Issuu on Google+

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monitoring and Conservation of Important  Sea Turtle Feeding Grounds in the Patok Area of Albania, 2008-2010        

2008 ANNUAL REPORT             Michael White1, Idriz Haxhiu2,5, Enerit Saçdanaku3, Lazion Petritaj3, Merita Rumano4, Fundime  Osmani2, Blerina Vrenozi2, Prue Robinson6, Stephanos Kouris6, Liza Boura6 and Lily Venizelos6.  Centro Recupero Tartarughe Marine, Lampedusa1; Museum of Natural Sciences, University  of Tirana2;  Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana3; Ministry of Environment,  Tirana4; Herpetofauna Albanian Society5; MEDASSET‐ The Mediterranean Association to  Save the Sea Turtles6.  Correspondence to: Dr Michael White, c/o Centro Recupero Tartarughe Marine‐WWF, 92010  Lampedusa (AG), Italy. E‐mail: michael.white@univ.bangor.ac.uk              ‐JANUARY 2009‐ 

   


ABSTRACT   The first year of a three year research project (2008‐2010) began at Patoku Lagoon, Albania,  in  June  2008,  monitoring  an  important  sea  turtle  foraging  ground.  The  project  included  researchers  from  Tirana  University.  The  population  structure  of  loggerhead  turtles  Caretta  caretta  captured  as  bycatch  in  stavnike  fish‐traps  was  investigated.  The  traps  yielded  103  turtles, which were tagged and released; 17 were subsequently recaptured thus suggesting  short  term  residency  in  the  Bay.  Ten  remigrants  had  been  tagged  previously  at  Patok  suggesting  that  Albania  forms  part  of  their  migratory  route.  There  was  one  juvenile  green  turtle Chelonia mydas.     Male  sea  turtles  (4  adults,  14  adolescents)  were  captured  at  Patoku,  suggesting  that  they  may  use  the  area  as  a  developmental  and  foraging  habitat.  This  discovery  has  increased  importance  due  to  our  presently  limited  understanding  of  the  distribution  and  marine  ecology of male sea turtles; and the threatened impact of global climate‐change, which may  force  embryonic  sex‐ratios  towards  female‐dominance.  Therefore  it  is  recommended  that  Gjiri i Drinit is legally recognised as a nationally and regionally important foraging habitat for  sea turtles; and that these endangered migratory species are fully protected under Albanian  national law.    Total cost of project:  38.593,74 EUR    Please reference as:   White,  M.,  I.  Haxhiu,  E.  Saçdanaku,  L.  Petritaj,  M.  Rumano,  F.  Osmani,  B.  Vrenozi,  P.  Robinson,  S.  Kouris,  L.  Boura  and  L.  Venizelos  (2009).  Monitoring  and  Conservation  of  Important  Sea  Turtle  Feeding  Grounds  in  the  Patok  Area  of  Albania.  2008  Annual  Report.  Joint  project  of:  MEDASSET;  GEF/SGP;  RAC/SPA  (UNEP/MAP);  Ministry  of  Environment,  Albania;  Natural  History  Museum,  Albania;  H.A.S.,  Albania;  University  of  Tirana;  ECAT,  Albania. 91 pages   

                     

2


LIST OF CONTENTS    ABSTRACT................................................................................................................................................. 2 LIST OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................... 3 LIST OF FIGURES ....................................................................................................................................... 5 1.

BACKGROUND .................................................................................................................................. 6

2.

MONITORING OF SEA TURTLES AT PATOK (2008) ........................................................................... 6

2.1.

Study area ................................................................................................................................... 7

2.1.1. 3.

Sea areas ................................................................................................................................. 8

FISHERIES........................................................................................................................................ 11

3.1.

Stavnikes ................................................................................................................................... 13

3.1.1.

Trap construction.................................................................................................................. 13

3.1.2.

Fish catch .............................................................................................................................. 14

3.1.3.

Stavnike fishermen ............................................................................................................... 14

3.1.4.

Other stavnikes in Gjiri i Drinit.............................................................................................. 17

4.

MONITORING FISH CATCH ............................................................................................................. 18

4.1. 5.

Catch composition..................................................................................................................... 19 SEA TURTLES................................................................................................................................... 23

5.1.

At‐sea encounters with turtles.................................................................................................. 23

5.2.

Sea turtles: morphometric data................................................................................................ 23

5.3.

Carapace scutes......................................................................................................................... 24

5.4.

Flipper‐tagging .......................................................................................................................... 25

5.4.1.

Stockbrand’s tags vs. Rototags ............................................................................................. 25

5.4.2.

Tagging database .................................................................................................................. 27

5.4.3.

Data collection ...................................................................................................................... 28

5.5. 5.5.1.  

Photo‐recognition of sea turtles ............................................................................................... 29 Head‐scale patterns .............................................................................................................. 29 3


5.5.2. 6.

Other factors that aid recognition ........................................................................................ 31

SEA TURTLES CAPTURED AS FISHERIES BYCATCH (2008)............................................................... 32

6.1.

Turtle Morphometric Data........................................................................................................ 33

6.2.

Sex ............................................................................................................................................. 35

6.3.

Male turtles............................................................................................................................... 36

6.4.

Juvenile developmental habitat................................................................................................ 37

6.5.

Green sea turtle Chelonia mydas.............................................................................................. 37

6.6.

Serial recaptures ....................................................................................................................... 38

6.7.

Remigrants ................................................................................................................................ 38

6.8.

Health status ............................................................................................................................. 38

6.9.

Epibiotic fauna........................................................................................................................... 39

6.10.

Overwintering ........................................................................................................................... 41

6.11.

Conclusions ............................................................................................................................... 42

6.12.

Anecdotal evidence................................................................................................................... 43

7.

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT .............................................................................................................. 44

8.

CONSERVATION AND OUTREACH ACTIVITIES (2008 – 2010)......................................................... 47

8.1.

Capacity‐building and awareness‐raising activities .................................................................. 47

8.2.

Research assistants at Patok for 2009 ...................................................................................... 51

8.3.

The importance of Gjiri i Drinit ................................................................................................. 51

8.4.

The importance of working with the local fishing communities............................................... 53

8.5.

Other monitoring activities ....................................................................................................... 55

8.6.

Collaboration with other research organisations ..................................................................... 55

9.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT................................................................................................................ 56

9.1.

Funding...................................................................................................................................... 56

9.1.1.

Regional Activity Centre for Specially protected Areas (RAC/SPA) ...................................... 57

9.1.2.

Global Environment Facility’s Small Grant Programme (GEF/SGP) ...................................... 57

 

4


9.1.3.

Mediterranean Association to Save the Sea Turtles – MEDASSET GR and UK ..................... 58

10.

CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................................................... 58

11.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE YEARS AT PATOKU............................................................ 59

12.

PHASE II ‐ THE 2009 PROJECT.................................................................................................... 60

13.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ............................................................................................................. 61

14.

BIBLIOGRAPHY........................................................................................................................... 62

15.

ANNEXES ................................................................................................................................... 69

   

 

 

LIST OF FIGURES    Figure 1: Gjiri i Drinit divided into two main sea areas: SH and PA ......................................................... 9 Figure 2: Typical design of a stavnike fish‐trap (Photo: I. Haxhiu). ........................................................ 14 Figure 3: Gjiri i Drinit: the red flags indicate stavnikes observed during 2008 ...................................... 16 Figure 4 Data‐entry window of the new tagging database (MEDASSET)............................................... 28 Figure 5: Curved Carapace Length (CCL) size‐classes (cm) for 98 loggerheads caught in the stavnikes at  Ishmit and Matit..................................................................................................................................... 34 Figure 6. Pellgu i Drinit. Red arrow shows where Lumi i Ishmit enters Drinit bay at Godull; blue arrow  indicates predominant wind‐direction (Maestrali). The beaches near to Ishmit are heavily‐polluted  with, mostly, plastic waste..................................................................................................................... 45

         

       

 

5


1. BACKGROUND    Within the framework of the Strategic Action Programme for the Conservation of Biological  Diversity in the Mediterranean Region (SAP BIO) and the implementation of the Action Plan  for  the  Management  of  the  Mediterranean  Monk  Seal  and  for  the  Action  Plan  for  the  Conservation  of  Mediterranean  Marine  Turtles  under  the  United  Nations  Environment  Programme  Mediterranean  Action  Plan  (UNEP/MAP),  a  Rapid  Assessment  Survey  of  important  Marine  Turtle  and Monk  Seal  habitats  in  the  coastal  area of  Albania was  carried  out  in  October‐November  2005  by  MEDASSET;  the  Mediterranean  Association  to  Save  the  Sea  Turtles,  with  the  financial  support  of  UNEP/MAP  Regional  Activity  Centre  for  Specially  Protected  Areas  (RAC/SPA);  MEDASSET;  and  the  Global  Environment  Facility’s  Small  Grant  Programme  (GEF/SGP).  The  research  boat  was  provided  by  Vernicos  Yachts.  Support  was  provided  by  the  Biology  Department  of  the  University  of  Tirana,  the  Port  Authorities  along  the Albanian coast; the Albanian Ministry of Environment, fishermen and local people. This  Rapid  Assessment  laid  the  groundwork  for  developing  the  present  Project:  Monitoring  and  Conservation of Important Sea Turtle Feeding Grounds in the Patok Area of Albania.     MEDASSET’s  Rapid  Assessment  Survey  (White,  M.,  I.  Haxhiu,  V.  Kouroutos  et  al.  2006)  provided strong evidence indicating that Patok has a high concentration of loggerhead turtles  Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758) throughout the year (especially between April and August)  and  could  be  an  important  feeding  ground  for  sea  turtles.  During  the  project  fishermen  throughout  Albania  were  interviewed  about  their  encounters  with  turtles,  seals  and  cetaceans. An important finding from these interviews was that large numbers of sea turtles  (100  +)  were  reported  from  Albania’s  northernmost  bay  at  Patok;  but  they  were  rare,  perhaps 2‐6 turtles in some years, in southern Albania.  Loggerhead turtles were caught as  bycatch in stavnike fish‐traps and trawling operations in the broader Patok area: Gjiri i Drinit  (White et al. 2006).     

2. MONITORING OF SEA TURTLES AT PATOK (2008)    The  project  aimed  to  develop  and  implement  an  ongoing  sea  turtle  research  programme  (population estimates, tagging, morphometrics, health status and environmental conditions),  as  well  as  a  public  awareness  and  capacity‐building  in  the  broader  Patok  area.  Establishing  the project at Patoku would highlight the importance of local sea turtle feeding grounds and  improve  sea  turtle  conservation  and  protection,  particularly  for  their  marine  habitats  and  migratory  routes.  Despite  its  richness  in  biological  and  landscape  diversity,  Albania  is  considered to have the highest rate of biodiversity loss in Europe; (Scandiaconsult Natura AB  and  The  Regional  Environmental  Center  for  Central  and  Eastern  Europe,  July  2000)  uncontrolled  human  activity  has  extensively  damaged  the  ecological  values  of  the  coastal  area  (RDS,  2005;  REAP,  2006).  Educational  programmes  are  needed  to  provide  the  population with an incentive to preserve its rich biodiversity; this should include conservation  of sea turtles and their habitats in Albania. In order to enhance national cooperation there is  a strong need to involve governmental, inter‐governmental and non‐governmental bodies, as   

6


well  as  environmental  and  volunteer  groups.  Emphasis  should  be  placed  on  improving  linkages  between  communities,  researchers,  universities  and  NGOs  involved  in  environmental protection around the Mediterranean. This would lead to better biodiversity  conservation  and  management  of  the  area’s  marine  natural  resources  (e.g.  fisheries).  Conservation and management plans rely upon the provision of accurate data to inform and  influence  local  authorities,  municipalities  and  fishermen.  Reliable  baseline  data  concerning  sea turtle distribution, both geographically and temporally, will add to our limited knowledge  of  Mediterranean  sea  turtle  foraging  habitats  (Bjorndal,  1999;  Margaritoulis  et  al.  2003;  White, 2007). It took two years to plan, develop, and to secure initial funding for this project,  which is working within the framework of MEDASSET's sea turtle conservation programme in  the  Mediterranean,  with  the  aim  of  facilitating  management  decisions  that  may  safeguard  long‐term existence of these crucial habitats and of training local individuals in the necessary  skills for the protection and monitoring of marine turtles; fieldwork began at Patoku Lagoon  on the 1st of June 2008.      

2.1. Study area    Patok  In  the  northernmost  part  of  the  Western  Lowlands  of  Albania  there  is  a  lagoon  at  Patok  [N41°38.191′; E019°35.32′]. A narrow causeway runs across wetlands (marsh) and the inner  lagoon to a small piece of land: this was where the project team established their field base  to  monitor  the  loggerhead  sea  turtles  that  forage  in  the  area  (Figure  1).  There  are  no  permanent residents at Patoku but some small cafes and restaurants that have been erected  to  provide  refreshment  for  visitors  that  come  to  the  coast  for  the  day,  especially  in  the  summer  months.  The  project  rented  rooms  in  the  newly‐built  Brilant  Restaurant,  which  is  also where our project team took their meals.    The  local  area  is  characterised  by  five  main  habitats:  wetland,  an  inner  lagoon,  an  outer  lagoon,  a  small  barrier  island,  and  then  a  shallow  sea  –  Gjiri  i  Drinit.  Five  sediment‐laden  rivers (Bunës, Drinit, Matit, Droja and Ishmit) enter Pellgu i Drinit bringing large amounts of  terrestrial  garbage,  mostly  plastics,  into  the  coastal  zone.    Lumi  i  Ishmit  brings  the  sewage  effluent from Tirana to the sea, where it enters the bay just north of Kepi i Rodonit (aka Kepi i  Skenderbej).    There are no garbage disposal facilities at Patok, and so everything is thrown into the inner  lagoon.  Even  if  there  was  a  designated  local  garbage‐collection  point,  infrastructural  arrangements would be required to facilitate the collection, transportation and processing of  the waste.     The  nearest  village  is  Fushëkuqe,  but  it  has  few  facilities.  The  nearest  port  –  Shengjin  –  is  about 50 km to the north by road, however, the roads are in terrible condition; some of the  potholes  are  more  than  one  metre  deep.  Alphabank  had  recently  (May  2008)  opened  a  branch in Lezhe, which meant that we no longer had to go to Tirana just for cash; but even  the 30 km journey to Lezhe was a 3‐hour round‐trip – mainly because of the roads.   

7


There  are  two  groups  of  stavnike  fishermen  at  Patoku:  our  group  (Rakip  Martini)  fishes  at  Ishmit, and another group (Çal) that fishes at Matit; both groups let us monitor their turtle  bycatch. There are also casual fishermen (e.g. rod & line, small traps, gill‐nets) and shellfish‐ collectors that work in the inner and outer lagoons.       

Gjiri i Drinit  Gjiri  i  Drinit  is  a  shallow  sea  (maximum  depth  in  survey  area  is  47  m)  with  a  sand/mud  substratum  dominated  by  bivalves  and  crabs.  Extensive  fishing  occurs  throughout  the  bay,  which  is  about  30  km  north  to  south.  Artisanal  fishing  is  the  main  economic  activity  in  the  bay, especially in the remote southern areas where we were based. There are a few trawlers  based at Shengjini, the only port in the bay; which also has an emerging tourism industry that  is especially popular with Kosovans.      

2.1.1. Sea areas     The bay (Gjiri i Drinit) was divided into two main research areas: Shengjini and Patoku   (Figure 1).    SH: Shengjini ‐ Northernmost part of Pellgu i Drinit:    • Western border is a line from the border with Montenegro, mouth of Lumi i Bunës, to  the tip of Kepi i Rodonit (Skenderbeg Head) [Navigation light: FL (2) 10s 40m 8M].   • Eastern border is the Albanian coast (includes lagoons & wetlands).   • Northern border is coastline from Bunës to Shengjin (includes Thrown‐sand beach, &  a wetland area).   • Southern border is a line of latitude (approx: N 41° 43′) connecting transect (western  border) to a light on the eastern shore [FL6s 15m 7M].   • Maximum depth is about 42 metres; and two rivers enter this area: Bunës & Drinit.     PA: Patoku. Southernmost part of Pellgu i Drinit; also known as Gjiri i Rodonit:     • Western border is the same transect as SH (mouth of Lumi i Bunës to the tip of Kepi i  Rodonit (Skenderbeg Head) [Navigation light: FL (2) 10s 40m 8M].   • Eastern border is the Albanian coast, with Patoku Lagoon being roughly central.   • Northern border is a line of latitude (approx: N 41° 43′) connecting transect (western  border) to a light on the eastern shore [FL6s 15m 7M].   • Southern border is Kepi i Rodonit.   • Maximum depth is about 42 metres; and three rivers enter this area: Matit, Droja &  Ishmit.     

 

8


SH

           

PA

                    Figure 1: Gjiri i Drinit divided into two main sea areas: SH and PA   

 (A star marks the causeway across the inner lagoon to Patoku 

 

field‐station.  Hellenic Hydrographic Service chart was provided by  MEDASSET and adapted by Dr. White) 

 

 

9


PHOTO 1: Southern lagoon at Patoku  where it shifts to marshland. 

PHOTO 2: Fishing canal in northern lagoon at  Patoku 

       

               

PHOTO 3: Looking west along the causeway  to Patoku field‐station; southern lagoon is to  the left, northern to the right 

 

PHOTO 4: Navigation canal cut through  Patoku’s barrier island: it goes from the  outer lagoon to Matit river (Lumi i Matit). 

10


3. FISHERIES   

This chapter provides for an overview of the various fishing methods employed in Gjiri I Drinit  and also provides for an in depth account of the Stavnikes:    Trawlers (tratta): the first trawlers were observed fishing near to the mouth of Lumi i Matit  on the 16th of July 2008; they are based at Shengjini and fish throughout Gjiri i Drinit.     Longliners  (from  Shengjini):  not  yet  observed,  but  believed  to  fish  at  ‘battla’  sea  mounts.   Only one turtle [W1438] was seen that had swallowed a hook & line; but we took it from a  stavnike. 

PHOTO  5:  Trawler  from  Shengjini  fishing  very  close  to  the  beach  at  Patoku;  water  depth  is  about 5‐6 metres

PHOTO 6: Flat‐bottomed boats used at Patoku  lagoon; water depth is only 10 cm in places 

  Coastal nets (mrezh): used in shallow waters (often 4‐6 m depth). We’ve spoken with Seferi,  who fishes the Droja/Godull area near to Ishmit; he sees turtles on most days.    Octopus pots: a ceramic pot or cinder‐block is placed on the seabed, marked with a floating  plastic bottle on a line; traps are examined periodically to see if an octopus has hidden inside.    Pinar:  these  are  a  type  of  barrier  net,  incorporating  a  trap  similar  to  a  keep‐net,  usually  erected in shallow water for winter fishing.  Eels (Anguilla anguilla) were captured with pinar  in  the  lagoons,  but  fishermen  were  also  observed  stabbing  eels  with  tridents  from  small  boats.   

 

11


PHOTO 7:  Octopus pot 

PHOTO 8: Pinar being erected in inner lagoon  at Patoku 

Shellfish:  an  unusual  method  is  used  whereby  people  walk  through  the  lagoon  using  their  toes to feel for bivalves in the sand, which they then pick up and collect in a bag hung around  their neck.    Dynamite:  although  illegal  we  saw  two  men  who  were  probably  placing  dynamite  charges  near to Tales Beach (05/07/2008); nearby we saw many dead fish floating at the surface. Dr.  Michael  White  heard  explosions  coming  from  seawards  on  several  mornings  (usually  6‐10  explosions),  and  subsequently  noted  these  occurrences  (Annexe  2).  We  received  a  report  (17/07/2008) that a dead tagged‐turtle was seen on the beach at Tales following explosions;  however, we do not know the  cause of  death and  the carcass disappeared,  so we have no  data.    Bilanç:  a  large  type  of  net  suspended  from  fixed  poles  that  is  lowered  onto  the  floor  of  a  riverbed, and then winched up periodically to check for fish.     Kalemero:  a  similar  device  to  Bilanç  but  smaller  and  hand‐operated;  also  used  in  rivers  or  lagoons.  

