. This is necessary because although the FDA regulates dietary supplements, they are regulated by different standards than conventional food and drug products: in a nutshell, the burden of safety for dietary supplements rests with the manufacturer. They are also legally responsible for accurate and truthful labeling of their product. The FDA does not test for or evaluate the truthfulness of claims made by dietary supplement products. The FDA will, however, report information about safety alerts and recalls if a dietary

NOW AVAILABLE AT AMAZON.COM Proceeds from the sale of this book benefit dementia research

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With television shows like The Doctors, and Dr. Oz promoting special diets, cleanses, and supplements, with the internet promising miracle cures, the use of complementary and alternative medicine has become central in society today. Maybe you have a friend who swears by a special diet. It can be hard to separate fact from fiction with all the different approaches to treating and preventing many illnesses. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) as “a group of different medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine. Complementary medicine is used [in combination] with conventional medicine. Alternative medicine is used in place of conventional medicine.” These approaches can encompass a wide variety and practices and products from acupuncture, to massage, to dietary and herbal supplements. The lack of reliable scientific data makes informed decisions about CAM difficult. There are many factors that drive consumers to purchase and explore these options, and there is some emerging evidence that some CAM

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+


+ 10

DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Follow the Medical Examiner between MED ICARE issues at MATTERS our blog PART D PRESCRIPTION DRUG COVERAGE +

by Trisha Whisenhunt

+

AugustaRX.com/news

and all the usual places

M

edicare Part D covers prescription drug costs only. You will pay a monthly premium for this coverage, just as you do for your Part B coverage. For 2014, the annual deductible on a Part D plan will be $310. This means you will have to pay the first $310 of your drug costs before your plan starts to pay its share. There are three ways to enroll in a Medicare drug plan. You can enroll when

you are first eligible to receive Medicare during the annual open enrollment period which runs from October 15 through December 7 of each year, or in cases involving a geographical move or when the insurer no longer offers coverage in your area. In such cases, you will be entitled to a special enrollment period during which you can choose a new Part D. While enrolling in a Part D is voluntary, you are subject to a late enrollment penalty if you

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do not enroll when eligible. The penalty is imposed when you go longer than 63 days or more in a row without credible prescription drug coverage. If you have comparable coverage through your or your spouse’s employer, there is no need to purchase a Part D. Once that coverage ends, you will have the 63-day window in which to enroll in a new plan. Credible prescription drug coverage could include drug coverage from a current or former employer or union, Tricare, Indian Health Services, the Department of Veterans Affairs or other private health insurance coverage. Your plan must contact you each year via letter or by an included newsletter to inform you that your drug coverage is credible. The cost of a late enrollment penalty depends on how long you have gone without credible coverage. Currently, the late fee is calculated by multiplying 1% of the national base beneficiary premium ($31.17 in 2013) times the number of full, uncovered months that you were eligible but did not join a Medicare drug plan and went without other credible prescription

drug coverage. The final amount is rounded to the nearest ten cents and added to your monthly premium. Since the national base beneficiary premium may increase each year, the penalty amount may also increase. You may have to pay this penalty for as long as you have a Medicare drug plan. If you do not agree with your late enrollment penalty, you can ask for a review or reconsideration. You will need to fill out a reconsideration request form. This will allow you an opportunity to provide proof which supports your case, such as information about previous credible prescription drug coverage. If you need assistance, call the customer service department for your plan. You may also call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Check the back cover of your Medicare & You Handbook for the SHIP office in your state. + by Trisha Whisenhunt, Certified Medicare Counselor, CSRA Area Agency on Aging (December 2013) Source: Medicare & You Handbook

I DON’T ALWAYS CHECK THE MEDICAL EXAMINER BLOG

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FOR A DOCTOR?

CHECK OUT OUR PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY ON PAGE 15

BUT WHEN I DO I REALIZE I’M TOTALLY MISSING OUT WHEN I DON’T. STAY HEALTHY MY FRIENDS. WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM/NEWS

OUR NEXT ISSUE DATE: Doing research? Click on “Study Hall” at AugustaRx.com

(THE FIRST ISSUE OF NEXT YEAR: JANUARY 10)

DECEMBER FRIDAY

20


DECEMBER 6, 2013

11 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

The blog spot — Posted by Leo Babauta on Oct. 17, 2013 at zenhabits.net [edited].

