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HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS

AUGUSTA’S MOST SALUBRIOUS NEWSPAPER • FOUNDED IN 2006

APRIL 18, 2014

It’s almost swimsuit season!

Who cares?

Swimsuit season... Is that the annual drive to lose weight and firm up so we can look good enough in swimwear to go bake in the sun on a beach or poolside and thereby raise our risk for skin cancer? Uh, can we rethink that? Here are some much better reasons to celebrate “swimsuit season.” • Live longer We might as well start off on a high note: the same kind of stuff that would offer the trivial benefit of looking better in a bikini — or perish the thought, a Speedo — is the same kind of activity that lengthens life. And the good news is that a mere 15 minutes a day can make a big difference. • Lower your diabetes risk Not that diabetes rates are skyrocketing or anything, but one study found that people who walk just 3,500 steps a day (there are roughly 2,000 steps in a mile) had a lower risk of developing diabetes than the people who walked the least in the study. • Have fewer migraine headaches Anyone familiar with migraines knows that relief can be hard to come by. But a small 2011 study found that regular exercise worked just as well as medication or relaxation therapy at stopping debilitating migraine headaches before they start.

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• Strengthen your bones Regular, weight-bearing activity has been shown to build up bone strength, which prevents some of the natural decline in bone health often seen as we age. Weight-bearing activity — like walking — does the trick. • Get sick less Thank your walking shoes next time you’re the only one at the office who hasn’t caught that bug going around. Regular exercise seems to boost the immune system. Translation: fewer colds and bouts of the flu. • Decrease your cancer risk Let’s see... look good in a bathing suit or have a lower cancer risk... That is a certifiable no-brainer. The risk for certain types of cancer — colon cancer for one — seems to be significantly affected by regular physical activity. Other studies suggest that teenage and early adulthood exercise may protect against breast cancer down road. • Reduce your risk of stroke According to the National Stroke Association, up to 80 percent of all strokes are preventable. Lowering blood pressure and losing excess pounds help, but just moving more makes a big difference too. In a 2013 study, inactivity was linked with a 20 percent increase in risk of stroke. Experts say a moderate-intensity workout at least five days a week has the most benefit, but any and all exercise is a step in the right direction. • Sleep better A 2013 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that people who self-identify as regular, vigorous exercisers got better sleep than their sedentary peers. Of the vigorous exercisers, just 17 percent said they got fairly or very bad sleep, while nearly half of the non+ exercisers reported the same. +

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APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

SAVE THE DATE

MEDICATION DISPOSAL DAY Sat., April 26

by Ross Everett

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9:00 am - 12:30 pm Keep your family safe Bring expired and unused medications for safe and legal disposal. Quick and convenient drop-off. No questions asked.

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WHO IS MY PATIENT?

’ve had a recurring thought throughout this year that came up again recently. While looking over some fun sexually transmitted infections notes, there was a table listing a few. In the table, there were some diseases in which the recommendation was to go ahead and treat your patient’s sexual partner as well, without even testing him/her. I began to wonder if that partner would then legally become my patient. Specifically, these notes were part of my Obstetrics and Gynecology rotation, which made the question even more intriguing. Under these circumstances, for example, an OB/GYN physician would be treating the most-likelymale partner of his current patient. I’m convinced that the average third party would find it strange for an OB/GYN to acquire a grown male patient. Still, the situation at hand restated a quandary I’ve had for most of this first year in clinical medicine: who exactly is MY patient? Sure, legally there is likely an answer to be found. For example, to prove medical malpractice, various elements must be established to make a successful claim. The first of these essentially states that a professional relationship must be established between the patient and the care provider and that, therefore, a duty of care was owed to that patient. If it came down to it, I could surely find some suits near

• ACNE • SKIN CANCER SURGERY • MOLE REMOVAL

the administrative offices who could tell me exactly who my patients are. But I’m not talking about that. I’m asking on a less practical, more theoretical level. As I stated in my last article, I am taking a one-year leave from my regular medical curriculum and pursuing a Master’s in Public Health, concentrating on Health Policy. I talked about my intrigue in allocating a finite amount of resources to a given population. As I stated then, it is often difficult to choose between offering more substantial aid to a select few versus offering a little aid to a great many. Today, I talk more specifically about my own time and effort as one of those resources—more specifically, down the road a few years from now when that time and effort is worth a little more to its recipients. Let me offer just one more comparison to fuel my inquiry. Each and every one of us has seen one of the television commercials seeking sponsors to feed African children. Whether one chooses to donate or not, I know commercials like those have made me ask myself if it’s right to send money there when there are struggling and starving children in my very own city here at home. Granted, “right” is probably not the appropriate word. I don’t think there is necessarily a “right” or “wrong” way when you’re helping other people. Still, it’s that natural inclination to help those in

• PSORIASIS • RASHES • WARTS • ITCH RELIEF

our immediate vicinity that I am curious about. Is that more appropriate than helping someone far away? Do we owe a little something more to our own? I revisit the question for a care provider. I think most people would agree that I should, first and foremost, take care of the patients who come to me specifically, and seek my care. However, should I completely exhaust 100% of my time and efforts seeing to their every health concern? For me, this is comparable to helping the select few with the most aid. Or rather, should I take time here and there to volunteer at health clinics in addition to my own practice’s patient load? And if I do so, should I be sure to volunteer at a local clinic, or should I participate in some sort of international aid? Should my priority be to maximize the health of each person in my city? My county? My state? My country? I cannot say with any certainty that a right answer even exists. Yet, it is a question that is interesting enough to entertain. As healthcare evolves, our focus is likely to change. Our legislators and healthcare leaders will have to decide where to redistribute the available resources to make the biggest impacts. While a defining line won’t likely be drawn, I think it’s time for providers and patients alike to let their opinions on the matter be heard. + Ross Everett is a 3rd year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia. He grew up in Buford, Georgia, and graduated from the University of Georgia in 2011. In addition to his coursework, he is interested in health policy, health systems and health management. Please contact him at wideeyedwhitecoat@gmail.com and Like him on Facebook at Wide-Eyed White Coat.

We welcome Chris Thompson PA-C to our practice, welcoming new and established patients.


APRIL 18, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

SEE PAGE SIX

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Nearly all of us — even doctors and nurses — are sometimes patients. Perhaps you were recently injured playing your favorite sport, or years ago you somehow got hurt without even leaving your favorite recliner. Maybe you were diagnosed with a dreaded disease, mugged in a dark and lonely parking lot, or you stubbed your toe in the safety of your own bedroom. On the other hand, perhaps you needed medical attention 5,000 miles from home. Whatever your medical experience, we’d like to hear your story for our Medicine in the First Person feature. It can be frightening or funny, ordinary or extraordinary, just a few paragraphs long or quite a lengthy tale, bylined or anonymous. We’ll publish your encounters with the medical profession as often as we receive them. +

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Send your submissions for Medicine in the First Person to the Augusta Medical Examiner via e-mail: info@AugustaRx.com or to PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397. (The Medical Examiner reserves the right to accept, reject, or edit any submission at its sole discretion.)

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MEDICAL EXAMINER

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www.AugustaRx.com The Medical Examiner’s mission: to provide information on topics of health and wellness of interest to general readers, to offer information to assist readers in wisely choosing their healthcare providers, and to serve as a central source of news within every part of the Augusta medical community. Submit editorial content to graphicadv@knology.net Direct editorial and advertising inquiries to:

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Daniel R. Pearson, Publisher & Editor E-mail: Dan@AugustaRx.com Augusta Medical Examiner photography: H + D Photography www.handdphoto.com AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER P.O. Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903-0397

(706) 860-5455 www.AugustaRx.com • E-mail: graphicadv@knology.net Opinions expressed by the writers herein are their own and their respective institutions. Neither the Augusta Medical Examiner, Pearson Graphic 365 Inc., or its agents or employees take any responsibility for the accuracy of submitted information, which is presented for informational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnosis and treatment, consult your doctor. The appearance of advertisements in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised. © 2014 PEARSON GRAPHIC 365 INC.


