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SPECIAL REPORT 2021

Lee Lambert

Diane Quihuis

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Michael Crow

Omar Mireles

Marc Cameron

Danette Bewley

Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Butler

Dr. Chad Whelan

Wesley D. Kremer

Joe Snell

David G. Hutchens

Judy Rich

CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE LEADS THE WAY

Bill Rodewald Mayor Regina Romero

Sandra Watson Lisa Lovallo

Ian McDowell

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David Adame

Dr. Robert C. Robbins

Fletcher McCusker

Sharon Bronson

Fletcher Mike McCusker Ménard

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READY FOR NEW HORIZONS

Sun Corridor Inc. Forges Ahead with Economic Recovery Plan By Jay Gonzales Years of economic development momentum and collaboration in the Tucson region are paying off in ways no one could have predicted in the throes of a worldwide pandemic. COVID-19 has crippled economies for nearly a year creating uncertainty for families, businesses and our future. Yet, Tucson finds itself in a better position than most for a post-COVID recovery that could set a path for a robust and resilient economic future. At least that’s what local economic officials believe, and they’re not sitting around waiting for something good to happen. They are seizing on what they see as an opportunity. From a strategic standpoint, Sun Corridor Inc. has formed a committee of the region’s most prominent business leaders that is deep into developing a recovery and resiliency plan. The team has identified five focus areas: company recruitment, workforce development/ training, shovel-ready real estate and infrastructure, talent recruitment, and tourism recovery. And in a position of strength, business and government leadership seems to be unified. “I remember decisions that were made by this community to keep busi68 BizTucson

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ness out. I remember some of the second guessing. I don’t hear that today,” said Judy Rich, the new board chair at Sun Corridor Inc. and CEO of TMC HealthCare. “I hear healthy debate, but I hear consensus if it’s good for the community.” That will be crucial when the recovery and resiliency plan is complete, said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc. “What I think helps is it’s a pretty diverse group that is putting this together,” Snell said. “There should be buyin from the region’s top leaders. There shouldn’t be any rocks thrown at it.” The recovery and resiliency committee was formed in the summer in light of promising economic rankings, including a spring Moody’s Analytics report that listed the Tucson region as one of the top 10 communities poised to quickly recover post-COVID-19 and high marks from a site selectors group that aids businesses and industry in corporate location selection. The first step was to identify focus areas, and it came up with the five. After identifying the five focus areas, the committee’s 21 members under Chair Steve Eggen, a retired CFO from Raytheon Missile Systems, have formed

working groups that are developing specific action items for each area. Those groups have begun bringing information through presentations to the entire committee. The timeline is for presentations to be done by the end of the year or early next year, with an action plan to be launched late first quarter or early second. Admittedly, much work remains, Snell said. While the region is making a good impression on several fronts – most notably in talent development – some long-standing, underlying issues and perceptions must be addressed. “We still have some challenges if we’re going to come out of this and remain strong after COVID,” Snell said. “We still are fighting some perception issues even though we’ve gained some ground. The perceptions of Southern Arizona are still moderate as a good place to do business. Some of that is a lack of awareness. “We need more resources to effectively tell our story out there.” Foremost, Eggen said, is how to best position Southern Arizona post-pandemic. “We’ve got to be thinking something different about how this all is going to be playing out,” Eggen said. “We have a www.BizTucson.com


BizECONOMY

community that has some opportunities as a result of this. There are some things here that have a stronger appeal than riding a subway packed with people.” Improve Roads The most visible challenge within the committee’s focus areas that must be addressed, Snell said, is the familiar issue of the region’s roads, where improvement and progress are slow. “In the latest perception study where we touched the nation’s largest site selectors, they basically said, ‘You’ve come a long way. You’ve made progress in improving your market position since 2006, but you absolutely have got to figure out the road issue.’ ” The road issues include maintaining and developing everything from neighborhood streets to major arteries. “The roads are in disarray. They’re not up to snuff with the competition,” Snell said. “It’s time to get creative and act with tenacity to address our roads.” Attract and Develop Talent Despite the roads, there have been significant gains in other long-held perceptions about Tucson as a place for business – most notably developing talent for the high-end businesses and industries eyeing the city. www.BizTucson.com

Snell credits the University of Arizona, Pima Community College and Arizona State University for turning the tide in the region, giving businesses confidence that if they come here, the talent will be here to fill their jobs, even calling UArizona a “talent factory.”

From an economic development perspective, this is the work that’s going to continue to grow us economically as a community.

– Judy Rich Board Chair, Sun Corridor Inc. & CEO, TMC HealthCare

“The No. 1 driver for companies is still the whole talent equation,” Snell said. “Back in 2006, 2007, we really were seen as a place that had major questions and whether businesses could find the talent here. “What we’ve seen is a sea change where we’re believing that in certain in-

dustries, we can win that talent game, that we have the ability to produce the talented workforce.” That’s especially true in aerospace, one of the industries that communities covet because of the potential for highpaying, high-tech jobs with upward mobility and innovation. Ten to 15 years ago, the Tucson region wasn’t really in play. Today, PCC is developing centers of excellence, and UArizona is focused on innovation in a number of high-tech areas, including aerospace and biosciences. Pima Community College Chancellor Lee Lambert heads the subcommittee addressing workforce development and training. In his presentation to the full Recovery and Resiliency Committee, he said some of the short-term solutions as we emerge from the pandemic are centered around “reskilling” and “upskilling.” The challenge will be providing those opportunities when most communication, meetings and classes are virtual, or the learning is a hybrid of virtual and in-person. Through its recent development of its Centers of Excellence, Lambert said Pima is already in position to be a driver continued on page 70 >>> Winter 2021 > > > BizTucson 69


BizECONOMY continued from page 69 in the area of talent development. “It requires that the college be wellconnected and really be listening and engaging on all fronts,” Lambert said. “I think that’s what you’ve seen happening at Pima. We have been engaging with so many of our partners to understand their needs and then align our resources to their needs. I think that’s partly why you’re seeing Pima emerging in a way that is more supportive of the needs of the community.” Dr. Robert C. Robbins, UArizona’s president since June 2017, said the university is attracting top talent among its faculty, which leads to sending top graduates into the job market. “There are people from all over the world who seek to come to the university to advance their academic mission and careers,” Robbins said. “Our professors are the ones that these mentees will gravitate toward. We’ve been incredibly fortunate to have some of the most talented faculty in the world, especially around astronomy, around optical science, the life sciences.” Robbins’ leadership and UArizona’s visibility on the COVID-19 front at the outset of the pandemic – with testing and protocols – have also drawn a huge spotlight on the region’s growing capability in the biosciences. Thriving Bioscience “The science that we’ve known the University of Arizona for is still a major driver for this economy and probably will be more important going into the future,” Snell said. “I think the visibility that Dr. Robbins has created has definitely helped us because, remember, one of the things we’ve always struggled with is living in the shadow of Phoenix. Getting that visibility out there is important.” Robbins said “it wasn’t intentional” that UArizona catapulted to the forefront of the biosciences industry, rather it was a circumstance of the pandemic and the university’s robust COVID-19 response. Robbins, a physician heading up a major research university, was frequently on national television and UArizona developed its own COVID-19 tests. The highly visible former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Richard Carmona was put in charge of UArizona’s incident command system. “No. 1, we knew from the start that taking this seriously was going to be im70 BizTucson

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portant,” Robbins said. “No. 2 is that we had to control our own destiny because we were going to be at the end of the supply chain. So getting our own tests, producing our own test kits, getting an organized incident command system with Dr. Carmona leading that, we made all the right moves early on.” It was an added boost to the momentum already being generated in the region’s biosciences industry. In midNovember, Sun Corridor Inc. released a summary of advances in creating jobs and gaining funding for the biosciences sector: u Arizona added 9,696 bioscience industry jobs between 2016-2018, an 8.3% growth rate, faster than the state’s overall job growth rate of 6.2%. u

From 2017-2018, wages for bioscience workers in Arizona increased by 4.9%. The national average increase was 4.1%.

u

In 2018, bioscience annual wages were nearly $18,000 above Arizona’s private-sector average.

u

From 2016-2018, bioscience research and development at Arizona’s universities grew by 25%, more than twice the national rate of 12%.