3 LITTLE TRICKS WHEN PEOPLE OFFEND YOU Something that we struggle with daily, that eats us up and causes stress and anger: annoying people. You know those people: they cut in line, are rude to you in the office or at the restaurant, cut you off in traffic, talk loudly about obnoxious things, play loud music when you’re trying to concentrate, interrupt you, and so on. These offenses are violations of the way you think people should act. And so it burns you up. Don’t worry, I’m the same way. If you just keep letting these offensive people get to you, you’ll always be mad or annoyed. Life won’t be very good. But it’s something you can learn to deal with. I have to admit I’m not perfect at this, but here are three strategies I use that are helpful:

“Remember: these are small problems.”

1. Get Big. I learned this one from Zen teacher Robert Thomas, who uses “Get Big” as one of his slogans that helps him to be mindful. Imagine you’re a 2-year-old who can’t have a toy or some ice cream right this minute. This problem is your entire universe because you have no perspective, and so, you throw a fit. This is the world of a 2-year-old (I should know, I’ve had 6 of them). But as adults, we know that these are very small problems, and in fact there are lots of other things the 2-year-old could do to be happy. Sure, that’s easy for us — we have a bigger perspective. But when someone offends us, we have a small perspective — their meaningless offense is the biggest thing in the world, and it makes us very angry. We throw the equivalent of a 2-yearold fit. But if we get a bigger perspective (if we Get Big), we can see that this little thing matters very little in the bigger picture. It’s not worth being angry over. So remind yourself to Get Big, then widen your perspective. 2. Float Down the Stream. When I drive and other drivers do rude things, I often get angry. Then I remember a trick: I imagine myself floating down a stream. I’m in a raft, and the other cars are just twigs and leaves floating past me one way or another on this stream. They don’t have to treat me a certain way, because they’re just twigs. And so I serenely float down this stream, not worrying about how the twigs float around me (though I try not to hit them, because, you know, safety first). And in truth, this is how life is — other people aren’t trying to offend you. They don’t worry about you or even notice you most of the time. They are just twigs floating by. Be nice to the twigs. 3. Give Them a Mental Hug. This little trick can transform the way I feel about someone who makes me angry. Let’s say someone has just said something rude to me. How dare they! Don’t they have any consideration for my feelings? But of course, in this reaction, I’m not having any consideration for their feelings — only mine matter. And so I try to empathize with this rude person and realize that they’re angry, or scared, or frustrated. They are being rude as a coping mechanism for their anger or fear. And so, mentally (and once in a while physically), I give them a hug. I have compassion for this scared person, because I too am often scared. We’re the same. We need a hug, some compassion, a little love. Try one of these three tricks the next time someone makes you mad or offends you. And then smile in serenity, armed with the comforting knowledge that, like me, you are superior to the rest of the world. + Speaking of blogs, the Medical Examiner’s blog is found at www.AugustaRx.com/news It features new content daily.

From the Bookshelf This slender volume is a book that deserves a place on every Augusta bookshelf. At 62 pages it won’t take up much space, but it tells a story that directly affects more than 25,000 people within the sound of this newspaper every single day. They’re the people who work in healthcare in and around this city. Beyond them, hundreds of thousands of patients are treated annually in our healthcare institutions, and this book is the story of their foundings. The table of contents lists the organizations profiled: • the Children’s Medical Center (now Children’s Hospital of Georgia) • Brandon Wilde • Walton Rehabilitation Hospital • Georgia Radiation Therapy Center • Shepeard Community Blood Center • Eisenhower Army Medical Center • St. Joseph (now Trinity) Hospital • St. Joseph (now Trinity) Home Health Care and Hospice • Doctors Hospital • Talmadge Memorial Hospital • Charlie Norwood Veterans Hospital • University Hospital

Right about now you might be thinking, all that in 62 pages? That’s a valid point. After all, the book For The People runs nearly 150 pages, and it’s the story of just University Hospital. So how can twelve institutions be covered in a mere 62 pages? Author Bill Atkinson* did not set out to write an exhaustive history. Instead, he has complied a book that is largely made up of the behind-the-scenes stories that led to their birth. In many cases, Atkinson was part of the brain trust that brought these important healthcare providers from vague concept to the reality of bricks and mortar, steel and glass. In fact, he served as the CEO of Trinity Hospital until his