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APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Hope IS Possible

A community on life support

Helen Blocker-Adams

Y

es, that headline may be a little dramatic, but if you ask some in this community they will say it’s pretty accurate. I often hear “Augusta has so much potential” or “We are the 2nd largest city in Georgia, why don’t we act like it?” You have probably heard it too. And what’s interesting is that there is no one group of people saying these things. It’s all across the board from all parts of the city. Many do not like the word change and I don’t like change for the sake of change. But over time change should be

evident...it should be seen. I posted a status on my Facebook page the other day and it resonated and attracted many comments from a diverse group of people. It read as follows: “Some of you may remember the scene in Color Purple where Seely was told she was “ugly, you so ugly” multiple times. When one gets beat down, ignored or disrespected over and over again, self-worth is destroyed. This, I believe, is part of the problem in Augusta. Some people think you don’t matter. Well, I think you do. And I don’t care who you are. Giving you hope, one person at a time. It’s what I do.” It bothers me when I hear an adult say something negative about our children. As if they didn’t have anything to do with their behavior. Our youth mimic what they see grown folks do. I realize some adults don’t like to hear that, but it’s the truth. Our young people need more positive adult role models, and those need to come from kids’ own families and neighborhoods, not from movies, TV, and the

sports world. They need hugs, encouragement and something to give them a sense of selfworth. Yes, we have many singleparent households and we have to address that, but in the meantime, how about doing your part to help fill the void? Try visiting a public school and sit with the children during lunch, or mentor a child or help them with their homework. There are many area ministries working with and for youth in our community. Positive messages like “you can do it... you matter... you are important... you can aspire to be whatever you want to be” are words our young people need to hear. Not “you are ugly... you won’t amount

to anything... you are stupid.” Where is the compassion? Lack of self-worth and selfesteem impacts a person’s heart and soul, work productivity, morale, and his or her mental health and wellbeing, and physical health. In a larger sense this also applies, in my opinion, to our city. We are Augusta, The Garden City. We bloom during the weeks leading up to the Masters tournament. We put on our smiling faces and prepare ourselves for the thousands of people who come to see this incredible golf tournament. And that is beautiful. But where is the love for the citizens who live in this city the other 51 weeks of the year? Do we not matter? Shouldn’t we make an effort to clean up the city for those residents who pour their dollars into this community to make it beautiful in the first place? I have had so many conversations about that over the past few weeks. It’s almost like having that one suit you only wear to church because it’s a special occasion. Our special occasion,

in part because it’s the largest economic driver for our city, is the Masters tournament. Well, I believe Augusta and it’s people are special. And I believe it’s past time to rebuild the self-worth and self-esteem among the people in this city that makes it so great. I suggest we make 52 weeks in Augusta “a special occasion.” It will take all of us to help make this happen. Our government didn’t make the mess. It’s the people, over time, who have created the mess by throwing items out of their cars on the highway, allowing trash to build up in our neighborhoods, or who victimize others by committing crimes that pollute our habitat. All of us can make the difference. It’s time to take ourselves off life support and blossom in a way we have never seen before. + Helen Blocker-Adams is Executive Director of the Southeast Enterprise Institute; mental health advocate; and youth advocate. You can email her at hba@hbagroup-intl. com or visit her website at www. helenblockeradams.com

Stay at home alternatives from the professionals at Right at Home “Right at Home” owners Celeste Hoffman and Kathy Crist introduce therapy dog Snickers to Mrs. Margaret Lista. Photo by Todd Lista.

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APRIL 18, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

WHAT EVERYBODY OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT EASY CURES FOR HEALTH HAZARDS

their efforts are some skinny clothes that they are too fat to wear and some good stories to tell at beer parties about how much weight they lost one summer. I have other friends who smugly joined the E-cigarette throngs and declared, “I don’t even want to smoke cigarettes now.” Six months later, they are all back inhaling noxious fumes laced with cyanide and all sorts of preservatives and unknown ingredients from their favorite brand of cigarettes. And they smell just as bad as they ever did. Decades back a snake oil peddler sold a pill guaranteed to make you lose weight regardless of what or how much you ate. “Take a pill a day and lose weight.” It worked! Everybody who took his pills lost weight. The problem was that once they stopped taking the pills, they could not stop losing weight. The pills had a

E

TH

Best secret all-natural ingredient: tape worm eggs. Tape worms crawling in our gut will make you skinny, no doubt about it. People will do, or pay, almost anything to lose weight … except stop eating. Exercise programs are useful. You will lose weight by burning calories. Your cardiovascular conditioning will improve and you will live healthier and longer and be more productive. In other words, your quality of life will increase. You will be less likely to have diabetes, hypertension, strokes, and heart attacks. I am against all of those. Physicians can help you with education, counseling, appetite suppressants, glucose excreters (such as Invokana), or surgery to compromise the stomach. None of those are

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necessary if you will simply eat properly. But that is not easy. People will do, or pay, almost anything to stop smoking … except stop smoking. Physicians can help you quit with education, Chantix or Wellbutrin, counseling, and support groups. None of those are necessary if you will simply not smoke. But that is not easy. There are definite problems with quick and easy fixes for life style problems. But finally, somebody has figured out something you can do to improve your health that is actually easy. A recent Northwestern University study shows you can lower your BMI (Body Mass Index, which should be between 18.5 and 25) by simply spending

AUGUSTA

T

he two most controllable health hazards are smoking and obesity. That is not exactly news. I have known that for a half century. Way back yonder some argued that if you smoke enough, you won’t be overweight, and that’s a good thing. Well, it may be true that if you puff on cigarettes rather than stuff food in your mouth all day, you may be skinny. People dying from emphysema or lung cancer don’t tend to be fat. The arena of weight loss and tobacco cessation has attracted more than their share of get-rich-quick quackologist. (Yeah, I made up that word, but I think it fits, and judging from the number of them in magazine, TV and radio ads, they need their own category in the Yellow Pages.) I have fat friends who went on, and swore by, the Atkins diet. They lost weight. But now they are as fat as they were before. All they have to show for

45 minutes in the early morning sunlight between 6 am and 9 am. The benefit was independent of caloric intake or exercise. People who simply did that had decreases in their BMI, and that is a good thing. Lends credence to Ben Franklin’s old Poor Richard’s Almanac adage: “Early to bed and early to rise makes you healthy, wealthy, and wise.” Have no fear, snake oil salesmen are still here. I can jhear them now: “Don’t waste your hard-earned money sweating in a fitness club or wearing out jogging shoes walking in the park. Eat our 500 calorie, fat-laden donuts filled with cream and dipped in chocolate while sitting in the sunlight and you, too, can lose weight.” + Bad Billy Laveau is a retired MD with a pointed sense of humor. Bad Billy speaks and entertains at public and private events for audiences not subject to cardiac seizure secondary to overwhelming laughter and glee BadBilly@knology.net or 706306-9397 FREE T AKE-H OME C OPY!

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HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS • HEALTH • MEDICINE • WELLNESS

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A night owl’s story

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APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

t was a February day I will never forget. I awakened around 6:30 a.m. and felt as tired and sleepy as if I had never gone to bed. I reset my alarm clock for another half hour of sleep. I had planned to attend a Bible study that morning, but apparently something had gone wrong during the night. When my daughter passed by my door on her way to the bathroom, she heard me breathing rather heavily. It didn’t sound right to her, so she called out and knocked on my door, but I didn’t respond. She came in and still couldn’t wake me. My son was in the other room. It hadn’t been long since he came back from the military. He sat up and stopped my daughter from trying to give me water, since I was

I almost didn’t wake up from lack of sleep. unconscious. She called 9-1-1. A police officer was first on the scene and he told my family that I had probably had a seizure and that it was good that my head was up. At that point I apparently said I couldn’t go to the hospital because I wasn’t properly dressed, but the police officer said it was ok. I don’t remember any of that. The next thing I do remember was being taken out the door and seeing the ambulance. I remember asking “What happened? Did I have a stroke?” They said they didn’t know. I prayed to God, not to save my life but to let his will be done.

