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HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS

AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER • FOUNDED IN 2006

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Just one domino never falls...

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ere you surprised to read the local high school graduation statistics in The Augusta Chronicle last week? If you missed the report based on data from the Georgia Department of Education, the figures are shocking: only 58 percent of Richmond County high school students graduate; only 76 percent do so in Columbia County. (Georgia’s statewide average is 71.5%.) The figures range from 100 percent for both A. R. Johnson and John S. Davidson magnet schools to 38 percent for Butler. What does this have to do with a newspaper whose focus is health and wellness? According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, here are some established facts about the link between health and education:

• People with more education are less likely to die from the most common acute and chronic diseases (heart condition, stroke hypertension, cholesterol, emphysema, diabetes, asthma

less likely to have anxiety or depression. • Better educated people report spending fewer days in bed or not at work because of disease. • Think jail or prison is a healthy place to live? According to the Center for Labor Market Studies, the risk of incarceration (jails, prisons, juvenile detention centers) for male dropouts is significant. In 2007, male dropouts (aged 16-24) were 63 times more likely to be institutionalized compared to those with a bachelors degree or higher. Compared to high school graduates, the figure is a tenth of that: 6.3 times more likely to be institutionalized. • The Wall Street Journal says high school dropouts make up 75 percent of state prison inmates across the country.

attacks, ulcer). • More educated people are less likely to have hypertension, emphysema or diabetes, let alone die from it. • Better educated people are Please see GRADUATION page 10

Which one of these doesn’t match the others?

Answer, page 7

by Ross Everett

GET YOUR KIDS VACCINATED!

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lliteracy is, perhaps, the only acceptable reason for parents not to get their eligible children their recommended vaccinations. The month before last, I wrote about Andrew Wakefield and the controversial—and downright fraudulent—beginnings of the notion that vaccinations cause autism in children. In the article, I highlighted how there have never been any major studies that demonstrate any such correlation. However, in science and medicine, there has to be some benefit, too, to defend a massive population health campaign such as public vaccination. The data has been Of course, not all vaccinations there the whole time, of course, but a involve a needle. new study published last month by the University of Pittsburgh, may have just made things too easy. The research, collected under Project Tycho, involved a massive data mining effort, compiling case reports—over 88 million individual ones— for contagious diseases in the United States that stretch back all the way to 1888. The most recent report from the project was published in The New England Journal of Medicine just last month. The reports included covered 56 different contagious diseases. However, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, diphtheria, pertussis, and hepatitis A were the main contagions focused on. The findings were extraordinary. According to their data and models, since 1924 childhood vaccination programs have prevented over 100 million cases of these contagious diseases in the United States. The researchers opted to exclude any projections for fatalities. However, one of the leading researchers, Dr. Donald Burke, dean of the school of public health at the University of Pittsburgh, feels like that number likely approaches 4 million. Yet despite the data, resistance is growing. The amount of unvaccinated children is increasing throughout the United States, primarily the result of parents’ ability to gain nonmedical exemptions for their kids. And we are paying for it. Please see WIDE-EYED page 3


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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Editor’s note: Healthcare is a whole new ballgame with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, or simply ACA). How will healthcare providers be affected? What about patients? And how about employers who provide health coverage as an employee benefit? How will Medicare and Medicaid recipients be affected? Look to this column for the answers.

HEALTHCARE REFORM & YOUR BUSINESS by Russell T. Head, CBC, CSA

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THE BEGINNING OF THE END

s I write this article we are mere days away from the end of an extended December 23 deadline to enroll through Healthcare.gov for a January 1st effective date. Healthcare reform regulations originally set the deadline for December 15. While enrollment through the website has increased dramatically from the inauspicious October launch, the current number Russell Head of enrollees are far from the projections that were anticipated at this time. Perhaps most surprising (or maybe not) for many are the number of people now enrolling for the government funded program of Medicaid. The states that chose not to expand Medicaid are seeing their enrollment increase because of the broad awareness of the healthcare reform mandate to be insured in 2014. Insurance brokers, navigators and application counselors have been busy educating and/or enrolling the public who may not be aware of the mandate. The enrollment process has been frustrating to say the least. How will the next few days play out for the healthcare.gov enrollment process? While our office has steadily been enrolling numbers of people throughout the past two weeks, it has not been without continued glitches and delays...or pressing the restart button after the system has locked up for no good reason. An electronic enrollment should not take up to 2 hours to decipher a premium tax credit or cost-sharing subsidy. Perhaps even more disconcerting is the number of people who believe they are insured starting January 1, yet their insurance carrier has no enrollment information from the back end of Healthcare.gov. The current admission by HHS is that the enrollment information of up to 25% of those enrolled may not have electronically transferred to their

prospective insurer. Enrollees think they have completed the process, but their information cannot be found. That should be of concern to those who believe they will have coverage on January 1. The front end of the system is working better, with increased capacity for up to 50,000 users in the system at one time. However, the back end of the system has electronic kinks that must be repaired for the completion of coverage. It would be like placing an order on Amazon to arrive before Christmas, but Amazon never acknowledges the transaction ever took place. How happy would you be? How long would Amazon be in business? We are three years into constructing the new healthcare reform law. HHS had three years to build the site. I suspect that Monday, December 23, will be a “tell all” day for the enrollment site. Will the system be able to handle the capacity of those applying for coverage? I will be pleasantly surprised if all goes well without a hitch... on the front end and the back end. How much more can the administration delay? The continuance of website glitches has the potential perception to annihilate President Obama’s marquee legislation to reform healthcare in America. Only time will tell. And time is about up. + For further explanation of the ACA/PPACA provisions outlined in this article, please refer to the following resources: www.hhs.gov www.irs.gov www.healthcare.gov www.cms.gov Russell T. Head is a Partner and Chief Visionary Architect with Group & Benefits Consultants, Inc., Augusta’s largest, privately held, locally owned employee benefits consulting firm. He can be reached at 706-733-3459 or rthead@gandbc.com. Visit Group & Benefits Consultants at www. groupandbenefits.com.

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DECEMBER 20, 2013

WIDE-EYED… from page 1 A report from the Center for American Progress summarizes several of these cause and effect relationships quite nicely. For example, in 2012, the CDC reports that there were more cases of pertussis, or “whooping cough,” than in any previous year since 1955. The report goes on to note that in 2010 pertussis caused 455 infants to be hospitalized and unfortunately 10 died. That was in California alone. 2012 rates were higher still. However, more than one bug has made a comeback. In 2008, the CDC reported 131 cases of measles, more than double the average for any previous year since 2000. The list goes on. Numerous parents feel the vaccines are dangerous, propagating a theory which has been debunked again and again. However, even more parents feel that the vaccines are unnecessary. After all, “my kid doesn’t need to get vaccinated since all the other kids will receive theirs.” The principle to which they refer is called herd immunity. It’s based on the premise that a contagion needs a certain percentage of susceptible people to be able to thrive and propagate within a population. Herd immunity is real, no doubt. However, we are unfortunately falling below the numbers needed to keep those at risk from being protected. The required percentage of vaccinated individuals varies with each specific disease. For most, it is in the vicinity of 80-95%. Yet, in a couple of pockets across the United States, the number of immunized children has fallen to near 50% for certain diseases. That’s a massive gap. If 5-20% can avoid being vaccinated without compromising herd immunity, that should be reserved solely for children who have significant contraindications to the vaccines, such as allergic reactions or diminished immune systems that cannot tolerate the vaccine or appropriately respond to it. Exemptions are not for those who just decided one day they weren’t going to do their part. The discussion is a touchy one, though, and

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the situation is one that requires sensitivity and forethought. After all, many of these parents genuinely believe these vaccines are putting their children at risk. Also, I know the current president—and probably any after him—would never get away with really cracking down on these exemptions, forcing more people to be immunized against their will. However, something has to be done. We live in a country that prioritizes independence and the ability of an individual to make decisions, even if they are not in his or her best interest. Personally I think intervention is warranted when your decision puts others in harm’s way, and even more so when your decision puts other children at risk. For now, we must advertise, publicize and educate the public about these dangers. These childhood illnesses are serious and can be lifethreatening. Unfortunately, as Dr. Burke stated, “If you’re anti-vaccine, that’s the price you pay.” +

SEE PAGE SIX

What’s your story?

!