PHOTO 9: Kalemeno

PHOTO 10: Bilanç in mouth of Matit river; the net  is lowered into the river & raised periodically 

   

12


3.1. Stavnikes     In the summer of 2008 our main research  efforts  were  focused  on  monitoring  stavnike fish‐traps. Stavnikes are a type of  fish‐trap, originating in Russia, introduced  into  Albania  around  30  years  ago  and  forgotten  about  until  2000,  when  the  Patoku  fishermen  started  to  use  them  again.    Two sets of traps were monitored closely:  Ishmit [N41°36.198′; E019°33.349′]; Matit  [N41°38.512′; E019°34.126′]1.    PHOTO 11: Fishermen returning from Matit stavnike.       3.1.1. Trap construction     A  rectangular  enclosure  is  erected  in  shallow  water  (depth  5‐6  m)  some  distance  offshore,  consisting of long wooden posts (length 8‐10 m, diameter 10‐15 cm) forced vertically into the  seabed, with nets secured to them in an arrangement that allows easy access into the traps  for fish and other marine animals. The number of posts required depends upon trap‐size, but  the design is always similar (Fig. 2). A stavnike is divided into sections (reception area, ante‐ chamber, and collection chamber), which is repeated to form a double unit. A long barrier‐ net  extends  from  the  fish‐traps  to  the  beach  (Ishmit  stavnike  was  1800  m  offshore;  Matit  only  200  m);  the  traps  are  constructed  to  allow  entry  from  either  side  of  the  barrier  net.  When fish or turtles encounter the barrier they have three choices: to turn left, right, or to go  back  the  way  they  came;  an  area  they  may  have  just  foraged.  Turning  beachwards  leads  them  into  shallower  water.  Animals  entering  the  reception area  are  guided  into  successive  chambers; escape from these is difficult although not impossible.  

 

                                                             1

Ishmit stavnikes were out of action for nine days in June & four days in July; the nets were  removed for cleaning (algal growth). One  trap  was damaged  in  heavy  weather (15/7/2008)  but rebuilt; and both stavnikes were destroyed on 24th July and not rebuilt in this year (2008).   

 

13


Figure 2: Typical design of a stavnike fish‐trap (Photo: I. Haxhiu). 

 

   

3.1.2.   Fish catch     Traps  were  emptied  early  each  morning  before  the  sun  got  too  hot;  harvesting  was  not  possible in strong winds or heavy seas. Working from a small boat inside the enclosure, the  fishermen slowly raised the bottom net by hand, reducing the size of the collection chamber,  until the catch could be emptied into the boat. Any turtles were lifted manually into the boat,  which  could  be  difficult  with  larger  animals.  Space  in  the  boats  is  limited  and  occasionally  tagged  turtles  were  released  directly  at  the  stavnikes  (their  tag‐numbers  were  communicated  via  telephone  to  Prof  I.  Haxhiu),  in  which  case  we  might  have  no  morphometric data; apart from those data collected at tagging.      3.1.3.  Stavnike fishermen    The  research  team  lived  and  worked  with  the  fishermen  who  fish  at  Ishmit,  and  so  have  a  very  good  relationship  with  them.  Another  group  of  stavnike  fishermen  (Matit)  were  less  accepting of the team initially and they wanted money in return for bringing the team turtles  (Leke 500‐1000 [€4‐8] per turtle). Our difficulty with this is that the research team and the  funding organisations, must obey the law, including CITES (1973), CMS (Bonn, 1979), and EU  Habitats Directives (1992). The other side of the story is that the fishermen are poor people,   

14


sometimes their catch is very small (2‐3 kg), they work hard ‐ for long hours, turtles in the  nets can cause damage and prevent fish from being caught, and they have to buy benzene to  get to their stavnikes or nets. Although these costs had not been anticipated in the budget  design, the team were able to shuffle money from various budget categories to provide the  fishermen  with  money  for  their  time,  their  fuel;  and  not  for  buying  the  turtles  from  them.  The project began working with the Matit fishermen on the 18th of June and by the end of  June  Dr.  White  had  built  a  good  relationship  with  them;  answering  their  questions  about  marine life, including sea turtles and their biology. This proved to be very useful when they  caught  an  ocean  sunfish  Mola  mola  for  the  first  time;  they  had  never  seen  or  heard  of  anything like this before.    It is clear therefore that the 2009 project must include in its budget a contribution towards  fuel costs for the fishermen that assist the project. Our medium‐term goal should be to end  such  dependency  through  education,  identifying  alternative  sources  of  income  for  the  fishermen, substitution of cash with publicity materials (e.g. T‐shirts), and national legislative  measures.   

                   PHOTO  12  :  Mola  mola  from  Ishmit  stavnike;  weight 42 kg. 

 

PHOTO 13 : An ocean sunfish Mola mola was  captured in Matit stavnike; it weighed 300 kg. 

15


Figure 3: Gjiri i Drinit: the red flags indicate stavnikes observed during 2008 

 

 (See Annexe 1)  [Map creared by Dr. Michael White using Garmin MapSource] 

 

16


3.1.4.  Other stavnikes in Gjiri i Drinit   

There were 18 sets of stavnikes throughout Gjiri i Drinit in 2008. A Global Positioning System  was  used  to  fix  the  location  of  key  points  (e.g.  stavnike  fish‐traps)  within  the  study  area  (Garmin  GPSMap  60C;  software:  Garmin  MapSource;  Atlantic  Blue  Chart;  WGS  84:  see  Annexe 1 for GPS locations).    • Vain  stavnike:  first  visited  this  on  the  5th  of  July  and  watched  the  fishermen  collect  the  catch,  which  was  very  sparse  that  day  (perhaps  10  fish  &  20  large  medusae).  This  trap  is  very  near  to  the  beach  (50  m).  The  team  spoke  with  the  fishermen and discovered that there  were  often  turtles  in  the  traps;  virtually  all  of  these  turtles  were  PHOTO 14: Vain stavnike: they are much less organised  than the Ishmit fishermen  untagged.    • Tales  stavnike:  The  team  also  visited  this  trap  on  the  5th  of  July:  their  catch  was  also  sparse  (4  kg  ‘stavril’:‐  Horse  mackerel  Trachurus  mediterraneus).  They  too  regularly  caught turtles in the traps (sometimes 3 or 4, but none for three days); once again almost  all the turtles were untagged.     • Stavnikes at Kepi i Rodonit: There are seven sets of traps along the northern side of the  peninsula; the team spoke with several of these fishermen, but they very rarely have any  turtles in their traps.    • Kune‐Çesku: this is the only stavnike to fish all year round. This trap is very interesting in  that  the  barrier‐net  is  removed  during  the  summer  months,  perhaps  because  of  its  proximity to the Shengjini tourist beach, and only re‐erected during the winter months.  When  the  barrier‐net  was  absent,  sea  bass  Dicentrarchus  labrax  went  into  the  traps,  when the barrier‐net was present the sea bass did not enter the traps, and congregated  to  forage  on  small  prey  caught  in  the  barrier‐net.  Çesku  has  a  good  understanding  of  global biodiversity and environmental issues. Our only turtle [AL0002] this summer from  the Shengjin sea area came from Çesku’s stavnike in September.    • Kune‐Prella:  this  trap  was  situated  on  the  seawards  side  of  the  coastline  between  Shengjini bay and Vain Nature Reserve; it is a difficult shore to reach from the landwards  side. The Prella group have a small depot in the mouth of Lumi i Drinit, and after some  considerable discussion agreed that they would keep turtles for us to measure and tag:  however,  they  wanted  money  for  this  (Leke  1000  per  animal  –  as  mentioned  earlier  money would have been given towards their fuel and effort and not towards buying the  turtle).  The  team  agreed  to  this  arrangement,  as  it  was  deemed  better  to  have  their   

17


cooperation initially, and then temporarily suspend the practice if and when the project  budget runs out. As it turned out they caught no more turtles during the field‐season.    •   •

Kune 2: there are two other stavnikes near by, but the fishermen could not be located.  Thrown‐sand  beach:  there  are  three  stavnikes  very  close  to  the  shore  in  the  northernmost  part  of  the  bay.  Logistical  limitations  prevented  the  team  from  visiting  these traps, but the fishermen were contacted by phone and asked to report any turtle  bycatch  to  us.  We  had  conducted  underwater  surveys  at  this  site  in 2005,  and  so  were  familiar with the area (White et al. 2006).   

  PHOTO 16: One of three stavnikes at Thrown‐sand    beach     

PHOTO 15: Vain stavnike is very close to the shore  

4. MONITORING FISH CATCH    Catches were monitored in three ways:     i) direct observation at the traps,   ii) direct observation of the catch when the boats returned to Patoku   iii) discussions with different fishermen about their catch (i.e. anecdotal evidence).     Whether  researchers  went  to  the  stavnikes  or  not  largely  depended  upon  the  fishermen’s  planned activities. On some mornings they emptied the traps and returned directly to Patoku  about  3‐5  hours  later,  on  other  days  they  continued  to  different  types  of  net  elsewhere  before returning to Patoku in the evening.   

 

18


PHOTO 17 

  Emptying the collection chamber of Ishmit stavnike 

  4.1. Catch composition    A simple method was needed that allowed the fish species caught each day to be identified:  without  causing  the  fishermen  any  extra  work.  Fish  types  were  photographed  and  briefly  described  each  day.  Initially,  most  species  were  not  known  to  our  researchers,  although  several could be allocated to genus (Rakaj, 1995; Miller and Loates, 1997). Over the first five  weeks we identified 30 fish to species level, and found out their Albanian names (which could  differ  between  fishermen);  this  process  continued  throughout  the  research  period  (Annexe  5).     Quantifying  each  species  by  weight  was  considered  initially,  but  discarded  as  being  impractical, because fish were not necessarily sorted by species; and fish could be combined  with different species for weighing on different days (sometimes fish were sorted into prime  quality  for  export  and  poorer  quality  for  local  consumption.  Restaurant‐owners  often  attended  and  purchased  the  best  quality  fish  for  their  customers).  The  head  of  the  Patoku  fishermen, Rakip Martini, is also a fish wholesaler and buys fish from the artisanal fishermen  (i.e. our base is a small fish market), and sometimes the project team could scrutinise these  other  catches.  When  fishermen  from  other  areas  were  questioned  it  was  sometimes  not  possible to see their catch. Particular attention was paid to the presence of prawns, medusae  or crabs, as these may attract foraging turtles.       

 

19


PHOTO  18:  Burdullak  Gobius  bucchichii  and  a  needle‐fish Belone belone.

     

PHOTO 19: Burdullak sorted by species 

  PHOTO 21: Mixed fish: corb, red mullet Mullus  barbatus, and sole 

PHOTO  20:  Mixed  fish:  mackerel  Scomber  scombrus,  red  gurnard  poss.  Aspitrigla  cuculus,  corb Umbrina cirrosa and sole Solea spp. 

     

 

PHOTO  22:  Very  small  thresher  shark  Alopias  vulpinus and octopus Octopus vulgaris. 

 

PHOTO 23: Mixed fish: grey mullet Mugil cephalus, sea  bass, and horse mackerel Trachurus mediterraneus 

20


PHOTO 24:  Red mullet Mullus barbatus   

 

PHOTO 26: Belone belone  

PHOTO 25: Sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax 

PHOTO 27: Dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus

 

PHOTO 30 : Belone belone  PHOTO 28: “Gof” Greater amberjack Seriola dumerili

   

PHOTO 31 : Dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus

 

PHOTO 29: Sorted catch 

21


PHOTO 30: Torpedo ray Torpedo torpedo

PHOTO 32: Small eel Anguilla anguilla

PHOTO 34: A North American immigrant: Blue crab  Callinectes  sapidus  at  Patoku  field‐station.  Now    naturalised in Eastern Mediterranean 

  PHOTO 31: Bonito Sarda sarda 

PHOTO 33: Bivalves on beach near Patoku 

PHOTO 35: An abundance of crabs:  Carcinus mediterraneus. 

                           

 

 

22


5.  SEA TURTLES  5.1. At‐sea encounters with turtles      White (2007) provided a system of classification for anecdotal evidence: I) Direct sighting of  turtle at sea; II) Reported anecdotal evidence, where the witness was questioned to provide  more  detailed  information;  III)  Less‐reliable  witnesses,  or  very  brief  encounters  with  megafauna. Only Class I & II sightings were used to compile data (Annex 3).    Most  of the data in Annex 3 were gathered during  informal discussions with local artisanal  fishermen  in  the  Patoku  area.  These  records  included  turtles  that  had  been  captured  and  released,  as  well  as  observations  of  turtles  swimming  nearby.  Education  of  these  artisanal  fishermen was an important component of our work at Patoku (Godley et al. 1998b). 

 

PHOTO 36: Recreational angler: they fish for many    hours and have reported sightings of swimming    turtles to us 

PHOTO 37: Shellfish collectors have also seen turtles  swimming between the lagoons at Patoku 

 

  5.2. Sea turtles: morphometric data    Turtles,  usually  captured  as  bycatch,  were  transported  to  the  team  field‐base  at  Patoku,  where  these  animals  were  measured,  photographed,  tagged  and  released.  Species  confirmation  was  based  on  standard  keys  (Dodd,  1988;  Marquez,  1990;  Eckert  et  al.  1999;  Wyneken, 2001).     The curved carapace length (CCL) and curved carapace width (CCW) were measured (Eckert  et al. 1999) and turtles allocated into 10 cm size‐classes (length‐frequency distribution) based  on their CCL e.g. 40 cm size‐class range: 40.0‐49.9 cm et seq. (White, 2007).   

 

23


As an indicator of the stage of sexual development three measurements were recorded from  the tail:  i)   Distance from posterior margin of plastron to midline of cloacal opening (Plas‐clo)  ii)   Total tail length (TTL)   iii)   Distance from tip of tail to posterior margin of the carapace (+/‐ cara)     

PHOTO 38: This is a typical juvenile short‐tailed loggerhead; it is difficult to determine the sex of  smaller animals externally. The tail tip does not extend beyond the carapace’s posterior margin.     

PHOTO 39: The extended tail of an adult male    loggerhead: the cloacal opening and TTL are some  distance beyond the carapace’s posterior margin.  5.3. Carapace scutes 

  PHOTO 40: The developing tail of an adolescent male:  the cloaca is just short of the carapacial margin, but the  tail tip has already extended beyond the carapace 

   

24


The carapace of a turtle consists of a series of interlocking keratinised bony plates (scutes);  the  pattern  differs  between  species  (Marquez,  1990;  Eckert  et  al.  1999;  Wyneken,  2001).  Scutes  were  categorised  as  being  nuchal,  vertebral,  costal  or  marginal,  and  these  were  counted starting anteriorly (e.g. V1‐V5).  

  PHOTO 41 : Loggerhead’s carapace: 5 vertebral scutes,    then distally there are 5 pairs of costal scutes (left &  right); and 12‐13 pairs of marginal scutes around the  perimeter. The anterior central marginal is known as the    nuchal scute   

 

PHOTO 42 : Measuring the curved carapace width (CCW)    of a very small juvenile Caretta caretta at Lampedusa. The  vertebral scutes still have jagged ‘keels’. The global      distribution of smaller turtles (in their oceanic phase) is  almost unknown.

5.4. Flipper‐tagging     All turtles were tagged prior to release and serial numbers recorded in Excel spreadsheets. A  small number of turtles (n=10) captured during this research had been previously tagged: all  at Patoku; the earliest was from 2003 (White et al. 2008).    5.4.1.   Stockbrand’s tags vs. Rototags     Incidental  tagging  has been  conducted  in  Albania  since  December 2002  (Dalton’s Rototags:  supplied by RAC/SPA, Tunis); these are now superseded by Stockbrand’s titanium tags with  an Albanian address. Although expensive we felt that the purchase of Stockbrand’s tags was  justified for three reasons:   i) The risk of entanglement in fishing gear is reduced;  ii) Tags remain legible for a longer period (some rototags were unreadable after five  years);  iii) Having  an  Albanian  address  on  the  tags  increased  the  importance  of  turtles  for  the  local  fishermen:  they  thought  that  the  RAC/SPA  tags  had  been  applied  to  turtles in Tunisia.   

25


PHOTO 43: Dalton’s Rototag; these may increase  PHOTO 44: Albania’s first Stockbrand’s tag: these    the risk of entanglement in fishing gear.  close into a ‘U‐shape’ and are less likely to catch    on fishing gear    Suggett & Houghton (1998) provided evidence that rototags can increase the risk of turtles  becoming  entangled  in  fishing  gear,  and  so  instead  we  chose  to  use  Stockbrand’s  titanium  tags for the Patoku project (these tags lock into a closed u‐shape). The titanium tags had to  be ordered and shipped from Australia (Stockbrands Co. PL, 53 Edward Street, Osborne Park,  WA 6017); they arrived at Tirana in mid‐July 2008, but then there was a protracted period of  negotiations as we tried to resolve an excessive demand for Customs duty and taxes. What  appears to have caused the problem was that the tags were addressed to an individual (Prof.  Haxhiu) rather than to an institution. The eventual outcome was that UNDP (especially Mr.  Gace)  and  the  Deputy  Minister  for  the  Environment  became  involved;  and  the  tags  were  eventually released to us in mid‐August. The delay in receiving the new tags meant that we  missed the peak‐capture period at Patoku, and the first Albanian tag was finally applied on  31st  August  2008.  Dr.  Michael  White’s  intention  was  to  remove  rototags  from  previously‐ tagged turtles and replace these with titanium tags whenever we can (the database will be  updated accordingly, see section 3.2.4).    The serial‐numbers on several previously‐tagged turtles were obscured by extensive barnacle  growth, in as little as 12 months. The rototag��[W1284] of an adult male tagged in 2003 was  barely legible after just five years. Three captured loggerheads (3%; n=102 turtles) had tag‐ scars  but  no  tags;  the  size,  shape  and  location  of  holes  in  the  fore‐flippers  suggested  that  rototags  had  been  used.  All  these  turtles  now  have  new  identities  [W1407,  W1434  &  W1440],  which  means  their  previous  life‐histories  remain  incomplete,  and  they  have  been  included twice in the population figures (Balazs, 1999; White et al. 2008).      The intention was to double‐tag all turtles (i.e. insert tags into both fore‐flippers) in order to  minimise this effect of tag‐loss, but at the last moment Prof Haxhiu insisted that we only use  one  tag  per  turtle;  due  to  the  severe  financial  constraints  in  Albania;  i.e.  we  can  tag  2000  instead of 1000 turtles.   

 

26


Dr.  White  had  taken  the  precaution  of  teaching  a  photo‐recognition  technique  to  Albanian  researchers, and so all turtles captured this summer have had their scutes and dorsal head‐ scales counted (White, 2007). Additional morphometrics data collection included CCL, CCW  and  three  tail  measurements;  a  useful  technique  for  determining  sexual  development  in  adolescent males (White, 2007; White et al. 2008).   

PHOTO 45: Tag scar that suggested a Rototag  had been applied, and then lost. 

   

       

 

PHOTO 46: This injury looked as though a Rototag had  been inserted, but then somehow the entire tag was    pulled through the flipper.

PHOTO 47 & 48: This Rototag [W1284] was almost illegible after just five years; a newly‐applied  Rototag is shown below for comparison. 

5.4.2. Tagging database    A  Microsoft  Access  tagging  database  has  been  developed  by  MEDASSET2  for  the  sea  turtle  tagging and morphometrics records from Patoku. A few minor problems were encountered  during  the  development  phase,  mostly  concerning  the  type  of  data  permissible  in  each  particular field. These problems were resolved in late‐June 2008 and the system is to be field‐                                                              2

 Database designed from MEDASSET volunteer Aliki Dona‐ Software Engineer 

 

27


tested.  The  database  coordinator  has  yet  to  be  confirmed,  but  record‐keeping  may  be  continued by Prof Haxhiu and his team. One responsibility will be to upload the Albanian tag‐ series  numbers  onto  the  ACCSTR  database  (Archie  Carr  Centre  for  Sea  Turtle  Research,  Florida).  Sea  turtle  researchers  throughout  the  world  can  report  any  encounters  with  previously‐tagged  turtles  to  the  original‐tagging  project,  by  using  “Tagfinder”  (www.seaturtle.org):  this  software  tool  was  developed  so  that  data  concerning  identified  turtles can be easily shared.       