I smiled, as my son and daughter were with me. She was riding in the front of the ambulance and my son followed in his car. I raised up and waved to him. They took me to the Medical College. The staff took good care of me and did the necessary tests. I had a seizure, apparently. I wondered what caused it, whether it was diabetes. I told them that sometimes I just don’t care to sleep and sit up at night reading my Bible or writing my book. The doctor said, “That will do it.” At 69, I thought I was healthy. I walk, jog, but at a moment’s notice it can all change. I love the nights, gazing at the stars, but now I tuck in early. + — submitted by Eleanor Hampton Harlem, Georgia

WE’RE BEGGING YOU We’re never too proud to beg. What we’re begging for is Medicine in the First Person stories. With your help, we’d like to make this a feature in every issue of the Medical Examiner. After all, everybody has a story of something health- or medicine-related, and lots of people have many stories. Send your interesting (or even semi-interesting) stories to the Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta, GA 30903 or e-mail to Dan@AugustaRx.com. Thanks!

“The cause was a mystery for a long time.” “And that’s when I fell.” nearest hospital “He doesn’t remember a thing.” “The was 30 miles away.” “I was a battlefield medic.” “He was just two when he died.”

“OUCH!”

“It was a terrible tragedy.” “She saved “I sure learned my lesson.” “I retired from medicine my life.” “It seemed like a miracle.” seven years ago.” “We had triplets.” “It was my first year “I thought, ‘Well, this is it’.” NOTHING SEEMED of medical school.” “They took me to the hospital by helicopter.” TO HELP, UNTIL. . “It took 48 stitches.”

ambulance crashed.” “Now THAT hurt!” “The “My leg was broken “I’m not supposed to be alive.”

“This was on my third day in Afghanistan.” in three places.” “I lost 23 pounds.” “Turned out it was just indigestion.” “At first I thought it was something I ate.” “The smoke detector woke me up.”

Everybody has a story. Tell us yours. Here’s our “No Rules Rules.” We’ll publish your name and city, or keep you anonymous. Your choice. Length? Up to you. Subject? It can be a monumental medical event or just a stubbed toe. It can make us laugh or make us cry. One thing we’re not interested in, however: please, no tirades against a certain doctor or hospital. Ain’t nobody got time for that.


APRIL 18, 2014

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Southern Girl Eats Clean

Salmon Salad - with Roasted Vegetables and Honey Lime Vinaigrette

I love this salad! Believe it or not, my husband, a meat and potatoes kind of guy, loves this salad too. It is more than filling and you will come away from the table completely satisfied. This combination of flavors is wonderful and this particular assortment of vegetables compliments the salmon nicely. Never in a million years would I have thought to roast radishes, but they are delicious this way, and the flavor of a radish changes quite a bit once it is roasted. I am always looking for flavorful recipes that will help add more Omega 3’s to our diet. Salmon is an excellent source of Omega 3’s and is known to have many heart healthy benefits. However, the typical way of simply broiling or grilling salmon can be a bit mundane. This salad is not only packed with veggies and Omega 3’s from the salmon, it is also, packed with flavor. The arugula adds a peppery taste, and the basil and honey lime vinaigrette marries well with the salmon. This salad is perfect for those warm spring evenings we have been enjoying lately. Give this recipe a try and enjoy it with a nice glass of Sauvignon Blanc for a lovely alfresco dinner.

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Salmon Salad What you’ll need: • 2-3 Tbsp. of organic cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil • 2-3 wild caught sockeye salmon filets • 2 medium organic zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch cubes • 10-12 organic radishes, washed, ends trimmed and cut into 1/2inch cubes Place the zucchini, radishes, • 1 1/2 cups of fresh or frozen red onion and corn into a 9x13 organic corn kernels baking dish. Drizzle with • 1 pint of organic grape olive oil and sprinkle with salt tomatoes and pepper. Toss well to coat. • 1/2 of a red onion, roughly Place grape tomatoes into a chopped into 1/2-inch pieces separate baking dish. Drizzle • 1 container or bag of organic with olive oil and sprinkle arugula with salt and pepper. • 1 cup of fresh organic basil Place both baking dishes • Sea salt and cracked black onto the middle oven rack. pepper Bake salmon until done, For the dressing: approximately 10-12 minutes • 1/3 cup of organic cold or until flakey. Remove from pressed extra virgin olive oil oven and set aside cool. • 2 Tbsp. of local honey Stir the veggies in the oven • 2 Tbsp. of fresh lime juice once and then place the • 3 cloves of organic garlic, baking dish with the grape crushed tomatoes into the oven with • 1/2 tsp. of Dijon mustard the other vegetables. Continue • Sea salt to taste to cook for approximately another 15- 20 minutes until Directions: veggies are done and fork Preheat oven to 425°F. tender and tomatoes are Place salmon filets into an starting to burst. oiled baking dish, skin side Remove the vegetables and down. Drizzle with a dab of tomatoes from the oven and olive oil and sprinkle with salt set aside to cool. and pepper.

In a separate small bowl whisk together the ingredients for the vinaigrette. Using a fork, remove the salmon from the skin and flake into chunks. Place 1-1/2 to 2 cups of arugula on to each dinner plate. Arrange veggies and tomatoes onto the top of the arugula, and place flaked salmon on top of the vegetables, dividing evenly onto all plates. Scatter chopped basil evenly onto each plate. Drizzle vinaigrette over salad and serve immediately. + Alisa Rhinehart writes the blog www. southerngirleatsclean. com She is a working wife and mother living in Evans, Georgia. Visit her blog for more recipes and information on clean eating.

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P harmacy 411

OUR NEWSSTANDS Medical locations: • Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr, 15th St., Main Entrance • Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Uptown Div., Wrightsboro Rd., main lobby • Doctors Hospital, 3651 Wheeler Rd, ER Lobby Entrance • Eisenhower Hospital, Main Lobby, Fort Gordon • George C. Wilson Drive (by medical center Waffle House and mail boxes) • GHSU Hospital, 1120 15th Street, South & West Entrances • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Medical Office Building, Harper Street, Parking Deck entrance • GHSU Hospital, Emergency Room, Harper Street, Main Entrance • GHSU Children’s Medical Center, Harper Street, Main Lobby • GHSU, Laney-Walker Boulevard transit stop, Augusta • Select Specialty Hospital, Walton Way, Main entrance lobby • Trinity Hospital, Wrightsboro Road, main lobby by elevators • Trinity Hospital Home Health, Daniel Village, main lobby • University Health Federal Credit Union/ University Hospital Human Resources, 1402 Walton Way, Main Lobby • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Emergency Room lobby area • University Hospital, 1350 Walton Way, Outside Brown & Radiology/Day Surgery • University Hospital - Columbia County, 465 N. Belair Road, Main Lobby • University Hospital Prompt Care, 3121 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta

Around town: • Barney’s Pharmacy, 2604 Peach Orchard Rd. • Birth Control Source, 1944 Walton Way • GRU Summerville Student Bookstore • Blue Sky Kitchen, 990 Broad Street • Columbia County Library, main branch lobby, Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans • Enterprise Mill (North Tower), 1450 Greene Street, Augusta • Daniel Village Barber Shop, Wrightsboro Road at Ohio Ave. • Hartley’s Uniforms, 1010 Druid Park Ave, Augusta • International Uniforms, 1216 Broad Street, Augusta • Marshall Family Y, Belair Rd, Evans • Mellow Mushroom, 12th and Broad Streets, Augusta • Parks Pharmacy, Georgia Avenue, North Augusta • Southside Family Y, Tobacco Road, Augusta • Surrey Center, Surrey Center Pharmacy, Highland Avenue, Augusta • Top-Notch Car Wash, 512 N. Belair Road, Evans • Wild Wing Cafe, 3035 Washington Road, Augusta

APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Very little if anything about healthcare is inexpensive, and that includes medicine. Tiny pills can command large prices. Over-the-counter medications may be less expensive, but are they also less effective? Find the answers to lots of your drug store questions in this column written by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson exclusively for the Medical Examiner.

WHY ISN’T MY PRESCRIPTION READY?!?