Going forward, Eggen said, the recovery and resiliency plan must be realistic with easy-to-measure results that economic development leaders can include in their pitch to boost Tucson as the nation recovers. “We’re not going to be able to solve everything. We’re not going to be able to attack everything we need to,” Eggen said. “We need to focus on those areas where we think we can be the most successful. “Really, those areas kind of play into where Sun Corridor Inc.’s emphasis has been. You talk about aerospace and defense as a category, biotech, logistics, mining and energy. Those are focus areas that have certainly been at the forefront for Sun Corridor Inc.” Reviving Tourism An additional recovery category for the committee is one of the region’s longtime, baseline industries – tourism. Brent DeRaad, president and CEO of Visit Tucson, was the first to present to the full committee on the crucial

need for a recovery plan. Tourism is one of the hardest hit areas with acclaimed restaurants closing and travel and hotel business down significantly. “It’s really gratifying to us to have tourism included in the overall recovery package for Tucson,” DeRaad said. “Just in 2019, the amount of spending by visitors was $2.6 billion – with a ‘B.’ When you look at that and then look at the impacts on tourism and travel from COVID-19, it’s really been substantial. We need to see tourism and travel get back to where it was in 2019.” With tourism and travel business down about 35%, tourism jobs are also taking a hit. Visit Tucson had already established a tourism recovery plan. But now, with tourism as a component of the overall Sun Corridor Inc. recovery plan, the work can be seamless. “One of the biggest things we’ve seen is that great places to live are great places to visit, and it’s really incumbent upon us to make sure that we’re partnering with Sun Corridor Inc. and with the business community as a whole to make Tucson a stronger place,” he said. “We need better roads. How do we enhance attractions? How do we get people visiting restaurants and keep these restaurants alive? How do we make Tucson better?” Rich, as chair of Sun Corridor Inc. and TMC’s CEO, has a unique perspective every day on the region’s ability to recover. The nurse of 17 years is not only managing a hospital during a pandemic and its priorities, she’s also helping to lead the economic development strategy. “From an economic development perspective, this is the work that’s going to continue to grow us economically as a community,” she said. “I really believe that it’s good work. It’s solid work. And it’s going to reap great benefits. “If you’re talking about life after COVID, I would say that’s a little different. I have a different perspective on that. I think that the people who live here have a lot to do with how that life is going to look. If we continue to wear masks, if we sign up for a vaccine once it’s ready for us, if we respect the rules of social distancing and we follow those guidelines, I think this community can get back very rapidly next year. If we drag our feet on adopting the science that’s going to be out there for us, then I think it could drag on for a long, long time.”

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New Runway for Tucson International Airport $327 Million Project to Add Safety, Reliability Projects like the $327 million Tucson International Airport runway safety enhancement project don’t come around very often. Over the next five years, the massive Airfield Safety Enhancement Project will demolish an existing runway and relocate and reconstruct a new parallel runway to meet FAA updated safety and standards, with an added benefit of greater efficiency for incoming and outgoing aircraft. The project, which broke ground in October, will generate an estimated 2,700 construction and trade jobs using a number of contractors. It comes at a time of intense economic pressure caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. “It would be very easy to say we had 72 BizTucson

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better stop or we should not move forward because of the uncertainty in the world,” said Danette Bewley, president and CEO of the Tucson Airport Authority, which operates the airport system that includes Tucson International Airport and Ryan Airfield. Bewley was named president in December 2019 after serving as VP of operations and COO since 2012. “We said no, we have the federal funding set up and we need to get this project done no matter what to ensure airfield safety. In addition, those are people’s jobs down there. Those are people’s lives. They have rent, they have mortgages, they have families to feed, and we take that seriously as a community partner.”

The project has been through the planning, environmental and design stages for 10 years, which Bewley said is standard for a project like this to come to fruition, considering the funding challenges and the federal approvals needed for most airport infrastructure projects. “Since the majority of our funds are coming from the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), we have a lot of different hoops to jump through,” Bewley said. “This was a complicated project because of the size and scale and scope of it. It involved a lot of other players outside of the TAA.” The FAA, Arizona Department of Transportation, Pima County, the City of Tucson, the U.S. Air Force, the Ariwww.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: COURTESY TUCSON AIRPORT AUTHORITY

By Jay Gonzales


This will make us a more reliable airport for our commercial and business partners.

zona Air National Guard, airlines that use the airport, and Raytheon Missiles & Defense were all part of the planning and coordination process, Bewley said. “All of these partners had to come together with the FAA to identify the safety and standards measures, the ‘why’ of the project, and discuss how these changes impact all of the stakeholders and other government agencies,” Bewley said. The primary “why” is safety, said Mike Smejkal, VP of planning and engineering for Tucson Airport Authority. The centerpiece of the project is a new parallel runway, which will be the same size as the existing main runway used by all aircraft that land and take off from the airport. There will be new taxiways and other safety enhancements in the overall construction which is bro-

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– Mike Smejkal VP of Planning & Engineering Tucson Airport Authority

ken down into four projects. The new parallel runway means that when an issue disrupts traffic on one runway – for instance, when a landing aircraft gets a flat tire or has other trouble – the other runway will be available to prevent interruption and allow for the continuity of operation. In addition, one safety issue at TUS has been “runway incursions,” when an aircraft mistakenly taxis onto a runway or lands on a runway or the wrong runway without FAA authorization, which causes a safety issue and disruption to the normal operation of the airfield. “Most of the time the incidents are fairly minor, but you can have an aircraft blow a tire and the runway would be down for 30 or 40 minutes,” Smejkal said. “It always seems to happen on a Friday afternoon and during the heavy

departure block. The new parallel runway included in the ASE Project will make TUS a safer and more reliable airport for our commercial and business operators.” Smejkal said there are 30 companies or organizations that are part of the construction and design team. Opportunity for work is being spread out across the community, bringing welcome jobs and business for the next five years. “Once we start bidding more of the work, that contractor and subcontractor community will get even larger,” Smejkal said. “I think by the time this project is done, probably every contractor that does any sort of heavy civil work will have worked on a portion of this project.”

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

CHAIR OF THE BOARD PRESIDENT & CEO TMC HEALTHCARE JUDY

RICH

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

We had just completed our goals for the year when COVID-19 was initially reported in the United States. Much of that work was put aside as we re-engineered our work processes and our facility to prepare for the first surge. COVID-19’s impact was a paradox in that as a health crisis, one would expect greater use of the healthcare system. Instead, while we saw more patients coming to us with a new, deadly contagion, we also saw our business cut in half when the governor halted “elective” procedures. Fewer patients meant less need for bedside staff, support staff, administrative staff and onward. To share the burden, most staff reduced hours yet we worked hard to maintain the hours and paychecks for our lower earning staff. We also worked to ensure staff had what they needed, and not just personal protective equipment (PPE). We opened a shop to provide free toilet paper, baby formula, cereal, paper towels and other essential items. Since most schools have been virtual, many staff elected to be home to help their kids. We’re working on ways we can help, including exploring a learning center on campus. Also, our nurses, therapists, doctors and clinical staff are burning out. I worry about the long-term impacts of this stress. It’s made harder when this epidemic is fueled by a lack of compliance with simple, effective measures. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic? 

One of the long-term impacts is the realization that a large part of our society doesn’t believe in science or evidence-based decision-making and is susceptible to misinformation. Death rates are soaring as a result. I’m not sure how we crack this

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nut, but stronger STEM education and critical thinking skills are essential. While the promise of vaccines is encouraging, the latest Gallup survey showed only 58% of the country is willing to get vaccinated. I also worry about the long-term impact on our doctors, nurses and other clinical staff. The toll is significant and I fear, many will leave health care for careers in other industries. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

As businesses learned telecommuting was a viable alternative to cubicles, I expect we’ll see telecommuters choosing to live in Tucson. Our downtown is a very attractive place to live with reasonable cost of housing and a vibrant environment. Our biosciences sector has been part of the COVID-19 vaccine development and I see many promising new regional startups. I think as soon as it’s safe, people are going to travel again and increased tourism will help the region. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

I love the outdoors here – and that’s been a great opportunity for us during this pandemic. It’s so easy to find a comfortable patio – whether at a restaurant or right in my backyard. I’m not from the desert, but it didn’t take long to fall in love with the mountains, the majestic saguaros, the birds and wildlife! I have to say, though, it’s more about the people. Tucson has friendly, smart and kind people committed to their community – and their community hospital!