             

                Figure 4 Data‐entry window of the new tagging database (MEDASSET). 

   

5.4.3.   Data collection 

  Datasheets and Excel spreadsheets were designed specifically for each task (morphometrics,  fisheries monitoring, & physical environment). Data entry proved challenging at times due to  frequent daily power that lasted up to 6 hours a time. Meticulous paper records were kept  and a computer was used for back‐up and data analyses.         

 

28


5.5. Photo‐recognition of sea turtles    Photo‐identification  is  an  established  fieldwork  technique,  used  to  re‐identify  certain  individuals  in  a  number  of  animal  species  (see  White,  2007  and  references  therein).  Successful  re‐identification  depends  upon  the  subject  having  some  unique  distinguishing  features  or  characteristics  that  persist  over  time.  White  (2007)  showed  that  loggerhead  turtles were individually identifiable by using photo‐recognition techniques that utilised the  scale‐patterns  on  the  dorsal  surface  of  the  head,  and  the  layout  of  carapace  scutes.  When  turtles had been captured then morphometric data could also be included.      5.5.1.   Head‐scale patterns    The  dorsal  surface  of  the  head  was  divided  into  two  regions  and  the  scales  in  both  areas  were counted:    1) PF Number: the number of prefrontal scales present       PHOTO 49 PF  Number:  Prefrontal  scales  (positioned  between  the  beak  and  the  eyes)  are  outlined  in  yellow;  loggerheads  usually  have  2  pairs,  but  this  turtle  also  has  two  smaller scales. 

      2) FP Number: the number of scales that touch the frontoparietal scale    

  PHOTO 50 FP Number: The frontoparietal scale is  the  large  central  scale  on  the  top  of  the  head  outlined  in  yellow.  The  FP  number  is  a  count  of  the  scales  that  touch this large central scale. 

 

                    29


Scales in the two regions differ in shape, size, and number.  Each of the index numbers (PF or  FP) could be used to separate individual turtles into groups; however, greater individuation  was achieved by using a combination of both indices (e.g. a turtle has PF = 6; FP = 10).     Subdivision of head‐scales into rank‐classes:    The reliability of photo‐recognition was further enhanced by subdividing the head‐scales into  various sizes (small, medium and large), although this required a more subjective approach  (Bennett and Keuper‐Bennett, 2004; White, 2007). The subdivision of PF and FP scales into  rank‐classes  was  achieved  on  a  case‐by‐case  basis:  counting  scales  directly  (or  examining  photographs  of  individual  turtles)  and  ranking  them  into  an  appropriate  class  (e.g.  the  FP  number of a turtle comprises 6 large, 2 medium, and 2 small scales). White (2007) decided  against classifying individual scales by their actual measurements, for instance deciding that  scales  of  5.0  mm  width  should  be  classified  as  small;  a  decision  based  on  the  perceived  difficulty of measuring a turtle’s facial scales in the wild, especially when working underwater  or  with  a  large  struggling  animal,  whereas  an  assessment  of  the  relative  size  of  different  scales in a photograph is a simple task. We followed White’s (2007) method, for ease of data‐ comparability; although in the present study most of the turtles had been brought to shore  and were more easily measurable.      PHOTO 51 Very unusual head‐scale: three  scales fused together during  embryonic growth 

       

 

 

30


5.5.2. Other factors that aid recognition    Carapace  damage  or  scute  anomalies,  and  missing  limbs  can  assist  the  re‐identification  process. 

PHOTO 52: Part of the carapace is missing on this    loggerhead 

   

 

PHOTO 54: Loggerhead has seven vertebrals and    seven costal scutes on the right‐hand side (five    costals on the left). 

     

 

  PHOTO 53: Caretta from Orikum hotel lost its right  fore‐flipper in fishing gear 

PHOTO 55: Small area of damage across V1 and  CR1 scutes; lepas barnacles are growing inside. This  will probably heal over a long period of time. 

31


6. SEA TURTLES CAPTURED AS FISHERIES BYCATCH (2008)    Most of the turtles in 2008 came from the stavnikes at Ishmit and Matit. The team took one  from a net (mrezh) at Godull, one from Çesku’s stavnike at Kune, one from a hotel at Orikum,  and caught one as it crossed some wetland between the outer and inner lagoons by Patoku  field‐station in daylight.  The majority were loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta, but there was  also one green turtle Chelonia mydas.   

   

PHOTO 56: Loggerhead in stavnike collection  chamber at harvesting 

PHOTO 57: Lifting a loggerhead from Ishmit  stavnike into the boat

PHOTO 58: Moving a bigger turtle from stavnike

PHOTO 59: Two Caretta in the boat at  Ishmit stavnike 

 

   

   

 

   

 

32


PHOTO 60: Seferi and family fishing with mrezh near to    Ishmit. When turtles are caught it is obviously a    problem in such a small boat 

 

PHOTO 61: Loggerhead being transported in a  boat back to Patoku; it was already tagged.

  

6.1. Turtle Morphometric Data     Ishmit and Matit:  There were 103 turtles captured in the two Patoku stavnikes during June and July 2008 (Fig.  5): Ishmit stavnike fished for 39 days and yielded 54 turtles (53 Caretta caretta; 1 Chelonia  mydas); Matit stavnike fished for 34 days and yielded 49 loggerheads. These stavnikes  worked during June and July, and then were dismantled following severe storm damage (24th  July).   Most turtles (80%) were large short‐tailed loggerheads, and almost half (47%; n = 46 turtles)  were in the 60 cm size‐class (Table 1). Only two had a curved carapace length (CCL) <50 cm;  and two had CCL >80 cm (Mean CCL = 64.0 cm; SD = 7.3 cm; 95% confidence limit = 1.47; CCL  range 45.5‐83.0 cm; n = 98 loggerheads; 4 loggerheads were data deficient due to carapace  damage). There was one small juvenile green turtle Chelonia mydas (CCL = 39.0 cm). 

 

33


Loggerhead CCL (cm) June & July 2008

Number of turtles

30 25 20 15 J une

10

J uly

5 0 40

50

60

70

80

Size-class (cm)

Figure 5: Curved Carapace Length (CCL) size‐classes (cm) for 98 loggerheads  caught in the stavnikes at Ishmit and Matit.   

 

The 60 cm size‐class accounted for 47% of the turtles; two turtles were >80 cm, and two <50 cm.   

Godull: Seferi caught a small loggerhead in his mrezh on 30th August (CCL = 48.0).  Shengjin‐Kune: Çesku caught a small loggerhead in his stavnike on 10th September (CCL =  49.0 cm).  Orikum: On the 20th September the project team released an adolescent male loggerhead  from Orikum, near Vlore, where it had been kept in a small pool in a hotel’s garden for 15‐18  months; it had been captured originally in fishing gear and had lost its right fore‐limb,  probably due to tissue necrosis.     Table 1. CCL (cm) size‐classes for 101 loggerheads tagged at Patoku during 2008. The  turtle  in  August was in a  net at  Godull. In  September  the smaller loggerhead  was  in  Çesku’s stavnike at Kune, the larger one was released from a hotel at Orikum.                       

CCL  June  July  August 

40    2  1 

50  17  10 

60  26  20 

 

 

Sept 

  

  

70  17  4    1 

80  2     

Total  62  36  1 

  

 

     

34


PHOTO 62     Adolescent  male  loggerhead  that  had  been  kept  in  a  pool  at  an  Orikum  hotel  as  a  tourist  attraction. The animal was well‐fed  and there was a continuous flow of  seawater  to  its  tank.  It  had  lost  a  fore‐flipper  through  tissue  necrosis,  and  was  originally  captured  in  fishing  gear  about  18  months  earlier.  We  made  a  televised  release  on  20th  September  2008,  which  was  attended  by  local  students  and  teachers. 

  6.2.  Sex    There was only one animal at Patoku in 2008 that may have been an adult female [W1425];  there was a recent injury to her neck, which may have been a ‘mating scar’; male turtles are  known  to  bite  the  back  of  the  female’s  neck  during  mating.  This  year’s  research  period  coincided with the egg‐laying period in the Mediterranean region: nesting is predominantly  in  the  eastern  basin  and  especially  in  the  Ionian  and  Levantine  Seas  (Geldiay  et  al.  1982;  Groombridge, 1990; Margaritoulis et al. 2003). There is a possibility that post‐nesting adult  females  (Margaritoulis,  1988c;  Argano  et  al.  1992;  Broderick  et  al.  2006)  might  be  encountered later in the year at Patoku, or elsewhere in Albania; as Lazar et al. (2000; 2004)  reported  that  some  turtles  tagged  in  Greece  during  nesting  had  been  encountered  later  in  Croatian waters.    PHOTO 63   Possible ‘mating scar’ on the neck of a  loggerhead  [W1425];  this  was  the  only  turtle  at  Patoku in 2008 that may  have  been an adult female. 

 

   

 

35


6.3. Male turtles     The distribution and lifestyle of male turtles is not as well known as that of females. Patoku  may  be  a  male  foraging  and  developmental  habitat,  as  20%  of  loggerheads  tagged  in  June  were males (adult = 4; adolescent = 9); there were five more adolescent males in July (White  et al. 2008). This has added importance because of the potential feminising‐effect of climate‐ change on global turtle populations (Davenport, 1989).    Carapace  and  tail  measurements  (cm)  are  given  for  18  male  loggerheads  (4  adults;  14  adolescents)  that  were  captured  in  stavnikes  during  June‐July  2008  (Table  2).  Analyses  of  variance  showed  that  the  carapace  measurements  between  adults  and  adolescents  were  significantly different (CCL: F1,16=6.98, P<0.05. CCW: F1,16=5.15, P<0.05). Analyses of variance  showed  that  there  were  highly  significant  differences  in  the  three  tail  measurements  between  adult  and  adolescent  male  loggerheads  (Plas‐clo:  F1,16=34.36,  P<0.01.    TTL:  F1,16=27.15,  P<0.01.    +/‐  cara:  F1,16=25.30,  P<0.01).    In  two  adolescents  the  tail  had  not  yet  extended beyond the carapace’s posterior margin (+/‐ cara = ‐1.0 and ‐2.5 cm).     Table 2.  Carapace and tail morphometric data (cm) for 18 male loggerhead turtles.  Legend:  CCL  curved  carapace  length;  CCW  curved  carapace  width;  Plas‐clo  distance  from posterior margin of plastron to midline of cloaca; TTL total tail length; +/‐ cara tip  of  tail  to  posterior  margin  of  carapace.  The  final  four  turtles  are  adult,  the  others  adolescent. *may have just reached maturity. 

  CCL 

CCW 

Plas‐clo 

TTL 

+/‐ cara 

59.5 

56.0 

11.0 

14.5 

0.5 

62.0 

62.0 

14.5 

17.0 

1.5 

62.5 

57.0 

12.5 

15.0 

‐1.0 

63.0 

57.0 

12.5 

15.0 

1.0 

65.0 

61.0 

15.5 

20.0 

3.0 

69.0 

65.0 

16.0 

20.0 

3.0 

69.5 

65.0 

16.0 

20.0 

3.5 

70.0 

64.0 

18.0 

22.5 

4.0 

71.0 

64.0 

18.0 

24.0 

5.0 

71.5 

68.0 

21.0 

27.0 

10.0* 

72.0 

67.0 

18.0 

23.0 

5.5 

73.0 

70.0 

23.0 

29.0 

11.0 

73.0 

65.0 

18.0 

22.0 

3.5 

74.0 

69.0 

15.0 

16.0 

‐2.5 

71.0 

63.0 

24.0 

28.0 

12.0 

71.0 

66.0 

29.0 

34.5 

12.0 

78.0 

73.0 

27.0 

34.0 

13.0 

83.0 

78.0 

38.0 

44.0 

16.5 

   

36


The tail measurements (Table 2) provided a good indication of the state of development of  secondary  sexual  characteristics  in  male  turtles  (Limpus  and  Limpus,  2003;  White,  2007;  White  et  al.  2008).  Morphological  changes  indicating  the  onset  of  male  adolescence  (proximal thickening and elongation of the tail) were observed in 14 loggerheads at Patoku. A  problem  has  always  been  that  it  is  difficult  to  identify  the  sex  of  small  juvenile  turtles  externally;  although  gonad‐differentiation  is  completed  during  embryonic  development  (Yntema  and  Mrosovsky,  1980;  Miller,  1997).  There  were  highly  significant  differences  between the tail measurements of adolescent and adult male loggerheads at Patoku (Table  2; White et al. 2008), and these were observed across a range of CCL size‐classes (mostly 60  and  70  cm);  which  adds  support  to  the  Australian‐findings  of  Limpus  et  al.  (1994a)  and  Limpus and Limpus (2003) that adolescence may take several years to complete.     In our Patoku study the smallest turtle showing definite tail development had a CCL = 59.5  cm. The largest adolescent (CCL = 74 cm) was far from attaining maturity (the tail tip was still  2.5  cm  short  of  the  carapace’s  posterior  margin);  whereas  two  fully‐mature  males  had  smaller carapace lengths (CCL = 71 cm). One loggerhead (Table 2), although small (CCL = 71.5  cm),  may  have  just  reached  maturity.  Turtles  varied  considerably  in  body  width  and  height  (ventral‐dorsal measurement), and so the least important morphometric measurement was  the curved carapace width (CCW), although still statistically significant.   

6.4. Juvenile developmental habitat    Captures of juvenile turtles at Patoku suggest that this area may be used as a developmental  habitat by loggerheads, and perhaps green sea turtles; this is an important finding because  the pelagic life‐stages and marine population structures, especially in the Mediterranean, are  not  well‐known  (Bolten  and  Balazs,  1982;  Frazer  and  Schwartz,  1984;  Bolten  et  al.  1992,  1993; Bolten, 2003a; Lazar et al. 2004).   

6.5. Green sea turtle Chelonia mydas    In June a juvenile green turtle Chelonia mydas (CCL 39 cm) was captured in Ishmit stavnike,  and then recaptured three weeks later in Matit stavnike; regionally this species nests only in  the northeastern Mediterranean, and more usually has a tropical distribution.       PHOTO 64     Green  turtle  Chelonia  mydas  captured  in  Ishmit  stavnike  (June  2008).  We  tagged  [W1169]  and  released it, then it was recaptured in  Matit stavnike three weeks later.   

 

37


Lazar  et  al.  (2004)  recently  reviewed  the  museum  specimens  and  records  of  green  turtles  known from the Adriatic Sea and found that most of these were misidentified loggerheads.  There  was  a  misunderstanding  for  many  decades  that  Caretta  caretta  in  the  Adriatic  Sea  were  small  turtles  and  therefore  the  bigger  individuals  were  often  reported  as  Chelonia  mydas. Probably only 10 were actually Chelonia mydas; three since 1985 were reported by  Lazar  et  al.  (2004):  Italy:  Po  River  Delta,  1985;  and  Margherita  di  Savoia,  1996.  The  first  confirmed  record  of  a  green  turtle  in  the  eastern  Adriatic  Sea  was  a  dead  juvenile  from  Trpanj, Croatia, in 2001 that had drowned in a gill‐net (Lazar et al. 2004).     The  capture  of  a  live  green  turtle  in  Albanian  waters  (this  record),  and  the  fact  that  it  remained foraging at Patoku for at least three weeks, is therefore of great importance (White  et al. 2008).   

6.6. Serial recaptures    An  important  finding  was  that  entrapped  turtles  were  not  deterred  from  foraging  locally,  despite being manhandled out of the nets, and then being landed for measuring and tagging.  The evidence for this is that 17 recently‐tagged turtles were recaptured in stavnikes on more  than one occasion (one was taken five times, two on three occasions, and 14 were captured  twice). These serial recaptures indicate that at least some turtles showed short‐term fidelity  to Patoku’s foraging grounds (16 Caretta caretta and the Chelonia mydas). Some turtles (6 Cc  & 1 Cm) were captured in both Ishmit and Matit stavnikes (4.5 km apart), suggesting a larger  foraging area was being used, whereas the other recaptures were always in the same traps.   

6.7.  Remigrants    Ten loggerheads had been tagged in previous years (all at Patok); the earliest in 2003; these  indicate repeat migrations: either to Patoku or enroute elsewhere. There were no recaptures  of turtles tagged by other projects (Bustard and Limpus, 1970; Margaritoulis, 1988c; Argano  et al. 1992; Lazar et al. 2000; 2004).   

6.8. Health status    Turtles were generally in good health: 13 loggerheads had visible carapace damage, probably  caused  by  boat  propellers  or  fisheries  impacts.  The  carapace  of  one  turtle  [W1441]  was  seriously  fractured  and  the  Matit  fishermen  wanted  to  kill  it  immediately.  This  loggerhead  was  a  large  animal,  the  injury  had  been  caused  several  months  previously  and  there  were  signs of new growth in the damaged area (tissue, blood vessels, keratin and scar tissue), the  turtle  was  otherwise  healthy,  had  extensive  fat  reserves,  and  was  very  vigorous;  Dr.  White  released  it.  The  rationale  was  that  if  we  killed  it  then  it  was  gone  forever,  whereas  if  we   

38


released it then it may be able to reproduce, which is obviously an important factor for an  endangered species. If it died subsequently at sea then other foragers would benefit from its  carcass. It takes several decades for a sea turtle to reach maturity and this animal was a large  specimen  (the  CCL  could  not  be  measured  due  to  the  damage,  but  the  CCW  was  the  third  largest in our records).     We  recaptured  this  turtle  two  weeks  later  in  a  stavnike,  which  shows  that  the  decision  to  release it had been the correct one, as it was still foraging. A loggerhead [W1438] in Matit  stavnike  had  been  caught  previously  on  a  longline  (monofilament  line  emerged  from  its  mouth, but the swallowed hook could not be seen and was probably in the stomach); as we  have no surgical or X‐ray facilities, the only option was to cut the line as near to the hook as  possible, and release the turtle.        

                 

PHOTO 65   Severely‐damaged carapace of a  loggerhead [W1441]. The turtle was  otherwise healthy and in good  condition.

6.9. Epibiotic fauna  Forty‐two  loggerheads  had  barnacles  (chelonibia  or  lepas  spp.)  attached  to  the  carapace  and/or head; six turtles were very heavily encrusted with epibiotic fauna.   

  PHOTO 66‐67: Barnacles attached to the carapace   

39


PHOTO 68: Colony of lepas spp. on the plastron    of a loggerhead.   

PHOTO 69: Barnacles (Chelonibia spp.) on a  loggerhead’s plastron. 

 

These  heavy  epibiotic  loadings  suggest  that  the  colonised  turtles  may  have  been  leading  a  sedentary  lifestyle,  although  attachment  of  epibionts  also  occurs  randomly.  Limpus  et  al.  (1994a) observed that loggerheads in eastern Australian neritic habitats had clean carapaces  when  they  recruited  from  oceanic  waters;  but  then  gained  epibiota  over  6‐8  weeks.  The  epibiotic  burdens  observed  at  Patoku  indicate  that  the  turtles  may  have  been  in  benthic  foraging habitats, perhaps locally, for some time.      

   PHOTO  70:  A  male  loggerhead  [W1107]  voided  this   faecal sample as it was being measured. This is the only 

hard  evidence  that  confirms  the  benthic‐foraging  hypothesis for Patoku so far. 

PHOTO 71: The fragment of shell in the faecal  sample  shown  above  may  have  been  Murex  (Bolinus) brandaris (neogastropoda). 

   

   

40


PHOTO 72: Benthic fauna commonly    observed at Patoku: Ark shell 

PHOTO 73: various bivalves

PHOTO 74: Squilla manta  

 

6.10. Overwintering    Loggerheads  have  been  reported  from  the  Adriatic  Sea  (Lazar,  1995;  Lazar  and  Tvrtkovic,  1995; 1998; 2003; Lazar, Margaritoulis and Tvrtkovic, 2000; 2004; Ziza et al. 2003; Lazar et al.  2004). Whether turtles actually remain in Albanian waters during the winter months or not is  more  difficult  to  answer.  One  reason  is  because  most  turtles  recorded  in  the  Patoku  study  came from stavnikes, however, fishing activities in Gjiri i Drinit differ between summer and  winter: only one stavnike (Çesku’s at Kune) is used all year round, and in autumn most of the  Patoku fishermen moved from the bay into  the more‐sheltered  inner and outer lagoons to  use pinar.  