I

f you’ve ever gone to the pharmacy to pick up your prescription and have been told that you have to wait for it to be finished, you may wonder what in the world could take so long. It is only one bottle with a few pills, right? Not exactly. Aside from the obvious store-specific issues of being under-staffed and over-worked (not our focus here), there are many, many other things that can impact a prescription’s progress to being completed. • How many prescriptions are in front of you? – A busy pharmacy may simply be backed up, especially at the beginning of the month. • Hand-written prescriptions may require a call to the doctor because of being illegible or some other question the pharmacy has about the it. • E-scripts, or computer orders that your doctor sends straight to the pharmacy may sound like a very efficient way to do things. No bad handwriting to get in the way, so the theory is that this eliminates questions and makes things faster. Yes and no. Instead of trying to decipher each doctor’s hieroglyphics, this system has its own quirks that often involve the pharmacy staff having to call and clarify the prescription in one way or another. Also, the e-script system usually sends instantly like clockwork, but every so often there is a delay in the system (just like a traffic jam). This seems to happen more often with large institutions like hospitals. • Drug interaction and/or allergy issues with the prescribed product often necessitate a phone call to the physician’s office to address. • Insurance eligibility issues – Phone calls about this can take from 5 minutes to an hour or more depending on the insurance company. Some of these problems can be

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prevented by making sure the pharmacy has your most recent insurance information. As a rule, insurance updates are not automatically sent to the pharmacy, so it is the patient’s responsibility to present the card. • Prior authorization required – Insurance companies are requiring more documentation in order to fill a prescription. A phone call or fax to the doctor to initiate the prior authorization is required. After that it becomes a waiting game. Sometimes with the perfect combination of situations this will take less than an hour, but that is unusual. Generally, you can expect to wait from 24 to 72 hours or more while the insurance company assesses the physician’s request. • In any of these situations that the pharmacy has to call someone else, there is always a chance that there will have to be a return phone call. Phone tag, in other words. Physician’s offices are busy and the pharmacy must often leave a message. Insurance companies sometimes will have to return a call with information. The pharmacy cannot dictate when these things will occur. For every order that requires an intervention before being filled, there are plenty more that make it through with no problems. Unfortunately, the prescriptions that do require intervention take up time and tend to bog down the rest of the system. In a small pharmacy this can be very timeconsuming. In a larger setting, this particular set of issues may not be as problematic. + Questions about this article or suggestions for future columns can be sent to us at cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net Written for the Medical Examiner by Augusta pharmacists Chris and Lee Davidson (cjdlpdrph@bellsouth.net )

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AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

DON’T LICK THE BEATERS

Voted “BEST BARBER SHOP” by the readers of Augusta Magazine

Daniel Village Barber Shop 2522 Wrightsboro Road

If you received a bad haircut elsewhere, stop by our shop.

Useful food facts from dietetic interns with University Hospital’s Augusta Area Dietetic Internship Program

A

The 411 on Eating Easter Eggs

We can repair most bad haircuts. We said most. Not all. Most.

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There is about 185-200 mg of cholesterol in one egg, (found in the yolk) but research shows that consumption of eggs really does not have a negative effect on cholesterol. If you are monitoring your cholesterol intake you should aim to keep it below 300 mg per day. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines suggest one egg yolk per day can be part of a healthy diet for most Americans. The American Heart Associations recommends limiting yolks to 3 per week. If you are trying to monitor your dietary cholesterol intake, there are good egg substitute products on the market. Or you can make your omelet with only the egg whites with a few tablespoons of low fat cottage cheese blended in. Are brown eggs more nutritious? The breed of the chicken determines the color of the shell, with white chickens producing white eggs and brown chickens producing brown eggs. The brown chickens are usually larger animals and require more food to lay an egg, which is one reason brown eggs are a little more expensive. An egg labeled “organic” simply means that no chemical pesticides or synthetic nutrients or animal bi-products are used in the feed given to the chicken. Some eggs are advertized as “cage-free” but that simply means that the hens were required to have a minimum of 5 minutes outside the cage to roam! If you are concerned about the welfare of the chicken, try to find eggs that are from a local farm where the chickens are free to roam. Be prepared to pay more for local farm eggs but many report that taste and the results in baked goods are eggs-quisite! Whether you serve grandma’s special deviled eggs, enjoy an omelet for brunch, or whip up a Martha Stewart brioche with farm fresh eggs, enjoy your eggs this Easter season as they are an egg-cellent source of nutrition! +

Ohio Ave.

re you planning to dye Easter eggs in your house this Easter? Dying Easter eggs is a fun activity for the whole family, but what about eating those eggs? Is it true that eating dyed Easter eggs could be dangerous? Yes, but only if eggs are not handled appropriately. Dying and decorating eggs is wonderful tradition and it is okay to consume those eggs afterwards, but egg safety is a necessity. Eggs should not be left out of the refrigerator for longer than two hours, so if your Easter egg hunt lasts longer than that you should discard those eggs. Also, if you are hiding eggs outside, hide them away from dirt and any potential animal feces, as this will prevent the eggs from becoming contaminated from bacteria. How long can you safely keep eggs after you dye them for Easter? What about those lovely colored eggs that decorated the family Easter table for a few days? Throw them out! However, assuming they did not stay out of the refrigerator too long, any hardboiled egg used for your egg hunt should be consumed or discarded after one week. Another essential fact is to discard any cracked eggs before dying, or after your egg hunt. Eggs that are cracked could allow bacteria inside and the bacteria may cause illness if that egg is eaten. Raw eggs can be stored up to 3-5 weeks in your refrigerator, and should be left in the carton and kept in the coldest area, not the door. Egg safety is important all year long, not just during Easter. Eggs are an inexpensive form of protein and are simple to prepare. That is one reason to add them to your diet. The price of Grade A eggs costs approximately $1.40-$2.00 per dozen, which is only $0.11-$0.16 per egg. This is very inexpensive compared to other animal sources of protein, like beef or pork, which can cost 35 cents per ounce or more. A large egg contains only about 80 calories, and offers the most complete form of protein, providing 6-7 grams of protein per egg. Consuming the whole egg (the white plus the yolk) will provide not only high quality protein but many vitamins and minerals. The egg yolk does contain more saturated fat and cholesterol, but also has more vitamins. Eggs are an excellent source of choline, folate, iron, zinc, vitamins A, D, E, B12, and riboflavin. Eggs are one of the few foods that contain vitamin D in its natural form. The egg yolk is also a good source of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin, powerful antioxidants that protect the eye from age related eye problems like macular degeneration and cataracts.

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— by Kristin Rushton University Hospital Dietetic Intern

440 Society Hill Drive Suite 201 Aiken, SC 29803

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The Money Doctor

temperature by 3 degrees can help you save almost 10% on your heating bill. Websites like www.whitefence.com can help you compare utility service providers in your area.

The small stuff adds up

T

he first quarter of the year is behind us. Now is a great time to review your cash flow or budget. Our last two articles focused on goal setting, and this article will explore how small choices you make today can help put more money in your pocket and help you reach your goals. The little things we do every day add up. If you do not know where you spend money each month, tracking your spending can be a great exercise. It does take a commitment to write down every item you purchase, but tracking it for just 60 days can give you a good snapshot

of your spending. Here are five examples of items that can add up quickly over time. 1. Auto Loans – Americans are borrowing record amounts for new and used cars. According to Experian Automotive, which tracks millions of auto loans, the average amount borrowed by car buyers climbed above $27,000 for the first time in 2013. The average monthly payment for new cars is $471 and for used cars is $352. A disturbing new trend is the increasing length of loans to seven or eight years as buyers attempt to keep payments

Beware of little expenses. A small leak will sink a great ship. — Benjamin Franklin

down. Consider making your next auto purchase a savings goal and paying with cash to avoid this trend. Over 30 years, saving $471 per month at 6% interest would give you $473,000. Be conscious of the decision you make with a longterm car payment. It can have a big impact on your financial independence. 2. Utility Payments – Shopping your utilities such as cable, internet, phone, and natural gas can make a big difference, but you can also monitor and change your consumption of some items for additional savings. Lowering your thermostat

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APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

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Swimsuit season... Is that the annual drive to lose weight and firm up so we can look good enough in swimwear to go bake in the sun on a beach or poolside and thereby raise our risk for skin cancer? Uh, can we rethink that? Here are some much better reasons to celebrate “swimsuit season.” • Live longer We might as well start off on a high note: the same kind of stuff that would offer the trivial benefit of looking better in a bikini or — perish the thought, a Speedo — is the same kind of activity that lengthens life. And the good news is that a mere 15 minutes a day can make a big difference. • Lower your diabetes risk. Not that diabetes rates are skyrocketing or anything, but one study found that people who walk just 3,500 steps a day (there are roughly 2,000 steps in a mile) had a lower risk of developing diabetes than the people who walked the least in the study. • Have fewer migraine headaches. Anyone familiar with migraines knows that relief can be hard to come by. But a small 2011 study found that regular exercise worked just as well as medication or relaxation therapy at stopping debilitating migraine headaches before they start.