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

SECRETARY/TREASURER MANAGING DIRECTOR MIRAMAR VENTURES

DAVID

SMALLHOUSE

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

We have not experienced any major pivots besides those I think the majority of the local, regional and national business communities have had to make – more flexible work schedules to accommodate work from home, virtual meetings and no business travel. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Post COVID-19, I believe many of the pivots I previously mentioned will continue in some form for efficiency plus productivity reasons. Specifically, fewer traditional in-person meetings, less business travel and if  appropriate, the continuance of working away from traditional workplaces. Personally, I look forward to fewer virtual meetings with a gradual return to more in-person meetings. I know some organizations are also preparing for hybrid meetings going forward, where participants will have better options of attending remotely even if others attend in-person.   From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

Community College also plays a significant contributing role in creating and retraining our workforce talent pool. Our beautiful desert and open space, outdoor recreational opportunities, affordable living and high quality of life are significant drivers in attracting new companies and workers who no longer need to be working at the mother ship. Our friendly cultural ties and proximity to Mexico, with our strategic logistic and transportation assets, make us very attractive for post-COVID-19 international trade and reshoring activities.   What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Tucson is an engaging, open and friendly community with many of the diverse cultural amenities normally available only in larger metropolitan communities. Our proximity to Mexico, the fabulous food, music and theater scene, our awesome outdoor recreation and the mountains all really impact my quality of life. The influence of the University of Arizona cannot be overstated. Not only is it an economic driver and provider of top talent, but the community members that the university attracts make us a rich place to make friends. UArizona is a huge differentiator when compared to our peer regional communities. Tucson has a special vibe and soul which is so hard to come by.

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Tucson and Southern Arizona are already being recognized as potential winners, post-COVID-19, by many industry experts including CBRE, Moody’s and the Site Selectors Guild, to name a few. We are a midsize metropolitan community with a great university that provides world-class research, innovation and supplies talent to local companies/industry. Pima

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR PRESIDENT & CEO FORTIS INC. DAVID G.

HUTCHENS

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

deliver power, and I think many of those folks will continue working remotely at least some of the time – including me.

We quickly developed health, safety and sanitation protocols to allow our crews, system controllers and other critical employees to continue working together in person to keep energy flowing. We prioritized work on system improvements, shored up our supply chain and developed contingency plans to ensure the continued reliability of our service. Then, like a lot of employers, we transitioned the rest of our workforce out of our offices and into remote work, usually from their homes. Our Information Services team did a great job getting everyone set up with the tools we’ve used to remain productive throughout this pandemic. We also made sure to take care of our customers by providing increased support for bill payment assistance and COVID-19 relief efforts through our community partners.

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

We’ve seen a shift in electric consumption, with residential customers using more energy at the same time many businesses have pared back. Other utilities have seen similar trends, but the impact here has been more significant because so many people became so much more dependent on the HVAC units in their homes, particularly during this year’s hotter-than-usual weather. While we expect some reversion to previous patterns once a vaccine becomes widely available, many businesses have learned their employees can be very productive while working from home. We expect remote work will continue long after the pandemic has eased – including for us at Tucson Electric Power. We have many employees who are not directly involved in operating or maintaining the systems we use to generate and 78 BizTucson

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Our community is really the perfect size to respond to this kind of challenge. We’re large enough to provide employers with a diverse, flexible and well-educated workforce without being so large that our transportation or infrastructure challenges will become overwhelming. Our warm climate will allow us to continue spending time outdoors through the winter, helping to reduce the increased risk of viral transmission that most communities face while forced inside during a cold winter. We also benefit from strong collaboration among the leaders of our local governments and the business community, helping us develop timely responses to emerging challenges. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

The weather is high on my list, of course. It’s the main reason I came here from Minnesota to attend the University of Arizona. I stayed because of all the wonderful people I’ve met here – including of course, my wife, Cathy, who I met while we were both engineering students at UArizona. We’ve raised two wonderful daughters here, and I really enjoy spending time with them and enjoying Tucson’s friendly, college-town atmosphere. I also appreciate our community’s environmental focus, which is why I’m proud that TEP is so committed to clean energy, electric vehicles and community partnerships that protect our unique desert ecosystem.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

PRESIDENT & CEO SUN CORRIDOR INC.

JOE

SNELL

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

The economic development business relies on strong relationships with site selectors and traditionally those relationships have been built in person. The standard site selection process is a difficult task amid COVID-19: the ability to physically visit a location. So, we have quickly shifted our mindset to virtual resources to maintain and build company and site selector relationships. With severely limited travel, we have become experts with Zoom and other virtual methods in order to stay top of mind in a very competitive landscape.  These technical skills and the addition of other virtual tools in our arsenal allow us to continue aggressively promoting Tucson and Southern Arizona as a business center. We have been successful in this shift. Case in point – we recently landed a new company, Sandvik, which conducted their entire site selection process virtually.  They signed the lease without ever having stepped foot in Tucson.  Sandvik officials  told us that finding partners like Sun Corridor Inc. that can connect with you virtually while advocating for you physically is invaluable in the new operating environment for growing businesses. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

There are several key trends emerging in economic development today. First, with the global disruption of supply chain caused by the pandemic, there is a growing trend of manufacturers considering near- and on-shoring their operations. Our proximity to Mexico and transportation infrastructure - via rail, air and highways with access to ports in LA – are huge benefits.  We believe virtual tours and limited business travel will turn from short-term trends to long-term trends, as com80 BizTucson

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panies are finding that it’s cost-effective and still productive. However, there is Zoom fatigue. Ultimately, I believe it’ll be a mix. Face-to-face still matters. I believe that companies will not authorize travel at the same levels they did when the pandemic is behind us. I think virtual meetings are here to stay. People will be allowed to work from home at least partially. This will change the types of buildings we need in the future. It is important for us to create an ecosystem to support the remote worker. Incentives that support people working from home and creating communities with high quality of life will change economic development.   From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

First, we had a strong economic foundation prior to the pandemic and that means those contributing factors, with or without pandemic, still exist and will speed our return to a healthy economy.  Economies that will be successful in the post-pandemic environment are those that offer a high quality pool of talent, innovative and effective workforce training and connected cost-effective real estate offerings. Site selectors and real estate consultants agree and predict that the most dynamic recoveries may bypass traditional powerhouses and take place in areas that were poised for growth in 2020 before COVID-19. Southern Arizona’s size, population density, wide open spaces and proximity to universities are our greatest strengths.  What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

I enjoy the outdoor amenities that Southern Arizona has to offer. From golfing to hiking to simply sitting by the pool.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT & CEO CHICANOS POR LA CAUSA

DAVID

ADAME

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

Chicanos Por La Causa operates in Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas and California, impacting almost 380,000 lives annually and many more indirectly. Our management team immediately went into pandemic mode. Office workers who could work from home have been doing so since March. Staff whose jobs required they meet with the public were advised of the latest COVID-19 preventative practices. The safety of our nearly 1,000 employees and the public is our top priority. We immediately realized it was not “business as usual” and addressed the resulting economic challenges. We hustled to get PPP loans to keep small businesses open. We serviced more than 920 loans, saving nearly 4,000 jobs. CPLC helped families facing crisis-related emergencies through rent and utility help and assistance to fight homelessness. We provided refurbished computers for students forced to learn at home, helping to address the digital divide. We provided basic needs and food boxes, including holiday bags. We have been involved with messaging prevention, testing, tracking and soon, helping out with vaccination distribution. In short, it was more than a “pivot.” It was more of “a full-court press” and we will continue to do so to serve the Latino community. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Most local and state COVID-19 relief efforts have come from the federal government. We know there is still political wrangling in Washington, D.C., with eviction moratoriums and supplemental unemployment insurance soon to expire. For an alarming number of people, the initial $1,200 individual stimulus check sent early in the pandemic is gone – as are any personal emergency funds. Many people have lost their 82 BizTucson

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jobs or seen their hours greatly reduced. In addition to many Latinos suffering from COVID-19, many families may soon face eviction – possibly their first such housing emergency. As a society, how can we help both landlord and tenant? We await the next relief package and the one after that. Perhaps 40% or more Arizonans who contracted the virus are Latino with a much higher death rate than the general population, yet the ensuing economic crisis will be felt for months and perhaps years by our most vulnerable. We must think both short-term and long-term. We must recover as a unified nation in an equitable way. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

One of the great advantages of our state, particularly our region, is its wide open space. Our ability to remain socially distant and leverage the research, technological and medical expertise of the University of Arizona, Banner Health and others is extremely advantageous. The robust multicultural community and sunny climate make us highly attractive to many industries globally.    What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

We are so fortunate here in Arizona to have such natural beauty. I particularly enjoy the Sonoran Desert landscape, mountains, history and culture. My family and I consider Tucson our second home. We have a house here, two of our daughters attend UArizona and Pima Community College and our son lives and works here. My CPLC Familia has been actively serving the greater Tucson community for 40 years! When I’m here, without a doubt, I am home. 