retirement, and his name pops up in several of these stories. This book isn’t a biography, however. Its pages contain a pretty thorough compendium of Augusta’s medical Who’s Who: names from Milton Antony and the Browns of Brown & Radiology to Rosie Messer, Dennis Skelley, Lee Smith, William Moretz, Fran Tedesco, and dozens of others. It features a foreword by William Kanto, MD, one of the founding fathers of the Children’s Medical Center at (then) MCG. Where can you find this book? Unless you run into Bill Atkinson in the flesh, order a copy from Amazon. And when you click “buy,” know this: Mr. Atkinson is dedicating proceeds from the sale of this book to dementia research. Your purchase will assist that goal. With that in mind, why not order several copies? + Foundings: Augusta’s Healthcare from Conception to Birth, by Bill Atkinson; 62 pages, published in November 2013 by CreateSpace *Mr. Atkinson wrote a 2009 series in the Medical Examiner about these “Foundings.”

Research News Well this is nuts Research findings just published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggest that people who eat nuts live longer. Two factors appear to be at play. Overall, nut eaters seem to have healthier lifestyles. But absent that, nuts alone, especially when part of the diet every day, seem to contribute to a longer lifespan. People who consumed nuts once a week were 11 percent less likely to die during the study, which followed about 120,000 people for 30 years. Four servings a week meant a 13 percent reduction in deaths, while eating a daily handful cut the death rate during the study by 20 percent. Researchers say nuts help lower cholesterol, inflammation, and insulin resistance. There is also a connection between eating nuts and reduced risk of death from coronary artery disease. Salted or chocolate-covered options may cancel the benefits, however. Other studies have

identified raw walnuts as the healthiest of nuts for their high level of antioxidants. Day or night? In a small study recently conducted in the Netherlands, researchers studied nearly 300 heart disease patients who took a daily low dose aspirin. Such regimens are designed to help prevent heart attacks and strokes by thinning blood and preventing platelets from clumping. During the study, researchers followed participants for three months as they took a daily morning aspirin, then three more months taking the aspirin at bedtime. The verdict: low dose aspirin is more effective when taken at bedtime. Exercising early — real early In preliminary findings that scientists say is merely theoretical pending additional research, a Canadian study suggests that the brains of babies carried by women who

exercise during pregnancy are more mature and highly developed than the brains of babies whose mothers did not exercise during pregnancy. Brain activity of all the babies in the study was tested within 12 days of birth, and showed various clear signals of advancement among babies born to exercising mothers. One focus of future research: whether the early benefit will linger into later life. Head case University of New Mexico research says brain damage from concussions last for months. Most people feel fine within a week to 10 days after a concussion, yet four months later doctors were still able to see abnormalities, suggesting that the brain had not healed. Before recovery is complete, the brain is more vulnerable to further injury. +


+ 12

DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE EXAMiNERS

THE MYSTERY WORD

+

by Dan Pearson

I can’t believe doctors pay for these lame slogans you’re coming up with. They do.

What’s your latest masterpiece?

“Call today! You’d be crazy not to!”

Let me guess... It’s for a psychiatrist.

© 2013 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE ACROSS 1. Augusta _____ 5. How _____ you! 9. Congressional TV 14. Malarial fever 15. Paradise 16. Criminal’s claim 17. Divine food (var.) 18. Regretted 19. Addictive nut of Asia 20. Apple product 21. Clarify 23. Strangest 25. Tear apart 26. Natal start 27. Grand ___ 28. “Within” prefix 32. Rule 35. Top Laker? 36. Stink 37. GA Tech conference 38. Snarled 41. Biblical high priest 42. Mets’ former home 44. Pouting expression 45. Not as strange as 23-A 47. Seed containers 48. Tool for making holes 49. Children’s Hosp. of GA network 50. Dr. ____ 52. Augusta novelist Louise 56. Puppet 60. Prepare for publication 61. Musical drama 62. ____ Hemingway (daughter of Mariel) 63. Strauss patriarch 64. Up and about 65. Computer nerd 66. Sign 67. Tiny 68. Long fish 69. Riverwalk, for example

BY

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Click on “Reader Contests”

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VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM TO ENTER!

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QUOTATION PUZZLE 28

35

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12

25

26 33

11

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!