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• Strengthen your bones Regular, weight-bearing activity has been shown to build up bone strength, which prevents some of the natural decline in bone health often seen as we age. Weight-bearing activity — like walking — does the trick. • Get sick less Thank your walking shoes next time you’re the only one at the office who hasn’t caught that bug going around. Regular exercise seems to boost the immune system. Translation: fewer colds and bouts of the flu. • Decrease your cancer risk Let’s see... look good in a bathing suit or have a lower cancer risk... That is a certifiable no-brainer. The risk for certain types of cancer — colon cancer for one — seems to be significantly affected by regular physical activity. Other studies suggest that teenage and early adulthood exercise may protect against breast cancer down road. • Reduce your risk of stroke According to the National Stroke Association, up to 80 percent of all strokes are preventable. Lowering blood pressure and losing excess pounds help, but just moving more makes a big difference too. In a 2013 study, inactivity was linked with a 20 percent increase in risk of stroke. Experts say a moderate-intensity workout at least five days a week has the most benefit, but any and all exercise is a step in the right direction. • Sleep better A 2013 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that people who self-identify as regular, vigorous exercisers got better sleep than their sedentary peers. Of the vigorous exercisers, just 17 percent said they got fairly or very bad sleep, while nearly half of the non+ exercisers reported the same. +

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If you prefer paper, we’re all over town. If you like our digital version, it’s always available on your favorite device at the Medical Examiner blog (www.AugustaRx. com/news) or online at www.issuu.com/medicalexaminer. You can easily view back issues, too. +

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3. Meals – Planning your meals can make a huge difference in your food bill. The 2012 Accounting Principles survey shows two-thirds of American workers buy their lunch rather than bring one from home. They estimate this costs an average worker nearly $2,000 a year. 4. Caffeine – The 2012 Accounting Principles survey also reported that caffeine pick-me-ups cost the average American worker nearly $1,000 per year. 5. Smoking – The financial impact can be just as harsh as the health risks. The average smoker spends 14% of their income on cigarettes. A pack a day can cost almost $2,000 a year.

These are just a few common items you may want to consider when reviewing your cash flow or budget. We have found that reviewing your budget is a great way to compare your spending to your priorities. Each of us has many needs and wants, but our resources are limited. By monitoring your spending habits, you can make sure your cash is going toward items consistent with your values and goals. Are you putting your money toward the items you identified as important when making your list of goals? If not, making adjustments early in the year can help you get back on track. + by Clayton Quamme. Clayton is a financial planner with Preston & Cleveland Wealth Management, LLC (www.preston-cleveland. com). Preston & Cleveland is a fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm with offices in Atlanta and Augusta, GA and Columbia, SC.

Guest Column

Medicaid offers more than healthcare For those who qualify for Medicaid, it can be a huge help. Depending upon your gross income, Medicaid will pay the Medicare premium each month, leaving the recipient to pay the 20% Medicare doesn’t cover. If the gross income is very low the state will pay it all, putting our poorest citizens in the position of having 100% healthcare coverage, and covers, at a cost of a couple of dollars, any prescriptions they may require regardless of what it is or how many. Sound like a good deal? It is. And there is more. Those who fall in the lowest economic bracket qualify for food stamps, lower energy costs, free smoke detectors, and Life Alert systems (installation free). Many also get lower housing costs, and a free cell phone with 250 minutes per month, and in limited areas, transportation for doctor visits. This isn’t limited to our senior citizens; unwed mothers and the disabled receive these benefits as well. The United States is a compassionate nation and we want to see our most vulnerable members given their basic needs. I don’t think any of us begrudge it. It is the abuse of these services is upsetting. The free cell phone is often referred to as the “Obama-Phone.” These phones were available well before Mr. Obama took office; they just weren’t widely known until his administration made the push for the welfare rolls to take a giant leap. Now we have commercials advertising these phones to those on public assistance. There is a web site that can be accessed to apply for the phone,

and a permanent physical address must be given because the phone is mailed to that address. Post office box addresses are not accepted. The phones are limited to 250 minutes and it is reasoned by the U.S. government that this is a sufficient allotment of time because the phone is not intended for social use. The intent is to make certain those on the lowest rung of the economic ladder have a way to make doctor appointments and gain access to emergency services. Viewed from that perspective, 250 minutes per month should be more than enough. Unfortunately, a good many of the users of these phones don’t agree, so they have found a way around the limit. They use the phone until the allotted minutes run out, then report the phone as lost or stolen. They are then issued another. If some of us in the business of dealing with Medicaid recipients know about this, it would follow that the state and federal government are aware also. If that is the case, why is this abuse allowed to continue? There should be rules and limits in place to keep this from happening. If they exist, it is clear they aren’t being enforced. There are so many ways that entitlement programs are being abused, with millions of taxpayer dollars being wasted every year. Some of these abuses are more difficult to track than others, but the phones should be easy to account for. The only way to effect change with this or any taxpayer misuse of funds is to write your representative in congress. + — Robert B. Ashton


APRIL 18, 2014

11 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

From the Bookshelf The blog spot – Posted by surgeon Sid Schwab at http://surgeonsblog.blogspot. com/2007/10/brittle-beauty.html

The Brittle Beauty of Human Beings I think my first real amazement in med school may have been learning about the nephron. Don’t ask me to recount it in detail; that part of my brain has long since been emptied and refilled with concern about fiber and bladder trabeculations (another good med-school word.) Looking at it one way (a perverse way?) the essence of medical school is the building of a sense of wonder at the complexity and beauty of the human body, and the essence of becoming a surgeon is the realization of how breakable and disposable it all is. If you look up “nephron,” you can see what a marvel it is: tubules coming and going, membranes, feedback loops, regulatory perfection. It’s but a small example. The brain and its corpora and olives [Med Examiner note: “olives” are the nicknames for two rounded oval landmarks on the brain’s medulla oblongata]; the endocrinata. Muscles and mitochondria. And wow: the liver. It’s simply astounding. Whereas the amount of new information raining down during med school years is more than enough to swamp even the most absorbent mind (and notwithstanding the sense of dooming often in the looming), it’s impossible not to be thrilled and exhilarated by the glimpses you get of the wondrous workings of the human body. And then you’re in a trauma operating room, staring deep into a stellate smash of livid liver. It oozes discontinuous destruction. Fragments of hepatic mush are strewn and coddled among clots of blood, stained with bile and mixed with stool. The beauty of the enzyme pathways is nowhere to be seen; Krebs is not in the building. Weak indeed is the capsule holding it all in, split apart like broiled bratwurst. How little it takes! Grey bits of brain on a stretcher in no way reflect the neatness of neurotransmitters, or of ions flashing across axons. A hand, with its marvelous pulleys and cables, when rent apart by a saw or a slash looks frail and helpless and pathetically flimsy. There are times, when driving, or riding my bike, when wielding a knife in or out of the operating room -- or just breathing! -- that I suddenly think of how tenuous it all is, how easily smashed and torn apart is this wonderful work of nature in which we find ourselves. It’s gelatin; it’s a paper bag. I don’t suppose the thought is unique to surgeons, or even health-folk in general. But we get a damnably intimate view, and there are times when it haunts me. Cinch your seatbelt, tighten the shoulder harness, keep two hands on the wheel. Wear a helmet. And for God’s sake, look both ways when you cross the street. +

It’s all so amazing. Until it isn’t.