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT & CEO TUCSON AIRPORT AUTHORITY

DANETTE

BEWLEY

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

Tucson International Airport (TUS) was on track to serve 4 million passengers in 2020, but instead welcomed only hundreds a day during the pandemic’s early stages. When the bottom finally came, it was far worse than anyone imagined. Airlines cut flights, concessions closed and the terminal became a ghost town. Our top priorities have always been safety, security and customer service, and the pandemic has crystalized those. We started the TUS CARES campaign and invested over a quarter of a million dollars in safety and cleaning enhancements. The measures included compliance with all CDC guidelines, social distancing messaging and signage throughout the airport and on shuttle busses, sanitizer dispensers, ultra violet lights to sanitize escalator and moving walkway handrails and elevator toe-kick buttons. We upgraded cleaning products and HVAC filters and mandated face coverings. We applied for and achieved the coveted gold standard accreditation from the Global Biorisk Advisory Council – only the 5th airport in the world to achieve it. We remain focused on best practices and innovative ideas and have made internal adjustments to closely manage and control spending. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Before the pandemic, U.S. airlines were experiencing a “Golden Age” of sorts, with U.S. airlines seeing an average 2.5 million passengers each day. Air travel between the U.S. and foreign countries reached an all-time high with nearly 80 million foreign visitors coming to the U.S. in 2019. The pandemic has since forced several airlines to restructure or cease operations. The first nine months of 2020 reflected operating reve-

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nues down about 60%. The industry is facing a material toll on U.S. airline employment – some reports indicate a reduction between March and September of 90,000 airline employees. The rate of layoffs and furloughs is projected to continue unless additional federal relief is provided. Through the CARES Act, the nations’ airports were granted $10 billion through a FAA grant – the share that TUS and RYN is eligible for is $22.6 million. TAA is using CARES Act funds to offset revenue losses, assist airlines through reduced rent and the waiver of certain minimum annual guarantees with concessionaires. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

The pandemic has created pent-up demand for travel, and leisure travelers are seeking open spaces and a desirable climate. Tucson is well-positioned to attract these travelers with wonderful hotels and resorts and an outdoor atmosphere for those seeking exercise and scenic beauty. TUS and the airlines serving TUS are taking notice. Airlines are adding flights and increasing capacity at a faster rate than many other airports. Though TUS is nowhere near pre-pandemic flight levels, the percentage of returning passengers is outpacing airports in California and in the Northeast. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Tucson is a lovely place to live because of the friendly people, climate and scenic beauty, the diverse culture, amazing art galleries and restaurants, and, of course, the outdoor lifestyle. It is also a place that people want to visit for the same reasons, while staying at our fine hotels and five-star resorts. Tucson is a region that has something for everyone.

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

2021


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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

SUPERVISOR, DISTRICT 3 PIMA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

SHARON

BRONSON

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

As the regional public health agency, Pima County has the sole responsibility for implementing public health actions during the pandemic. This caused a substantial shift in resources and personnel to our public health agency.  Our agency has been responsible for all testing, contract tracing and advisories, as well as, regulatory actions to minimize the spread of COVID-19. As a political subdivision of the state, Pima County cannot enact measures to prevent COVID-19 without the consent of the state.  This is the primary reason the county enacted a mask-in-public mandate days after a governor’s executive order allowed such. The county is a public service organization and as such, delivers services through our essential workers.  Even during the governor’s stay at home order, law enforcement continued to operate, the Pima County Adult Detention Center could not shut down. Transportation employees continued to maintain the roads and our wastewater employees continued to provide essential utility services.  Most of our workforce would be classified as essential employees. One of the bigger challenges was continuing to provide these services, while also providing equipment, processes and procedures that minimized the risk of COVID-19 for our employees. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the US and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

It is likely the long-term impacts will include increased remote or online working and a substantial shift in retail activity to online services.

From your business vantage point, what qualities put Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

The factors that will lead to a quicker economic recovery are related to how well the county has handled the pandemic, whether our actions are viewed by others as responsible, proactive and responsive to the medical needs of those infected with COVID-19. Pima County has received high marks for our COVID-19 response and earned a reputation as a proactive public health agency. In addition, our population size as a medium metropolitan area makes us attractive for relocations of employers and individuals from much larger areas as we have few natural disasters that affect the workforce and productivity.  Our primary threats are from fire and floods.  Fires occur mostly within the federal public lands surrounding Tucson and floods have been effectively managed through continued flood control investments. Finally, we have continued to plan and prepare for economic expansion through refining and advancing our Economic Development Master Plan in concert with Sun Corridor Inc. to train the workforce, provide shovel-ready locations for new or expanding employers and we continue to make directed infrastructure investment. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

We live and work in an ecological wonderland that I’m proud to have played a leading role in protecting over the past 20 years.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE DOD LIAISON

COMMANDER 162ND WING MORRIS AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE BRIGADIER GENERAL

JEFFREY L.

BUTLER

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

This pandemic caught us a bit off guard like the rest of the nation. Fortunately, our airmen are quite resilient and highly trainable, so we learned how to fight to this disease like any other opposing force. We carried two teams from April through August with maximum telework where applicable and working separate 14-day shifts in order to naturally segregate and prevent spread.  We also established 100% medical screening early in the pandemic.  In Arizona, our leader of the National Guard (Maj. Gen Michael McGuire) is a “Super TAG,” which means he also leads DEMA (Department of Emergency and Military Affairs).  As such, he is responsible to the citizens of Arizona in community, state and federal capacities.  McGuire’s proactive approach provided real-time information and a smart way forward in aligning with current policy and accelerated our learning how to combat this disease.  Since September, we have transitioned back to our full-time force, still maximizing telework and have been able to continue mission.  We have learned a lot with respect to this pandemic and have active measures in place to test and quickly contact trace when needed.  This has prevented this disease from stopping our ability to execute mission.  I’m proud of our citizen airmen and their resolve to prevail during this pandemic. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

steep virtual learning curve, but overall I would say the military has continued to execute mission in a fairly robust manner. We are still deploying on time and meeting requirements.  Much of this is due to the targeted nature of this particular virus.  Our airmen do not typically experience heavy symptoms if infected. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

We have the right climate to inhibit this disease, for one. The military footprint here is also a strong point with DavisMonthan and Morris installations bringing the city of Tucson usable revenue as well as patriotism in the local community.  Beyond that, people love living and working in Tucson. All you have to do is step outside anytime from October to May. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

What’s not to like? Tucson is a great place to raise a family and I have seven kids.  It’s also a fun college town with a downtown that will rival anything this nation has to offer.  My family and I also enjoy anything outdoors and Tucson offers the world in outdoor climate enjoyment.

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The U.S. military tends to thrive in crisis. There are definite impacts in the way of training delays enterprise-wide, and a

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

VICE PRESIDENT CATERPILLAR RESOURCE INDUSTRIES SALES, SERVICES AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION MARC

CAMERON

2021

As we welcome you to Tucson, describe your background in your industry, and what the immediate future holds?

