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MCYC Training Programme

Child Protection • What is child abuse/neglect? • What are my responsibilities? • How would I recognise a child with child protection concerns? • What should I do if I suspect child abuse? • Where can I get further help and advice? • Practicality Child Protection

Sarah Hockley

2012


WHY CHILD PROTECTION?

What are we protecting children from?

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


What is Child Abuse? • Child Abuse & neglect is a generic term encompassing all ill treatment of children including serious physical & sexual assaults as well as cases where the standard of care does not adequately support the child’s health or development.

• Children may be abused or neglected through the infliction of harm or through the failure to prevent harm • Abuse can occur in a family or an institutional or community setting. The abuser may or may not be known to the child. • A child is anyone under 18 years old – for the purposes of child protection

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


Four Categories of Child Abuse • physical abuse e.g. hitting, shaking, poisoning, burning, suffocating, fabricated/induced illness etc • sexual abuse e.g. forcing/enticing a child to take part in sexual activities (including non contact activities) • neglect e.g. failure to provide adequate food, shelter, clothing, protection from harm, access to medical care etc • emotional abuse e.g. conveying to children they are worthless, unloved or inadequate, exploiting/corrupting children, causing children to feel frightened or in danger eg witnessing domestic violence

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


THE 5TH CATEGORY???

Spiritual Abuse ‘The mistreatment of a person who is in need of help, support or greater spiritual empowerment, with the result of weakening, undermining or decreasing that person’s spiritual empowerment.’ ‘Someone using their power within a framework of spiritual belief or practice to satisfy their needs at the expense of others’ Misuse of power Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


What is a Child in Need? • A child who is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or to have the opportunity of achieving or maintaining, a reasonable standard of health or development without provision for him/her of services by the local authority OR his/her health or development is likely to be significantly impaired, or further impaired, without such provision OR he/she is disabled

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


What are my responsibilities? • Whatever your role you have a responsibility for protecting children from harm and promoting their welfare. • Whenever you have a concern about a child’s safety (physical, emotional or sexual), except when immediate action is required, it is always best to discuss this with your Child Protection Officer before acting on your concerns. • When you have a concern to make sure you make a recording of the concern of incident pass it on to your CP officer. It will be stored and a filed in the relevant way.


How do I recognise possible signs of child abuse/neglect? Signs of Physical Abuse and Neglect • The signs symptoms and history below do not define abuse. However, in certain situations, contexts and combinations they will raise suspicion of abuse. • It is better to refer on suspicion. If you wait for proof, serious harm may occur Be suspicious if: • History changes • Delay in seeking help • History and Injury not compatible • Suspicious pattern of injury • Multiple injuries of different ages/sites • Signs of neglect

Child Protection

2012


Possible signs of child abuse History •History inconsistent with injury presented •Delay in seeking help •Disclosure of abuse by child •Exposure to family violence, pornography, alcohol or drug abuse •Severe social stress •Isolation and lack of support •Parent/s abused as children •Mental illness •Unrealistic expectations of child •Inappropriate or inconsistent discipline •Terrorising, humiliating or oppressing •Neglecting the child •Promoting excessive dependency on the child •Actively avoiding seeking care or shopping around for care


Possible signs of child abuse Physical Signs • Multiple injuries, especially of different ages: bruises, cuts, abrasions • Scalds and burns, especially in unusual distributions • Pregnancy • Genital injuries • Sexually transmitted diseases • Unexplained failure to thrive • Poor hygiene • Dehydration or malnutrition • Fractures • Poisoning, especially if recurrent


Possible signs of child abuse Behavioural & Developmental Signs • • • • • • • • • • •

Aggression Anxiety and Depression Obsessions Overly responsible behaviour Frozen watchfulness Sexualised behaviour Fear Sadness Defiance Self-mutilation Overall development delay: motor, emotional, speech and language, social, cognitive, vision and hearing • Suicidal thoughts/plans • Withdrawal from family • Substance abuse

Child Protection

2012


OVERVIEW • We are all in charge of trying to ensure the safeguarding of Children/YP • If a situation arises and you are concerned speak to your CP officer • Record the situation as exact as you can and pass it to your CP officer • Try not to discuss the situation with other people • Remember you can never promise the child/young person complete confidentiality • Don’t put yourself in unprofessional situations Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


MCYC Policy It is not the responsibility of staff or volunteers to deal with suspected abuse but it is their responsibility to report concerns in line with guidance on reporting child abuse. You may find that these suspicions back up other recorded incidents. Remember, do not investigate – do report.


a) If a child’s behaviour/appearance gives reason for concern or a child has an unusual physical injury or a child confides about abuse, the procedure that MUST be followed is: • immediately inform one of the nominated persons. • use the Incident Record Forms to make a record of your actions; include anything the child said, anything you asked the child, and your observations. This may be used as evidence later. Record only the facts as you know them, ensure the child has access to an independent adult (e.g. teacher/group leader/youth worker) • if abuse is suspected, you or one of the nominated persons should report concerns directly to your nearest Local Safeguarding Children’s Board.