Speaking of blogs, the Medical Examiner blog is found at www. AugustaRx.com/news. Visit daily!

DOING RESEARCH? The Medical Examiner website has a zillion links to useful and informative sites of all kinds. Visit www.AugustaRx.com/StudyHall.html

Here is a book many are saying is quite good which had its genesis in a very bad moment: author Dan Harris, a TV journalist, was given an intro by Charles Gibson and Diane Sawyer one morning on Good Morning America. He was supposed to do the news. Instead he had a panic attack witnessed by roughly 5 million viewers. Naturally, it has been preserved forever on YouTube. After gasping his way through a single story, Harris dished it right back to Charles Gibson, and probably ran to the nearest psychologist. One could hardly blame him. If you’ve never had a panic attack — and I wish I could say I haven’t — it’s an incredibly accurate term. It’s not simple garden variety nervousness. It’s panic! It’s an attack of panic. I remember once being the emcee of a meeting of bigshots at Plant Vogtle before an audience of about 800. I had to say a few words and then introduce a series of suits. Given the hours-long bout I had with sheer, unrelenting terror in the hours leading up to the event you would think I was supposed to give a 20-minute speech before

millions. I remember berating myself for my occupation of choice. “I should have seen this day coming when I started,” I recall thinking. Like I could have been that clairvoyant. (For the record, the event itself was uneventful; the panic was 97 percent gone before I walked onto the stage). The point of this little personal tale is that Dan Harris tackles exactly this problem, the little voice —ok, the loud voice — of self-doubt and negativity we all battle from time to time. It would be bad enough if it came from some toxic friend or relative, but this harshest of all critics is, well, me. And for you, it’s you.

Like another Dan I know, Dan Harris found the solution was not going to be found in pills. You run out of pills; you forget to take them; they’re expensive; and you can never predict when an irrational panic attack will descend upon you for no reason at all. You can’t ask the world to pause while your pharmaceuticals take effect. It’s far better to change the way you think, to alter your approach to various unchangeable triggering situations, to start some new habits and try to end some others. That’s what Harris describes in this book. As the title suggests, it’s no magic bullet that guarantees a complete and miraculous transformation of your very existence. In fact, one of its keys is something that Harris wouldn’t have thought possible. But that was then. If your inner voice leads you around by the nose, and even induces panic when it’s in a particularly malicious mood, this book might be the antidote. +

10% Happier by Dan Harris, 256 pages, published in March 2014 by It Books.

Research News Like that snooze bar? Isn’t it great to hit the snooze bar and immediately fall back asleep? Those extra minutes seem especially sweet — and maybe on the weekends you can even go for multiple hits and score an extra half hour of sleep. Thinking about how good that feels, consider the opposite: being awakened half an hour before your alarm goes off. Not fun. Well, it turns out that being robbed of half an hour of sleep is exactly what happens, on average, to kids who sleep in a room with a television. More than 1,800 kids ages 6 months to nearly 8 years old were studied by investigators from Harvard School of Public Health and MassGeneral Hospital for Children. They found that the resulting sleep deficits had negative effects on both mental and physical health. Although a bedroom TV is the worst offender, the study found that over the course of time, every hour

of TV viewing by children was associated with 7 fewer minutes of sleep each day. The study will be published in the May issue of Pediatrics. Got Hep C? You may not have it much longer. Over this past weekend while Augustans were slightly distracted by a golf tournament, a major breakthrough was announced in the treatment of hepatitis C, the #1 driver of cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver transplants in the U.S. The new oral drug, tested at the University of Texas Health Science Centre and at dozens of study sites in Europe, cured between 90 and 96 percent of the participants in 12- and 24week studies. The drug virtually extinguishes the virus that causes hepatitis C, although its common side effects are fatigue, headaches and nausea. Researchers say the new therapy and its “out-of-theballpark” success rate marks a

turning point in the treatment of hepatitis C. The study was released Saturday by The New England Journal of Medicine. The new interferon-free medication is expected to be widely available later this year or very early in 2015. Raising your blood pressure In case you missed it, the definition of what high blood pressure is has been raised for older adults. Previously the goal of treatment and lifestyle modification was 140/90. That target has now been relaxed based on clinical evidence (or the lack thereof); the new ideal is 150/90 for people over 60. The change, published in the March 29 Journal of the American Medical Association, means millions of Americans within the changed range are no longer considered hypertensive. For anyone with mild hypertension, this would be an excellent reason to schedule a chat with your doctor soon. +


+ 12

THE EXAMiNERS +

This crossword is pretty hard.

APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

by Dan Pearson

What clue are you stuck on?

“Eviscerated.”

Seven.

How many letters?

Go with “gutless.”

ON S IC

The Mystery Word for this issue: PROSIMETTOT

© 2014 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

ACROSS 1. Part of a pirate’s logo 6. Medic beginning 10. Cone dropper 14. Lofty nest 15. Money of Cambodia 16. An addict 17. Desert region of Israel 18. Not written 19. One of 18 in golf 20. Unity 22. Varies; disagrees 24. Destiny 25. Long fish 26. Late antiapartheid activist 30. Nutritional abbrev. 31. Polychlorinatedbiphenyl, for short 34. Think too much of 36. Australian marsupial 38. Pleasing 39. Saint Kitts and _______ 42. Secondhand 43. 2008 Liam Neeson film (with a 2012 sequel) 45. Overealous environmentalist 47. Low ranking nav. officer 48. Eccentric 51. Blight on the landscape 52. Lymph follower 53. Derelict 54. Athletic shoe 57. Convert 02 into 03 62. One way to serve potatoes 63. Lance prefix? 65. The “R” of R.E.M. 66. Nicole Smith’s first name 67. Principal 68. Surrounded by 69. Small duck 70. Lump of earth 71. Flat shelf

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VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM TO ENTER!

QUOTATION PUZZLE 31

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

DOWN 1. Augusta follower of 26-D 2. Sharp 3. Exhort 4. Mortgage 5. A mason’s trowel can be one 6. Gland in men 7. Atmosphere 8. What cards are scanned by 9. ______ professions (in medicine) 10. Uses a pipe 11. Small island 12. Close 13. Energy units 21. Gannet or goose 23. Antiaircraft fire 26. Augusta intro to 1-D 27. ____ Flu 28. The narrow tops of bottles 29. Daughter of Mariel (Hemingway) 31. Leisurely stroll (Literally, “step” in Spanish)

AVE

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!

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K LE

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com

32. Bell description 33. Noted Augusta burn survivor Shirley 35. Character famously played by Joanne Woodward 37. Belonging to us 40. Like a frozen lake 41. Soviet spacecraft 44. Small recess 46. Relating to the thigh 49. Post hosp. 50. Pertaining to skin 52. Relating to the nose 54. Quick!!! 55. Not one 56. Sicilian volcano 58. Title 59. Apple music player 60. Zest 61. Verge 64. Life prefix

— Italian proverb

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may be used only once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

E6

5 7

4 8 2 1 8 3

X A M I N E R

4

3 9

7

7

4

2

1 6

2 1 9 7

2

4 1

S

3

8

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

Solution p. 14

U D O K U

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle. All the listed letters following 1 are the 1st letters of each word; the letters following 2 are 2nd letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues or numbers with minimal choices listed. A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

1

2

1 2

O H 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 A C O O I 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 4 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 . O I H I B T T TA C C 2 . F L E E B S O O OT H 3 . I N L E E 4 . G V E C 5 . H E E 6 . A R T 7 . N L 8 . E 9 . S 1 0 . S

SAMPLE:

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

O 2

V 3

E 4

I 1

S 2

B 1

L 2

I 3

N 4

D 5

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2014 All rights reserved

WORDS NUMBER

1

THE MYSTERY WORD


APRIL 18, 2014

13 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE BEST MEDICINE ha... ha...

T

he super-wealthy young mother from Beverly Hills was so rich that, after being pregnant for nine months, her Perrier broke. A nurse quit her job working with an ear doctor and got a job at a bank instead. On her first day at the bank, a customer walked up and asked her if she would check his balance. So she pushed him. What do you call a parrot wearing a raincoat during a downpour? Polly unsaturated. Two stray dogs who lived in an abandoned building downtown were surprised one morning to find parking meters installed up and down the street. “Well there goes the neighborhood,” said one dog. “What do you mean”” said the other. “Pay toilets,” said the first

There’s a new breed of dog that’s half pit bull and half collie. After it mauls you it goes for help.