I started my career as a civil engineer at Peter Kiewit Sons’ Inc., a large construction and engineering organization. I was given lots of opportunities in that role and it eventually led me to mining. After Peter Kiewit Sons’ Inc., I spent 18 years at Rio Tinto Plc, where I held various leadership roles, including as president and CEO for Diavik Diamond Mines and the Managing Director for Kennecott Utah Copper. Recently, I led the development and execution of the end-of-life strategy for Rio’s North American legacy assets. My wife, Charlie, and I plus our three sons Wyatt, Ryder, and Brooks have relocated to Tucson after I was named the VP of Caterpillar Inc. I am responsible for the Resource Industries Sales, Services and Technology Division, which includes all aspects of the go-to-market strategy for surface and underground mining, as well as services and technology. As I transition into this role and Tucson, I plan to do a lot of listening over the next few months to determine how I can best serve my team and my community. What are your first impressions of the region?

The Tucson area is booming with opportunity! It’s a diverse and welcoming community complete with top-notch universities and a great quality of life. It offers both the small-town feel and big-town amenities, which is something you can’t get in a lot of cities. As an avid outdoorsman, my family and I are looking forward to further exploring Tucson’s beautiful landscape and experiencing its unique culture. The people have been extremely welcoming, and I am genuinely impressed with the hospitality and kindness I’ve received. Thank you.

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What corporate goals do you have here in Southern Arizona?

One of our priorities is to partner with local schools, colleges, and universities to develop future talent. Providing students with exposure to mining as a whole and all facets of the industry, such as engineering, technology, business, machining, and welding to name a few, will provide an opportunity for future careers. It is essential to enriching our diverse talent pipeline so that we can continue to fill critical roles. In addition to developing local talent, we want to also contribute to the region’s success in attracting top talent and industries to Southern Arizona.  Tucson is a place where people want to live and work. We have a collective interest to ensure our community’s continued growth and economic success. Mining has a long history here and we are grateful to be part of the community in Southern Arizona. What are you looking forward to, both personally and professionally, in moving to Tucson?

As a new resident of Tucson, I am looking forward to meeting all the people both at Caterpillar and within the community. Relationship building and networking are very important to me – especially right now with so many people working virtually. It is critical to help us build and grow, and to our mental health and safety. I am also looking forward to working with other Tucson business leaders on the greatest challenges impacting our community.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

MICHAEL

CROW

2021

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

The key pivot points for us relative to the pandemic have been to accelerate innovation and to maintain steady focus. Luckily, we’ve been able to do both and we will be a stronger institution after COVID-19 than we were prior to the pandemic. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic? 

The long-term impact of the pandemic is that those who are technologically agile, highly innovative and adaptive, and capable of culture change will survive and prosper.   Others who choose to wait for a return to what was pre-pandemic will struggle with its artifacts as well as the rapidly accelerating rate of technological, physical and social change. 

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

The Tucson metro area, in the Sun Corridor, possesses many positive qualities, including its physical location in one of the most beautiful places on the planet. This, plus its open culture and drive for success make Tucson a fabulous place to start or build a business, particularly in those areas where Arizona has a natural advantage, like industries related to health outcomes, sustainability and the environment, and innovation. If we can further accentuate these advantages it will be to everyone’s benefit. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

The attributes of Tucson that I personally enjoy the most are the culture, the uniqueness of the city itself, the natural physical beauty and the diversity of its population. All of these things give Tucson a unique edge in building its future.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT RAYTHEON MISSILES & DEFENSE

WESLEY D.

KREMER

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

We learned early on how to streamline our processes to get capabilities into our customers’ hands. One of the first things we did, along with our government customers, was shift most of our workforce to remote working. Before the pandemic, we were highly reliant on in-person meetings to drive action, which required extensive lead time to coordinate, plus the time and cost associated with traveling. By rapidly adopting remote work, we’re wiping out years of practices that didn’t always serve us. For the most part, productivity levels haven’t fallen off since this transition, and in many ways, I feel we are more efficient and nimble now.   What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

One thing COVID-19 has allowed us to do is refocus on digitally transforming our business, which will take years off the DoD acquisition process and allow us to deliver solutions that outpace threats sooner. In the digital environment, our customers can see the impacts of decisions in real time, and when issues arise, they can mitigate immediately to avoid rework and delays. This will have a transformative impact, enabling data-driven decision making, which saves time, reduces costs and shortens delivery timelines in ways we’ve never seen before. Our entire organization will be solving problems by using technology enablers like Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, DevSecOps, Cloud Computing and 5G to not just understand but predict behavior. We see this in pockets now, but a full digital transformation will allow us to consistently apply these enablers in meaningful ways across not just our business but our entire industry. 94 BizTucson

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From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

We all know the ongoing impact of the pandemic has hit the commercial aerospace industry especially hard. But, on the defense side, where Raytheon Missiles & Defense is primarily focused, business remains strong. We are continuing to hire and expand our global footprint. And as the largest private employer in the region, that’s good news for Tucson. The city’s business-friendly regulatory environment and investment in workforce training and education make it very attractive to industry, and that enables businesses like RMD to attract topnotch talent to the region. It was also good news to read that Forbes magazine listed Tucson as one of the 10 U.S. cities best positioned to recover from coronavirus. The city is well known throughout our industry as an attractive and vibrant place for aerospace professionals who also look for flexibility, space, career progression and income growth. This should give Tucson a recovery advantage over many other cities across the country.   What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Tucson is a beautiful place with rich culture, friendly people, great food and even better weather. We have 350 days of sunshine a year and can enjoy the outdoors more often than most other parts of the country. From hiking and rock climbing, cycling on The Loop, to attending a cultural event downtown or cheering on the Wildcats at a home game, there is so much activity and adventure this city has to offer. With its small town feel and charm, it’s a great place to raise a family.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

CHANCELLOR PIMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

LEE

LAMBERT

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

Pima Community College suspended face-to-face operations in early March and redesigned nearly 2,000 classes and many student services to deliver effective education and support to students when classes resumed, almost exclusively online. We retooled multiple systems to quickly relieve the pandemic’s economic strain on students. PCC received about $9.9 million in CARES Act funding. In April, PCC began to distribute $7.1 million to students, based on need and the number of credit-hours taken in the spring semester. Our Governing Board approved spending up to $2.6 million in those funds to close the digital divide that inhibits success of many students. PCC has purchased nearly 2,100 laptops and tablets and 250 WiFi hotspots. More than 1,000 students were approved devices on loan as of late November and more than 3,550 students received degrees and/or certificates during 2020 graduation – a number comparable to years past. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Higher education is recognizing its role in addressing the broad economic inequality revealed by the pandemic. The pandemic has also accelerated trends already taking hold in higher education, such as the pivot to online delivery of education and support. One such trend has been students’ increasing interest in short-term credentials. PCC is part of the Community College Growth Engine Fund that seeks to build “micropathways” – two or more credentials that can be packaged together to quickly connect learners to employment.

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From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

The Tucson region’s economy should rebound because elected officials, business and government leaders recognize that an educated workforce is a critical driver of short-term recovery and long-term revitalization. Area businesses understand that a well-trained workforce drawn from all races, ethnicities and gender identities will enhance their own competitiveness as well as Tucson’s overall economy. Appreciation of education and diversity has been evident throughout the pandemic. On Election Day, 70 percent of Pima County voters approved Proposition 481, which enables PCC to use more of the revenues it has collected to enhance student experiences. PCC also became part of significant public-private partnerships to prepare workers to rebound economically and to thrive in a world being transformed by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Artificial Intelligence, mobile technology, cloud computing and the Internet of Things are key enablers of change in our region. Notable among these initiatives is the Reskilling and Recovery Network, a 20-state collaboration focused on helping women and communities of color who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic, and a partnership with Amazon Web Services and the Arizona Commerce Authority to increase access to cloud computing education. PCC has aided the region’s economic revitalization by developing Centers of Excellence – cutting-edge spaces created with the needs and expectations of industry in Applied Technology, Cybersecurity/Information Technology and other key sectors. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

I love the natural beauty of the area. The sunsets and the mountains are incredible to view and experience. The people are warm and friendly and care deeply about their community.. Biz www.BizTucson.com

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

MARKET VP SOUTHERN ARIZONA COX COMMUNICATIONS

LISA

LOVALLO

2021

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

At Cox, we understand the critical role our products and services play in keeping families, businesses and schools functioning. During this pandemic, our teams have been working harder than ever to keep the community connected. We have put the safety of our employees and customers above everything else. Since March, we have been following all CDC guidelines and protocols, which has changed how we interact with customers.  PPE, masks and social distancing have temporarily changed how we work together and it has made our customer’s experience less personal.  We look forward to returning to a place where we can shake our customers hands, have lunch with colleagues and hug someone we care about.  What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

In the beginning of the pandemic, we stopped entering customers’ homes. Using new technology, new apps and common sense, our teams found ways to help customers help themselves. A customer’s ability to install our products and services without waiting days for an appointment has been a positive outcome. It is safer, it is faster and it is less expensive for everyone. It’s one example of how the pandemic created an opportunity to improve the customer experience. What is important long term is that we don’t lose the goodness that has come out of our pandemic response. We don’t want to “snap back” to the old way of doing certain things. The businesses that thrive in the future will be those that take advantage of what they learned during the pandemic. 