The following are some key Do’s and Don’ts if a child reports abuse: • • • •

• • •

• • • •

Always: Stay calm – ensure the child is safe and feels safe. Allow the child to speak without interruption, accepting what you have been told. (This should not be seen as believing or disbelieving what you have been told) Reassure the child and stress that they are not to blame, tell them that they are right to tell you and that you will try to offer support – but do not promise to keep it a secret and tell the child it is your responsibility to inform others. Alleviate feelings of guilt and isolation, without passing any judgement. Tell the child that you will try to offer support but you will have to pass the information on. Make a note as soon as possible after the event detailing what you and the child discussed. Never: Rush into details that may be inappropriate. Make promises you cannot keep. Take sole responsibility – consult someone else so that you can protect the child and gain support for yourself.


b) If you receive an allegation from an adult about another adult or yourself the procedure that MUST be followed is: – immediately inform one of the nominated persons. – record the facts as you know them and give a copy of the record to one of the nominated persons. – if an allegation is suspected, you or one of the nominated persons should report concerns directly to your nearest Local Safeguarding Children’s Board.


The 4 P’s Planning for safety with children and young people

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


Premises Risk assessment

--Appropriate for age/ability -Well lit (inside and out) --Chair and tables --Access to kitchen --toilets –access and supervision --plugs, wires etc -- heating guards --entrances and exits secure – in and out Maintenance --Process for repairs and cleaning.


People Recruitment -- application form -- assessment/selection process -references/CRB Supervision & Support -- training provision -- accountability (Who’s in charge) -- annual review process -- handling complaints Team Work

-- vigilance -- back up and personal safety


Practice Risk Assessment -- appropriate activities for age/ability -- clearing up and leaving

Number of Leaders -Leader ratios, minimum of two leaders Behaviour – expectation and management -- drink, drugs, personal relationships Travel Insurance Emergency -- Fire procedures and drills -- First Aid training and equipment Internet safety ‘out of camp contact’ Communication with parents/carers Dress appropriate Child

Protection

2012


Procedures Written CP/good practice guidelines (availability) Registration, consent, attendance -Attendance register -- basic member documentation Incident and record keeping -- incident/review book Confidentiality -location of records What happens if‌. -- illness or accidents - recording -- concerns or allegations (young people or staff)

Sarah Hockley


PRACTICALITY • Ratios (for indoor activities) • For 0-2 year olds – 1 leader to every 3 children • For 2-3 year olds – 1 leader to every 4 children • For 3-8 year olds – 1 leader to every 8 children • For over 8s – 1 leader for the 1st 8 children, then 1 leader for every 12 children. • There must always be at least 2 leaders (18+) for any group. • Time alone with Children – Minimise the chances of an adult and child/small group of children being left alone together. – If you need to talk confidentially to a child, do this within sight of others (move room, leave door open) – If you find yourself in the situation of being on your own with child, tell your coordinator/another leader asap.


PRACTICALITY •

Good practice – Treat all YP with respect & dignity – Be aware of your language, tone of voice and where you put your body – Be aware of any inappropriate close relationship developing with a individual child. – DO NOT ENGAGE IN THE FOLLOWING » Invading the privacy of children when they are going to the toilet » Rough, physically or sexually provocative games » Making sexually suggestive comments about or to a child or YP » Inappropriate and intrusive forms of touching » Any scapegoating, ridiculing or rejecting of a child or YP » Do not invite a child or YP into your home alone.

Think about when your pray with young people- where are you, how many leaders nearby etc..


PRACTICALITY Touch

Touch is an important part of human relations; it can be necessary to stop a young person from hurting themselves, it is a natural way of responding to someone in distress. You must always be aware of what is appropriate and inappropriate physical contact. Be conscious of your actions. - The side hug is your best friend!! Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


Scenarios

Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012


LAST TIPS….. If you ever question if its ok….. Think First Never say you can give full confidentiality Sarah Hockley

Child Protection

2012

Training Sessions ChildProtection2012v1  

Child Protection MCYC Training Programme Sarah Hockley Child Protection WHY CHILD PROTECTION? 2012 Sarah Hockley Child Protection

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