22

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10

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com

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I I Y T

T T N V

G E N G I L L A F E I I T S E S V I T L E E E H M O S S

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

35. Body of truth or facts 39. Full speed (nautical) 40. Half-sized prefix 43. #1 over-the-counter drug 46. Surround entirely 49. Belonging to onetime Augusta commissioner Andy 51. White with age 52. Wool prefix, sometimes 53. Swelling from excess fluid 54. Colorado or Mississippi 55. Stench 56. Castle protector 57. Church recess 58. Network of nerves or blood vessels 59. Aspen or ash

DOWN 1. Former Augusta visitor 2. Christian love 3. Eclipse type 4. Directing 5. Augusta Young Adult novelist Christine 6. Mature 7. Spool 8. Tolerable 9. Residence of 1-D? 10. Thin 11. Pocket bread 12. Assist in crime 13. River called White and Blue 22. Fracas; brawl 24. Sinus M.D. 27. Powerful, influential person 29. Never (poetic) 30. Reuben seller 31. Grapes of Wrath farmer 32. Coarse file 33. Reflected sound 34. Tea type

L N I L

— Emily Dickinson

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may be used only once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

E

S

1 2 7 1 7 6 9 3 4 1 3 5 6 4 8 2 5 1 6 5 3 9 6 7 3 1 2 9 6 7 2 6

X A M I N E R

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

Solution p. 14

U D O K U

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle. All the listed letters following 1 are the 1st letters of each word; the letters following 2 are 2nd letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues or numbers with minimal choices listed. A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

L 1 2 3 4 1

2

3

H 1 2 3 T 1 2 3 4

G 1

2 3 1 2 3 O 1 2 1 2 3 4

W 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 T H — John-Paul Sartre 1 2 3 1 2 3 4

1 . G R R O W T T T T B H I 2 . S H H H N O O O O I A U 3 . W M C L AY S E E O N 4 . T Y K I E T 5 . N 6 . G

SAMPLE:

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

O 2

V 3

E 4

I 1

S 2

B 1

L 2

I 3

N 4

D 5

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

WORDS NUMBER

1

The Mystery Word for this issue: SIRRCETAGI


THE BEST MEDICINE ha... ha...

Johnny raises his hand and says, “HIJKLMNO!” The teacher asks, “Where did you get that idea?” “You just said it was H to O.” Q: Anyone know any jokes about sodium? A: Na

A

doctor tells a single woman that she has only six months to live. He advises her to marry the dullest man she can find and move to a one-horse town in the middle of nowhere. The woman asks, “Will that cure me?” “No,” replies the doctor, “but it will make your six months seem like a very long time.” Two personal trainers walk into a bar. The third one ducks. Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division. Q: If H2O is the formula for water, what is the formula for ice? A: H2O cubed.

The pre-med student is struggling through a chemistry exam when the professor finally asks an easy question: “H2O is the formula for water. What is H2O4?” The answer he wrote: “Washing, cleaning and drinking.” A teacher asks his class, “To review, what is the chemical formula for water?”

Three scientists go duck hunting. A duck flies by and the medical researcher takes the first shot, which goes a foot too low. Another duck flies by and this time the chemist fires, but his shot sails a foot too high. The third scientist, a statistician, jumps up and shouts, “We got it!” A Higgs Boson particle walks into a church. “What are you doing here?” aks the priest. Higgs Boson replies “Are you kidding? You can’t have mass without me.” The obstetrician was accustomed to seeing unusual tattoos when working in labor and delivery. One patient had a fish tattoo on her abdomen. “That sure is a pretty whale,” he commented. With a rueful smile, she replied, “It used to be a dolphin.” Patient: “Doctor, I hope you can help me. I’m under tremendous stress. I lose my temper and snap at people all the time.” Doctor: “Tell me about your problem.” Patient: “I just did, you stupid jackass!” +

Why subscribe to the Medical Examiner? Because no one should have to make a trip to the doctor or the hospital just to read Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper.

+ +

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDICAL EXAMINER By popular demand we’re making at-cost subscriptions available for the convenience of our readers. If you live beyond the Aiken-Augusta area or miss issues between doctor’s appointments — don’t you hate it when that happens? — we’ll command your mail carrier to bring every issue to your house! NAME ADDRESS CITY

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

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Choose ____ six months for $16; or ____ one year for $32. Mail this completed form with payment to Augusta Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta GA 30903-0397