Nearly all of us — even doctors and nurses — are sometimes patients. Perhaps you were recently injured playing your favorite sport, or years ago you somehow got hurt without even leaving your favorite recliner. Maybe you were diagnosed with a dreaded disease, mugged in a dark and lonely parking lot, or you stubbed your toe in the safety of your own bedroom. On the other hand, perhaps you needed medical attention 5,000 miles from home. Whatever your medical experience, we’d like to hear your story for our Medicine in the First Person feature. It can be frightening or funny, ordinary or extraordinary, just a few paragraphs long or quite a lengthy tale, bylined or anonymous. We’ll publish your encounters with the medical profession as often as we receive them. + Send your submissions for Medicine in the First Person to the Augusta Medical Examiner via e-mail: info@AugustaRx.com or to PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397. (The Medical Examiner reserves the right to accept, reject, or edit any submission at its sole discretion.)

THE MONEY DOCTOR: FISCAL HEALTH IN THIS ISSUE

For an enlarged view, visit the Examiner blog (www.AugustaRx.com/news) post dated 12/20/13.

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www.AugustaRx.com The Medical Examiner’s mission: to provide information on topics of health and wellness of interest to general readers, to offer information to assist readers in wisely choosing their healthcare providers, and to serve as a central source of news within every part of the Augusta medical community. Submit editorial content to graphicadv@knology.net Direct editorial and advertising inquiries to: STK #505003 and 512400

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(706) 860-5455 www.AugustaRx.com • E-mail: graphicadv@knology.net Opinions expressed by the writers herein are their own and their respective institutions. Neither the Augusta Medical Examiner, Pearson Graphic 365 Inc., or its agents or employees take any responsibility for the accuracy of submitted information, which is presented for informational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnosis and treatment, consult your doctor. The appearance of advertisements in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. © 2013 PEARSON GRAPHIC 365 INC.


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DECEMBER 20, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Hope IS Possible

Unleashing the hero within

Helen Blocker-Adams

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ast week I attended a four day conference at my church, New Life Church. I have attended many conferences over the years, but I must say, the speaker, Pastor Scot Anderson of Scot Anderson Ministries, and his message was the most timely, relevant, life-changing experience I have had in a very, very long time. With my political plans to be Augusta’s first woman mayor, a New Year ready to burst at the seams, a personal relationship prayerfully poised to blossom, my incredibly healthy lifestyle

journey and my strengthening relationship with God, the conference theme, “Creating the Hero in You,” was precisely what the doctor ordered. Turning the page on a new year is always exciting for me. I love the idea of New Year. I love the first day of the new year, spending time with my family and eating those so-called good luck foods like collard greens and black eyed peas. Don’t get me wrong, I have bills and obligations like you do. I have personal and professional issues to resolve. I don’t have all the answers to life’s problems. But with all of that, it’s still been a fantastic year with many successes, which I will speak about later. If you have read any of my columns over the years you know I am an optimist. 2014 will be my sixth year writing for The Augusta Medical Examiner and I’m pretty excited about that. I am optimistic about the upcoming new year. I don’t believe we should let the New Year come in with a bad attitude. It serves no purpose. Having a bad attitude doesn’t

improve the situation, does it? Every year brings new possibilities, new opportunities, new chances to get things right, a new chapter to be a part of solutions and make our world better. That is why I love the New Year. Whatever you choose to do to bring the New Year in, please be safe. Personally I will be in church. I love to experience 12:01 am in a place of worship and have been doing that for as long as I can remember. 2014 will be an exciting year for Augusta. We have many elections coming up - federal, state and local - that definitely will bring much excitement and high anticipation for the citizens of Augusta-Richmond County, the whole CSRA and of course, for the candidates. Pastor Anderson’s message “Creating the Hero in You” had special meaning for me because after embarking on my healthy lifestyle journey 19 months ago, I definitely feel like a hero. I’ve consistently gone to Champion Fitness & Nutrition gym three times a week at 5 am. I cook more now than I ever have. I know how to grocery shop for better eating and health. I rarely eat fried foods, I eat good carbs, smoothies, grilled foods, fresh veggies and fresh fruit, yogurt and other healthy foods. On days I don’t work out, I walk or jog in the evenings as often

as I can. In April of 2012, I was wearing size 20/22 W (full figure) clothes. Today I am back in a size 16 (regular. No more M (Misses) or W (full figure) letters next to the number size. To say that I am thrilled is quite an understatement. Yes, I feel like a healthy hero. I have made a total transformation in my life and there is no turning back. Some of the nuggets from last week’s success conference include: Most successful people know how to solve problems. Most successful people are resourceful. There is a difference between a hero and a hostage. Too many people resolve to be hostages, consciously or subconsciously. Heroes, those in the comic books and especially in the Bible, are beacons of light and hope. Heroes have a belief system to dominate and have dominion. A hostage has to take what is given to him, but a hero recognizes that although the circumstances may not look good, there is always a “to be continued.” Too many people have a victim mentality vs a victory mentality. Heroes overcome the lions in their life. Heroes have faith and have high expectations. Those are just a few of the positive messages I wanted to share with you. Some of

the scriptures that backed up everything he talked about include: Psalms 8:6; Galatians 6:9; Ephesians 6:11; and Philippians 3:13. I highly encourage you to read, study and ponder these powerful words from God. There is indeed a hero within you. You have to embrace it, believe it, and take full advantage of the promises God has planned specifically for you. The pastor inspired me so much that I plan to re-launch a division in my company, The HBA Group, that has been dormant for several years. The speaker/workshop division and I plan to kick off the New Year with a series of workshops entitled “YES, It’s Possible!” - Five keys to achieving your dreams when your back is against the wall. If you’re interested, please email me and I will send you the details. I want to take this time to wish you and your family a Happy New Year. May it be blessed, happy, prosperous and may you achieve all you desire in life. Because, after all, there is a hero within you! + Helen Blocker-Adams is Executive Director of the Southeast Enterprise Institute; mental health advocate; and youth advocate. You can email her at hba@hbagroup-intl. com or visit her website at www. helenblockeradams.com

Stay at home alternatives from the professionals at Right at Home “Right at Home” owners Celeste Hoffman and Kathy Crist introduce therapy dog Snickers to Mrs. Margaret Lista. Photo by Todd Lista.

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WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT PAIN AND GREATNESS

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athan stood just off to the edge of a circle of talkative middle-aged adults. A TV blared off to one side. He ignored it. His eyes were sharp, clear, and knowing. They had the awareness of a hawk ready to strike. He spoke quietly. When he addressed elders, “Sir” was plentiful and soft. At a moment of convenience he pulled me aside and asked me to look at his hand. It was swollen at the base of the metacarpal below the right

index finger and just above the wrist. It was an obvious break from the night before. The treatment was basic: immobilization, protection, and patience. I reshaped his aluminum splint to the proper functional position. It would be almost as good and strong as new in 6 months. I knew how it happened: some unfortunate soul had used his jaw to strike Nathan’s fist. And no, they were not drunk in an Augusta bar, showing off for tipsy girls, trying to score panty points.

AUGUSTA

Nathan Key (left) and his Silver Medal with Evans attorney Kirk Gilliard. FREE T AKE-H OME C OPY!

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AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER • FOUNDED IN 2006

DECEMBER 20, 2013

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Best The night before, Cutlass (a mountain of a man and a heavy equipment salesman), Kirk Gilliard, (an Evans defense attorney) and I drove to Columbia, SC to see Nathan “Show Stopper” Key fight in the Caged Chaos 165-pound division of Mixed Martial Arts. His street weight is 182 pounds of solid muscle. Nathan made short work of his opponent, catching him in a submission hold halfway through the 2nd round. We were elated. We were impressed. We were congratulatory. I shook Nathan’s hand with considerable enthusiasm.

What I did not know was that Nathan broke his hand in the first round and every punch he threw thereafter was as painful as my handshake. I advised Nathan to hold off fighting for 4 – 6 months to let the hand heal properly. He thanked me properly. I saw him from time to time thereafter is social settings. The hand was healing. However, he confided that he was still training, but protecting the hand as much as possible. “Training? For what?” I demanded with considerable indignity. “What could be so important that you can’t wait a few months?”

e n i c i d ME

“The Wako Senior World Kick Boxing Championship in Turkey. I will represent the United States in my weight class of Kick Boxing. My country is more important than my hand.” I was taken aback, put in my place, and humbled by his sense of purpose. Seldom does one have the opportunity to be called a friend by a man of such principle. The US government does not support kick boxing as other nations do. Nathan had to pay his own way to Turkey, pay his own medical bills. By day, Nathan installs fire extinguisher systems. Nathan neither whined, complained, nor begged for money. He made and sold T shirts to pay his way to Turkey where he would have to endure the pain and loneliness of facing and defeating, in a foreign country, 5 consecutive world-class fighters over 7 days in order to win a Gold Medal. His father went with him. They flew tourist class from Atlanta to Chicago to Vienna, Austria to Antalya, Turkey. That took 13 hours plus layovers, and cost $1400 per seat. The Pinehurst Resort on the coast was $800 including meals: heavy on fish and fresh vegetables and light on beef and pork.