  PHOTO 75: A loggerhead has extensive epifaunal (barnacles and mussels) and algal growth, but only on the  posterior part of the carapace: was the front part buried?  

 

41


The Adriatic Sea seawater temperatures reduce in the winter (perhaps 8‐9°C at Venice), and  we  know  that  ectothermic  sea  turtles  suffer  from  cold‐stunning  and  possibly  death  (Witherington  and  Ehrhart,  1989;  Bentivegna  et  al.  2002).  There  is  also  evidence  that  sea  turtles  hibernate  in  cold  water  conditions  (Felger  et  al.  1976;  Carr  et  al.  1980;  Ogren  and  McVea; 1995). Of particular interest was the discovery from Cape Canaveral (Kennedy Space  Centre),  Florida,  that  in  the  winter  some  loggerheads  were  half‐buried  in  the  mud  walls  of  the ship‐canal; this was determined from the fact that part of the carapace was clean (i.e. in  the mud), while the exposed parts were encrusted with barnacles (Carr et al. 1980). Photo 75  suggests that a similar event may have occurred: the turtle was either half‐buried, or had its  head protected in some way (perhaps in a small grotto or beneath a ledge).    

6.11.  Conclusions    Stavnikes  appear  to  be  a  ‘turtle‐friendly’  method  of  fishing.  Perhaps  the  most  important  factor  is  that  turtles  entering  the  traps  can  swim  around  and,  crucially,  surface  to  breathe  normally. In‐trap foraging is also a possibility, as one loggerhead was observed eating a fish in  the stavnike. 

  PHOTO 76 & 77: Turtle in the trap  

 

Sea turtles described in this study were captured in stavnikes in Gjiri i Drinit (June‐July 2008).  Most  were  larger  juvenile  (short‐tailed)  loggerheads  Caretta  caretta,  but  adult  males  were  also  present;  there  was  one  juvenile  green  turtle  Chelonia  mydas.  These  bycatch  records  represent  an  unknown  proportion  of  turtles  using  Gjiri  i  Drinit:  only  two  traps  were  monitored  regularly,  and  we  do  not  know  how  many  turtles  of  those  present  in  the  area  actually enter traps; saturation tagging has yet to be achieved locally.     Ten loggerheads had been tagged at Patok in previous years, suggesting that Albania forms  part  of  their  migratory  route.  Tag‐loss  can  lead  to  population  overestimation.  Seventeen  turtles  showed  short‐term  residency  in  the  bay,  which  was  demonstrated  through  their   

42


subsequent  recaptures  in  fish‐traps.  These  serial  recaptures  also  suggest  that  being caught in a stavnike does not deter  turtles  from  foraging  locally.  Male  sea  turtles  (4  adults,  14  adolescents)  were  captured  at  Patoku,  suggesting  that  they  may use the area as a developmental and  foraging  habitat.  This  discovery  has  increased  importance  due  to  our  presently  limited  understanding  of  the  distribution  and  marine  ecology  of  male  sea turtles; and the threatened impact of  global  climate‐change,  which  may  force  embryonic  sex‐ratios  towards  female‐ dominance.   PHOTO 78: This loggerhead had eaten part of a fish in Ishmit    stavnike.    In the Mediterranean region the marine ecology of sea turtles, and their marine distribution  patterns,  both  geographical  and  temporal,  are  largely  unknown  (Groombridge,  1990;  Margaritoulis et al. 2003; White, 2007). Although the monitoring programme at Patoku is still  in its early stages, we can confirm that substantial numbers of Caretta caretta are present in  Gjiri  i  Drinit  during  the  summer  months  (White  et  al.  2008);  and  in  the  future  it  may  be  possible to show that turtles frequent Albanian coastal and offshore waters during the winter  months too.    Therefore,  it  is  recommended  that  Gjiri  i  Drinit  is  legally  recognised  as  a  nationally  and  regionally  important  foraging  and  developmental  habitat  for  sea  turtles;  and  that  these  endangered  migratory  animals  are  fully  protected  under  Albanian  national  law  (Laurent,  1988b; Action Plan, 1999).     

6.12.  Anecdotal evidence    Important data: an ex‐soldier, based on Inshulla i Sazanit in the mid‐1970’s saw loggerheads  nesting there on the eastern beach on three occasions; he also saw live hatchlings. They used  to  eat  “Breshke”  (the meat  was  delicious,  especially  the  liver);  on  one occasion  they  had  a  loggerhead that weighed 140 kg (MGW, anonymous interview 20/06/2008).    Kune coastal zone: a local fisherman saw three live hatchlings on these remote beaches in  2006  [GPS:  N41°  44.969;  E019°  34.080]  (MGW,  anonymous  interview  20/09/2008).  These  isolated  sandy  beaches,  are  difficult  to  access  from  land  and  there  is  no  development,  despite being near to Shengjini beach; where there is an emerging d tourist industry.   

 

43


A  stavnike  fisherman  at  Vain  told  our  researchers  that  “Adriatic  White  Prawns”  reproduce  close  inshore  at  Vain  during  April/May  (he  actually  said  ‘the  entire  Adriatic  prawn  population’… however, we have no data).    Tun  Shells  Tonna  galea  (Gastropoda)  were  observed  egg‐laying  underwater  near  Kepi  i  Rodonit (13th September, 2008).  

 

7.  PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT    The wind‐direction and wind‐speed, cloud cover (in Octas), air temperature (°C) and SST (sea  surface temperature °C) were measured each day at Patoku field‐station. Occasionally data  were missed if we were surveying elsewhere.    Wind direction was determined with a Silva compass. Wind‐speed and air temperature were  measured  with  a  ‘Kestrel  2000  Pocket  Weather  Meter’  (Nielsen‐Kellerman;  www.nkhome.com).  SST  was  recorded  with  a  ‘Tronic  In‐Out  digital  thermometer’  (no  supplier details are known).      Table 3: Wind direction was recorded at Patoku from June‐September  2008.  The  predominant  winds  blew  from  the  northwest  (Maestrali)  and west (Ponente). A mountain range to the east probably prevented  winds  from  that  direction. [Note: There  were  no  data  on  1  or 2  days  each month when we surveyed elsewhere].   

Wind  North  Northeast  East  Southeast  South  Southwest  West  Northwest 

June  1  4  0  2  2  1  5  14 

July  1  1  0  0  3  3  5  16 

August  1  2  0  0  0  1  9  17 

September 0  3  0  1  0  4  7  9 

Days  3  10  0  3  5  9  26  56 

 

  Winds were strongest around midday and weakened in the late‐afternoon, generally ceasing  altogether at sunset. The dominant Maestrali (northwesterly wind; Table 3) may explain why  the  Godull  area  is  so  heavily  polluted  with  terrestrial,  mostly  plastic,  waste.  Lumi  i  Ishmit  transports  large  quantities  of  sewage  &  garbage  from  Tirana  into  Gjiri  i  Rodonit,  where  it  enters  the  bay  immediately  north  of  Kepi  i  Rodonit  (Fig.  6).  The  prevailing  wind  may  then  force the plastic waste onto the nearest beaches (Godull/Droja and the north shore of Kepi i  Rodonit), rather than allowing its dispersal into the open sea. The more northerly beaches,  such as at Tales and Vain, are much less polluted; however, their nearest rivers (Lumi i Matit  and Lumi i Drinit) appear to be cleaner and carry much less waste into the bay.    

44


Figure  6.  Pellgu  i  Drinit.  Red  arrow  shows  where  Lumi  i  Ishmit  enters  Drinit  bay  at  Godull;  blue  arrow  indicates  predominant  wind‐direction (Maestrali).     The  beaches  near  to  Ishmit  are  heavily‐ polluted with, mostly, plastic waste.   

The  problems  and  impacts  of  anthropogenic  waste,  especially  of  plastics,  in  the  marine  environment  have been widely reported (e.g. Clark,  1997;  Goldberg,  1997);  and  several  authors  have  reported  on  the  interactions  between  turtles  and  pollutants  (e.g.  Fritts,  1982;  Balazs,  1985;  Gramentz,  1988;  Schulman  and  Lutz,  1995;  Godley  et  al.  1998,  1999;  Tomas  et  al.  2002;  Witherington  and  Hirama,  2006).    Of  particular  concern  were  the  findings  of  Stefatos  et  al.  (1999)  when  they  discovered  that  the  incidence  of  plastics  on  the  seafloor  was  far  greater  than  the  amount  of  surface‐borne debris encountered.    Recent experimental research by Thompson et al. (2004) showed that microscopic fragments  of  plastic  were  ingested  by  benthic  fauna:  amphipods  (detritivores),  lugworms  (deposit  feeders), and barnacles (filter feeders) within a few days; this would imply that plastics have  now  entered  the  global  food  chain,  although  the  long‐term  ecological  effects  are  not  yet  known.   

 

PHOTO 79: Left view is Godull beach looking north towards Patoku; right view shows some of  the plastic adjacent to the mouth of Lumi i Ishmit. 

45


PHOTO 80 Tales beach (right) and Vain (left) have much less plastic waste on them 

    Environmental  parameters:  SST  (Table  4)  and  air  temperature  (Table  5)  were  recorded  at  Patoku  every  day  unless  we  were  surveying  elsewhere;  final  records  were  taken  on  25th  September 2008. Prof Haxhiu had given the fishermen a thermometer to measure the SST at  Ishmit  stavnike;  however,  this  was  a  very  low  priority  for  them  and  was  usually  forgotten,  also  they  could  not  go  to  the  traps  in  poor  weather  conditions.  Throughout  the  research  period in 2008 (June‐September) the Mean SST was >24°C, so water temperature was not a  limiting factor for the presence of turtles in the foraging areas.       Table  4:  Sea  surface  temperature  (SST)  was  measured  daily  at  Patoku  field‐ station.  The  Mean  SST  was  >24°C  throughout  the  research  period  (June‐ September 2008).   

SST  June  July  August  September 

Mean  27.0  28.4  28.6  24.1 

SD  2.37  1.95  1.70  3.99 

Min  22.5  25.0  24.5  17.0 

Max  32.0  32.0  32.0  29.0 

Days  29  29  30  24 

  Table 5: Air temperature (°C) was measured daily at Patoku field‐station. The  Mean  air  temperature  was  >23°C  throughout  the  research  period  (June‐ September 2008).   

Air Temp  June  July  August  September 

Mean  26.2  26.9  27.0  23.0 

SD  3.61  2.52  1.87  3.60 

Min  20.4  20.9  24.2  18.4 

Max  32.0  31.1  31.9  29.0 

Days  29  29  30  24 

   

46


In  order  to  better  understand  when  turtles  are  present  in  Gjiri  i  Drinit,  which  may  be  throughout  the  year,  we  should  measure  the  SST  at  other  times  of  the  year.  This  could  be  achieved by Prof. Haxhiu & Enerit Saçdanaku being paid for a few days each month during the  winter, so that they could go to Patoku or Godull and monitor the monthly trend of seawater  temperature.  Such  visits  would  reinforce  our  connections  with  these  fishing  communities,  and allow incidental captures or encounters with turtles to be recorded.       

8.  CONSERVATION AND OUTREACH ACTIVITIES (2008 – 2010)    Conservation  and  educational  planning  during  the  project  were  led  by  Prue  Robinson  (MEDASSET).   

8.1. Capacity‐building and awareness‐raising activities    Students  from  Tirana  University  participated  in  fieldwork  at  Patoku  as  research  assistants.  Initially  two  biology  students  (Enerit  Saçdanaku  and  Lazion  Petritaj)  were  chosen  as  researchers, but the project had insufficient funds to sustain this arrangement (paying their  field‐allowance  and  food);  consequently  Enerit  Saçdanaku  worked  with  Dr.  White  for  over  three months.  

  PHOTO 82 :  Another group of biology students from    Tirana University    Biology  students  from  the  University  of  Tirana  visited  our  field‐station  at  Patoku  for  a  practical  demonstration  of  sea  turtle  handling,  morphometrics,  photo‐recognition  techniques,  and  lectures  on  biology,  ecology  and  the  presence  of  Caretta  caretta  at  Gjiri  i  Drinit.  Three  groups  of  students  attended  (50  on  the  3rd  of  June,  50  on  the  4th  June,  and  another 50 on the 21st of June, 2008). There was a useful teaching opportunity on the second  day,  when  a  juvenile  green  turtle  Chelonia  mydas  was  released  and  so  aspects  of  its 

PHOTO 81 : Biology students from Tirana  University on a field‐trip to Patoku 

 

47


morphology  and  behaviour  could  be  compared  with  those  of  loggerhead  turtles.  Media  coverage was available on all three days.     A  television  documentary  was  made  by  KOHA  television  (27/06/2008)  of  us  tagging  turtles  with  Matit  fishermen.  This  hour‐long  report  on  our  project,  produced  as  part  of  Koha’s  ‘Koordinatat’ series, included interviews with Dr. White, Prof. Haxhiu, Enerit Saçdanaku, and  Gjerj  Çal  (a  Matit  fisherman);  it  was  screened  on  Sunday  29th  of  June  and  repeated  on  6th  July.   

 

PHOTO 83 : KOHA TV filming our work with the Matit fishermen at Patoku 

  Koha/Klan TV filmed the Qarku of Lezhe presenting an award to Dr. Michael White at Patoku  for his services to Albania; this was subsequently shown on most major television networks  in  late‐September  2008.    SHQIP  Newspaper  published  a  two‐page  article  (Viti  III  –  Nr.  163  (813). E diel, 15 qershor 2008) about our work at Patoku and the visits by biology students  from Tirana University; it also highlighted the problem of terrestrial garbage at Godull, much  of which is transported there from Tirana via Lumi i Ishmit.              PHOTO 84   Top Channel filming our work at  Patoku field‐station 

           

48


PHOTO 85: Dr. White and Prof. Haxhiu with  the teachers from Orikum Middle School. 

PHOTO 86 : Prof. Haxhiu explaining about  our work at Orikum.

  Top Channel News produced a 15‐minute item about Patoku Lagoon, which included footage  of our work with sea turtles and fishermen, and an interview with Prof. Haxhiu (Screened on  19th July). They also filmed the release of the captive turtle from a hotel at Orikum, south of  Vlore.  Pupils  and  teachers  of  the  local  Middle  School  attended.  The  3‐minute  piece  was  shown twice (21st and 22nd September 2008).      Dissemination of the Project’s results to the scientific community     Dr.  White  made  the  opening  presentation  at  the  Third  International  Biology  Conference  at  Tirana  (26‐27th  September  2008;  Tirana  International  Hotel).  The  paper  (White  et  al.  2008)  will be published in the Journal of Natural Sciences/Buletini i Shkencave Natyrore (Annexe 7).  Dr. White also presented the Patoku research in the Management and Conservation section  (Abstract 2889) of the 3rd Mediterranean Conference on Marine Turtles (Hammamet, Tunisia)  in  October,  2008.  An  abstract  (Abstract  2936)  has  been  accepted  for  the  29th  Annual  Symposium  on  Sea  Turtle  Biology  and  Conservation  (Brisbane  17th‐19th  February  2009)  and  will be presented by Dr Michael White.    Feedback from peers    Scientists  in  the  global  sea  turtle  community  have  placed  considerable  importance  on  our  findings from Patoku (Gjiri i Drinit) this summer.     After  the  presentation  at  Tunisia,  Dr.  White  was  asked  by  scientists  from  Italy  and  Croatia  about  how  we  could  develop  collaborative  research  in  the  Adriatic  region;  migratory  sea  turtle  species  may  use  the  entire  Mediterranean,  as  well  as  more  remote  regions,  as  their  habitat.  Dr.  White  was  also  commended  by  the  IUCN  regional  vice‐chair  for  the   

49


Mediterranean  for  presenting  this  important  work  at  the  conference.  There  was  great  interest  from  Libyan,  Tunisian,  Maltese,  Turkish,  Cypriot,  Greek,  Spanish,  and  other  Italian  scientists about our research at Patoku, and particularly how genetic‐profiling might provide  the link between the foraging turtle population in the Adriatic and nesting populations in the  Eastern  Mediterranean  basin.  Mrs  Lily  Venizelos,  President  of  MEDASSET,  was  also  approached  by  numerous  other  scientists  and  sea  turtle  experts  about  developing  collaborative studies with Albania.     Turtle  research  in  some  Mediterranean  countries  has  been  underway  for  two  or  three  decades  (Italy,  Cyprus  and  Greece  in  particular;  Demetropoulos  and  Hadjichristophorou,  1995),  and  in  Croatia  since  about  1994.  In  contrast  when  we  look  at  Albania,  the  first  tags  were  applied  to  turtles  at  Godull  in  late‐2002.  Watching  presentations  by  our  scientific  colleagues at Hammamet shows that in terms of awareness there is a ‘black hole’ between  Greece and Croatia: turtles leave the Ionian and arrive near Slovenia; whereas it is obvious  that they have to traverse either Italian or Albanian waters enroute to the northern Adriatic  (Lazar, 1995; Lazar and Tvrtkovic, 1995; 1998; 2003; Lazar, Margaritoulis and Tvrtkovic, 2000;  2004; Lazar et al. 2004; Ziza et al. 2003).    PhD candidate    Merita  Rumano  works  for  the  Ministry  of  Environment,  and  her  PhD  thesis  now  has  to  be  relevant to her work, rather than just on sea turtles. The proposal is to make a study of the  Ishmit River (which brings the sewage effluent and garbage from Tirana into Gjiri i Drinit) and  its  impacts  upon  the  sea  turtle  foraging  grounds  in  our  study;  we  can  regard  this  as  complementary to our research.     

 

50


8.2. Research assistants at Patok for 2009    For  the  2009  Project,  training  more  students  would  further  improve  capacity‐building  outcomes.  To  do  this,  the  Project  would  have  to  pay  each  student  a  field‐allowance  (Leke  1000  per day, about €8) and provide food and  accommodation  at  Patoku  (Food  requires 1700 Leke per person/per day).  It is important to include students from  the  other  Albanian  Universities,  which  could  lead  to  the  establishment  of  research projects in other coastal areas,  such as Himare and Sarande in southern  Albania.  These  could  be  staffed  by  HAS  members  and  all  abiding  by  the  same  research protocols. 

               

 

PHOTO 87: Enerit  and Lazion, our two biology student  research assistants counting scutes on a loggerhead. 

 

  PHOTO 88: Geology students from Tirana University on  a field trip to Patoku. They came with us to measure  turtles from Matit stavnike.  

PHOTO 89: Enerit applying a rototag to a  loggerhead at Patoku 

     

 

51


8.3. The importance of Gjiri i Drinit    Our findings show that Gjiri i Drinit is an important summer foraging ground for sea turtles,  and may subsequently prove to be used as an overwintering area too; the benthos is rich in  small  invertebrates,  bivalves  and  crustacea.  The  bay  is  also  a  developmental  habitat  for  Caretta caretta, and occasionally Chelonia mydas; as  well  as providing a migratory corridor  for  marine  turtles.  Of  particular  importance  is  the  presence  of  adult  and  adolescent  male  loggerheads,  as  their  marine  ecology  is  poorly  understood.  Dolphins  (probably  Tursiops  truncatus)  are  resident  in  the  bay,  particularly  in  the  northern  areas:  they  have  been  reported to enter Lumi i Drinit during high water.    Patoku  Lagoon  was  observed  to  be  an  important  reproductive  habitat  for  different  fish  species  (fry  frequented  waters  as  shallow  as  1  cm).  Migratory  eels  Anguilla  anguilla  are  present in the lagoons, particularly during the spring and autumn.     Gjiri  i  Drinit  provides  important  artisanal  fishing  grounds,  which  are  utilised  by  local  communities, in an economically impoverished area of Albania. Therefore it is essential that  any  legislation  enacted  to  protect  this  sensitive  environment  should  include  permission  for  fishing  activities  to  take  place,  even  if  some  form  of  zoning  were  to  established.  A  determined effort  should  be  made  to  eradicate  dynamite‐fishing:  the  Lezhe  authorities  are  currently investigating this matter (Bardh Rica, pers. com.).    Patoku,  Kune,  and  Vain  Lagoons  are important habitats for birds;  the  Patoku  lagoons  support  a  rich  variety  of  birds,  some  apparently  resident  (e.g.  Kingfisher  Alcedo  atthis;  Little  Egret  Egretta  garzetta),  and  others  migratory  (Greater  Flamingo  Phoenicopterus  ruber;  Great  White  Egret  Egretta  alba;  Cormorant  Phalocrocorax  carbo). Swallows Hirundo rustica  were  observed  to  build  nests  using  the  mud  from  the  foreshore  by  our  field‐station;  PHOTO 90: Little Egret Egretta garzetta they reproduced successfully.   Note: bird species were identified using Jonsson (1996).    The  Golden  Jackal  Canis  aureus  was  often  heard  in  the  area,  but  never  encountered.  It  is  possible that otters Lutra lutra also use the Patoku area for foraging, as mounted specimens  (i.e. ‘stuffed’) were seen in a nearby restaurant. 