The Patient’s Perspective by Marcia Ribble

I

thought it was about time I lightened up the tone here. There are frequent articles and stories in publications and on TV and online about the medical benefits of having a pet for senior citizens, so my 16-year-old granddaughter and I went to Columbia County Animal Control on William Few Parkway and selected a dog. We chose KC, a sweet girl if there ever was one. KC is a year-old border collie mix who is determined to herd us and keep us safe from predators of any sort. As we were trying to get her into the car, we noticed that KC was having trouble with jumping up onto the back seat, something most mid-sized dogs can do with great ease. That was confirmed when we got home and noticed that KC had a distinct limp, favoring her rear right side leg. It took a while, but finally an x-ray showed that KC had fractured that gimpy leg at some point in the past. Because Animal Control had picked her up as a stray, we didn’t know what caused her broken leg, but we knew that we were going to keep her. We were grateful that even though she had been injured, she had not been euthanized. I thought it was especially appropriate for a senior citizen with gimpy legs to have a dog with a gimpy leg. The vets who x-rayed her said she would probably always limp, and that without veterinary help her leg had healed perfectly, leaving only one muscle that had atrophied. But atrophied muscles can return to a great deal of functionality, as folks who have had strokes or other injuries that result in a limb not being used all the time can testify. And, as healing of her leg progressed, KC began to use the leg that no longer was causing her pain. When she is jumping up or down, she still tends to use both rear legs in tandem,

Talk is cheap. Not talking can be deadly.

but other than that she runs very well and seldom limps at all. Run she does with gusto, and very fast, circling our patio furniture as though she was herding sheep. The patio furniture obediently stays right in place, so she is learning to hop up and rest on the chairs and the love seat. As a firm proponent of physical therapy, I added massaging her leg to her routine. Massage helps to bring extra healing blood to that lazy muscle, which for all intents and purposes is no longer lazy, so she no longer is a gimpy senior citizen dog. Before, her tail curved down under her in a very submissive posture. Now it curves up proudly, wagging, with its feathering standing out as it should. KC reminds me every day to get up and move and stay active like she is. KC reminds me by coming over and bumping my knees with her snout and once I’m up she follows closely behind me, nuzzling the back of my knee to keep me moving to open the door and let her out. She has a soft, deft touch that can barely be felt, but it encourages me to keep going. It’s a nice symbiotic relationship! + Marcia Ribble received her PhD in English at Michigan State and retired from the University of Cincinnati. She taught writing at the college level and loves giving voice to people who have been silenced. She is now teaching again at Virginia College in Augusta. She can be reached with comments, suggestions, etc., at marciaribble@hotmail.com.

You know your children are growing up when they start asking questions that have answers. — John J. Plomp

DECEMBER 6, 2013


+ 14

DECEMBER 6, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE MYSTERY SOLVED The Mystery Word in our last issue was: DIETITIAN

...cleverly hidden (on the left house) in the p. 9 ad for BLANCHARD & CALHOUN REAL ESTATE Congratulations to TIMOTHY WILLIFORD, who scores a $20 Wild Wing Cafe gift certificate, two free movie passes courtesy of Health Center Credit Union, and a free Top Notch Car Wash gift card. Win this stuff! The new Mystery Word is on p. 12. Start looking!

The Celebrated MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then be the first to find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries you’ll score our goodie package: gift certificates from Wild Wing Cafe, Top Notch Car Wash, and movie passes from Health Center Credit Union! SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (Winners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

SENDING US A CLASSIFIED? USE THE FORM BELOW AND MAIL IT IN, OR GO TO WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM AND PLACE & PAY CONVENIENTLY AND SAFELY ONLINE. THANKS!

EXAMINER CLASSIFIEDS HOMES, APARTMENTS, ROOMMATES, LAND, ETC.

Sterling Road, located off Stevens Creek at Riverwatch Pkwy. $850/mo. Call 678467-7187.

FOR RENT 2 bdrm 1 bath unfurn upstairs condo. Carport, pool, outside laundry. Country Club Hills condos, Milledge Road near GRU/ASU. $700/mo + $500 dep. We furn water, you pay electric. 706-736-7167 Email: ronst79@gmail. com

FOR SALE: GORGEOUS, immaculate, never occupied townhome located mins from Medical District. 2 bed, 2 bath, master en suite, walk-in closets, office. 1450 sq ft. hardwood floors throughout, fabulous upgrades, custom kitchen and baths. Floor to ceiling windows, fenced yard. Partially furnished! 120k OBO. 803-507-6621.