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The people in Turkey were polite and did not practice road rage even when cut off, intentionally or otherwise. When Nathan Key finally charged onto the canvas with his still-healing hand, lightning reflexes, and unyielding determination, he stood tall. Number One fell. Number Two fell. Number Three fell. Number Four fell. The only remaining obstacle between Nathan and a Gold Medal for the US was a Frenchman call “The Tank” because of his thick compact structure and thunderous punches. Fans roared. Adrenalin flowed. Punches popped. Kicks landed. Conflict filled the air. Pain was ignored. Nathan did not flinch. Nor did he fall. But neither did the Frenchman. It was a moment of profound greatness. The judges awarded the fight to “The Tank” on points. A heavy Silver Medal adorned Nathan’s neck and chest when his feet touched US soil. Much to my relief, his hand was not damaged. Nor was his pride. Nor were his good manners. The Silver Medal did not make him a self-centered braggart. Nathan is too strong for that. What is next for Nathan? More mixed martial arts. Stay in shape. Eat right. Sleep well. Train harder. Prepare to put The Tank on his back in two years. + Bad Billy Laveau is a retired MD with a pointed sense of humor. Bad Billy speaks and entertains at public and private events for audiences not subject to cardiac seizure secondary to overwhelming laughter and glee BadBilly@knology.net or 706306-9397

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I dragged her 600 yards

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his past July I was leaving for a trip to Naples, Florida, to visit my mother and step-dad for a week. Katie, my Border Collie rescue dog, was going to spend the time I was away at her “doggie spa,” McDuffie Animal Hospital. Before I headed there and then off for the 10-hour drive to Florida, I took Katie for a walk. I have 5-1/2 acres in the country, which adjoins 300 acres of timberland. A path goes all around the perimeter of my property. Katie and I usually didn’t walk together. She was very shy when it came to doing her business, so I gave her plenty of space. I was a couple hundred feet down the path when I heard her yelp. She’s not really a

It was too late. barker, so any sound coming from her was unusual. The next thing I knew, Katie was flying down the hill toward me. She flopped down at my feet and her eyes rolled back in her head and she was panting rapidly. Katie weighs 75 pounds, so I was in a bind. There was no way I could pick her up and carry her about 600 yards to the car. I ran toward the house, calling neighbors as I ran, but nobody was home. I got a tarp out of the back of my Jeep and headed back to Katie. By this time I had reached a friend of mine

who was on the way, and also Dave, the vet tech at McDuffie Animal Hospital. I had seen two bite marks on Katie’s nose, so we had a hunch she had been bitten by a snake. Dave said to bring her in right away, but that we probably had an hour and a half window of opportunity to save her. Beyond that it would be too late. It wasn’t going to take me a fraction of that time. I would have gotten her there in five minutes if I could have pulled it off. I ran back to Katie with the tarp, rolled her onto it and dragged her all the way back to the Jeep. Within five minutes, my friend drove up. We did the one-two-three-heave and got her into the Jeep. By this time Katie’s breathing was really labored, but I flew

the 7 miles to the clinic, hell bent for leather. I figured if I was pulled over I would just keep going, so it was a good thing I didn’t see any cops. Even though I got there in record time, when I opened the back of the Jeep she was perfectly still. It was too late. I went in and told them there was no rush; Katie was gone. The speed of it all didn’t really add up, so Dr. Lauren Ducey at McDuffie Animal Hospital did a blood test. The results showed a massive amount of venom in Katie’s bloodstream. They called the Department of Natural Resources to report their findings, and the DNR got in touch with me. I showed them where it happened and they set up a trap baited with live mice in a little cage within the trap. That trap snagged a 12foot long, 8-inch diameter diamondback rattlesnake. They said they would take it to a “reptile rescue” facility. I’m normally a live-andlet-live kind of person, but

after losing Katie I thought it would only be fair if I got a pair of boots out of that snake, but it wasn’t to be. Katie was the sweetest dog and was very smart, but was timid when I first got her. If you moved too fast she would cower in fear, but with love and attention she had really blossomed. There was a chow mix named Scrappy at the hospital that someone had brought in for boarding, but they never came back for it. I had planned to bring Scrappy home with me when I got back from Florida to keep Katie company, but instead it was just Scrappy coming home with me. I want to express my thanks to the staff at McDuffie Animal Hospital throughout all of this, and several other adventures I’ve had with my animals this year. They’re truly awesome. + — submitted by Nancy Gardner Thompson, Georgia

WE’RE BEGGING YOU We’re never too proud to beg. What we’re begging for is Medicine in the First Person stories. With your help, we’d like to make this a feature in every issue of the Medical Examiner. After all, everybody has a story of something health- or medicine-related, and lots of people have many stories. Send your interesting (or even semi-interesting) stories to the Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903 or e-mail to Dan@AugustaRx.com. Thanks!

“The cause was a mystery for a long time.” “And that’s when I fell.” nearest hospital “He doesn’t remember a thing.” “The was 30 miles away.” “I was a battlefield medic.” “He was just two when he died.”

“OUCH!”

“It was a terrible tragedy.” “She saved “I sure learned my lesson.” “I retired from medicine my life.” “It seemed like a miracle.” seven years ago.” “We had triplets.” “It was my first year “I thought, ‘Well, this is it’.” NOTHING SEEMED of medical school.” “They took me to the hospital by helicopter.” TO HELP, UNTIL. . “It took 48 stitches.”

ambulance crashed.” “Now THAT hurt!” “The “My leg was broken “I’m not supposed to be alive.”

“This was on my third day in Afghanistan.” in three places.” “I lost 23 pounds.” “Turned out it was just indigestion.” “At first I thought it was something I ate.” “The smoke detector woke me up.”

Everybody has a story. Tell us yours. Here’s our “No Rules Rules.” We’ll publish your name and city, or keep you anonymous. Your choice. Length? Up to you. Subject? It can be a monumental medical event or just a stubbed toe. It can make us laugh or make us cry. One thing we’re not interested in, however: please, no tirades against a certain doctor or hospital. Ain’t nobody got time for that.


DECEMBER 20, 2013

Southern Girl Eats Clean

New Year’s Day Salad

With the New Year almost upon us, how about a lovely, clean salad made with all the traditional New Year’s Day foods. Well.... it’s traditional if you live in the South. You know Southern folklore? “Eat your greens and black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day for prosperity and good luck in the coming year.” Until recently I had never even heard of this salad. I don’t know why because it’s obviously very southern. I was on one of my MANY trips to Earth Fare when I saw this salad in the deli case. I bought a container and absolutely fell in love with it. I thought to myself, “I can make this!” Although Earth Fare’s version of this salad was not terribly unhealthy....I wanted to make sure to omit the sugar and any unhealthy oils. The collard greens are loaded with nutrition as well as the black-eyed peas and peppers. Enjoy this salad in the New Year and increase your health....Not to mention your prosperity and luck in the year 2014!