 

52


8.4. The importance of working with the local fishing communities    In the summer of 2008 most of our turtles came from fisheries (>99%), hence it is imperative  that we maintain an excellent relationship with the various fishermen.   

  PHOTO 91: Ishmit fishermen unloading catch at our Patoku base.

PHOTO 92: Loggerheads caught in Matit stavnike in  June 2008. 

  The fishing communities are also a vital audience for environmental education. One example  was  when  fishing  activities  changed  in  August:  barrier‐nets  (pinar)  were  erected  in  the  lagoons  at  Patoku,  mostly  to  catch  eels  –  the  fishermen  at  Godull  criticised  these  pinar,  as  they  believe  that  these  small‐mesh  nets  kill  many  of  the  newly‐spawned  fish,  or  prevent  them from leaving the lagoons and reaching the sea (Bearzi et al. 2006). This is viewed locally  as a reason for falling fish catches; despite declining fish stocks being a global problem. We  know  that  dynamite  is  used  in  the  Godull  area  (Annexe  2),  but  it  is  a  major  challenge  to  persuade  this  isolated  community  that  dynamite  has  a  severe  impact  on  their  shallow  ecosystem. 

     

PHOTO 93 & 94: Local fishermen helping us to remove barnacles from turtles prior to release. 

53


When the mrezh‐fishermen at Godull find crabs in their net, i.e. every day, they smash the  crustaceans to pieces, as it takes too long to remove them individually by hand; Prof Haxhiu  has been telling them for years that this is a problem.    

An  important  educational  goal  for  the  next  research  period  is  to  teach  local  fishermen  to  identify  green  turtles  Chelonia  mydas  (Lazar  et  al.  2004)  and  leatherbacks  Dermochelys  coriacea (Casale et al. 2003), so that we can develop a better understanding of the marine  distribution  and  habitat  use  of  turtles  in  the  Adriatic  Sea.  It  seems  possible  that  pelagic  turtles  utilise  the  north‐bound  currents  that  flow  along  the  eastern  border  of  the  Adriatic  (Orlic et al. 1992). 

  PHOTO 96: A Matit fisherman releases    an adult male loggerhead for Patoku.  

PHOTO 97: Ilir at Godull with us; he could be  the caretaker of a holding‐tank for turtles 

PHOTO 95: Locals from Patoku helping with  a stranded loggerhead; it kept getting stuck  in the shallow area on a very hot day 

PHOTO 98: Godull/ Droja fishing community

     

54


8.5. Other monitoring activities    Stavnikes at Ishmit and Matit were dismantled at the end of July after suffering severe storm‐ damage; the fishermen decided that it wasn’t worth the cost of rebuilding the fish‐traps this  year. The focus of our research shifted and we took the opportunity to survey other coastal  areas,  interviewing  fishermen  elsewhere.  Field‐trips  were  made  to  Divjake  and  Karavastres  Lagoon; where turtles have also been captured in fishing gear.     We discovered that the restaurant on Patoku’s barrier island has a loggerhead in a small pool  there; we are still negotiating for its release.   

A Shengjini trawler captain was interviewed at Kune Lagoon: apparently many of the trawlers  have  been  replaced  in  the  past  two  years.  When  we  conducted  our  rapid  coastal  survey  assessment in 2005 (White et al. 2006), most of the Shengjini boats used for fishing appeared  to be unseaworthy.    

PHOTO 99 : Restaurant on Patoku’s barrier  island; Kepi i Rodonit is in the background 

PHOTO 100 : Alexander, a trawler captain, with  Prof. Haxhiu and Enerit at Kune 

 

8.6. Collaboration with other research organisations    Ocean sunfish Mola mola   Dr. White sent the following information to Dr Tierney Thys who subsequently posted it, and  photographs, onto his website at: www.oceansunfish.org/sightings      “I  thought  you  may  be  interested  to  hear  about  two  captures  of  ocean  sunfish  that  I  observed in the Adriatic Sea recently. Both animals were caught in fish‐traps and were dead  when I saw them a couple of hours after capture. I’m studying sea turtles at Patoku Lagoon in  northern Albania and work closely with several groups of local fishermen. What surprised me  was  that  they  were  in  such  shallow  water,  especially  the  larger  fish;  the  sea  water   

55


temperature is around 26°C at present. The habitat is sandy substratum rich in bivalves and  crabs. The GPS [WGS84] coordinates have been included for you too.    The first sunfish was caught on Monday 30th June 2008: weight 42 kg; straight‐line distance  fin‐tip  to  fin‐tip  was  1.28  m;  overall  straight‐line  length  1.02  m.  Ishmit  trap  location:  [N41°  36.198; E019° 33.349] water depth 6.0 metres. (This group of fishermen had caught a Mola  mola in 2002, weight 80 kg).    The second was caught on Sunday 6th July 2008: weight 300 kg; straight‐line distance fin‐tip  to fin‐tip was 2.03 m; overall straight‐line length 1.62 m.  Matit trap location: [N41° 38.512;  E019° 34.126] water depth 5.5 metres. (This was the first sunfish that these fishermen had  ever seen or heard of).    Albanian (Shqip) name is:  “peshk hënë” moon fish, or “peshk lepur” rabbit fish  I  hope  that  these  sightings  help  you  in  your  work;  my  understanding  is  that  the  status  of  Mola mola is yet to be evaluated.”     

9. PROJECT MANAGEMENT    The Project Management was carried out by MEDASSET. All fund raising was also carried out  by  MEDASSET.  This  section  outlines  the  funding  difficulties  that  limited  the  initial  scope  of  the  project  (reducing  the  number  of  activities  that  were  initially  planned  before  receiving  confirmation  of  the  final  budgets  approved  by  RAC/SPA  and  GEF/SGP),  as  well  as  the  solutions  that  were  employed  so  that  the  research  could  be  executed  successfully.  In  addition, an account is provided with regard to the contribution of the partners involved     The total Project Budget was 38.593,74 EUR 

  9.1. Funding     Finance had been promised by different donors, but funds were very slow to materialise. We  decided  to  start  the  fieldwork  almost  unfunded,  as  the  natural  world  does  not  wait  for  bureaucracy to resolve its difficulties (Anecdotal evidence suggested that >100 loggerheads  had  been  captured  between  April  and  mid‐June  in  the  Matit  stavnike  alone).  MEDASSET  provided the initial funding, enabling Dr. White to travel to Albania and begin research; they  also  paid  for  the  project  car.  RAC/SPA  supported  the  opening  phase  of  study;  then  UNDP  (GEF/SGP) continued with a substantial contribution towards the ongoing costs.     The initial shortage of cash meant that everyone had to take us on trust that we would pay  the accommodation rent and food bills, whenever funds were credited to our accounts. The  issue of which budget‐component the room rental & food costs should be drawn from was 

 

56


only resolved on the 15th July (Dr. White & Prof. Haxhiu had used their own money to cover  the costs for June: €700 rent & Leke 103940 food [€866]).     The funding process per donor is described below in further detail.    9.1.1. Regional Activity Centre for Specially protected Areas (RAC/SPA)  Contribution 3000 EUROS    RAC/SPA granted 3.000 Euros towards the project activities.    9.1.2. Global Environment Facility’s Small Grant Programme (GEF/SGP)  Contribution:  25.871 US Dollars    GEF/SGP  contributed  25.871  US  Dollars  towards  the  project.  The  fundraising  was  geared  from MEDASSET and the budget was transferred to ECAT because only an Albanian NGO was  eligible to receive funding from GEF/SGP.  The  funding  was  granted  to  ECAT  in  4  stages:  30%  on  an  MOU  being  signed  between  GEF/SGP and ECAT; 30% when 1st progress report received; 30% on 2nd progress report; and  the  final  10%  when  the  annual  report  and  ECAT’s  certificate  of  expenditure  have  been  delivered to GEF/SGP.  Due  to  lengthy  bureaucratic  processes  the  first  GEF/SGP  instalment  was  not  paid  to  ECAT  until the 15th/16th July 2008.  A progress meeting (Dr. White ‐ MEDASSET, Prof. Haxhiui‐ HAS, Mr. Gace ‐GEF/SGP, and Mrs.  Marieta  Mima  ‐  ECAT)  was  held  on  the  15th  July  2008  at  Patoku  to  discuss  our  financial  situation; fieldwork had been underway for almost seven weeks. It was clear that our initial  budget  had  been  under‐estimated,  notably  as  we  discovered  we  had  to  pay  fishermen  for  captured  turtles;  this  had  not  been  included  in  our  budget,  which  had  been  based  on  our  previous research programmes in other countries.  The Patoku field‐staff calculated a new budget to reflect the actual situation in the field; and  Dr. White wrote a covering letter to MEDASSET justifying all the points. This revised budget  (Annexe  8)  should  form  the  basis  of  future  fund‐raising  endeavours  for  the  project’s  fieldwork  in  Albania.  A  voucher  system  was  designed  and  instigated  for  casual  payments  (rent, student’s allowance etc.) to satisfy ECAT’s accounting needs.     

 

57


9.1.3. Mediterranean Association to Save the Sea Turtles – MEDASSET GR and UK  Contribution: 17.956,63 EUROS    MEDASSET mitigated for the delay in the transfer of funds from other donors by initiating the  project with MEDASSET funds. MEDASSET worked hard to try and secure additional funds to  cover the budget shortfall. In July the Project manager suggested that the project might need  to finish early through lack of funds, however, we pushed beyond this point and continued  our  research  until  the  end  of  September;  thus  achieving  our  project  aims.  The  funding  shortfall meant that our capacity‐building endeavours were constrained, in particular that we  could only  afford to  have one student‐researcher working on the  project instead of two or  three (food costs and daily field allowance). There were six students from Tirana University  that  wanted  to  come  to  Patoku  to  conduct  research  projects,  but  there  was  no  money  available  to  support  them.  Some  project  activities  that  were  not  considered  of  highest  priority were not realised (eg: Turtle tanks).  MEDASSET‐UK  made  a  most  welcome  financial  contribution  to  our  project  in  September,  which allowed us to complete the 2008 field‐season, settle all bills, and pay Dr. White’s flight  home to Italy.      

10. CONCLUSIONS    The  research  project  at  Patoku  in  2008  should  be  regarded  as  highly  successful,  and  our  sincere thanks go to all of the project partners and funding organisations for their support.  All  the  Workplan  (WP)  research  aims  and  objectives  were  achieved  at  Patoku,  as  were  MEDASSET’s conservation objectives.    Project  outreach  activities  were  considerable:  we  facilitated  three  field‐trips  for  biology  students  from  Tirana  University,  our  project  was  included  in  seven  television  programmes  (June‐September 2008),  a SHQIP newspaper article, and Dr. White has already presented the  Patoku research to the international sea turtle community; and we have a scientific paper ‘in  press’.    We  have  created  an  opportunity  for  collaborative  research  activities  and  a  conservation  programme  to  be  established  in  the  Adriatic  region,  working  with  Croatian  and  Italian  colleagues. We seek to build an Education Centre at Patoku Lagoon, which can train future  generations of Albanian marine researchers.    The  project  went  far  beyond  its  original  concept  and  it  seems  that  we  have  initiated  what  may  become  a  realistic  and  sustainable  venture  in  Albania;  which  is  capable  of  making  an  important contribution to the Mediterranean’s regional programme for the conservation of  marine turtles.        

58


11. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE YEARS AT PATOKU    Godull:   There is a small fishing community in this area near Droja and Ishmit rivers (south of Patoku);  the  people  were  most  welcoming  and  we  built  up  a  good  relationship  with  several  of  the  fishermen and their families. The area is very poor and has no infrastructure (no electricity or  water  supplies);  the  houses  are  rough  constructions  of  wood,  plastic  and  tarpaulins.  There  are many sea turtles using this shallow nearshore habitat; and it was the place where Prof.  Idriz  Haxhiu  began  his  work  with  local  fishermen  in  2002.  The  fishermen  catch  turtles  as  bycatch in their nets (mrezh); and dynamite‐fishing regularly occurs here too. Therefore we  should try and monitor the bycatch at Godull, but it poses some challenges:    i) The fishermen would be  willing to bring  turtles to Patoku, but we would have to pay for  benzene.  The problem with this is that we might end up with many fishermen individually  transporting turtles to us and so it may be difficult to calculate a realistic budget outlay on  this basis.   ii) We  could  construct a tank  at Godull where turtles  could  be kept for a  short period, and  researchers  go  over  from  Patoku  every  2‐3  days  to  measure,  photograph,  tag,  and  release  the animals. There are beach‐users here too, although the beach is covered in plastic garbage  and  Tirana’s  sewage  enters  Gjiri  i  Drinit  via  the  Ishmit;  so  it  provides  an  educational  opportunity.    iii) If we had a tank at Godull it would be necessary to pay someone a small salary to act as  the caretaker; and to distribute funds, or T‐shirts, to the local fishermen in return for bringing  us turtles.  We have identified a possible custodian (Ilir), who has assisted us voluntarily on  several occasions in 2008, and he has also helped Prof. Haxhiu to tag turtles over the last five  years.  iv)  Another  option  would  be  to  have  a  student  researcher  based  there.  However,  because  facilities are almost nonexistent at Godull we would probably have to change students there  every  three  days  (they  can  use  Patoku  as  their  base).  Excellent  food  is  available  at  Godull;  one of the fishermen (Seferi) has a small restaurant.    We may be able to find a solution using some combination of these ideas, but our research  would be improved by including the bycatch from Godull. During a visit there in August one  fishermen had caught and released six loggerheads in his net that morning (at‐sea encounter  X012; Annexe 3).                   

 

 

59


12. PHASE II ‐ THE 2009 PROJECT   

The  main  aim  of  the  2009  project  is  to  highlight  the  importance  of  the  sea  turtle  feeding  grounds  in  the  region;  improve  sea  turtle  and  biodiversity  conservation;  and  to  better  manage the area’s marine natural resources (e.g. fisheries), as well as improving our limited  knowledge of the Mediterranean.  Specific objectives:  •

• • • • •

To continue the development and implementation of the sea turtle research programme  in the broader Patok area (population estimates, tagging, measuring carapace, recording  age and physical conditions, DNA profiling, Satellite tracking). Fish traps (stavnike) will be  monitored  on  a  daily  basis  (June  ‐  September).  Record  the  distribution  of  sea  turtles,  geographically and temporally (including overwintering data) and relate these to physical  parameters.  To continue the development and implementation of the public awareness programme in  the broader Patok area. Develop demonstration activities at this important site through  awareness‐raising, training and networking of stakeholder groups.  To  improve  the  ability  of  government  bodies,  university  students  and  NGOs  to  ensure  environmental  sustainability  and  capacity  building.  Improve  the  capacity  of  Albanian  scientists to monitor the marine turtle population in local waters.  To reduce fisheries bycatch, destructive fishing practices and over‐fishing.  Establish an Education Center at Patok.  Elaborate a collaborative research proposal for sea turtles in the Adriatic region 

  WORK PACKAGES have been created in order to meet the project objectives:  WORK PACKAGE 1 – Project Management   WORK PACKAGE 2 ‐ Field Work   WORK PACKAGE 3 – Satellite Tracking (new component)  WORK PACKAGE 4 – DNA Profiling (new component)  WORK PACKAGE 5 – Capacity Building  WORK PACKAGE 6 – Education Centre (Independent project component)3  WORK PACKAGE 7 – Education and Awareness  WORK PACKAGE 8 – Dissemination of Results                                                               3

 This project component is independent to the rest of the project, so that any finances required by the  education centre do not impact upon our ability to realise the other work packages. 

 

60


13. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS     The Patoku  project  would  like  to  thank  Lily  Venizelos (President  of MEDASSET),  Arian  Gace  (GEF/SGP),  Atef  Ouerghi  (RAC/SPA),  and  Merita  Rumano,  Fundime  Osmani  and  Blerina  Vrenozi.    Also  our  thanks  go  to  MEDASSET,  MEDASSET  (UK),  UNDP  (GEF/SGP)  and  (RAC/SPA)  for  providing funding for this work; and to Marieta Mima (ECAT) for administering the GEF/SGP  budget on behalf of UNDP.    Special thanks go to:   The Prime Minister Sali Berisha and the Ministry of Environment  Patoku: Rakip & Ladja and the staff at ‘Brilant’ (Alma, Armir; Sokal the chef); the Patoku and  Matit fishermen.  Godull: Seferi and family, Ilir  Shengjini: Çesku and Alexander.  Alphabank: Nevi Camovic and colleagues  Lezhe: Qarku Bardh Rica and the councillors of Lezhe region  Tirana: Staff and students of Tirana University & Museum of Natural Sciences; HAS members;  Top Channel News, KOHA & KLAN TV, and Shqip newspaper.  Lastly: to all of those people that we met, spoke with, or shared experiences with … 

  Thank you!   

 

 

61


14. BIBLIOGRAPHY   

1. Action plan for the conservation of Mediterranean marine turtles. Adopted (in 1999)  within the framework of the Barcelona Convention for the protection of the marine  environment and the coastal region of the Mediterranean (1976). Produced by the  Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas, Tunis (UNEP‐MAP).    2. Argano, R., R. Basso, M. Cocco and G. Gerosa.  (1992). New data on loggerhead (Caretta  caretta) movements within the Mediterranean.  Bollettino del Museo dell Istituto di  Biologia dell’ Universita di Genova 56‐57: 137‐163.    3. Balazs, G. H.  (1985). Impact of ocean debris on marine turtles. In: Proceedings of the  Workshop on the Fate and Impact of Marine Debris. Shomura, R. S. and M. L. Godfrey  (Editors).      4. Balazs, G. H.  (1999).  Factors to consider in the tagging of sea turtles. Pp. 101‐109. In:  Eckert, K. L., K. A. Bjorndal, F. A. Abreu‐Grobois and M. Donnelly, (Editors). (1999).     5. Research and management techniques for the conservation of sea turtles. IUCN/SSC  Marine Turtle Specialist Group Publication No. 4.  235pp.    6. Bearzi G., E. Politi, S. Agazzi and A. Azzellino. (2006). Prey depletion caused by overfishing  and the decline of marine megafauna in eastern Ionian Sea coastal waters (central  Mediterranean). Biological Conservation 127(4):373‐382.    7. Bennett, P. and U. Keuper‐Bennett. (2004). The use of subjective patterns in green turtle  profiles to find matches in an image database. Pp. 115‐116. In: Coyne, M. S. and R. D.  Clark, compilers.  (2004).     8. Proceedings of the Twenty‐First Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and  Conservation.  NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐528, 368 pp.    9. Bentivegna, F., P. Breber and S. Hochscheid.  (2002).  Cold stunned loggerhead turtles in  the South Adriatic Sea.  Marine Turtle Newsletter 97: 1‐3.    10. Bjorndal, K. A. (1999).  Priorities for research in foraging habitats.  Pp. 12‐14.  In: In:  Eckert, K. L.; K. A. Bjorndal; F. A. Abreu‐Grobois and M. Donnelly (Editors). (1999).     11. Research and management techniques for the conservation of sea turtles. IUCN/SSC  Marine Turtle Specialist Group Publication No. 4. 235pp.    12. Bolten, A. B. (2003a). Variation in sea turtle life history patterns: Neritic vs. Oceanic  developmental stages. Pp. 243‐257.  In: Lutz, P. L.; J. A. Musick and J. Wyneken. (Editors).  (2003).    