ROOMMATE WANTED! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath house with pool, 2 minutes from colleges. Perfect for medical or grad students. $425+share utils. 706.993.6082 FOR SALE: 3 BR house + 1 BR apartment (private entrance) + 2 full basements. Apt ideal for aging parent, or home office, or rental (now rented; income to offset mortgage). 310sqft basemt perfect for office or playroom. 2nd basemt (240sqft, large windows) great for workshop or studio. House & apt (2042sqft), hardwd floors, new baths. Lush back yard. Tanglewood area, near Augusta Mall. $93,500 OBO. 617-6292915. WEST AUGUSTA House for rent. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1500 sqft, 1-car garage, 3024

Augustagahomesearch.com Foreclosures • Rentals • MLS Roman Realty 706-564-5885

SERVICES VIDEOS-FOR-THE-WEB SERVICE Documentary style interview or demonstration shot HD with pro audio and basic edits, 3-min. finished video uploaded to your account. Complete package $250. Please call David: 803-645-8370. Documentary Video Productions, LLC – Aiken, SC. BIBLE BY PHONE - Free daily Bible readings; for Spiritual Encouragement and Growth. Call 706-855-WORD (9673)

NOTICE! ATTENTION! If any current or past employer has failed to pay you min. wage or time and a half overtime pay, you may be entitled to an order from US Federal Court awarding you twice the amount of your unpaid wages plus atty. fees. For info, call Arthur H. Shealy, Attorney at Law, 803-278-5149, 1010 Plantation Rd, North Augusta SC 29841. You may be entitled to a similar award for unpaid wages if your employer required you to perform duties during your lunch hour, before clocking in, or after clocking out. BUSINESS ASSISTANCE Ridiculously affordable and highly visible advertising available through the pages of Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper, aka the Augusta Medical Examiner. Have you heard of it or seen a copy? Rates can be reviewed at AugustaRx.com. Questions? Send an e from the site, or call the publisher directly: Dan Pearson at 706.860.5455. E: Dan@AugustaRx.com

TELL A FRIEND ABOUT THE MEDICAL EXAMINER! THE PUZZLE SOLVED

WHAT’S YOUR DRUG OF CHOICE? (OURS IS COFFEE)

Augusta Medical Examiner Classifieds

FULL-SERVICE MOVER Anthony’s Professional Moving, 28 years serving the CSRA moving hospital equipment, offices, homes, apartments, etc. Estimates are FREE. Call 706.860.3726 or 706.814.8141

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QUOTATION QUOTATION PUZZLE SOLUTION: Page 12: “To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.” — Emily Dickinson

AD COPY (one word per line; phone numbers MUST include the area code): .50

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SEE PAGE 12

In case we need to contact you. These numbers will not appear in the ad.

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM Name Address Work number (if applicable) ( ) Home phone ( ) Category of ad (leave blank if unsure):

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COFFEE IS GOOD MEDICINE

(Copy this form or continue on additional sheet if more space needed.)

Send this form with payment to:

AUGUSTA MEDICAL EXAMINER, PO BOX 397, AUGUSTA, GA 30903-0397 Total ad cost by number of words as shown above: $

VISIT DRUGOFCHOICECOFFEE.COM

WORDS BY NUMBER “Only the guy who isn’t rowing has time to rock the boat.” — Jean-Paul Sartre

Multiply by number of times ad to run: x Total submitted: $

The Augusta Medical Examiner publishes on the 1st and 3rd Friday of every month. Your ad should reach us no later than 7 days prior to our publication date.

Thanks for reading!

www.AugustaRx.com


DECEMBER 6, 2013

15 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

DIETITIAN… from page 9 supplement is reported and found to be dangerous or contaminated, and will step in if a product has been deemed unsafe. They must prove their safety infractions in order to have the product removed from the marketplace. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulates dietary supplement advertising and reports if a supplement is making false or harmful claims. Since the guidelines for dietary supplements and their claims are not as stringent as most drug products, it is important for consumers to be aware of what they are buying. How can you check out a product? One resource is consumerlab.com. This website publishes lab tested results of dietary supplements. This website does require a fee to view full access to reviews on supplements, but there are other alternatives. Consumers can also look for labels from the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), and NSF, the National Sanitation Foundation, an independent organization that provides product certification and testing in the interests of public health. If a label from one of these companies is on a supplement, it signifies that the supplement has gone through a strict verification process. The question remains, are dietary supplements worth buying? The answer: sometimes. Navigating the endless amounts of information about even just