A man’s beat up old Volkwagen Beetle broke down on a lonely road. He was standing next to it when a guy in a Jaguar pulled up. “Need a lift?” he asked. The Volkswagen driver explained he didn’t want to leave his car there. The Jaguar driver was nice enough to offer to tow him. They used a chain to hitch the VW to the Jaguar, and got ready to head to town. “I know it’s scary being towed so close behind a vehicle like this,” said the Jaguar driver, “so if I get going too fast, flash your lights or blow your horn.” At the first red light they came to on the outskirts of town, a Ferrari pulled up next to the Jaguar and began to rev its engine. The Jaguar driver forgot all about the car he was towing, and when the light went green, both drivers hit their accelerators and were soon screaming down the road over 100 mph. A police officer saw the three cars tear past him and realized there was no way he could catch all three, so he called for backup. “I just saw a Ferrari and a Jaguar doing 120 side by side,” he excitedly said into his radio, “and an old beat-up Volkswagen is right behind them flashing his lights and blowing his horn trying to get by!” Why did the doctor fail as a kidnapper? Nobody could read his ransom notes. Harley: You know where I can get about ten thousand cockroaches? Marley: First of all, why? Harley: I’m moving, and my lease says I have to leave the place in the same condition I found it. +

Why subscribe to the Medical Examiner? Because no one should have to make a trip to the doctor or the hospital just to read Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper.

The Patient’s Perspective by Marcia Ribble

A

fter many months of being mostly healthy, I’m doctoring again. I woke up a couple of weeks ago with one very sore, hot leg, which the doctor diagnosed with cellulitis. The prescription for antibiotics helped a lot, but I wasn’t prepared to wake up one morning to see the skin from knee to ankle beginning to slough off, as dead skin killed by the infection rushed to get out of the way of the healing going on under it. For diabetics like me, cellulitis can be the start of some very bad processes, the worst of which can lead to amputations. So it is a case where cooperation between patient and doctor is essential to prevent those negative outcomes. This is one time when I am not being casual with the doctor’s requirements, which are: 1. Take all the medication as directed. 2. Sit with my leg elevated as much as possible. [This one is difficult for me because I am normally kind of a fidgety person who gets up, sits down, gets up again, and in general keeps moving, even when I am sitting as still as I ever do. As a child this led to getting pinched in church for swinging my legs and kicking the back of the pew in front of me.] 3. Keep my leg clean and dry, which means either stick with sponge baths or put on a trash bag to shower. Anytime it rains this has meant doing some hopping, skipping, and jumping to avoid the wet paw prints brought in by the dog, even when I try to catch her

Talk is cheap. Not talking can be deadly.

by the back door and rub her down with a towel. I haven’t looked, but I am guessing that the bottom of the dressing on my leg is just about the same color as the mud in our yard, which is close to (but not quite) red clay. 4. Be extra conscientitious about taking my diabetes medication and work to keep my blood sugars as close to normal as I can manage them, and this includes checking my blood sugars more frequently than usual. My friend Dave tells me that if I’m a good girl the doctor will give me a lollipop, which is pretty funny for someone at age 70, but I’m hoping for way more than a lollipop. I’m looking for a completely healed and healthy leg that remains attached, just as it has always been since I was a growing fetus. It is a leg I am quite fond of and which I find very useful. + Marcia Ribble received her PhD in English at Michigan State and retired from the University of Cincinnati. She taught writing at the college level and loves giving voice to people who have been silenced. She is now teaching again at Virginia College in Augusta. She can be reached with comments, suggestions, etc., at marciaribble@hotmail.com.

+ +

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDICAL EXAMINER By popular demand we’re making at-cost subscriptions available for the convenience of our readers. If you live beyond the Aiken-Augusta area or miss issues between doctor’s appointments — don’t you hate it when that happens? — we’ll command your mail carrier to bring every issue to your house! NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

Choose ____ six months for $20; or ____ one year for $36. Mail this completed form with payment to Augusta Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta GA 30903-0397

TO OUR READERS AND OUR ADVERTISERS


+ 14

APRIL 18, 2014

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

THE MYSTERY SOLVED ON S IC

The Mystery Word in our last issue was: OPTOMETRIST

K adEfor ...cleverly hidden (upper left) in the p. 16L AV GROUP & BUSINESS CONSULTANTS E

Unfortunately, due to a glitch at AugustaRx.com, we were again unable to receive and view Mystery Word Contest entries for the Jan. 24 issue. We hope to have that problem fixed soon. We’re putting The Mystery Word on sick leave until we can get this repaired. Our apologies.

The Celebrated MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then be the first to find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries you’ll score our goodie package: gift certificates from Wild Wing Cafe, Top Notch Car Wash, and movie passes from Health Center Credit Union! SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (Winners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

SENDING US A CLASSIFIED?

EXAMINER CLASSIFIEDS HOMES, APARTMENTS, ROOMMATES, LAND, ETC. FOR RENT 2 bdrm 1 bath unfurn upstairs condo. Carport, pool, outside laundry. Country Club Hills condos, Milledge Road near GRU/ASU. $700/mo + $500 dep. We furn water, you pay electric. 706-736-7167 Email: ronst79@gmail. com ROOMMATE WANTED! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath house with pool, 2 minutes from colleges. Perfect for medical or grad students. $425+share utils. 706.993.6082 WEST AUGUSTA House for rent. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1500 sqft, 1-car garage, 3024 Sterling Road, located off Stevens Creek at Riverwatch Pkwy. $850/mo. Call 678467-7187. FOR SALE: GORGEOUS, immaculate, never occupied townhome located mins from Medical District. 2 bed, 2 bath, master en suite, walk-in closets, office. 1450 sq ft. hardwood floors throughout, fabulous upgrades, custom kitchen and baths. Floor to ceiling windows, fenced yard. Partially furnished! 120k OBO.

803-507-6621. Augustagahomesearch.com Foreclosures • Rentals • MLS Roman Realty 706-564-5885

SERVICES VIDEOS-FOR-THE-WEB SERVICE Documentary style interview or demonstration shot HD with pro audio and basic edits, 3-min. finished video uploaded to your account. Complete package $250. Please call David: 803-645-8370. Documentary Video Productions, LLC – Aiken, SC. BIBLE BY PHONE - Free daily Bible readings; for Spiritual Encouragement and Growth. Call 706-855-WORD (9673) FULL-SERVICE MOVER Anthony’s Professional Moving, 28 years serving the CSRA moving hospital equipment, offices, homes, apartments, etc. Estimates are FREE. Call 706.860.3726 or 706.814.8141

TELL A FRIEND ABOUT THE MEDICAL EXAMINER THE PUZZLE SOLVED

USE THE FORM BELOW AND MAIL IT IN, OR GO TO WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM AND PLACE & PAY CONVENIENTLY AND SAFELY ONLINE. THANKS!

Augusta Medical Examiner Classifieds

(OURS IS COFFEE)

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

.75

1.00

1.25

1.50

1.75

2.00

2.25

2.50

2.75

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3.50

3.75

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6.25

6.50

6.75

7.00

7.25

7.50

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8.00

8.25

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9.00

Send this form with payment to: Total ad cost by number of words as shown above: $

M O N T E

A V I A N

S T A T

N O N E

U R G E

L I E N

L E V E L N D E E R R C E K E N S O N O E A K T S N A A L

S O L A N

P R O S T A T E

D D E A M C

D E R M A L

A R A I E L R A L D I E E R D E V I S E C O E Y B U O Z B U I N O D

P U F F F L S A K O U F R E S M O N R A A M L E

I S L E

N E A R

E R G S

P A S E O

C L E A R

B A D K E

I P O D

Z I N G

E D G E

QUOTATION The Sudoku Solution

COFFEE IS GOOD MEDICINE

(Copy this form or continue on additional sheet if more space needed.)