62


13. The biology of sea turtles, Volume II. CRC Press. Boca Raton. 455pp.    14. Bolten, A. B. and G. H. Balazs. (1982). Biology of the early pelagic phase – the “lost year”.   Pp. 579‐581. In: Bjorndal, K. (Editor). The Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles.  Smithsonian Institution Press. Washington D. C.  615pp.    15. Bolten, A. B., K. A. Bjorndal, J. R. Martins, T. Dellinger, M. J. Biscoito, S. E. Encalada and B.  W. Bowen.  (1998). Transatlantic developmental migrations of loggerhead sea turtles  demonstrated by mtDNA sequence analysis.  Ecological Applications 8: 1‐7.    16. Bolten, A. B., H. R, Martins, K. A. Bjorndal, M. Cocco and G. Gerosa.  (1992). Caretta  caretta (loggerhead): Pelagic movement and growth.  Herpetological Review 23: 116.     17. Bolten, A. B., A. R. Martins, K. A. Bjorndal and J. Gordon.  (1993). Size distribution of  pelagic‐stage loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the waters around the Azores  and Madeira. Arquipelago, Life and Marine Sciences 11A: 49‐54.    18. Bonn Convention.  (1979).  The Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory  Species of Wild Animals (CMS).    19. Bowen, B. W., J. C. Avise, J. I. Richardson, A. B. Meylan, D. Margaritoulis and S. R.  Hopkins‐Murphy.  (1993). Population structure of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in  the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.  Conservation Biology 7: 834.    20. Bowen, B. W., F. A. Abreu‐Grobois, G. H. Balazs, N. Kamezaki, C. J. Limpus and R. J. Ferl.   (1995). Trans‐Pacific migrations of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) demonstrated  with mitochondrial DNA markers.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 92:  3731.    21. Broderick, A. C., M. S. Coyne, F. Glen, W. J. Fuller and B. J. Godley. (2006). Foraging site  fidelity of adult green and loggerhead turtles. Pp. 83. In: Frick, M., A. Panagopoulou, A. F.  Rees and K. Williams (compilers).     22. Book of Abstracts, Twenty‐Sixth Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and  Conservation.  International Sea Turtle Society, Athens, Greece.  376 pp.    23. Bustard, H. R. and C. J. Limpus. (1970). First international recapture of an Australian  tagged loggerhead turtle. Herpetologica 26: 358‐359.    24. Carr, A., L. Ogren and C. McVea. (1980). Apparent hibernation by the Atlantic loggerhead  turtle Caretta caretta off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Biological Conservation 19:7‐14.   

 

63


25. Casale, P., P. Nicolosi, D. Freggi, M. Turchetto and R. Argano, (2003). Leatherback turtles  (Dermochelys coriacea) in Italy and in the Mediterranean basin. Herpetological journal  13: 135‐139.    26. CITES. (1973). The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild  Fauna and Flora.    27. Clark, R. B. (1997).  Marine Pollution (Fourth Edition).  Clarendon Press, Oxford.  Pp.161.    28. Davenport, J. (1989). Sea turtles and the Greenhouse Effect. British Herpetological  Society Bulletin 29: 11‐15.    29. Demetropoulos, A. and M. Hadjichristophorou.  (1995). Manual on Marine Turtle  Conservation in the Mediterranean.  UNEP (MAP) SPA/IUCN/CWS/Fisheries Department,  MANRE (Cyprus).    30. Dodd, C. K.  (1988).  Synopsis of the biological data on the loggerhead sea turtle Caretta  caretta (Linnaeus 1758).  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Biological report 88(14).  Pp.110.    31. Eckert, K. L., K. A. Bjorndal, F. A. Abreu‐Grobois and M. Donnelly, (Editors).  (1999).  Research and management techniques for the conservation of sea turtles. IUCN/SSC  Marine Turtle Specialist Group Publication No. 4.   235pp.    32. Felger, R. S., K. Cliffton and P. J. Regal. (1976). Winter dormancy in sea turtles:  independent discovery and exploitation in the Gulf of California by two local cultures.  Science 191: 283‐284.    33. Fitzsimmons, N. N.  (1996). Use of microsatellite loci to investigate multiple paternity in  marine turtles. Pp. 69‐77. In: Bowen, B. W. and W. N. Witzell (Editors).     34. Frazer, N. B. and F. J.  Schwartz. (1984). Growth curves for captive loggerhead turtles,  Caretta caretta, in North Carolina, USA. Bulletin of Marine Science.  34: 485‐489.     35. Fritts, T. H.  (1982). Plastic bags in the intestinal tracts of leatherback marine turtles.  Herpetological Review 13(3): 72‐73.    36. Geldiay, R., T. Koray, and S. Balik.  (1982). Status of sea turtle populations (Caretta c.  caretta and Chelonia m. mydas) in the Mediterranean Sea, Turkey. Pp. 425‐434. In:  Bjorndal, K. (Editor).     37. Godley, B. J., M. J. Gaywood, R. J. Law, C. J. McCarthy, C. McKenzie, I. A. P. Patterson, R. S.  Penrose, R. J. Reid, and H. M. Ross. (1998). Patterns of marine turtle mortality in British  Waters (1992‐1996) with reference to tissue contaminant levels. Journal of the Marine  Biological Association U. K. 78:973‐984.     

64


38. Godley, B. J., A. C. Gucu, A. C. Broderick, R. W. Furness and S. E. Solomon. (1998b).  Interaction between marine turtles and artisanal fisheries in the eastern Mediterranean:  a probable cause for concern. Zoology in the Middle East 16: 49‐64.    39. Godley, B. J., D. R. Thompson and R. W. Furness.  (1999).  Do heavy metal concentrations  pose a threat to marine turtles from the Mediterranean Sea?  Marine Pollution Bulletin  38(6): 497‐502.    40. Goldberg, E. D.  (1997).  Plasticizing the sea floor: An overview.  Environmental  Technology Volume 18:195‐202.    41. Gramentz, D. (1988). Involvement of loggerhead turtles with the plastic, metal, and  hydrocarbon pollution in the central Mediterranean. Marine Pollution Bulletin 19: 11‐13.    42. Green, D. (2000). Mating behaviour in Galapagos green turtles. Pp. 3‐5. In: Kalb, H. J. and  T. Wibbels, compilers. (2000).     43. Groombridge, B. (1990). Marine turtles in the Mediterranean: Distribution, population  status, conservation. A report to the Council of Europe, Environment and Management  Division. Nature and Environment Series, Number 48. Strasbourg 1990.    44. Habitats Directive. (1992). The Council Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats  and of Wild Fauna and Flora (92/43/EEC).    45. Jonsson, L.  (1996).  Birds of Europe.  Christopher Helm (Publishers) Ltd. London.  Pp. 559.    46. Laurent, L. (1998b). Conservation Management of Mediterranean loggerhead sea turtle  Caretta caretta populations. Scientific basis for establishing a marine turtle conservation  strategy for the Mediterranean. Report on WWF International Project 9E0103, WWF  International Mediterranean Programme, Rome.    47. Lazar, B. (1995). Analysis of incidental catch of marine turtles (Reptilia, Cheloniidae) in the  eastern part of the Adriatic Sea:  Existence of over winter areas? Ekologija.  Pp. 96‐97. In:   Proceedings of Abstracts of a Symposium in Honour of Zdravko Lorkovic.  N. Ljubesic  (Editor), Zagreb.    48. Lazar, B., D. Margaritoulis and N. Tvrtkovic. (2000). Migrations of the loggerhead sea  turtle Caretta caretta into the Adriatic Sea. Pp 101‐102. In: Abreu‐Grobois, F. A., R.  Briseno‐Duenas, R. Marquez and L. Sarti, compilers. (2000).     49. Lazar, B., D. Margaritoulis and N. Tvrtkovic. (2004). Tag recoveries of the loggerhead sea  turtle Caretta caretta in the eastern Adriatic Sea: implications for conservation. Journal of  the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom (2004) 84: 475‐480.   

 

65


50. Lazar, B. and N. Tvrtkovic. (1995). Marine turtles in the eastern part of the Adriatic Sea:  preliminary research. Natura Croatica 4(1): 59‐74.    51. Lazar, B. and N. Tvrtkovic. (1998). Status of marine turtles in Croatia. Report on the  implementation of the action plan for the conservation of Mediterranean marine turtles.  UNEP(OCA)/MED WG.145/4.    52. Lazar, B. and N. Tvrtkovic.  (2003). Corroboration of the critical habitat hypothesis for the  loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta in the eastern Adriatic Sea. Pp. 165‐169.     53. Lazar, B.; P. Casale; N. Tvrtkovic; V. Kozul; P. Tutman and N. Glavic. (2004). The presence  of the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, in the Adriatic Sea. Herpetological Journal 14:  147‐147.    54. Limpus, C. J. and D. J. Limpus. (2003). Biology of the loggerhead turtle in Western South  Pacific Ocean foraging areas. Pp. 93‐113. In: Bolten, A. B. and B. E. Witherington (Editors)  Loggerhead sea turtles. Smithsonian Books, Washington. Pp. 319.    55. Limpus, C. J., P. J. Couper and M. A. Read. (1994a). The loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta  in Queensland: Population structure in a warm temperate feeding area. Memoirs of the  Queensland Museum 37: 195‐204.    56. Margaritoulis, D. and A. Demetropoulos (Editors). Proceedings of the First Mediterranean  Conference on Marine Turtles. Barcelona Convention – Bern Convention – Bonn  Convention (CMS). Nicosia, Cyprus. 270pp.    57. Margaritoulis, D. (1988c). Post‐nesting movements of loggerhead sea turtles tagged in  Greece.  Rapports et Procès‐verbaux des Réunions. Commission Internationale pour  l’Exploration Scientifique de la Mer Méditerranée 31(2): 283‐284.    58. Margaritoulis, D., R. Argano, I. Baran, F. Bentivegna, M. N. Bradai, J. A. Caminas, P. Casale,  G. de Metrio,  A. Demetropoulos, G. Gerosa, B. J. Godley, D. A. Haddoud, J. Houghton, L.  Laurent and B. Lazar. (2003). Loggerhead turtles in the Mediterranean Sea: Present  knowledge and conservation perspectives. Pp. 175‐198. In: Bolten, A. B. and B. E.  Witherington (Editors). Loggerhead sea turtles.  Smithsonian Books, Washington. Pp. 319.    59. Marquez, M. R.  (1990).  FAO Species Catalogue.  Volume 11: Sea Turtles of the World. An  annotated and illustrated catalogue of sea turtle species known to date.  FAO Fisheries  Synopsis 125(11).  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Rome.  81pp.    60. Miller, J. D. (1997).  Reproduction in sea turtles. Pp. 51‐81. In: Lutz, P. L. and J. A. Musick  (Editors). The biology of sea turtles.  CRC Press Inc, Boca Raton, Florida.  Pp. 432.    61. Miller. P. J. and M. J. Loates. (1997). Collins Pocket Guide, Fish of Britain and Europe.  HarperCollins Publishers, London. 288pp.   

66


62. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SWFC‐54.  580 pp.  Honolulu, Hawaii.    63. Ogren, L. and C. Jr. McVea.  (1995). Apparent hibernation by sea turtles in North  American waters. Pp. 127‐132. In: Biology and conservation of sea turtles (Ed. K. A.  Bjorndal), Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington and London. Pp 615.    64. Orlic, M., M. Gacic and P. E. La Violette. (1992). The currents and circulation of the  Adriatic sea. Oceanologica Acta 15: 109‐124.    65. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Sea Turtle Conservation Genetics. NOAA  Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐396.    66. Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation.  NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐436     67. Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and  Conservation. U.S. Department of Commerce. NOAA Technical Memorandum. NMFS‐ SEFSC‐443. Pp.291.    68. Rakaj, N.  (1995).  Iktiofauna e Shqiperise.  Shtëpia Botuese “Libri Universituar”, Tiranë.   700pp.    69. RDS (2005). Regional Development Strategy, Millennium Development Goals: Lezha  Region. Regional Environmental Centre, Albania 107pp. http://www.undp.org.al    70. REAP (2006). Regional Environmental Action Plan: Drini River Delta Shkodra‐Lezhe.  Regional Environmental Centre, Albania 94pp. http://albania.rec.org    71. Scandiaconsult Natura AB and The Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern  Europe, Strategic Environmental Analysis Of Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo And  Macedonia, July 2000    72. Schulman, A. A. and P. L. Lutz.  (1995). The effect of plastic ingestion on lipid metabolism  in the Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas). Pp: 122‐124. In: Richardson, J.I. and T. H.  Richardson (Compilers). (1995). Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Workshop on Sea  Turtle Biology and Conservation.  NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐361,  Pp.274.    73. Stefatos, A., M. Charalampakis, G. Papatheodorou and G. Ferentinos. (1999). Marine  debris on the seafloor of the Mediterranean Sea: Examples from two enclosed gulfs in  Western Greece. Marine Pollution Bulletin 36(5): 389‐393.    74. Suggett, D. J. and J. D. R. Houghton. (1998). Possible Link Between Sea Turtle Bycatch and  Flipper Tagging in Greece. MTN 81: 10‐11.   

67


75. Thompson, R. C., Y. Olsen, R. P. Mitchell, A. Davis, S. J. Rowland, A. W. G. John, D.  McGonigle and A. E. Russell. (2004). Lost at sea: Where is all the plastic? Science 304:  838.    76. Tomas, J., R. Guitart, R. Mateo and J. A. Raga.  (2002). Marine debris ingestion in  loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, from the Western Mediterranean. Marine  Pollution Bulletin 44: 211‐216.    77. The Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles. Smithsonian Institution Press. Washington  D. C.  615pp.    78. White, M. G.  (2007). Marine ecology of loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta (Linnaeus,  1758) in the Ionian Sea: Observations from Kefalonia and Lampedusa. Ph.D. Thesis,  University College Cork, Ireland. 300pp.    79. White, M., I. Haxhiu, V. Kouroutos, A. Gace, A. Vaso, S. Beqiraj and A. Plytas. (2006). Rapid  assessment survey of important marine turtle and monk seal habitats in the coastal area  of Albania, October‐November 2005. (Available from www.MEDASSET.org).    80. White, M., I. Haxhiu, E. Saçdanaku, L. Petritaj, M. Rumano, F. Osmani, B. Vrenozi, P.  Robinson, S. Kouris and L. Venizelos. (2008). In press. Monitoring stavnike fish‐traps and  sea turtle bycatch at Patoku, Albania. Journal of Natural Sciences/Buletini i Shkencave  Natyrore, December, 2008.    81. Witherington, B. E. and L. Ehrhart. (1989). Hypothermic stunning and mortality of marine  turtles in the Indian River lagoon system, Florida.  Copeia 1989: 696‐703.    82. Witherington, B. E. and S. Hirama. (2006). Little loggerheads packed with pelagic plastic.  Pp. 137‐138.  In: Pilcher, N. J., Compiler (2006).  Proceedings of the Twenty‐Third Annual  Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation.  NOAA Technical Memorandum  NMFS‐SEFSC‐536, 261 pp.    83. Wyneken, J. (2001). The anatomy of sea turtles. U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA  Technical Memorandum NMFS‐SEFSC‐470, 172pp.    84. Yntema, C. L. and N. Mrosovsky. (1980). Sexual differentiation in hatchling loggerheads  incubated at different controlled temperatures. Herpetologica 36: 33‐36.    85. Ziza, V., Z. Marencic, R. Turk and L. Lipej.  (2003).  First data on the loggerhead turtle  Caretta caretta in Slovenia (North Adriatic).  Pp. 261‐264.  In: Margaritoulis, D. and A.  Demetropoulos (Editors).  Proceedings of the First Mediterranean Conference on Marine  Turtles.  Barcelona Convention – Bern Convention – Bonn Convention (CMS).  Nicosia,  Cyprus.  270pp. 

 

68


15. ANNEXES   

1) GPS co-ordinates (WGS 84) for important features in the Patoku / Gjiri i Drinit study area. 2) Dynamite usage. 3) At-sea and incidental encounters with turtles. 4) Detailed Workplan Objectives for the Patoku Project. 5) Fish species identified at (or known from) Patoku. 6) Commendation presented to Dr. White by the Qarku and Councillors of Lezhe. 7) Paper in press: “Monitoring Stavnike Fish-Traps And Sea Turtle Bycatch At Patoku, Albania”. Journal of Natural Sciences/Buletini i Shkencave Natyrore, Tirana. 8) Monthly budget required at Patoku in future years. 9) 2008 expenditure.   10) Project Awareness Material. 11) Project partners and Funders description. Project Staff.

 

69


Annexe 1    GPS co‐ordinates (WGS 84) for important features in the Patoku / Gjiri i Drinit study area  

 

 

Location  Patoku field‐station  Lagoon southern exit Ishmit stavnike A  Ishmit stavnike A/B  Ishmit stavnike B 

Latitude/Longitude  N41 38.191 E19 35.327  N41 37.276 E19 35.004  N41 36.198 E19 33.349  N41 36.232 E19 33.349  N41 36.243 E19 33.394 

Ishmit stavnike C  Ishmit stavnike C/D 

N41 36.039 E19 33.624  N41 36.068 E19 33.637 

Ishmit stavnike D  Seferi: Godull/Droja  Old mouth of Ishmit  Ishmit river mouth  Rodonit stavnike W  Rodonit stavnike E1  Rodonit stavnike E2  Rodonit stavnike E3  Rodonit stavnike E4  Rodonit stavnike E5  Rodonit stavnike E6  Skenderbeg  Church  Canal navigation  mark 

N41 36.082 E19 33.671  N41 35.782 E19 34.599  N41 36.898 E19 35.749  N41 34.728 E19 33.291  N41 35.018 E19 28.201  N41 34.778 E19 28.882  N41 34.504 E19 29.938  N41 34.334 E19 30.676  N41 34.411 E19 31.347  N41 34.627 E19 32.057  N41 34.896 E19 32.656  N41 35.148 E19 26.889  N41 34.971 E19 27.500 

Location  Canal entrance  Canal midpoint  Canal footbridge  Canal/Matit  Matit river mouth  Shallow spit by  Matit  Stavnike Matit  Old mouth of  Matit  Stavnike Tales E  Stavnike Tales W  Tales beach  Vain stavnike S  Vain stavnike N  Vain beach  Drinit river mouth Kuna stavnike 2  Prella stavnike  Stavnike Çesku  Stavnike TS1  Stavnike TS2 

N41 38.253 E19 34.967 

Stavnike TS3 

Latitude/Longitude  N41 38.333 E19 34.842  N41 38.397 E19 34.768  N41 38.530 E19 34.615  N41 38.553 E19 34.567  N41 38.251 E19 34.239  N41 38.220 E19 34.145  N41 38.512 E19 34.126  N41 39.656 E19 34.065  N41 40.501 E19 34.357  N41 40.700 E19 34.186  N41 41.598 E19 34.757  N41 44.066 E19 34.341  N41 44.121 E19 34.330  N41 44.108 E19 34.637  N41 44.969 E19 34.080  N41 45.865 E19 34.865  N41 45.876 E19 34.324  N41 46.145 E19 35.371  N41 49.906 E19 32.069  N41 49.755 E19 32.416  N41 49.561 E19 32.821 

70


Annexe 2    These  explosions  were  heard  at  Patoku,  and  were  probably  from  illegal  dynamite‐fishing.  Anecdotal  evidence  suggests  that  charges  were  home‐made  (weed‐killer  based).  These  events  usually occurred early‐morning, and mostly from the directions of Ishmit and Tales.    