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

Tucson has many advantages. We have a large-enough population base to have great amenities, we have the University of Arizona driving innovation and industry, we have significant employers adding jobs and our cultural connection to Mexico makes our region unique and special. Our housing costs remain affordable, we have committed ourselves to protecting our environment and preserving our local habitat, wild spaces and open spaces. The pandemic has opened up the opportunity for a large percentage of the global workforce to work anywhere. Tucson is an attractive place for the new, virtual workforce. I think the way we handle the deployment of the vaccine will be critical to our ability to bounce back faster than other communities. We also need to be mindful about how CARES Act funds and additional stimulus dollars are applied to local needs.  If both of those things are done well, we will be in good shape in 2021.  What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

The pandemic has made me much more appreciative of my own neighborhood. Terri and I have been walking in our neighborhood almost every day since March. I have gotten to know so many of my neighbors and that has been a huge silver lining for us. Tucson has active and engaged neighborhoods.  I think that’s a strength. When neighbors know each other, help each other, care about each other and work together to make the community stronger, everyone wins. 

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

CEO UAVENTURE CAPITAL

FLETCHER

M c CUSKER

2021

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

We help commercialize University of Arizona technology. With the campus closed during the pandemic a lot of projects were delayed, labs were closed, committees on hiatus. There was no pivot for us, just delays. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

We don’t see long term impacts in the innovation, invention fields or university tech transfer. Raising capital will be more challenging, with investors taking less risk.

What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Tucson’s food culture has been right up there with the top five cities in America and our music scene was second only to Austin, I believe. Food and music are the two most challenged activities during the COVID-19 shutdown. We have lost some of our best restaurants and the concert venues are dark. Bringing our entertainment sector back to where it was will be a huge challenge, but I am personally dedicated to both causes and convinced we will be back and better than ever. “I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.” – Maya Angelou.

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From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

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Tucson’s geographic location, dispersed living, cost of living and innovation/tech culture make us one of the most desirable cities post-pandemic.  

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

VP & TUCSON REGIONAL DIRECTOR, BUILDING GROUP SUNDT CONSTRUCTION INC. IAN

MCDOWELL

2021

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

When the construction industry was deemed essential, we found ourselves on the leading edge of figuring out how to provide safe environments for our employees and subcontracting partners during the pandemic. We had to improvise ways to find or make items that were in short supply.  We actually wound up “manufacturing” hand sanitizer in our warehouse so we would have an adequate supply. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Construction work has been steady through the pandemic in the region, providing continued employment and new opportunities for displaced workers. Efforts by Sun Corridor Inc. have provided a new stream of employment opportunities, as well. I also think we are reaping the benefits of good momentum from companies like Caterpillar moving to town and the explosive growth downtown spurred by Rio Nuevo. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Too many to list. I love the food and the cultural offerings. I love that there is new growth blended with rich history. I love that the Arizona Bowl is the only bowl that gives all the proceeds to charity. I love that we are such a close-knit community.  I love that when my kids were younger, we would go to the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum every weekend. Did I mention the weather?

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The construction industry has been fortunate to be able to continue work during the pandemic. We are all watching to see how the airline and hospitality industries recover long term from the pandemic and how that will affect the built environment for these industries.  We are also interested to see how pandemic-induced “work from home” situations will affect office building demand and configurations in the future.  

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

GENERAL MANAGER BOMBARDIER AVIATION TUCSON SERVICE CENTER MIKE

MÉNARD

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

In the business aviation industry, safety is, and has always been, at the top of our priorities. To address the pandemic, we have added another dimension to our safety focus: viral protection for our customers, employees and business partners. Bombardier has taken prompt, decisive action to ensure that potential COVID-19 exposure and transmission is mitigated. We implemented new shift structures to minimize unnecessary contacts between employees, deployed technology for those who could work from home and implemented strict masking and enhanced sanitation protocols. Fortunately, the fundamental nature of our business didn’t have to change, but we did adapt to ensure we can continue to operate safely, preserving the health of all involved.   What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

The pandemic – with its ensuing heightened focus on safety and security – has highlighted the value of private business and personal travel. The value of in-person presence for many events has not lost its importance and will continue to be a necessity for both domestic and international business. The airline travel markets will recover in time. However, the recovery path of business aviation will be much steeper as the need for safe, efficient travel continues to increase globally. This trend has already begun even as the pandemic continues, as we all adapt to the new normal. It will only accelerate as vaccines are developed and deployed and the world rebounds. Bombardier’s business jets are now more than ever a key business tool. 

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?  

The region has a broad diversity of industries and businesses which help keep the economy balanced. The fact that area businesses remain resilient amid the COVID-19 pandemic means that the region’s most valuable resource – its people – will power future growth. Every enterprise has been adversely affected by the pandemic but most Tucson businesses have adapted and continue to prosper. Area businesses have lost less ground and have less “making up” to do before they can resume growth and economic expansion.   Bombardier’s Tucson Service Center has actually grown over the past year, continuing to support local businesses. We have added personnel to all our business lines, responding to increased demand for aircraft maintenance services and supporting new aircraft deliveries across all of Bombardier’s model lineup starting with our flagship, the Global 7500.  What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Tucson has its own hockey team – as a Canadian that should be all I need to know! However, as a new resident here, what strikes me the most – in addition to the beautiful mountain views in every direction – are the many activities and opportunities here. There is something for every season and every taste. Even through this pandemic, the eclectic restaurant scene remains vibrant. Within a couple hours’ drive, there are outdoor activities from skiing to fishing to hiking to top-rated golf facilities. The Tucson area offers all the advantages and opportunities of the big city and very few – if any – of the downsides.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS & SECRETARY PIMA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

2021

This past year, our work in the Tucson community has been defined by the pandemic and our response to it. Overwhelmingly, we have had an “all-hands-on-deck” response from the IDA’S support organizations (Community Investment Corporation, Family Housing Resources and Southern Arizona Land Trust) to meet the unforeseen needs of the community. More specifically, the Community Investment Corporation’s capacity as a fiscal agent for local government programs, partnered with Pima County to administer a $3.625 million grant to provide eviction prevention assistance to almost 1,000 county residents. With an estimated 74,000 renting households unable to make a rent payment over a three-month period, and an estimated cost of the impending eviction crisis without rent assistance interventions at over $419 million to the community, taking on this role was essential in our economic development and preservation role. The IDA has seen the current low interest rate environment reflect an increase in borrowings, including bond issues through the IDA. The low interest rates on home mortgages have meant that the use of down payment assistance programs that the IDA created, both “Pima Tucson Homebuyer Solution” and the “Single Family Mortgage Credit Certificates” have exploded, all with the goal of assisting affordable home ownership. Anyone trying to buy a home in Pima County is aware of this dynamic. However, the uncertain economic situation has also resulted in an increase in forbearances for the existing home loans. Family Housing Resources, as certified HID counseling entity, is actively involved in both foreclosure and eviction counseling, as well.