New Year’s Day Salad What you’ll need: 1 Tbsp. of organic cold pressed extra virgin olive oil 1 large bunch of fresh organic collards (Or, to save time you may buy a bag of pre-cut, prewashed collards) 1 medium organic Vidalia onion, chopped 3-4 cloves of garlic, crushed 1/2 cup of fire-roasted red peppers, chopped 1 can of organic black eyed peas, drained and rinsed (I use Eden Organic brand) 2-3 Tbsp. of sweet pickles (low in sugar) For the Dressing: 1/4 cup of organic cold pressed extra virgin olive oil 3 Tbsp. of red wine vinegar 1/2 tsp. of Dijon mustard 1 tsp. of crushed red pepper Sea salt and cracked black pepper to taste (I use a generous pinch of each) Making the dish: Wash and remove all of the tough stems from the collard leaves and chop coarsely. Place collards in a large stock pot filled about half full of water and a 1/2 tsp. of salt. Bring collards and water to a boil over medium to high heat. Allow

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Which one of these doesn’t match the others? Actually, they all go together. It would be hard to separate drinking and driving and jail time — and even if you could, it just wouldn’t be right. These three are like peanut butter and jelly and bread. You’ve got to have all three. Or do you? Hold on. This just in: Between now and New Year’s Day, if you choose to drive and then drink, there is a way to avoid the handcuffs — and worse. Cut and save this box and if you need a free ride, it won’t have to be in the back of a squad car — or an ambulance — or a hearse. + Bradford Health Services and Yellow Cab are offering a Free Ride Home now through New Years Day for adults 21 years of age or older who are too impaired to drive. Bradford’s Free Ride Home will be provided within a 30 mile radius. For further information call Bradford at 706-854-1126 or 1-800-333-1865. + AAA (Triple A) and Bud Light are sponsoring Tow To Go now through January 1, a free service to get up to two people and one car safely home. For details, call 1-(855) 2-TOW-2-GO or visit autoclubsouth.aaa.com/safety/two_to_ go.aspx +

to boil for approximately 5-10 minutes. The collards will cook down. Do not overcook, as the collards should be a bit crisp for this recipe. While collards are boiling, heat 1 Tbsp. of olive oil in a small skillet over medium to high heat. Add chopped onions and garlic and sauté until softened, approximately 5-7 minutes, remove from heat and set aside. Once collards are done, drain well and place into a large mixing bowl. Add sautéed onions and garlic, black-eyed peas, roasted red peppers and sweet pickles. Toss all ingredients until well incorporated.

In a small bowl, whisk together all of the dressing ingredients, pour over salad and toss well to coat. Place in the refrigerator to chill slightly. Serve as a sidedish or alone as a clean and nutritional lunch! +

Alisa Rhinehart writes the blog www.southerngirleatsclean.com She is a working wife and mother living in Evans, Georgia. Visit her blog for more recipes and information on clean eating. is now



+

  ®

• Specialty Pharmacy • Home Infusion Ser vices • IV Nursing

Try our Pot Head Blend Currently available at Inner Bean on Davis Road.

“Coffee is good medicine.” — J. Perkins Brewster III.

Our next issue date: January 10, 2014

Same phone numbers! Same convenient location! 3630 Wheeler Road • Augusta, Georgia phone: 706.447.4343 • tollfree: 877.436.4584

www.ambienthealthcare.com

From hospital to home, quality of care continues


+8

P harmacy 411

OUR NEWSSTANDS Medical locations: • Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr, 15th St., Main Entrance • Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Uptown Div., Wrightsboro Rd., main lobby • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, ER Lobby Entrance • Eisenhower Hospital, Main Lobby, Fort Gordon • George C. Wilson Drive (by medical center Waffle House and mail boxes) • GHSU Hospital, 1120 15th Street, South & West Entrances • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Parking Deck entrance • GHSU Hospital, Emergency Room, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Children’s Medical Center, Harper Street, Main Lobby • GHSU, Laney-Walker Boulevard transit stop, Augusta • Select Specialty Hospital, Walton Way, Main entrance lobby • Trinity Hospital, Wrightsboro Road, main lobby by elevators • Trinity Hospital Home Health, Daniel Village, main lobby • University Health Federal Credit Union/ University Hospital Human Resources, 1402 Walton Way, Main Lobby • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Emergency Room lobby area • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Outside Brown & Radiology/Day Surgery • University Hospital - Columbia County, 465 N. Belair Road, Main Lobby • University Hospital Prompt Care, 3121 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta

Around town: • Barney’s Pharmacy, 2604 Peach Orchard Rd. • Birth Control Source, 1944 Walton Way • GRU Summerville Student Bookstore • Blue Sky Kitchen, 990 Broad Street • Columbia County Library, main branch lobby, Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans • Enterprise Mill (North Tower), 1450 Greene Street, Augusta • Daniel Village Barber Shop, Wrightsboro Road at Ohio Ave. • Hartley’s Uniforms, 1010 Druid Park Ave, Augusta • International Uniforms, 1216 Broad Street, Augusta • Marshall Family Y, Belair Rd, Evans • Mellow Mushroom, 12th and Broad Streets, Augusta • Parks Pharmacy, Georgia Avenue, North Augusta • Southside Family Y, Tobacco Road, Augusta • Surrey Center, Surrey Center Pharmacy, Highland Avenue, Augusta • Top-Notch Car Wash, 512 N. Belair Road, Evans • Wild Wing Cafe, 3035 Washington Road, Augusta

Plus... 500+ doctors offices throughout the area for staff and waiting rooms, as well as many nurses stations and waiting rooms of area hospitals.

DECEMBER 20, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Very little if anything about healthcare is inexpensive, and that includes medicine. Tiny pills can command large prices. Over-the-counter medications may be less expensive, but are they also less effective? Find the answers to lots of your drug store questions in this column written by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson exclusively for the Medical Examiner.

WHY AM I ON SO MANY MEDICATIONS?

A

common topic of conversation in the pharmacy these days centers on the number on prescriptions one person takes in a given day. This is a valid point of concern for a lot of people, especially our senior citizens. Sure, people require more medication as they age and the body fails in little ways. But when a younger person is on three medications for a single condition or an elderly patient has to juggle a dozen or more medicines things can get a little confusing. The explanation is in the method of prescribing medications for different common conditions. A high dose of any medication can cause many unacceptable side effects. Look at the common saying “too much of anything can be a bad thing” and think about even water has its limits. Too much water and you dilute out your body’s electrolytes including potassium which regulates your heart beat. Does this mean do not drink water? No! It means use the accepted guidelines and do not fall for the premise that if some is good, then more is obviously better. Let’s start with two of the more common medical conditions occurring today - high blood pressure and diabetes. To treat high blood pressure a physician may use beta blockers, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, alpha blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB’s), just to hit the popular categories. So which category is right for you? Actually it’s not which one but which ones that is the appropriate question. You may start with a single medication for high blood pressure, but as the disease progresses you will require more and more medications for this single condition. These multiple types of blood pressure medications are designed to work on different receptors and different parts of your body and ultimately work together to control your blood pressure. While ACE inhibitors and ARB’s work by preventing the production of a substance in your kidneys that ultimately constrict the blood vessels and raise blood

Merry Christmas To our many loyal customers we extend our sincere thanks and best wishes for the coming year.

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pressure, other classes such as beta blockers work directly on the heart. There are also diuretics that work with the kidneys and help to eliminate extra fluid that our bodies may be retaining. By eliminating this fluid we reduce the pressure load that our hearts pump against. This does not address related diagnoses like high cholesterol leading to plaque buildups in our arteries which can cause related heart disease. That will add at least one if not two more medications to decrease the cholesterol levels, which can be effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. If you are diabetic, you can count on multiple medications to prevent side effects from high doses of any one medicine too. We have medicines to make your pancreas secrete more insulin as well as medicines to reduce the sugar released by the liver. Some medicines can cause your cells to become more sensitive to insulin present in your body. That allows for utilization of sugar instead of its just accumulating in your body. We also have insulin that can be added to what our body makes if we quit producing enough to cover our needs. That only covers the major classes of diabetic medications that doctors have at their disposal. The goal is to reduce your blood sugar to an acceptable level to prevent serious complications. One can see that each class has a different effect on blood sugar and that the different classes can be used to attack out of control blood sugar at different points in the body’s sugar production and utilization cascade. So it only makes sense that two medications work better than one. This also allows for lower dosages of each medication reducing the possibility of side effects from higher dosages. If you factor in that many of the common conditions in today’s elderly patients are progressive and interlinked with each other (both in being risk factors for each other and generally occurring at the same ages), you reach the conclusion that we are lucky everyone isn’t on six or seven medications. A word of advice to end this column would be to consult your pharmacist anytime you add to or change your medication profile. We are here to help and will work with your insurance and your physician to try to accommodate your needs without breaking your bank account. + Questions about this article or suggestions for future columns can be sent to us at cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net Written for the Medical Examiner by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson (cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net )

Boardwalk to Bark Place Kennnel & Daycare welcoming dogs 40 lbs and under 5873 Huntington Drive Grovetown, Georgia (706) 840-3141 (706) 556-8127 www.boardwalktobarkplace.com

Thank you for supporting our advertisers!