Date  05/07/2008  05/07/2008  07/07/2008  14/07/2008  16/07/2008  22/07/2008  23/07/2008  28/07/2008  05/08/2008  06/08/2008  06/08/2008  13/08/2008  14/08/2008  15/08/2008  20/08/2008  21/08/2008  22/08/2008  25/08/2008  28/08/2008 

Time  0945  1000  0730  0830  0740  0700  0735  0740  1230  0740  0842  0723  0726  0733  0635  0734  0741  0822  0742 

Explosions N/A  N/A  10  7  6  N/A  10  4  6  8  3  9  7  4  7  8  10  7  7 

Place  Tales  Matit  Tales  Tales  Tales  Matit  Tales  Tales  Tales  Ishmit  Tales  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit  Ishmit 

Notes  Tales to Matit: saw charges being placed  Many dead fishes        Report of dead turtle on beach, no details  Prof. Haxhiu saw many dead fishes     Probably more; I was in restaurant                 Probably more; a noisy car came by                

12/09/2008 

0742 

11 

Ishmit 

  

 

 

71


Annexe 3    At‐sea and incidental encounters with turtles. Some turtles were captured by fishermen working in very  small boats and released immediately. Class of sighting is described above (under sea turtles). The names  of fishermen are under ‘notes’; Mrezh is a type of gill‐net.   

Record 

Date 

Place  

Sea Area 

Species 

Class 

Notes 

X001 

01/06/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

 

X002 

05/06/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Petrit 

X003 

08/06/2008 

Godull 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Seferi 

X004 

15/06/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

 

X005 

23/06/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Armir 

X006 

27/06/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Armir 

X007 

02/07/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Armir 

X008 

08/07/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Armir 

X009 

10/07/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Bridge 

X010 

11/07/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Art 

X011 

12/07/2008 

Patok 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Noshi 

X012 

05/08/2008 

Godull 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Bycatch 

X013 

29/08/2008 

Thrown‐sand 

SH 

Cc 

II 

Bycatch 

X014 

29/08/2008 

Rodonit 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Bycatch 

X015 

01/09/2008 

Godull 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Mrezh 

X016 

03/09/2008 

Godull 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Mrezh 

X017 

03/09/2008 

Matit 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Art 

X018 

03/09/2008 

Ishmit 

PA 

Cc 

II 

Art 

   

 

72


Annexe 4    Detailed Workplan Objectives for the Patoku Project    Notes: i) Cells blocked in red were postponed due to lack of funds. ii) WPs should be underway by the ‘key  date’ although they may have already been completed. iii) Most objectives are ongoing.    Phase 1: Preparatory studies  WP no 

Event 

1.1 

Research Training 

1.1(i) 

Develop research training programme 

1.1(ii) 

W/shop for potential researchers 

1.1(iii) 

  Started   

  Ongoing   

 

 

Completed 

Key date 

 

 

Feb‐2008 

Apr‐2008 

Apr‐2008 

  

 

 

 

Identify suitable researchers 

Apr‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

1.1(iv) 

Deliver training programme 

Jun‐2008 

1.2 

Establish project base 

1.2(i) 

Confirm research methodology 

1.2(ii) 

Construct aquarium facility 

1.2(iii) 

Identify suitable site for education centre 

1.3 

Identify locations where turtles are regularly seen/captured 

1.3(i) 

Identify local sources of information on turtles 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

1.3(ii) 

Record sightings of turtles at sea 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

 

 

 

Phase 2: Research programme  WP no 

Event 

2.1 

Select fisheries for bycatch monitoring 

2.1(i)  2.1(ii) 

*   

 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

May‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

  

 

 

 

Apr‐2008 

 

Apr‐2008 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Started 

Ongoing 

Completed 

Key date 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate with interested fishermen 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

Define sea areas & allocate site designation codes 

May‐2008 

May‐2008 

May‐2008 

2.1(iii) 

Determine usage patterns for different fishing gear types 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.1(iv) 

Record presence & capture of sea turtles 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.1(v) 

Record environmental factors 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.1(vi) 

Identify trends in results 

Jun‐2008 

 

Aug‐2008 

2.2 

Investigate sea turtle population dynamics 

 

 

 

 

2.2(i) 

Record data from captured turtles 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.2(ii) 

Identify individual turtles 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.2(iii) 

Develop & establish central tagging database  

Sep‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

2.2(iv) 

Record evidence for site fidelity 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.2(v) 

Report presence of previously‐tagged turtles 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

 

 

73


WP no 

Event 

Started 

Ongoing 

Completed 

Key date 

2.3 

Health assessment of turtles 

 

 

 

 

2.3(i) 

Record health status of captured turtles 

2.3(ii) 

Administer appropriate treatment to selected animals  

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

  

 

 

 

2.3(iii) 

Arrange transportation for turtles requiring surgery 

  

 

 

 

2.4 

Define impacts on turtles 

 

 

 

 

2.4(i) 

Interaction with fisheries 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

2.4(ii) 

Determine if turtles are taken locally as a food resource  

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

2.4(iii) 

Determine if turtles are used in traditional medicine 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

2.4(iv) 

Identify sources of pollution 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

2.4(v) 

Identify losses of habitat (actual or potential) 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

2.5 

Facilitate appropriate research activities 

  

 

 

 

2.6 

Interviews and socio‐economics 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

2.7 

Optional research endeavours 

 

 

 

 

2.7(i) 

Rapid Survey assessment of possible nesting beaches 

  

 

 

 

2.7(ii) 

UHF satellite tracking (feasibility study) 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

2.7(iii) 

Reassess possible overwintering grounds 

Oct‐2008 

 

 

2.7(iv) 

Record sightings of other marine megafauna 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phase 3: Data dissemination & conservation  WP no 

Event 

Started 

Ongoing 

Completed 

Key dates 

3.1 

Provide data to the Government of Albania 

Sep‐2008 

 

Dec‐2008 

3.2 

Identify critical habitats for turtles in Albanian  waters 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

3.2(i) 

Develop GIS database (initially for Gjiri i Drinit) 

  

 

 

 

3.3 

Develop cooperation with important organisations 

 

 

 

 

3.3(i) 

Liaise with other research groups 

Jul‐2008 

 

 

3.3(ii) 

Liaise with other conservation groups 

Apr‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

3.3(iii) 

Develop communications network 

Mar‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

3.3(iv) 

Develop fund‐raising capacity for HAS 

Sep‐2008 

 

 

3.4 

Develop & implement conservation objectives 

 

 

 

 

3.4(i) 

Develop short‐ & medium‐term conservation measures 

Sep‐2008 

 

Dec‐2008 

3.4(ii) 

Develop management plans as required 

 

 

 

 

 

 

74


WP no 

Event 

Started 

Ongoing 

Completed 

Key date 

3.5 

Outreach activities 

 

 

 

 

3.5(i)  3.5(ii) 

Forge strong links with local community 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

Apr‐2008 

 

Aug‐2008 

3.5(iii) 

Identify and encourage future sea turtle researchers  Information onto websites (MEDASSET, Euroturtle,  Ecat) 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

3.6 

Establish education centre at Patoku 

 

 

 

 

3.6(i) 

  

 

 

 

3.6(ii) 

Create displays  Train researchers/students as guides for centre's  visitors 

  

 

 

 

3.6(iii) 

Design & produce leaflets, posters, T‐shirts etc. 

Feb‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

3.6(iv) 

Develop training courses & interactive workshops 

Apr‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

3.6(v) 

Deliver environmental education 

Jun‐2008 

 

 

3.6(vi) 

Identify & train veterinarians in sea turtle medicine 

Jun‐2009 

 

 

 

3.7 

Encourage media access 

Jun‐2008 

 

 

3.7(i) 

Translate & distribute press releases 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

3.7(ii) 

Television and press coverage 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jun‐2008 

3.8 

Scientific publications 

Jun‐2008 

 

 

3.8(i) 

Produce PowerPoint presentations of Patoku research 

Jun‐2008 

 

Sep‐2008 

3.8(ii) 

Present Patoku research at international conferences 

Jul‐2008 

 

Sep‐2008 

3.8(iii) 

Publish results in peer‐reviewed journals 

Sep‐2008 

 

Mar‐2009 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Started 

Ongoing 

Completed 

Key date 

Phase 4: Fundraising & project evaluation  WP no 

Event 

4.1 

Initial fundraising 

 

 

 

 

4.1(i) 

Prepare budget estimates 

Feb‐2008 

May‐2008 

May‐2008 

4.1(ii) 

Give presentations to interested donors 

Apr‐2008 

 

May‐2008 

4.1(iii) 

Secure sufficient funding to launch the project 

Apr‐2008 

May‐2008 

May‐2008 

4.2 

Obtain funding for research in subsequent years 

Oct‐2008 

 

Jun ‐ 2008 

4.3 

Obtain funding for Education Centre at Patoku 

Jul‐2008 

 

Jun ‐ 2009 

4.4 

Hold regular progress meetings 

Jul‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

4.4(i) 

First progress report 

Jun‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

Jul‐2008 

4.4(ii) 

Second progress report 

Aug‐2008 

 

Sep‐2008 

Sep‐2008 

4.4(iii) 

Translate reports into Albanian 

 

 

4.5 

Review, revise, add or delete objectives as necessary 

Apr‐2008 

 

Jul‐2008 

4.6 

Produce annual project summary  

Jun‐2008 

Jan‐2009 

Dec‐2008 

4.7 

Provide donors with annual report 

 

 

Feb ‐ 2009 

Jan‐2009 

 

 

 

 

75


Annexe 5    Fish species identified at (or known from) Patoku    Note: ‘Shqip’ indicates the Albanian name, which could differ between fishermen    Shqip 

English 

Latin 

Notes 

Gof 

Greater amberjack 

Seriola dumerili 

 

Barbun 

Plain red mullet 

Mullus barbatus 

 

Barbuni i shkëmbit 

Striped red mullet 

Mullus surmeletus 

 

Palomidi 

Bonito 

Sarda sarda 

 

Skumbri 

Mackerel 

Scomber scombrus 

 

Scumer 

Chub mackerel 

Scomber japonicus 

aka “Kolo” 

Shkerpi 

Brown scorpionfish 

Scorpaena porcus 

 

Shkerpi i kuqe 

Red scorpionfish 

Scorpaena scrofa 

 

Salpe 

Salema 

Sarpa salpa 

 

Peshku lejlek 

Belone 

Belone belone 

 

Peshku lejlek 

Agujon needlefish 

Tylosurus acus 

 

Stavrill 

Horse mackerel 

Trachurus mediterraneus 

& T. Trachurus 

Qefull 

Flat‐headed mullet 

Mugil cephalus 

aka "Cumer" 

Kocja 

Gilthead  

Sparus auratus 

 

Bishtmellenjeza 

Brill 

Scophthalmus rhombus 

flatfish 

Peshk derr 

Grey trigger fish 

Balistes capriscus 

 

Gjuhëzë kanali 

Common sole 

Solea solea 

S. Vulgaris/S. Aegyptus 

Gjuhëza e Adriatikut 

Adriatic sole 

Solea impar 

 

Dentali 

Dentex 

Dentex dentex 

 

Swordtail 

Derbio 

Trachinotus ovatus 

 

Levrek 

Sea bass 

Dicentrarchus labrax 

 

Ngjala 

Eel 

Anguilla Anguilla 

 

Merluci 

Hake 

Merluccius merluccius 

 

Kubla 

Twaite shad 

Alosa fallax 

 

Dallëndyshe deti 

Flying fish 

Exocoetus volitans 

 

Peshku fluturues 

Atlantic flying fish 

Cheilopogon heterurus 

 

Peshku fluturues 

Bentwing flying fish 

Cheilopogon exsiliens 

 

Lojba 

Leerfish 

Lichia ammia 

‘Serra’ in Greece 

Açuge 

Anchovy 

Engraulis encrasicholus 

 

Peshk hënë 

Ocean sunfish 

Mola mola 

aka "Peshk lepur" 

Burdullak 

Bucchich's Goby 

Gobius bucchichii  

 

Burdullak zezi 

Black Goby 

Gobius niger 

 

 

 

76


Shqip 

English 

Pesku pëllumb 

Smooth hound 

Mustelus mustelus 

"pigeon fish" 

Kali i detit 

Seahorse 

Hippocampus hippocampus 

& H. Ramulosus 

Peshk elektrik 

Eyed electric ray 

Torpedo torpedo 

 

Rombo 

Common stingray 

Dasyatis pastinaca 

 

Melanur 

Common seabream 

Oblada melanura 

 

Cow‐nosed ray 

Rhinoptera marginata 

 

Korb 

Corb 

Umbrina cirrosa 

 

Sargua 

Two‐banded seabream 

Diplodus vulgaris 

 

Bishtzi 

Annular gilthead 

Diplodus annularis 

aka "Sargu" 

Sargu 

White seabream 

Sargus sargus 

 

Pëllëmbëza buzoqe 

Black seabream 

Spondyliosoma cantharus 

 

Bilbil 

Snipefish 

Macrorhamphosus scolopax   

Latin 

Notes 

Shtiza 

Great Barracuda 

Sphyraena sphyraena 

 

Veshfloriri 

Golden grey mullet 

Liza aurata 

aka “Veshari” 

Snake? 

Moray eel 

Muraena Helena 

 

Peshk dhelpër 

Thresher shark 

Alopias vulpinus 

Shengjin 2005 

Kovaç 

John Dory 

Zeus faber 

Himarë 2005 

Korifena 

Dolphinfish 

Coryphaena hippurus 

Palermos 2005 

Peshk shpatë  Peshkaqen  njeringrënës 

Swordfish 

Xiphias gladius 

 

Great white shark 

Carcharodon carcharias 

 

Peshkaqen kokështypur  Bluntnose six‐gill shark 

Hexanchus griseus 

 

Peshkaqen tonil 

Shortfin mako 

Isurus oxyrinchus 

 

Tonil 

Porbeagle 

Lamna nasus 

 

Gafore 

Crab 

Carcinus spp 

& other spp. 

Karkalec 

Prawn 

 

 

 

 

77


Annexe 6    Commendation presented to Dr. White by the Qarku and Councillors of Lezhe     

 

 

78


Annexe 7    “In press”: Journal of Natural Sciences/Buletini i Shkencave Natyrore, Tirana  MONITORING STAVNIKE FISH‐TRAPS AND SEA TURTLE BYCATCH AT PATOKU, ALBANIA    1

2

3

3

4

2

Michael White , Idriz Haxhiu , Enerit Saçdanaku , Lazion Petritaj , Merita Rumano , Fundime Osmani ,  2

5

5

Blerina Vrenozi , Prue Robinson , Stephanos Kouris and Lily Venizelos .   1

2

Centro Recupero Tartarughe Marine, Lampedusa ; Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana ; Faculty of  3

4

5

Natural Sciences, University of Tirana ; Ministry of Environment, Tirana ; MEDASSET .   Correspondence to: Dr Michael White, Centro Recupero Tartarughe Marine‐WWF, 92010 Lampedusa (AG), Italy.  E‐mail: michael.white@univ.bangor.ac.uk 

  ABSTRACT   Research began at Patoku Lagoon, Albania, in June 2008, monitoring an important sea turtle foraging  ground;  the  project  included  researchers  from  Tirana  University.  The  population  structure  of  loggerhead  turtles  Caretta  caretta  captured  as  bycatch  in  stavnike  fish‐traps  was  investigated.  The  traps  yielded  103  turtles,  which  were  tagged  and  released;  17  were  subsequently  recaptured.  Ten  remigrants  had  been  tagged  previously  at  Patok.  Adult  and  adolescent  male  loggerheads  were  encountered. There was one juvenile green turtle Chelonia mydas.   Keywords: Loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, foraging, bycatch, stavnike fish‐traps, Chelonia mydas.     INTRODUCTION   A  yacht‐based  rapid  assessment  of  Albania’s  coastal  waters  was  conducted  in  October‐November  2005 as part of the MEDASSET (Mediterranean Association to Save the Sea Turtles) Marine Research  Programme  to  determine  the  current  distribution  of  sea  turtles  and  Mediterranean  Monk  Seals  Monachus  monachus.  The  project  works  within  the  framework  of  the  Strategic  Action  Plan  for  the  Conservation of Biological Diversity in the Mediterranean Region (SAP BIO) and the implementation  of the Action Plans for the Management of the Mediterranean Monk Seal and for the Conservation of  Mediterranean  Marine  Turtles  under  the  United  Nations  Environment  Programme  Mediterranean  Action Plan (UNEP/MAP). During the voyage fishermen throughout Albania were interviewed about  their  encounters  with  turtles,  seals  and  cetaceans. An  important  finding  from  these  interviews  was  that  large  numbers  (100’s)  of  marine  turtles  were  reported  from  Albania’s  northernmost  bay  at  Patok; but they were rare, perhaps 2‐6 turtles in some years, in southern Albania. Loggerhead turtles  Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758) were caught as bycatch in stavnike fish‐traps and trawling operations  in the broader Patok area: Gjiri i Drinit (White et al. 2006).   A research programme that included researchers from Tirana University was planned for Patok, which  would include monitoring the stavnike fish‐traps and other fishing activities; this began in June 2008  and continued throughout that summer. Collaborating closely with local fishermen, researchers were  able to measure and tag many of the sea turtles that were caught incidentally in the stavnikes. We  st 

started  work  with  Rakip  Martini’s  group  of  fishermen  at  Patoku  on  the  1 of  June,  and  included  a  th 

second group (Çal) on 18 June.    

 

79


MATERIALS AND METHODS     1. Study area   Gjiri i Drinit is a shallow sea (maximum depth 47 m) with a sand and mud substratum dominated  by bivalves and crabs. Five sediment‐laden rivers (Bunës, Drinit, Matit, Droja and Ishmit) enter the  bay bringing large amounts of terrestrial garbage, predominantly plastics, into the study area. The  project base was established at Patoku Lagoon [N41°38.191′; E019°35.327′].   2. Stavnikes   Stavnikes  are  a  type  of  fish  trap,  originating  in  Russia,  introduced  into  Albania  around  30  years  ago, and then they were forgotten about until 2000, when the Patoku fishermen started to use  them again.   Two  sets  of  traps  were  monitored  closely:  Ishmit  [N41°36.198′;  E019°33.349′];  Matit  [N41°38.512′; E019°34.126′].  Note: Ishmit stavnikes were out of action for nine days in June & four days  in  July;  the  nets  were  removed  for  cleaning  (algal  growth).  One  trap  was  damaged  in  heavy  weather  th 

(15/7/2008) but rebuilt; and both stavnikes were destroyed on 24 July and not rebuilt in this year (2008).  