QUIHUIS

What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

The current political environment has created a great deal of uncertainty, impacting legislation, technology, government funding, fundraising and employee engagement. During this time when more services are needed from the general nonprofit industry, non-profits must also navigate through COVID-19 challenges and safety measures, mitigate uncertainty in funding sources from government entities and prepare for continued change in 2021. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

The ability of our local business leaders and local politicians to work together and quickly respond to safety measures (such as COVID-19 testing, wearing masks, social distancing, curfews, etc.) will help slow the spread of the pandemic and will improve economic recovery. However, the speed and delivery of the vaccine and approval of a new federal stimulus package for small business owners and Tucson residents is also key to our economic recovery. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

As a native of Tucson, I have come to appreciate our desert and scenic beauty. Our winter weather is often sunny and enjoyable. Our weather is why many tourists leave their snowy homes in search of some sunshine and warmer climate. It is a good time for outdoor activities. Our history and diverse culture also make Tucson a great place to live.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

DIANE


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

DR. ROBERT C.

ROBBINS

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

Nearly every aspect of our operations had to pivot. In March, our faculty and staff quickly adapted courses for remote learning, while also putting risk reduction measures in place to keep critical research labs open. The change created severe financial challenges, mitigated with a hiring freeze, pausing new construction projects, and furlough and furlough-based salary reduction programs. Led by Dr. Richard Carmona, former U.S. surgeon general and a longtime faculty member, our reentry team worked over the summer and throughout the fall semester to implement our Test, Trace, Treat strategy and create a campus environment that would minimize the risk of viral transmission and allow us to offer in-person classes.    What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic? 

The pandemic has had a severe impact on higher education. We will emerge strong at the University of Arizona, but things are going to look different, probably for a long time. Online education was already growing, and that growth has accelerated. Online learning provides increased access to flexible, affordable, high-quality education, particularly non-traditional and underrepresented adult learners. It also allows us to continue serving international students who can no longer travel as freely. Our academic affiliation with the new, independent, Arizona non-profit, the University of Arizona Global Campus, will help extend the university’s mission to many more students.

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From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

The pandemic has demonstrated the extent to which we live in a global society, where the challenges of one community can have an impact worldwide. It also has demonstrated how Tucson and Arizona have the capacity for adaptation and problem solving necessary to lead on a global stage. We all need to work together, across the private and public sectors, across industries and disciplines. Southern Arizona’s culture of collaboration has primed us to emerge stronger than ever, if we take the public health emergency seriously and slow the spread of the virus. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

I have always loved the heat in Arizona, and the Tucson community is incredible.

Biz PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

2021

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

SENIOR VP & REGIONAL MANAGER HARSCH INVESTMENT PROPERTIES

2021

The safety of our tenants, vendors and staff has been our top priority since the start of this pandemic. We then took a look at the financial impact of the pandemic across the Harsch Investment Properties portfolio, which consists of industrial, office, retail and multifamily properties, and assessed what resources our team would need to respond to issues in each product type and for each tenant individually. For our teams across all of the Harsch offices, it has been “all hands on deck,” as we work through what we need to do to keep our tenants operating safely and prepare our properties for a shift in how the public and our tenants use these physical spaces. We were looking forward to introducing our first speculative industrial project in Tucson at an incredible ribbon cutting event in March with the Mayor, City Council members and industry leaders, but that had to be delayed due to the pandemic. Our plan has always been to open a regional office in Tucson to serve our tenant base throughout Arizona. We moved forward with those plans despite the pandemic and it has been key to our success in retaining tenants and growing our footprint in the market. We’re now looking at filling the remaining vacancy at Tucson Airport Distribution Center with some amazing distribution tenants. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic? 

The most dramatic trend in the commercial real estate industry is the increased demand for warehouse and distribution space. The need for large functional buildings to accommodate e-commerce and last-mile users has exploded because of the pandemic and will likely have permanent implications going

www.BizTucson.com

RODEWALD

forward. The office and retail sectors have been negatively impacted in the short term and have required individual tenant attention and cooperation, but those sectors should improve as we move toward an end to the pandemic. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

Open space and attitude. There has been a documented flight from densely built and populated cities because of the pandemic, with many companies learning they can survive and thrive outside of a downtown high rise. Employees now realize that hour-long commutes on subways or on crowded freeways are avoidable. Las Vegas, Reno, Salt Lake City, Boise and Tucson should benefit from these trends. The attitude component involves what I see as an amazing team approach in Tucson involving local government, education, industry and business leaders toward smart growth and a strong economy. Harsch Investment Properties is active in many communities on the West Coast and rarely do we see the level of cooperation among local stakeholders. Sun Corridor Inc. plays a significant role in this dynamic and they will be an important part in the recovery of the region. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

Beyond the friends and business partners that I have met and worked with, I absolutely love the natural resources and outdoor opportunities available in and around Tucson. The food scene is another huge plus as are the wonderful hotels and resorts. The Arizona Inn seems like my second home.

Biz

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

BILL


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

MAYOR CITY OF TUCSON

REGINA

ROMERO

2021

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

The City of Tucson immediately moved to a virtual work environment to keep all of our employees safe, while not skipping a beat in providing core services. Over the past year, our amazing city team and dedicated employees have been adjusting and re-evaluating while pivoting to serve the City of Tucson. We moved to virtual mayor and council meetings, set up mask giveaways, testing sites and virtual permit reviews. In May, to support the local economy, we launched a pilot program for businesses to temporarily extend outdoor dining areas and received approval within 72 hours. This was in addition to waiving easement and parking fees. I also asked the council to support an initiative to amend the parklet policy and permanently extend outdoor dining for businesses. Small business navigators were added to the team and have fielded almost 700 requests for assistance through October.

long-term goals. The good news is that we have momentum. In May, Moody’s Analytics ranked Tucson among the Top 10 U.S. Cities Best Positioned to Recover from the Coronavirus. In July, the Site Selectors Guild identified Tucson among top mid-sized cities for new projects. Thanks to wise financial planning by mayor and council, with support from the city manager and his financial team, the city is positioned to weather this pandemic and return even stronger. For the first time, we have the ability to set 10% of our General Fund in our Rainy Day Fund. Our city’s credit ratings improved this year once again, and we are in great standing to borrow for future needs at low interest rates, benefitting taxpayers. Finally, mayor and council made a once-in-a-generation decision to embrace historically low interest rates and sell pension obligation bonds to secure our public safety pension system. This move could save Tucsonans more than $600 million taxpayer dollars for decades to come and ensure the retirement security of our police officers and firefighters.

What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?

As a region and community, we must join together to be mindful of our most vulnerable populations hardest hit during this pandemic. A multi-faceted solution by working together – the city, the county, the state, non-profit organizations and the private sector – will create a sustainable approach to address long-term impacts. From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?

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Our diversity and commitment to preserving our culture and history are among the many attributes that make Tucson unique. We are endowed with pristine landscapes and surrounded by breathtaking public lands with hundreds of hiking trails to enjoy nature and observe wildlife. Our community is environmentally grounded and has a strong ethic of conservation. We are working to beautify neighborhoods through the Tucson Million Trees Campaign and improve green infrastructure through the Green Stormwater Infrastructure program. It gives me great pleasure to serve such an environmentally conscientious community. Tucsonans are innovators and we never give up.

Biz www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

PRESIDENT & CEO ARIZONA COMMERCE AUTHORITY

2021 In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

The Arizona Commerce Authority has always served small businesses. As a result of the pandemic, we’ve substantially increased our services and programs to support them. For example, the virtual Small Business Boot Camp, which launched in April, has now hosted over 100 sessions attended by more than 7,000 small business representatives. More than 99% of all Arizona businesses are small, so their resilience and recovery are critical for the overall health of our statewide economy. Our team will maintain this high level of support, indefinitely. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic? 

Before the pandemic, Arizona led the nation in economic and population growth. Over the past year, our state has consistently ranked among the top five for economic momentum by State Policy Reports, which accounts for personal income, employment and population growth. Currently, we’re ranked No. 3 in the nation. Despite economic headwinds, the level of interest in investing in Arizona has not declined. Not only does our momentum remain strong, the projects we’re working on currently represent more jobs than roughly the same number a year ago – demonstrating the quality and size of companies looking here. Most excitingly, we’re experiencing a high degree of activity and interest here from companies in the manufacturing sector that are re-evaluating their global footprint. In fact, manufacturing projects currently make up nearly 58% of the ACA’s total pipeline. We expect many industry leaders will consider reshoring some operations and creating more regional supply chain hubs. Arizona is well-positioned to benefit from these shifts and lead the nation in advanced manufacturing growth. www.BizTucson.com

SANDRA

WATSON

From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions? 