DECEMBER 20, 2013

DON’T LICK THE BEATERS Useful food facts from dietetic interns with University Hospital’s Augusta Area Dietetic Internship Program

THE COCONUT CRAZE EXPLAINED

C

by Brianna Dumas University Hospital Dietetic Intern

Meaningful video gives patients a reason to visit your website, and gives you an opportunity to inform and educate.

“Fact-based no-hype video creativity” You’ll like what we do for you or it’s free.

EVANS | 4216 WASHINGTON RD | (706) 855-1616 S. AUGUSTA | 2115 WINDSOR SPRING RD | (706) 922-1611 AIKEN | 220 E. GATE DR | (803) 226-0034

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OUR CUSTOMERS NEVER WEAR THIS HAT. But it does prove that a person can still look pretty good even on a bad hair day. VISIT OUR NEWEST BARBER: BRENDA ROBERTS, TUE-SAT

Visit danielvillagebarbershop.com today for your personal barber’s hours, local community news, information on the history of hair and haircuts, local art and music, and all kinds of fascinating and useful information!

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digested carbohydrates in the form of sugar and electrolytes. This liquid, also known as coconut water, and packs fewer calories, less sugar, and more potassium than commercialized sports drinks. Some question whether or not they could replace their sports drink with the more natural form of coconut water, but research has concluded that while coconut water does contain more potassium, it does contain the amount of sodium needed in an effective sports drink. One ounce of most unflavored coconut water contains 5.45 calories, 1.3 grams sugar, 61 mg of potassium, and 5.45 mg of sodium. By comparison, sports drinks like Gatorade would contain ounce for ounce more sugar and sodium but less potassium. Rehydrating with water, a banana, and salty pretzels would work well to replace fluids and mineral losses. As the coconut matures, the surface browns and the inside contains less liquid, known as mature coconut water. It is in these coconuts that the oil can be extracted. Since coconut oil is almost 100% pure saturated fat, it has been the source of health controversy. However, research has concluded that coconut fat is mainly dominated by lauric acid and myristic acid. A few

studies looked at coconut oil and found the combination of fatty acids improved the ratio of total cholesterol: HDL (good) cholesterol but they also raised LDL (bad) cholesterol. This differs from the monounsaturated oils most cook with, such as olive oil or canola oil. These oils raise HDL without raising LDL. But looking further at lauric acid, it is unlike any other saturated fat. It is a medium-chained triglyceride, meaning it is metabolized differently than most of the long-chained fatty acids we find in our current westernized diet. Lauric acid has also been highly regarded for many other health and beauty uses. This fatty acid has been the main source of debate in whether or not to seriously consider coconut oil in our diets. If you’re considering coconut oil, here are a few more facts to help you make up your mind. Pure virgin coconut oil, containing no hydrogenation, has no trans fats. Coconut oil is a plant-based fat, meaning it does not contain cholesterol. Coconut oil has a high smoke point, making it resistant to oxidation and more shelf stable. But what about the most important thing: taste? Known for its mild, nutty flavor, this oil is best when sautéing greens or other veggies. The vegan population is even going (coco)nuts about it for its ability to create that flaky texture they miss so very much in their pastries. Based on the research, coconut water and oil don’t get the dietitian stamp of approval. But, recommendations for fat intake always remain the same; use sparingly in your diet. So the next time you run across some coconut water or coconut oil in the store, take some time to decide if this is what is right for your personal, dietary needs and wants. Enjoy your coconut cake or ambrosia without guilt. Happy Holidays! +

Ohio Ave.

oconut cake may be the star on your holiday dessert table. Coconut is often found in the delectable Southern concoction of ambrosia, a mixture of fresh oranges, grapefruit, cherries and coconut often adorning a Christmas buffet. But have you noticed the flurry of attention around other coconut products this season? Step into any supermarket or health food store and you can’t help but notice all the new coconut products on the shelves. Whether you are a home chef, athlete, or food blogger, coconut seems to be the latest buzz on the Internet, TV, and food articles. All of this seems odd since historically, professionals in the nutritionscience field have shunned coconut. So why is coconut now getting such fame? And is this a product we should look further into adding into our diets? Two of the most popular coconut items currently on shelves are coconut water and coconut oil. Coconut in general has been highly regarded for its many uses for centuries. Used for culinary, medicinal and cosmetic purposes, virtually every part of this plant can be utilized. Looking at an immature green coconut, we start with a hard shell filled with water rich in easily

9+

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

FOUNDINGS

They say the camera adds ten pounds. What if instead it added ten patients?

Former Trinity Hospital CEO Bill Atkinson’s book on the behind-the-scenes tales of twelve Augusta healthcare institutions.

NOW AVAILABLE AT AMAZON.COM Proceeds from the sale of this book benefit dementia research


+ 10

PAPER OR PLASTIC?

If you prefer paper, we’re all over town. If you like our digital version, it’s always available on your favorite device at the Medical Examiner blog (www.AugustaRx. com/news) or online at www.issuu.com/medicalexaminer. You can easily view back issues, too. +

Less

t ha n a m i l l

ion people can’t be wr

ong.

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the Join

+

DECEMBER 20, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

GRADUATION… from page 1 • A report entitled “Decreasing Health Care Costs by Increasing Educational Attainment” stated that the dropouts from the Class of 2006 alone will cost the U.S. $17 billion in Medicaid expenditures over their lifetimes. • Those with more years of schooling are less likely to smoke, to drink heavily, to be overweight or obese, or to use illegal drugs. The irony is that these expensive and non-essential habits (tobacco, alcohol, illegal drugs) are more commonly practiced by those with little money, another result of little education. • The U.S. Bureau of the Census reports that as of 2006, high school dropouts earned an average of $17,299 per year compared with nearly $27,000 for high school graduates. • The group America’s Promise says that “each year dropouts represent $320 billion in lost lifetime earning potential.” • High school dropouts bore the brunt of the recession more than the rest of the population: the overall national unemployment rate in January 2012 was 8.3 percent; for high school

graduates: 8.4 percent; for college graduates: 4.2 percent. But for high school dropouts the rate was 13.1 percent according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Since it takes money to live whether you’re a dropout or a Ph.D., the money has to be found somewhere. Crime is one source of added income for many without a job or job skills. Inevitably, social programs fill some of the income gap. You and I pay for those, meaning this issue has an impact on society as a whole, not just upon the dropouts themselves. • One study found that if all welfare recipients who are high school dropouts were instead graduates, welfare costs would drop by $1.8 billion. • Another irony is that, while dropouts represent many billions of dollars in expense to governments, they pay an estimated $36 billion less in taxes every year than their more educated fellow citizens. So their net effect drains public coffers both coming and going. What’s the answer? In truth, all 16 pages of this paper could be filled with

statistical data about the negative effects of dropping out of school. We haven’t even scratched the surface here, and these are just dry facts and figures. The real story is told in the often bleak everyday lives of those with little education, with substandard (or no) jobs, constant anxiety over not having enough food and money, poor diet, reduced access to health care, and troubles with the legal system, to name just a few. Droputs are obviously a complex problem that a little newspaper in Augusta, Georgia, is unlikely to solve. Still, we can’t help but think government programs and university studies can only do so much. The true solution lies with individual families. With mothers and fathers working with their children. With single mothers doing everything they can to keep their children interested in education. With grandparents tutoring grandchildren. With teachers reaching out to parents, and giving at-risk students personal attention. Do you agree that’s the smart approach? What can you do? +

mpanies who already suppor t us ! tens of co

I DON’T ALWAYS CHECK THE Parents, Teachers, Caregivers: Tired of fussing and nagging? MEDICAL EXAMINER BLOG ORGANIZE YOUR KIDS THE CHART MART WAY! AVAILABLE AT: Columbia County Library Cafe AGC Teacher Supply Dixie Dawgs at Saturday Augusta Market