AUGUSTA MEDICAL EXAMINER, PO BOX 397, AUGUSTA, GA 30903-0397

K E E N

QUOTATION PUZZLE SOLUTION: Page 12: “Experience is what you get when you don’t get what you want.” — Italian proverb

AD COPY (one word per line; phone numbers MUST include the area code): .50

S A N O

SEE PAGE 12

In case we need to contact you. These numbers will not appear in the ad.

.25

BUSINESS ASSISTANCE Ridiculously affordable and highly visible advertising available through the pages of Augusta’s Most Salubrious Newspaper, aka the Augusta Medical Examiner. Have you heard of it or seen a copy? Rates can be reviewed at AugustaRx.com. Questions? Send an e from the site, or call the publisher directly: Dan Pearson at 706.860.5455. E: Dan@AugustaRx.com

NOTICE! ATTENTION! If any current or past employer has failed to pay you min. wage or time and a half overtime

WHAT’S YOUR DRUG OF CHOICE?

Name Address Work number (if applicable) ( ) Home phone ( ) Category of ad (leave blank if unsure):

pay, you may be entitled to an order from US Federal Court awarding you twice the amount of your unpaid wages plus atty. fees. For info, call Arthur H. Shealy, Attorney at Law, 803-278-5149, 1010 Plantation Rd, North Augusta SC 29841. You may be entitled to a similar award for unpaid wages if your employer required you to perform duties during your lunch hour, before clocking in, or after clocking out.

VISIT DRUGOFCHOICECOFFEE.COM

6 7 9 1 3 5 8 4 2

1 5 8 6 2 4 3 9 7

3 4 2 8 9 7 6 1 5

2 1 6 3 5 9 7 8 4

5 9 3 4 7 8 2 6 1

7 8 4 2 6 1 5 3 9

8 6 5 9 4 2 1 7 3

4 2 1 7 8 3 9 5 6

9 3 7 5 1 6 4 2 8

WORDS BY NUMBER “The height of cleverness is to be able to conceal it.” — Francois de La Rochefoucauld

Multiply by number of times ad to run: x Total submitted: $

The Augusta Medical Examiner publishes on the 1st and 3rd Friday of every month. Your ad should reach us no later than 7 days prior to our publication date.

Thanks for reading!

www.AugustaRx.com


APRIL 18, 2014

15 +

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

Care managers help seniors navigate aging issues by Kathy Crist Put yourself in Dawn’s shoes. Her mom, who is recovering from a bungled knee surgery, fell at the hospital, shattering her ankle. Mom is currently in a rehabilitation facility, but Crist wants to return home now. As the only sibling in the area, Dawn has drained all her vacation/sick leave to help her mother. The medical, insurance, financial and home care questions spin in Dawn’s head as her stress heightens. Who can help Mom as she recovers at home? How much will that cost? What does Medicare cover? How

do I keep up with insurance complications? Do we have legal recourse with the neglectful surgeon? How can I juggle all the communications with her doctors and physical therapist? Dawn found the answers in one person: a professional geriatric care manager. Specializing in aging and elder care issues, a geriatric care manager is a health and human services professional who helps guide and advocate for families caring for older relatives and disabled adults. May is National Geriatric Care Manager Month, when geriatric care managers nationwide will offer the public an assortment of seminars, webinars, educational activities and special events related to caring well for the elderly. National Geriatric Care

Manager Month is a way to honor geriatric care managers across the country and make their mission known. These tireless health professionals relieve so much stress and worry for families who often feel overwhelmed with all the dynamics of caring for their older loved ones and other family members facing health challenges.” America’s baby boomer population is expected to climb to nearly 87 million by 2050, and as more and more individuals prefer to age in place with at-home care, professional geriatric care managers will prove increasingly beneficial. Geriatric care managers provide a holistic approach to a client’s health needs, assisting

in a broad range of services including: • Medical management— facilitating communication among doctors, client and family; attending doctor appointments • Home care services— evaluating in-home care such as Right at Home to secure the safety and well-being of the client; assisting the family in overseeing the services • Financial oversight— monitoring bill paying or consulting with the client’s accountant or power of attorney • Legal concerns—consulting with or making a referral to an elder law attorney; in court, sharing an expert opinion for determining the appropriate level of care Professional geriatric care

managers are certified by a specific care management organization (e.g., the National Association of Social Workers) and they belong to the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers, which was formed in 1985 to advance dignified care for senior adults and their families. + Right at Home of the CSRA offers in-home companionship, personal care and assistance to seniors and disabled adults who want to continue to live independently. Right at Home is locally owned and directly employs and supervises all caregiving staff, each of whom is thoroughly screened, trained and bonded/insured prior to entering a client’s home. To learn more about Right at Home, go to www.csra.rightathome.net or call 803-278-0250.

+

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICS

ALLERGY Tesneem K. Chaudhary, MD Allergy & Asthma Center 3685 Wheeler Road, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

DRUG REHAB

CHIROPRACTIC Poppell Chiropractic Clinic 1106-A Furys Lane Martinez 30907 706-210-2875 Most insurance plans accepted

DENTISTRY Dr. Judson S. Hickey Periodontist 2315-B Central Ave Augusta 30904 706-739-0071

Karen L. Carter, MD 1303 D’Antignac St, Suite 2100 Augusta 30901 706-396-0600 www.augustadevelopmentalspecialists.com

Steven L. Wilson, DMD Family Dentistry 4059 Columbia Road Martinez 30907 706-863-9445

DERMATOLOGY Georgia Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center 2283 Wrightsboro Rd. (at Johns Road) Augusta 30904 706-733-3373 www.GaDerm.com

Ideal Image 339 Fury’s Ferry Rd Martinez 30907 1-800-BE-IDEAL • www.idealimage.com Schedule a FREE Consultation

MEDICAL MASSAGE

Steppingstones to Recovery 2610 Commons Blvd. Augusta 30909 706-733-1935

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Group & Benefits Consultants Inc. 3515 Wheeler Rd, Bldg. C Augusta 30909 706-733-3459 Floss ‘em or lose ‘em! www.groupandbenefits.com

Jason H. Lee, DMD 116 Davis Road Augusta 30907 706-860-4048

LASER SERVICES

FAMILY MEDICINE Urgent MD Augusta: 706-922-6300 Grovetown: 706-434-3500 Thomson: 706-595-7825 Primary Care Rates

HOSPICE Alliance Hospice 3685 Old Petersburg Rd. Suite 145 Augusta 30907 706-447-2461 Hospice Care of America 4314 Belair Frontage Rd. Suite E Augusta 30909 706-447-2626

Medical Massage Stuart Farnell L.M.T. 803-646-1846 jsfarnell@att.net www.FarnellClinic.com

OPHTHALMOLOGY Roger M. Smith, M.D. 820 St. Sebastian Way Suite 5-A Augusta 30901 706-724-3339

OPTICIAN

Parks Pharmacy 437 Georgia Ave. N. Augusta 29841 803-279-7450 www.parkspharmacy.com

SENIOR LIVING Augusta Gardens Senior Living Community 3725 Wheeler Road Augusta 30909 SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 706-868-6500 www.augustagardenscommunity.com

SLEEP MEDICINE Sleep Institute of Augusta Bashir Chaudhary, MD 3685 Wheeler Rd, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

VEIN CARE

Murphy & Robinson Phil Harris 1571 Walton Way Augusta 30904 706-737-2020

...PHARMACY

O P T I C I A N S

PHARMACY Medical Center West Pharmacy 465 North Belair Road Evans 30809 706-854-2424 www.medicalcenterwestpharmacy.com

Vein Specialists of Augusta G. Lionel Zumbro, Jr., MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI 501 Blackburn Dr, Martinez 30907 706-854-8340 www.VeinsAugusta.com

WEIGHT LOSS PHC Weight Loss & Wellness Centers 246B Bobby Jones Expwy Martinez: 706-868-5332 Thomson: 706-597-8667 www.phcweightloss.com

If you’d like your medical practice listed in the Professional Directory, call the Medical Examiner at 706.860.5455


+ 16

AUGUSTA MEDiCAL EXAMINER

APRIL 18, 2014

Apr18 14  

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