3. Trap construction   A  rectangular  enclosure  is  erected  in  shallow  water  (depth  5‐6  m)  some  distance  offshore,  consisting  of  long  wooden  posts  (length  8‐10  m,  diameter  10‐15  cm)  forced  vertically  into  the  seabed, with nets secured to them in an arrangement that allows easy access into the traps for  fish  and  other  marine  animals.  The  number  of  posts  required  depends  upon  trap‐size,  but  the  design  is  always  similar.  A  stavnike  is  divided  into  sections  (reception  area,  ante‐chamber,  and  collection chamber), which is repeated to form a double unit. A long barrier net extends from the  fish‐traps  to  the  beach  (Ishmit  stavnike  was  1800  m  offshore;  Matit  only  200  m);  the  traps  are  constructed to allow entry from either side of the barrier net. When fish or turtles encounter the  barrier they have three choices: to turn left, right, or to go back the way they came; an area they  may  have  just  foraged.  Turning  beachwards  leads  them  into  shallower  water.  Animals  entering  the  reception  area  are  guided  into  successive  chambers;  escape  from  these  is  difficult  although  not impossible.   4. Fish catch   Traps were emptied early each morning before the sun got too hot; harvesting was not possible in  strong winds or heavy seas. Working from a small boat inside the enclosure the fishermen slowly  raised the bottom net by hand, reducing the size of the collection chamber, until the catch could  be emptied into the boat. Any turtles were lifted manually into the boat, which could be difficult  with larger animals. Space in the boats is limited and sometimes turtles were released directly at  the traps.   Catches were monitored in three ways: i) direct observation at the traps ii) direct observation of  the catch when the boats returned to Patoku iii) discussions with different fishermen about their  catch (anecdotal evidence). Whether researchers went to the stavnikes or not largely depended  upon the fishermen’s planned activities. On some mornings they emptied the traps and returned  directly to Patoku about 3‐5 hours later, on other days they continued to different types of net  elsewhere before returning to Patoku in the evening.   5. Sea turtles   Turtles captured as bycatch were usually brought to our field base at Patoku, where animals were  measured, photographed, tagged and released. Incidental tagging has been conducted in Albania  since  2002  (Dalton’s  Rototags:  RAC/SPA,  Tunis);  these  are  now  superseded  by  Stockbrand’s  titanium tags with an Albanian address.   6. Morphometric data   The curved carapace length (CCL) and curved carapace width (CCW) were measured and turtles  allocated  into  10  cm  size‐classes  (length‐frequency  distribution)  based  on  their  CCL  e.g.  40  cm  size‐class range: 40.0‐49.9 cm et seq. (White, 2007).   As an indicator of the stage of sexual development three measurements were recorded from the  tail:    

80


i) Distance from posterior margin of plastron to midline of cloacal opening (Plas‐clo)   ii) Total tail length (TTL)   iii) Distance from tip of tail to posterior margin of the carapace (+/‐ cara)     RESULTS     1. Turtle bycatch   There were 103 turtles captured in the two stavnikes during June and July 2008: Ishmit stavnike  fished for 39 days and yielded 54 turtles (53 Caretta caretta; 1 Chelonia mydas); Matit stavnike  fished for 34 days and yielded 49 loggerheads.   2. Size‐classes   Almost half of the loggerheads (47%; n = 46 turtles) were in the 60 cm size‐class (Table 1). Only  two had a curved carapace length (CCL) <50 cm; and two had CCL >80 cm. Mean CCL = 64.0 cm;  SD  =  7.3  cm;  95%  confidence  limit  =  1.47;  CCL  range  45.5‐83.0  cm;  n  =  98  loggerheads  (4  loggerheads were data deficient due to carapace damage). There was one small juvenile green turtle  Chelonia mydas (CCL = 39.0 cm).   3. Health status   Turtles  were  generally  in  good  health:  13  loggerheads  had  visible  carapace  damage,  probably  caused by boat propellers. The carapace of one turtle was seriously fractured, but, as the animal  was  very  vigorous,  it  was  released  again;  and  recaptured  two  weeks  later.  One  loggerhead  in  Matit  stavnike  had  been  caught  previously  on  a  longline  (monofilament  line  emerged  from  its  mouth, but the swallowed hook could not be seen and was probably in the stomach).   4. Male turtles   Carapace  and  tail  measurements  (cm)  are  given  for  18  male  loggerheads  (4  adults;  14  adolescents) that were captured in stavnikes during June‐July 2008 (Table 2). Analyses of variance  showed  that  the  carapace  measurements  between  adults  and  adolescents  were  significantly  different  (CCL:  F =6.98,  P<0.05.  CCW:  F =5.15,  P<0.05).  Analyses  of  variance  showed  that  1,16

1,16

there  were  highly  significant  differences  in  the  three  tail  measurements  between  adult  and  adolescent  male  loggerheads  (Plas‐clo:  F =34.36,  P<0.01.  TTL:  F =27.15,  P<0.01.  +/‐  cara:  1,16

F

1,16

=25.30,  P<0.01).  In  two  adolescents  the  tail  had  not  yet  extended  beyond  the  carapace’s 

1,16

posterior margin (+/‐ cara = ‐1.0 and ‐2.5 cm).   5. Serial recaptures   Seventeen turtles tagged during this study (16 Cc & 1 Cm) were recaptured in stavnikes on more  than one occasion (one was taken five times, two others on three occasions, and 14 turtles were  captured  twice).  Seven  turtles  (6  Cc  &  1  Cm)  were  captured  in  both  stavnikes  (4.5  km  apart),  whereas the other 10 recaptures were always in the same traps.   6. Remigrants   Ten loggerheads had been tagged in previous years (all at Patok); the earliest in 2003.   7. Tag loss   Three Caretta caretta (3%; n = 102 loggerheads) had, apparently, lost their flipper‐tags; the size,  shape and location of holes in their flippers suggested rototags had been previously applied. The  plastic rototags on several loggerheads (n = 5) were heavily encrusted with barnacles; one rototag  was barely legible after just five years.   8. Epibiotic fauna   Forty‐two loggerheads had barnacles (chelonibia or lepas spp.) attached to the carapace and/or  head; six turtles were very heavily encrusted with epibiotic fauna.     DISCUSSION     Stavnikes appear to be a ‘turtle‐friendly’ method of fishing. Perhaps the most important factor is  that  turtles  entering  the  traps  can  swim  around  and,  crucially,  surface  to  breathe  normally;   

81


whereas in trawls, for example, many captured turtles will drown. There was one observation of a  loggerhead  eating  a  fish  inside  a  stavnike,  and  so  in‐trap  foraging  is  also  a  possibility.  An  important conclusion was that entrapped turtles were not deterred from foraging locally, despite  being  manhandled  out  of  the  nets,  and  then  being  landed  for  measuring  and  tagging.  The  evidence for this is that 17 turtles were recaptured in stavnikes on more than one occasion. Such  serial recaptures indicate that at least some turtles showed short‐term fidelity to Patoku foraging  grounds (16 Caretta caretta; 1 Chelonia mydas). Ten of the loggerheads released from Patok were  recaptured in the same trap, either Matit or Ishmit, indicating that they foraged in a localised part  of the bay. Another seven turtles (6 Cc & 1 Cm) were captured in both stavnikes (4.5 km apart),  perhaps showing that they utilised a more extensive foraging area.   Patoku (& Gjiri i Drinit) is frequented by larger juvenile and adult loggerheads (Table 1). Data so  far suggest that adult females are not using the Patoku foraging ground (one 80 cm CCL turtle may  have been female, but this remains unconfirmed). However, this research coincided with the egg‐ laying period in the Mediterranean region, and perhaps adult females will be encountered later in  the  year  (post‐nesting).  Ten  loggerheads  had  been  tagged  in  previous  years  (all  at  Patoku),  the  earliest in 2003; these indicate repeat migrations either to Patoku or enroute elsewhere. Tag loss  (3%  seen  in  this  study)  can  result  in  a  turtle  receiving  new  tag  numbers,  thus  its  previous  life‐ history  remains  incomplete  and  population  assessments  may  be  overestimated  (Balazs,  1999;  White, 2007).     A juvenile green turtle Chelonia mydas (CCL = 39 cm) was in Ishmit stavnike (June); regionally this  species  nests  only  in  the  northeastern  Mediterranean,  and  more  usually  has  a  tropical  distribution.   The distribution and lifestyle of male turtles is not as well known as that of females. Patoku may  be a male foraging and developmental habitat, as 20% of loggerheads tagged in June were males  (adult=4; adolescent=9); there were five more adolescent males in July. This discovery has added  importance  because  of  the  potential  feminising‐effect  of  climate‐change  on  global  turtle  populations (Davenport, 1989).     The development of secondary sexual characteristics in adolescent turtles occurs across a range  of  year‐classes  (Limpus  and  Limpus,  2003;  White,  2007).  Morphological  changes  indicating  the  onset of male adolescence (proximal thickening and elongation of the tail) were observed in 14  loggerheads at Patoku (Table 2). These animals were mostly in CCL size‐classes 60 and 70 cm; the  smallest  turtle  showing  clear  tail  development  had  a  CCL=  59.5  cm.  The  tail  tip  of  the  largest  adolescent (CCL= 74.0 cm) was still 2.5 cm short of the carapace’s posterior margin.     These  bycatch  records  represent  an  unknown  proportion  of  turtles  using  Gjiri  i  Drinit:  only  two  traps  were monitored  regularly,  and we do not  know how  many  turtles  of those present  in the  area actually enter traps. Saturation tagging has yet to be achieved locally. It was not logistically  possible to monitor all the stavnikes in Gjiri i Drinit (we located 18 traps in the bay, which is about  30  km  north  to  south);  we  lacked  a  sea‐going  boat  and  the  local  roads  were  in  very  poor  condition.  Fishermen  from  other  areas  were  interviewed  about  their  encounters  with  turtles  whenever possible.   In  the  Mediterranean  region  the  marine  ecology  of  sea  turtles,  and  their  marine  distribution  patterns, both geographical and temporal, are largely unknown (Margaritoulis et al. 2003; White,  2007).  Although  the  monitoring  programme  at  Patoku  is  still  in  its  early  stages,  we  can  confirm  that  substantial  numbers  of  Caretta  caretta  are  present  in  Gjiri  i  Drinit  during  the  summer  months.            

82


CONCLUSION     Sea  turtles  described  in  this  study  were  captured  in  stavnikes  in  Gjiri  i  Drinit  (June‐July  2008):  most  were  large  loggerheads  Caretta  caretta,  but  there  was  one  juvenile  green  turtle  Chelonia  mydas.  Ten  loggerheads  had  been  tagged  at  Patok  in  previous  years,  suggesting  that  Albania  forms  part  of  their  migratory  route.  Tag‐loss  can  lead  to  population  overestimation.  Seventeen  turtles  showed  short‐term  residency  in  the  bay,  which  was  demonstrated  through  their  subsequent  recaptures  in  fish‐traps.  These  serial  recaptures  also  suggest  that  being  caught  in  a  stavnike does not deter turtles from foraging locally. Male sea turtles (4 adults, 14 adolescents)  were captured at Patoku, suggesting that they may use the area as a developmental and foraging  habitat.  This  discovery  has  increased  importance  due  to  our  presently  limited  understanding  of  the  distribution  and  marine  ecology  of  male  sea  turtles;  and  the  threatened  impact  of  global  climate‐change, which may force embryonic sex‐ratios towards female‐dominance. Therefore it is  recommended  that  Gjiri  i  Drinit  is  legally  recognised  as  a  nationally  and  regionally  important  foraging habitat for sea turtles; and that these endangered migratory animals are fully protected  under Albanian national law.     LITERATURE CITED     BALAZS, G. H. (1999): Factors to consider in the tagging of sea turtles. Pp. 101‐109. In: Eckert, K.  L.;  K.  A.  Bjorndal;  F.  A.  Abreu‐Grobois  and  M.  Donnelly  (Editors).  (1999).  Research  and  management  techniques  for  the  conservation  of  sea  turtles.  IUCN/SSC  Marine  Turtle  Specialist  Group Publication No. 4. pp. 235.     DAVENPORT,  J.  (1989):  Sea  turtles  and  the  Greenhouse  Effect.  British  Herpetological  Society  Bulletin 29: pp. 11‐15.     LIMPUS,  C.  J.,  LIMPUS,  D.  J.  (2003):  Biology  of  the  loggerhead  turtle  in  Western  South  Pacific  Ocean foraging areas. Pp.93‐113. In: Bolten, A. B. and B. E. Witherington (Editors). Loggerhead sea  turtles. Smithsonian Books, Washington. pp. 319.     MARGARITOULIS,  D.,  ARGANO,  R.,  BARAN,  I.,  BENTIVEGNA,  F.,  BRADAI,  M.  N.,  CAMINAS,  J.  A.,  CASALE,  P.,  DE  METRIO,  G.,  DEMETROPOULOS,  A.,  GEROSA,  G.,  GODLEY,  B.  J.,  HADDOUD,  D.  A.,  HOUGHTON,  J.,  LAURENT,  L.,  LAZAR,  B.  (2003):  Loggerhead  turtles  in  the  Mediterranean  Sea:  Present  knowledge  and  conservation  perspectives.  Pp.  175‐198.  In:  Bolten,  A.  B.  and  B.  E.  Witherington (Editors). Loggerhead sea turtles. Smithsonian Books, Washington. pp. 319.     WHITE, M. G. (2007): Marine ecology of loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758) in  the  Ionian  Sea:  Observations  from  Kefalonia  and  Lampedusa.  Ph.D.  Thesis,  University  College  Cork, Ireland. pp. 300.     WHITE, M., HAXHIU, I., KOUROUTOS, V., GACE, A., VASO, A., BEQIRAJ, S., PLYTAS, A. (2006): Rapid  assessment  survey  of  important  marine  turtle  and  monk  seal  habitats  in  the  coastal  area  of  Albania, October‐November 2005. (Available from www.MEDASSET.org).     This research was co‐funded by: MEDASSET; MEDASSET (UK); RAC/SPA; UNDP (GEF/SGP); UNEP‐MAP.   Partners were: MEDASSET; RAC/SPA; UNDP (GEF/SGP); UNEP‐MAP; HAS, ECAT (Tirana); Ministry of the  Environment, Tirana; Museum of Natural Sciences; University of Tirana.          

 

83


Table 1. Number of loggerheads in each 10 cm size‐class of CCL     CCL   40  50  60  70  80  Total  June  0   17  26  17  2   62   July  2   10  20  4   0   36  

      Table  2. Carapace and tail morphometric data  (cm)  for 18 male  loggerhead  turtles.  Legend:  CCL  curved  carapace  length;  CCW  curved carapace width; Plas‐clo distance from posterior margin of  plastron to midline of cloaca; TTL total tail length; +/‐ cara tip of  tail  to  posterior  margin  of  carapace.  The  final  four  turtles  are  adult, the others adolescent. *may have just reached maturity.     CCL   CCW  Plas‐clo  TTL   +/‐ cara  59.5   56.0  11.0   14.5  0.5   62.0   62.0  14.5   17.0  1.5   62.5   57.0  12.5   15.0  ‐1.0   63.0   57.0  12.5   15.0  1.0   65.0   61.0  15.5   20.0  3.0   69.0   65.0  16.0   20.0  3.0   69.5   65.0  16.0   20.0  3.5   70.0   64.0  18.0   22.5  4.0   71.0   64.0  18.0   24.0  5.0   71.5   68.0  21.0   27.0  10.0*   72.0   67.0  18.0   23.0  5.5   23.0   29.0  11.0   73.0   70.0  73.0   65.0  18.0   22.0  3.5   74.0   69.0  15.0   16.0  ‐2.5   71.0   63.0  24.0   28.0  12.0   71.0   66.0  29.0   34.5  12.0   78.0   73.0  27.0   34.0  13.0   83.0   78.0  38.0   44.0  16.5  

 

 

84


Annexe 8    Monthly budget required at Patoku in future years    Note: This budget is based on what our actual costs at Patoku were during the research period in  2008;  and  should  form  the  basis  for  fund‐raising  in  future  years  (€4000  per  month).  The  ‘additional  budget’  allows  another  part‐time  student  researcher  to  be  trained,  thus  enhancing  capacity‐building.  However,  the  best  option  is  to  obtain  even  more  funds,  which  would  allow  several  students  to  live  and  study  on  the  project,  thus  maximising  our  capacity‐building  endeavours.  If  we  contribute  to  additional  fishermen’s  groups  then  that  component  will  need  increasing too. Finally, the at‐sea surveys are done on an ad hoc basis and include visits to other  sea areas, such as Kepi i Rodonit or Vain stavnikes.          Accommodation  Food   Pocket Money  Office  Phone  Benzene  Benzene  Benzene & Boat Rent  Benzene & Boat Rent  Field Expenses  Total per month       

 

        White & 1 student‐full time  Student     White & Haxhiu (2x6000)  White  Haxhiu  Fishermen ‐ Rakip Group  Fishermen ‐ Cal Group  Haxhiu (20 days x 6,000)          

  

  

  

Leke  84,000  92,000  30,500  12,000  12,000  20,000  25,000  40,000  40,000  120,000  475,500 

                         

   Euro  700.00 766.67 254.17 100.00 100.00 166.67 208.33 333.33 333.33 1000.00 3962.50

     

     

Total ( 4 Months)                          Note: Additional Budget             2nd Student   15 days (Food & Pocket Money)  Entertainment  hosting visitors     At‐sea surveys  10,000/ day      Subtotal                 Total per month                

1,902,000              38,000  15,000  50,000  103,000     578,500    

15850.00             316.67 125.00 416.67 858.33    4820.83   

Total (4 Months) 

2,314,000 

19283.33

Includes additional budget    

85


Annexe 9  2008 expenditure      

   

 

86


Annex 10  Project Awareness Materials    T‐SHIRTS     Front

Back 

POSTER 

   

 

87


LEAFLET  Front                 Back 

 

88


Annex 11    Project partners: MEDASSET; UNDP GEF/SGP; UNEP‐MAP RAC/SPA; HAS; ECAT (Tirana); Ministry  of the Environment, Tirana; Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana; Faculty of Natural  Sciences, University of Tirana.    Funders: MEDASSET Greece; MEDASSET UK; GEF/SGP; RAC/SPA UNEP‐MAP    MEDASSET – The Mediterranean Association to Save the Sea Turtles – is an international non‐governmental  organization  (NGO)  founded  in  1988,  working  for  the  conservation  of  sea  turtles  and  their  habitats  throughout  the  Mediterranean.  It  has  been  involved  in  conservation  and  scientific  research  programmes,  public  awareness,  environmental  education  and  lobbying  decision‐makers.    E‐mail:  MEDASSET@MEDASSET.org    UNDP’s GEF/SGP ‐ The United Nations Development Programme / GEF Small Grants Programme Established  in  1992,  the  year  of  the  Rio  Earth  Summit,  The  GEF  Small  Grants  Programme  [SGP]  embodies  the  very  essence of sustainable development. By providing financial and technical support to projects in developing  countries  that  conserve  and  restore  the  natural  world  while  enhancing  well‐being  and  livelihoods,  SGP  demonstrates  that  community  action  can  maintain  the  fine  balance  between  human  needs  and  environmental imperatives. Focal Point: Mr. Arian Gace: arian.gace@undp.org     UNEP/MAP’s  RAC/SPA,  United  Nations  Environment  Programme  Mediterranean  Action  Plan’s  Regional  Activity  for  Specially  Protected  Areas‐  SPA  was  established  by  the  contracting  Parties  to  the  Barcelona  Convention and its protocols with the aim  of assisting Mediterranean countries in the implementation  of  the Protocol concerning Specially Protected Areas in the Mediterranean. RAC/SPA’s mission is to assist the  Parties  in  establishing  and  managing  specially  protected  areas,  conducting  programmes  of  scientific  and  technical  research,  conducting  the  exchange  of  scientific  and  technical  information  between  the  Parties,  preparing management plans for protected areas and species, developing cooperation programmes among  the  Parties,  and  preparing  educational  materials  designed  for  various  groups.  E‐mail:  atef.ouerghi@rac‐ spa.org     Herpetofauna’s  Albanian  Society  (H.A.S)  was  established  in  2001  and  directed  by  Prof.  Idriz  Haxhiu;  this  society  includes  Professors,  Doctors  and  specialists  in  Biological  Science,  Biologists,  Biology  Teachers  and  Students. The specialists of H.A.S have participated in many meetings, conferences, congresses, symposia  and seminars organized within Albania and abroad. Activities are related to the protection and monitoring  of the environment and different species, especially those that are endangered. The Project “Marine Turtle  Conservation: Protection, public awareness and tagging” has been carried out from 2002‐2005.     Ministry  of  Environment,  Forest  and  Water  Administration,  Nature  Protection  Policy,  Tirana,  Albania,  Director:  Mr.  Sajmir  Hoxha.  The  Albanian  government  has  identified  and  prepared  four  National  Action  Plans  (NAPs)  in  the  framework  of  the  Strategic  Action  Programme  for  the  Conservation  of  Biological  Diversity in the Mediterranean Region (SAP BIO). One of these NAP aims is the proclamation of the Marine  National Park of Karaburuni area, which will be the first Marine Park in Albania    ECAT,  Tirana:  The  Environmental  Centre  for  Administration  and  Technology  is  a  non‐profit  organization  developed  to  assist  local  governmental  and  non‐governmental  organizations,  as  well  as  industries  and  educational  institutions,  in  the  development  and  implementation  of  projects,  programmes  of  action,  and  policy instruments to improve the environment. E‐mail: ecat@ecat‐tirana.org  

               

89


Project staff    Dr Michael White (Principal investigator & project leader)  Prof. Idriz Haxhiu (Director of the Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana)  Enerit Saçdanaku (Student of Biology, University of Tirana)  Lazion Petritaj (Student of Biology, University of Tirana)  Stephanos Kouris (MEDASSET: Director / Project Manager)  Prue Robinson (MEDASSET: Environmental Scientist ‐ conservation development)  Lily Venizelos (President of MEDASSET)    Occasional staff    Merita Rumano (Ministry of Environment, Tirana)  Fundimje Osmani (Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana)  Blerina Vrenozi (Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana)  Aliki Dona (MEDASSET volunteer– database design)  Liza Boura (MEDASSET ‐ Environmental Scientist) 

     

 

90


Monitoring and Conservation of Important Sea Turtl2008 Annual Albanian Report