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DECEMBER 20, 2013

The blog spot – Posted Nov. 27, 2011 at http://asystoleisstable.blogspot.com/

The Honor of Responsibility and Trust The patient has been temporarily paralyzed by the drugs, and you’re the one keeping them alive by squeezing air into their lungs...but...no pressure. Gulp. I was holding the mask as tightly against her face as I could, sealing the rubber to her cheeks in the effort to keep highly oxygenated air from leaking out. Looking down at her from the head of the bed I saw the patient from a different vantage point, a place that made her look so vulnerable. And she was vulnerable. A few minutes prior to closing her eyes she had been nervously chatting and laughing away as we prepared her for surgery. The dose of propofol and the inhaled sedatives smoothed her face and left her body limp. Now we had injected medication into her intravenous line to paralyze her. Once her muscles were relaxed we could slide a tube down her throat and into the trachea, providing the means to ensure that her airway would remain open and her lungs could be well ventilated with oxygen during the surgery. I removed the mask to prepare for the intubation. Her skin was pale, the freckles standing out now that the nervous blush had faded from her cheeks and neck. She was perfectly still and we were moving into action. It struck me then how explicitly patients trust their doctors and nurses. Of course I have always understood this as a general concept in healthcare but this was suddenly a much more concrete example. Patients literally put their lives in our hands on a daily basis. Why have I never said to a patient, “Thank you for trusting me with your most precious possession”? Why has a patient never said to me, “Please do not be hurried or harried, distracted or inattentive, because today you are responsible for my survival”? I suppose these are silent agreements and understandings that we have in all of our patient interactions. Yet the fact that we don’t outwardly acknowledge these understandings means that maybe we’ve forgotten that at the core, it is an honor to be in this role. I’m not so unrealistic to think that one is thankful when the bleep goes off for the 47th time on a Christmas eve night shift... but I hope that at the end of the day when I am bone tired and flopped-out on the couch in the call room I’ll remember this, and take even just a tiny measure of satisfaction from the honor of responsibility. No pressure. +

“Why are these things never said? ”

Speaking of blogs, the Medical Examiner’s blog is found at www.AugustaRx.com/news It features new content daily.

This could be yyou. The Medical Examiner can be delivered right to your door! Use the handy form on page 13

11 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

The Money Doctor Setting Goals — The Key to a Successful Financial Plan

W

ith the end of the calendar year and holiday season fast approaching, many people will spend time during the next few weeks reminiscing about 2013 and planning for 2014. This is a great time to review your financial health. Let’s start with two questions. Did you accomplish what you wanted in 2013? What do you want to do in 2014? An old saying that still holds true today says, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will take you there.” The first step to developing a financial plan is goal setting. Unfortunately, many of us don’t do detailed planning for our personal life to include developing goals for our family, marriage, kids, and charitable donations. According to a late 1990’s consumer mistakes survey by the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board, the most frequent mistakes consumers make when approaching financial planning is that they do not set measurable goals. You will not be able to answer the questions above if you have not identified what you want to accomplish. Our first meeting with every client focuses on developing goals and targets to get everyone on the same page. Here are a few things we have found that help when setting goals: • Make your goals SMART. The acronym stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-Bound. Underneath each goal detail the specific actions that you need to take to achieve the goal. • Write down your goals. Research has shown that people who write down their goals are on average 33% more likely to accomplish those goals. • Goal setting is not a one-time event. You should review and update your list of goals throughout the year. Especially, if you experience a major life event, such as the birth of a child. • Create goals for different time horizons. You can have short-term goals and long-term goals. Generally, short-term goals are those that will take place in the next 12 months. A few common examples are taking a vacation, charitable giving, protection against loss, or making a major purchase. Long-term goals can be one, three, five or more years in the future. We often hear goals like retirement savings, paying off your mortgage, education,

starting a business, legacy planning, becoming financially independent, and weddings as common long-term goals. Your investment strategy should be different for short-term and long-term goals. Once you understand your goals, you have one more step before you can start building a plan to accomplish those goals. You must identify the questions your financial plan should answer to help you reach your goals. Here are a few common questions financial plans can help address: • What type of retirement account should you contribute to and how much during the year? • What is the best way to save for education? • What debt should I pay off first? Should I consolidate my debt into one account? • Do I have enough insurance for life, disability, home, property and casualty, liability, and auto? • Will my estate pass to my heirs the way I intend? Does my will match my beneficiary designations on other accounts? • When should I take Social Security? When should my spouse take Social Security? • What should I invest my non-retirement savings in as I save for short and long-term goals? • When should I review my credit report? • What tax strategies can I use to maximize my charitable giving to organizations I enjoy supporting? There is never a bad time to review your financial health. You can start by making sure you have measurable goals and a list of questions you plan to answer with your financial plan. This holiday season take time to sit down and determine what road you are traveling down and identify if that is the road you want to be on. + by Clayton Quamme. Clayton is a financial planner with Preston & Cleveland Wealth Management, LLC (www.preston-cleveland.com). Preston & Cleveland is a fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm with offices in Atlanta and Augusta, GA and Columbia, SC.

Like this newspaper? The best way to support the Medical Examiner is by supporting our advertisers.

WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT


+ 12

DECEMBER 20, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE EXAMiNERS

THE MYSTERY WORD

+

by Dan Pearson

How would you like Thanks for asking, to join me for a but I’m trying to New Year’s Eve toast? cut back.

Cut back? On toasting?

Oh, come on. Well... ok. It’s one night a year. Maybe just one slice.

I’m on a strict low-carb diet.

The Mystery Word for this issue: TULMISTAN

© 2013 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

ACROSS 1. _____ Hollow (in Augusta) 5. ______ Orchard 10. Augusta Rowing Regatta power source 14. fat 15. Of an axis 16. Understood 17. Bandage type 18. Stuff yourself 20. “Mini-stroke” abbrev. 21. Non-Rx 23. __________ Wells 25. Knee injury ltrs. 26. Lowest of all clubs 27. Hopelessness 31. Underwear type 35. Type of radiation (abbrev.) 36. Carolina intro? 38. Andes pack animal 39. Largest city in MD 41. Aspirin, for ex. 43. Aborigine of Borneo 44. Inner ear structure 46. Rush 48. Abbreviation that’s often an October focus 49. Legendary British racehorse of the late 1870s 51. Queen of the jungle? 53. Stroke abbrev. 54. US HHS agency 55. Moment 59. Make a rise or fall sharper 63. Twitch 64. Upheaval 66. Where The Wild Things ___ 67. Dressed 69. Head of the 755 Club? 70. Operatic melody 71. Villain’s antagonist 72. ____ in state (before a funeral) 73. Straw or wicker beehive

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Click on “Reader Contests”

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VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM TO ENTER!

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

30. Like a marsh plant 31. Pierce 32. Possibly 33. Gather 34. Diamond _____ 37. Greek T 40. Slight trace (abbrev.) 42. Piling, like snow 45. Muted green tweed color 47. Warble 50. By hand 52. Scottish form of no 55. Scratch 56. _____ Delta 57. Wound leftover 58. Salver 59. Before long 60. Like 34-D 61. City in NW Pennsylvania 62. Low tide 65. Med. imaging type 68. D of DIY 70. In the same way that

— Bob Ross (1942 - 1955)

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may be used only once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

DOWN 1. Indicate, such as an error 2. Augusta painter Ed 3. ____ enrollment 4. Depart 5. Savannah Rapids feature 6. Sr. officer (in business) 7. Oxygen and nitrogen, familiarly 8. Musical staff sign 9. Word before food or club 10. Sooner State for short 11. Reversing prefix 12. Restraint 13. Bling; goodies 18. Killer whales 19. Absorbent cloth 22. Inits. of “The Raven” poet 24. Earth (with “the) 27. City with the world’s tallest building 28. De facto seat of Columbia County 29. Simultaneous firing of guns

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

Solution p. 14

U D O K U

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle. All the listed letters following 1 are the 1st letters of each word; the letters following 2 are 2nd letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues or numbers with minimal choices listed. A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

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1 . WA AT T R Q N 2 . H U R R O O N I 3 . S O G E E E 4 . S H W R N 5 . G E E T T 6 . I R 7 . S O 8 . N 9 . S

SAMPLE:

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

O 2

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2013 All rights reserved

WORDS NUMBER

1

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!


DECEMBER 20, 2013

THE BEST MEDICINE ha... ha...

Sara: Well, I guess I’ve reached that awkward, in-between age. Cara: What do you mean? Sara: Too young for Medicare, too old for men to care.