one supplement can be overwhelming, confusing, and even contradictory. Here are a few websites and organizations the keep the most up-to-date research on dietary supplements. • National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: www.nccam.nih.gov/ • The National Comprehensive Medicine Database: www. naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com • The Office of Dietary Supplements: www.ods.od.nih. gov Dietary supplements can interact with many medications and can potentially be harmful. Because of this, it is essential, to speak with a healthcare professional willing to take the time to navigate the current information and determine if a particular dietary supplement is safe and effective. These professionals may include a physician, a registered dietitian, or a pharmacist. Minimally, a healthcare provider should always be alerted of dietary supplements, natural products or any other CAM usage. With caution and further research, integrating and continuing to use dietary supplements and other forms of CAM can prove to be beneficial in many aspects of health and wellness. + — by Randalynn Hajeck, RD, CSO, LD Georgia Regents University Cancer Center Dietitian

SEE THIS CASH? +

It’s yours!

+

(if you are the randomly chosen finder of this issue’s Mystery Word)

Anytime you see the Scrubs of Evans ad on our front page, that issue’s randomly chosen Mystery Word Contest winner gets the usual haul plus a $40 gift card from Scrubs of Evans!

+

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY ALLERGY

DERMATOLOGY

Tesneem K. Chaudhary, MD Allergy & Asthma Center 3685 Wheeler Road, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

CHIROPRACTIC Poppell Chiropractic Clinic 1106-A Furys Lane Martinez 30907 706-210-2875 Most insurance plans accepted

DENTISTRY Dr. Judson S. Hickey Periodontist 2315-B Central Ave Augusta 30904 706-739-0071

DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICS Karen L. Carter, MD 1303 D’Antignac St, Suite 2100 Augusta 30901 706-396-0600 www.augustadevelopmentalspecialists.com

DRUG REHAB Floss ‘em or lose ‘em!

Jason H. Lee, DMD 116 Davis Road Augusta 30907 706-860-4048 Dental Partners of South Augusta W. Palmer Westmoreland, DMD 2504 Peach Orchard Rd Augusta 30906 706-798-8300 Evans Dental Group 4250-2 Washington Rd Evans 30809 706-860-3200 www.evansdentalgroup.com

Georgia Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center 2283 Wrightsboro Rd. (at Johns Road) Augusta 30904 706-733-3373 www.GaDerm.com

Steppingstones to Recovery 2610 Commons Blvd. Augusta 30909 706-733-1935

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Group & Benefits Consultants Inc. 3515 Wheeler Rd, Bldg. C Augusta 30909 706-733-3459 www.groupandbenefits.com

FAMILY MEDICINE Urgent MD Augusta: 706-922-6300 Grovetown: 706-434-3500 Thomson: 706-595-7825 Primary Care Rates

HOSPICE

...PHARMACY

Alliance Hospice 3685 Old Petersburg Rd. Suite 145 Augusta 30907 706-447-2461

LASER SERVICES Ideal Image 339 Fury’s Ferry Rd Martinez 30907 1-800-BE-IDEAL • www.idealimage.com Schedule a FREE Consultation

OPHTHALMOLOGY Roger M. Smith, M.D. 820 St. Sebastian Way Suite 5-A Augusta 30901 706-724-3339

OPTICIAN

SENIOR LIVING Augusta Gardens Senior Living Community 3725 Wheeler Road Augusta 30909 SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 706-868-6500 www.augustagardenscommunity.com

SLEEP MEDICINE Sleep Institute of Augusta Bashir Chaudhary, MD 3685 Wheeler Rd, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

VEIN CARE

Murphy & Robinson Phil Harris 1571 Walton Way Augusta 30904 706-737-2020

Parks Pharmacy 437 Georgia Ave. N. Augusta 29841 803-279-7450 www.parkspharmacy.com

O P T I C I A N S

PHARMACY Medical Center West Pharmacy 465 North Belair Road Evans 30809 706-854-2424 medicalcenterwestpharmacy.com

Vein Specialists of Augusta G. Lionel Zumbro, Jr., MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI 501 Blackburn Dr, Martinez 30907 706-854-8340 www.VeinsAugusta.com

WEIGHT LOSS PHC Weight Loss & Wellness Centers 246B Bobby Jones Expwy Martinez: 706-868-5332 Thomson: 706-597-8667 www.phcweightloss.com


+ 16

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

DECEMBER 6, 2013

Dec6 13  

Fat is good! No it isn't! Yes it is! Medical student diary; hand-washing 101; why Rx prices have skyrocketed; a look at alternative medicine...