Three boys were riding their bikes one afternoon when a fire engine zoomed past with blaring sirens. They noticed a Dalmatian on the front seat of the fire engine. The first boy said, “They use that dog to man was walking into the post office when keep the crowds back.” he was accosted by a particularly smelly, “No,” said said the second boy, “He’s just dirty and shabby-looking homeless man who for good luck.” asked him for a couple dollars for a bite to eat. But the third boy knew the real reason. The man took out his wallet, extracted two dollars and said, “Now tell me the truth. If I give “You’re both wrong,” he said. “When they get to the fire they use the dog to help them you this money, will you buy some beer with it find the nearest fire hydrant.” instead?” “No, I stopped drinking years ago,” the As a traveling salesman from the city homeless man said. entered a little country store, he noticed a “Will you use it to gamble instead of buying sign warning, “Danger! Beware of dog!” food?” the man asked. posted on the door. Inside, he noticed a “No, I don’t gamble,” the homeless man said. harmless old hound dog asleep on the floor “I need everything I can get just to stay alive.” beside the cash register. “Will you spend the money on green fees at a “Is that the dog folks are supposed to golf course instead of food?” the man asked. “Are you NUTS?” replied the homeless man. “I beware of?” he asked the owner. “Yep, that’s him,” came the reply. haven’t played golf in 20 years.” The stranger couldn’t help but be amused. “Well,” said the man, “I’m not going to give “That certainly doesn’t look like a dangerous you two dollars. Instead, I’m going to take you dog to me. Why in the world would you post home for a terrific dinner cooked by my wife.” that sign?” The homeless man was astounded. “Won’t “Because,” the owner explained, “Before your wife be furious with you? I know I’m dirty, I posted that sign, people kept tripping over and I probably smell pretty bad.” him.” + The man replied, “That’s okay. I just want her to see what a man looks like who’s given up beer, gambling, and golf.”

A

Why subscribe to the Medical Examiner? Because no one should have to make a trip to the doctor or the hospital just to read Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper.

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SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDICAL EXAMINER By popular demand we’re making at-cost subscriptions available for the convenience of our readers. If you live beyond the Aiken-Augusta area or miss issues between doctor’s appointments — don’t you hate it when that happens? — we’ll command your mail carrier to bring every issue to your house! NAME ADDRESS CITY

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

STATE

ZIP

Choose ____ six months for $16; or ____ one year for $32. Mail this completed form with payment to Augusta Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta GA 30903-0397

The Patient’s Perspective by Marcia Ribble

S

ometimes we think we know everything there is to know about conditions we have. However, that is often just an illusion. I used to think I understood my asthma, but I am discovering how much I don’t know. And it’s a whole lot of ignorance! One question I have is how to tell if the medications I’m using right now are actually effective. I’m taking Spireva for the asthma, but sporadically rather than daily. Using the inhaler made me dizzy and light-headed and seemed totally ineffective at either preventing or aborting spells of coughing. What complicates things further is that I also have allergies that make me cough when the phlegm goes down the back of my throat. I take loratadine for allergies. Past contacts with a pulse oximeter have shown low levels of oxygen and resulting recommendations that I practice deep breathing to increase the levels, plus a warning that I am precariously near to carrying oxygen around with me. No matter what I take, I still cough until I can barely get enough air in to cough again. Awareness of our own bodies is often the first step towards being able to gain control of asthma, and I wasn’t aware of the issue until they started running ads on TV asking whether or not viewers were in control of their asthma. You know the one — where the person says their asthma is under control and then some friend or family member instantly appears to contradict them before disapppearing just as instantly. Listening to the ad and the actor’s response to the person with asthma — that they had been unable to participate in an activity, had

Talk is cheap. Not talking can be deadly.

used their inhaler frequently, were out of work sick more often than other employees, or coughed all the way through date night — alerted me to the fact that I was not at all sure what it means to be in control of one’s asthma. That ad notes that you can go to asthma.com to check out your levels of control. When I went to that site I found that, although it has a sponsor (GlaxoSmithKline), it is not set up to advertise its products. Instead it has a series of questionnaires to fill out and it does not keep the information from your test results. It provides a nice sheet to help folks keep track of their asthma on a daily basis, one you can download and make copies of for your own use. I don’t claim to be an expert or anything close to one, but it does seem like a useful website to help us gain a better understanding of what asthma control should look and feel like. Here’s to better breathing for all of us, especially now that we’re closing our doors and windows and breathing frosty air outdoors! + Marcia Ribble received her PhD in English at Michigan State and retired from the University of Cincinnati. She taught writing at the college level and loves giving voice to people who have been silenced. She is now teaching again at Virginia College in Augusta. She can be reached with comments, suggestions, etc., at marciaribble@hotmail.com.

DOING RESEARCH? The Medical Examiner website has a zillion links to useful and informative sites of all kinds. Visit www.AugustaRx.com/StudyHall.html


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DECEMBER 20, 2013

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE MYSTERY SOLVED The Mystery Word in our last issue was: GERIATRICS

...cleverly hidden (on the cruise ship) in the p. 9 ad for INTERNATIOAL UNIFORM Congratulations to RON McDEARIS, who scores a $20 Wild Wing Cafe gift certificate, two free movie passes courtesy of Health Center Credit Union, a Scrubs of Evans gift card, and a free Top Notch Car Wash gift card. Win this stuff! The new Mystery Word is on p. 12. Start looking!

The Celebrated MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then be the first to find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries you’ll score our goodie package: gift certificates from Wild Wing Cafe, Top Notch Car Wash, and movie passes from Health Center Credit Union! SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (Winners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

SENDING US A CLASSIFIED? USE THE FORM BELOW AND MAIL IT IN, OR GO TO WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM AND PLACE & PAY CONVENIENTLY AND SAFELY ONLINE. THANKS!

Augusta Medical Examiner Classifieds

EXAMINER CLASSIFIEDS HOMES, APARTMENTS, ROOMMATES, LAND, ETC.

Sterling Road, located off Stevens Creek at Riverwatch Pkwy. $850/mo. Call 678467-7187.

FOR RENT 2 bdrm 1 bath unfurn upstairs condo. Carport, pool, outside laundry. Country Club Hills condos, Milledge Road near GRU/ASU. $700/mo + $500 dep. We furn water, you pay electric. 706-736-7167 Email: ronst79@gmail. com

FOR SALE: GORGEOUS, immaculate, never occupied townhome located mins from Medical District. 2 bed, 2 bath, master en suite, walk-in closets, office. 1450 sq ft. hardwood floors throughout, fabulous upgrades, custom kitchen and baths. Floor to ceiling windows, fenced yard. Partially furnished! 120k OBO. 803-507-6621.

ROOMMATE WANTED! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath house with pool, 2 minutes from colleges. Perfect for medical or grad students. $425+share utils. 706.993.6082 FOR SALE: 3 BR house + 1 BR apartment (private entrance) + 2 full basements. Apt ideal for aging parent, or home office, or rental (now rented; income to offset mortgage). 310sqft basemt perfect for office or playroom. 2nd basemt (240sqft, large windows) great for workshop or studio. House & apt (2042sqft), hardwd floors, new baths. Lush back yard. Tanglewood area, near Augusta Mall. $93,500 OBO. 617-6292915. WEST AUGUSTA House for rent. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1500 sqft, 1-car garage, 3024

Augustagahomesearch.com Foreclosures • Rentals • MLS Roman Realty 706-564-5885

SERVICES VIDEOS-FOR-THE-WEB SERVICE Documentary style interview or demonstration shot HD with pro audio and basic edits, 3-min. finished video uploaded to your account. Complete package $250. Please call David: 803-645-8370. Documentary Video Productions, LLC – Aiken, SC. BIBLE BY PHONE - Free daily Bible readings; for Spiritual Encouragement and Growth. Call 706-855-WORD (9673)

FULL-SERVICE MOVER Anthony’s Professional Moving, 28 years serving the CSRA moving hospital equipment, offices, homes, apartments, etc. Estimates are FREE. Call 706.860.3726 or 706.814.8141 NOTICE! ATTENTION! If any current or past employer has failed to pay you min. wage or time and a half overtime pay, you may be entitled to an order from US Federal Court awarding you twice the amount of your unpaid wages plus atty. fees. For info, call Arthur H. Shealy, Attorney at Law, 803-278-5149, 1010 Plantation Rd, North Augusta SC 29841. You may be entitled to a similar award for unpaid wages if your employer required you to perform duties during your lunch hour, before clocking in, or after clocking out. BUSINESS ASSISTANCE Ridiculously affordable and highly visible advertising available through the pages of Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper, aka the Augusta Medical Examiner. Have you heard of it or seen a copy? Rates can be reviewed at AugustaRx.com. Questions? Send an e from the site, or call the publisher directly: Dan Pearson at 706.860.5455. E: Dan@AugustaRx.com

TELL A FRIEND ABOUT THE MEDICAL EXAMINER! THE PUZZLE SOLVED

WHAT’S YOUR DRUG OF CHOICE?

F L A G

R I C E

D U B A I

E V A N S

(OURS IS COFFEE)

I T C H

N I L E

O G P P O A E O V N E R I A C L S P A I A S O L T N V I L O N O M C V A S T A N C T U A D A R O L

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM Name Address Work number (if applicable) ( ) Home phone ( ) Category of ad (leave blank if unsure):

E A C H X I L E E R E A T C F L O T W R T H E U T H L S A I D H U R R Y Y L I O F D T S T E R M O I L A R O N Y I N G

O A R K N E T I W I N O R M A L A M D Y A B S N E S A E P E A R A R I S K E

S W A G L A K E S N E A P

SEE PAGE 12

QUOTATION

In case we need to contact you. These numbers will not appear in the ad.

QUOTATION PUZZLE SOLUTION: Page 12: “You do your best work if you do a job that makes you happy.”

AD COPY (one word per line; phone numbers MUST include the area code):

— Bob “Joy of Painting” Ross .25

.50

.75

1.00

1.25

1.50

1.75

2.00

2.25

2.50

2.75

3.00

3.25

3.50

3.75

4.00

4.25

4.50

4.75

5.00

5.25

5.50

5.75

6.00

6.25

6.50

6.75

7.00

7.25

7.50

7.75

8.00

8.25

8.50

8.75

9.00

The Sudoku Solution

COFFEE IS GOOD MEDICINE

(Copy this form or continue on additional sheet if more space needed.)

Send this form with payment to:

AUGUSTA MEDICAL EXAMINER, PO BOX 397, AUGUSTA, GA 30903-0397 Total ad cost by number of words as shown above: $

VISIT DRUGOFCHOICECOFFEE.COM

4 5 8 1 7 9 6 2 3

9 7 2 6 3 4 5 1 8

1 3 6 5 8 2 4 9 7

6 8 7 4 2 3 9 5 1

5 4 3 9 1 6 7 8 2

2 9 1 7 5 8 3 4 6

8 6 5 3 4 1 2 7 9

7 2 9 8 6 5 1 3 4

3 1 4 2 9 7 8 6 5

WORDS BY NUMBER “There are no right answers to wrong questions.” — Ursula K. Le Guin

Multiply by number of times ad to run: x Total submitted: $

The Augusta Medical Examiner publishes on the 1st and 3rd Friday of every month. Your ad should reach us no later than 7 days prior to our publication date.

Thanks for reading!

www.AugustaRx.com


DECEMBER 20, 2013

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Intergenerational relationships provide social, emotional and physical benefits by Kathy Crist Not too long ago, TV shows like “The Andy Griffith Show” and “The Waltons” portrayed the bond of older folks with their younger relatives (Opie knew better than to challenge Aunt Bea, Kathy Crist and John-Boy showed his respect to Grandpa and Grandma and to those feisty Baldwin sisters). With our increasingly high-tech culture lacking in face-to-face interactions, does it really matter if seniors and young ones engage with each other? Ongoing studies on intergenerational relationships are showing that it does. In schools where older

adults regularly volunteer in classrooms, the children actually score higher in reading. Other research finds that children who interact with older adults show increased personal and social development. An impact study within Big Brothers Big Sisters revealed that young people involved in adult-youth mentoring programs were 52 percent less likely to skip school and 46 percent less likely to start using illegal drugs. In day-to-day interaction in elder care, we find that seniors who interact with babies, children, teens and collegeage students are generally less depressed and more energetic. Breaking down the barriers between generations literally adds life to everyone’s years. Increased social interaction

between older and younger individuals brings out more smiles, which lowers stress, blood pressure and heart rate. Other overall health benefits to forming stronger relationships across the years include: + Strengthened immune system. For both older and younger individuals, social interaction and physical activities reduce stress hormones and build the body’s natural defenses to fight off illness and disease. + Increased skills and knowledge. Seniors learn about computer and technology innovations from youth to keep more engaged in society. Older adults share their wisdom and life experiences to mentor the younger. + Decreased fears. Young

children feel less fearful about being around older people and seniors develop less fear about aging and death. + Greater emotional and social intelligence. Children and youth who interact with seniors develop greater communication and social skills and a more positive selfesteem. The intergenerational relationship fills a void for elders not having grandchildren or family near. + Renewed sense of purpose in life. Older adults feel less isolated and sense their continued usefulness to others and their community. To create deeper multiage relationships, both seniors and youth can choose a number of activities to enjoy together. Playing board or computer games, cooking, storytelling, gardening, watching movies,

discussing current events, and putting together photo albums and scrapbooks all form tighter bonds between generations. Despite the generation gap in their differences, seniors and youth can build mutually beneficial friendships that significantly affect their overall well-being today and tomorrow. + Right at Home is a locally owned and directly employs and supervises all caregiving staff, each of whom is thoroughly screened, trained, bonded and insured prior to entering a client’s home. Right at Home serves Augusta and surrounding areas in the CSRA. For more information, contact Right at Home at www.csra. rightathome.net, 706-814-7393 or by email at admin@rightathomecsra.net.

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY ALLERGY

DERMATOLOGY

Tesneem K. Chaudhary, MD Allergy & Asthma Center 3685 Wheeler Road, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

CHIROPRACTIC Poppell Chiropractic Clinic 1106-A Furys Lane Martinez 30907 706-210-2875 Most insurance plans accepted

DENTISTRY Dr. Judson S. Hickey Periodontist 2315-B Central Ave Augusta 30904 706-739-0071

DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICS Karen L. Carter, MD 1303 D’Antignac St, Suite 2100 Augusta 30901 706-396-0600 www.augustadevelopmentalspecialists.com

DRUG REHAB Floss ‘em or lose ‘em!

Jason H. Lee, DMD 116 Davis Road Augusta 30907 706-860-4048 Evans Dental Group 4250-2 Washington Rd Evans 30809 706-860-3200 www.evansdentalgroup.com

YOUR LISTING HERE Augusta Area Healthcare Provider Prices from less than $100 for six months CALL 706.860.5455 TODAY!

Georgia Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center 2283 Wrightsboro Rd. (at Johns Road) Augusta 30904 706-733-3373 www.GaDerm.com

Steppingstones to Recovery 2610 Commons Blvd. Augusta 30909 706-733-1935

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Group & Benefits Consultants Inc. 3515 Wheeler Rd, Bldg. C Augusta 30909 706-733-3459 www.groupandbenefits.com

FAMILY MEDICINE Urgent MD Augusta: 706-922-6300 Grovetown: 706-434-3500 Thomson: 706-595-7825 Primary Care Rates

HOSPICE

...PHARMACY

Alliance Hospice 3685 Old Petersburg Rd. Suite 145 Augusta 30907 706-447-2461

LASER SERVICES Ideal Image 339 Fury’s Ferry Rd Martinez 30907 1-800-BE-IDEAL • www.idealimage.com Schedule a FREE Consultation

OPHTHALMOLOGY Roger M. Smith, M.D. 820 St. Sebastian Way Suite 5-A Augusta 30901 706-724-3339

OPTICIAN

SENIOR LIVING Augusta Gardens Senior Living Community 3725 Wheeler Road Augusta 30909 SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 706-868-6500 www.augustagardenscommunity.com

SLEEP MEDICINE Sleep Institute of Augusta Bashir Chaudhary, MD 3685 Wheeler Rd, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

VEIN CARE

Murphy & Robinson Phil Harris 1571 Walton Way Augusta 30904 706-737-2020

Parks Pharmacy 437 Georgia Ave. N. Augusta 29841 803-279-7450 www.parkspharmacy.com

O P T I C I A N S

PHARMACY Medical Center West Pharmacy 465 North Belair Road Evans 30809 706-854-2424 medicalcenterwestpharmacy.com

Vein Specialists of Augusta G. Lionel Zumbro, Jr., MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI 501 Blackburn Dr, Martinez 30907 706-854-8340 www.VeinsAugusta.com

WEIGHT LOSS PHC Weight Loss & Wellness Centers 246B Bobby Jones Expwy Martinez: 706-868-5332 Thomson: 706-597-8667 www.phcweightloss.com


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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Dec20 13  

VACCINATE YOUR KIDS!!! Medicine in the 1st Person: "I dragged her 600 yards;" Education and its impact on health; the latest on Obamacare; T...

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