Tucson has many unique attributes that position it well. The city is experiencing incredible tech job growth. In 2019, it was ranked the No. 1 market in the nation for growing tech companies in CBRE’s Scoring Tech Talent Survey. That survey noted Tucson has seen 90% growth in tech jobs, accompanied by a 29% growth in tech wages – the highest among the survey’s top 25 cities. The University of Arizona is an incredible asset in attracting employers seeking highly skilled talent. Its selection for a $26 million National Science Foundation grant to establish the Center for Quantum Networks places Tucson at the forefront of innovation. For more evidence of Tucson’s ability to land global companies that will create high-wage jobs, look no further that Raytheon’s choice to keep the headquarters of its newly integrated missiles and defense business here. Tucson is a wonderful place to live, with affordable housing prices, vibrant arts and culture and an unmatched outdoor lifestyle. The pandemic has caused an exodus of highly skilled workers from costly markets such as San Francisco, Seattle and New York. Cities like Tucson stand to benefit greatly. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy? 

Tucson has an amazing culinary scene! I love El Charro Café and Maynard’s at the train depot is also a favorite. I also really enjoy the Pima Air & Space Museum – the history is fascinating.

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

CEO BANNER-UNIVERSITY MEDICINE TUCSON

DR. CHAD

WHELAN

In what ways has your organization had to “pivot” as the short-term impacts of the pandemic took hold?

In the pandemic’s early phase, we had to dramatically shift course and create new ways of caring for patients and their families. We were also under restrictions that markedly limited a core part of our business – taking care of people with non-COVID-19 needs. These concurrent events caused enormous financial pressure and stress. Early on, our leadership transitioned into an incident command mode, but realized we needed to learn from our frontline workers about what was working in real time.  We also learned that we needed to communicate, communicate, communicate. Over the next several months, we transformed our business so we can now safely care for large numbers of COVID-19 patients and non-COVID-19 patients. We have transitioned to more virtual visits, altered our visitor policies, changed how we provide in-person care and shifted many team members to work from home. The early pivoting we did has positioned us for continual readiness so that every day, we are forecasting capacity constraints and making adjustments. What trends are you experiencing in your own industry, across the U.S. and globally, related to expected long-term impacts of the pandemic?

Health care delivery has faced enormous changes through this pandemic. There is global concern about delays in care for non-COVID-19-related illnesses. Nationally, our frontline clinical professions, particularly nursing, are seeing a flood of retirements and transitions. The demand for traveling clinicians has also led to soaring pay rates, so nurses are choosing to travel rather than have a home base.  The loss in volume, and subsequently revenue, coupled with increased patient care costs places significant financial pressure on health care provid110 BizTucson

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ers. These stressors are being felt in the United States, locally, and particularly in rural hospitals and independent physician groups where closures may continue. We expect this will lead to increased consolidation. Still, here in Tucson and across the country, we have seen health care delivery systems partner with public health departments to better face this pandemic.  I hope we continue these partnerships and learn how to better serve our communities.   From your business vantage point, what qualities put the Tucson region in a position to recover quicker economically and more effectively than other regions?   

Our climate and geography will be increasingly attractive for those who want to spend more time outdoors and have more room than in major cities. These same factors may allow us to better manage the delicate balance of public health to keep people safe and our community open. We have already seen this in our recruiting efforts for physician leaders over the past several months. What are some of the attributes of Tucson that you personally enjoy?   

There are so many things about Tucson that my family and I love including the incredible diversity of people, the pride in histories and cultures of Tucson and the opportunities the University of Arizona offers. But there are two things that set Tucson apart.  First, the natural beauty we experience every day here is spectacular.  I love to watch the mountains wake up each morning, to be out on a run and catch a glimpse of wildlife or to explore a new hike into the mountains. Second, I really enjoy the people who choose to live here.  While there is great diversity in backgrounds and interests, there is a universal commitment to kindness.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

2021


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mara G. Aspinall

Mara G. Aspinall

Managing Director, BlueStone Venture Partners CEO, Health Catalysts Group A $50 million venture capital fund focused on life sciences investments in the Southwestern states. BlueStone has three portfolio companies in Arizona. Serves on the board of directors of BCBS of Arizona, Abcam, Allscripts, Orasure, and Castle Biosciences. Co-founder of ASU School of Biomedical Diagnostics, the only program in the world focused entirely on the study of diagnostics. Aspinall is also the Principal Investigator in The Rockefeller Foundation / ASU grant on COVID-19 diagnostics research.   

Jean-Claude Bernard

Finance Manager – Service Center Network Bombardier Inc. Global leader in aviation and transportation headquartered in Montreal with over 52,000 employees worldwide and with production and engineering sites in over 25 countries. In fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2019, Bombardier posted revenues of $15.8 billion. Tucson facility serves the aftermarket business, servicing in-service business aircraft.  The facility is also the largest Bombardier service center in the world, providing aircraft maintenance, interior refurbishment and paint services to our worldwide customers.  Bombardier is present in Tucson since 1975 through Learjet Inc.

www.BizTucson.com

Jean-Claude Bernard

Robert Brown

Robert Brown

Senior Director of External Affairs TuSimple The world’s largest and most advanced self-driving truck company. TuSimple is developing a commercialready Level 4 (SAE) autonomous driving solution specifically designed to meet the demands of long-haul heavy-duty trucks and aims to transform the $800 billion U.S. trucking industry. The company was founded in 2015 with a mission to improve the safety and efficiency of the trucking industry and reached unicorn status in 2019.

Don Bourn

CEO Bourn Companies Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Tucson. Privately held real estate development and investment company, specializing in large-scale mixed-use projects, corporate office and retail properties. Completed more than 4 million square feet of projects across Tucson and the Western United States.

Don Bourn

James D. Buie President  Involta 

Award-winning national hybrid IT service provider and consulting firm. Involta helps organizations plan, manage and execute hybrid IT strategies using a broad range of services including strategic consulting, colocation, cloud computing, managed IT, cybersecurity, fiber, and network connectivity. Led the company’s expansion from a regional provider to a national brand, establishing its hybrid cloud strategy and building capabilities to better serve clients through numerous acquisitions while continuing to grow organically. 

James D. Buie

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SUN S RCORRIDOR O T C E R I D FINC. O D RBOARD AOB .CN OF I RDIRECTORS ODIRROC NUS

Jaime S. Chamberlain

Jon Dudas

Jaime S. Chamberlain

Jon Dudas

Founded in December 2004.

Founded in 1885

Brings together key stakeholders from the area to address improving Arizona’s largest port facilities, streamlining the crossing process at the Nogales ports of entry and enhancing economic development in the Nogales-Santa Cruz County region.

A land-grant university with a total enrollment of 46,932 students for Fall 2020.

Chairman Greater Nogales and Santa Cruz County Port Authority

The Mariposa Port of Entry and the Nogales port of entry system are the gateway for 13 million cars, 21 million people, 14,000 trains and 700,000 trucks representing close to $30 billion in international trade.

Amy Cohen

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Ranks in the top 20 among all U.S. public research institutions and top 35 overall nationwide with more than $687 million annually in total research activity University’s research ranks in the top 5 in astronomy and astrophysics and No. 2 in water resources worldwide (No. 1 nationally).    

Ali J. Farhang

Managing Partner Farhang & Medcoff

The industry’s most advanced end-to-end solutions to detect, track and engage threats.

Firm has offices in Tucson and Phoenix. Practices business consultation, commercial litigation, labor and employment law, and various regulatory issues. Chairman and founder of the Arizona Bowl.

Engineer/Program Manager with 30 years of experience in aerospace and defense.

Co-owner of the Tucson Sugar Skulls. Member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council.

Assesses risk and ensures resiliency of products including missile defense systems, precision weapons, radars, command and control systems and advanced defense technologies.

Assistant Varsity Football Coach at Tucson High School.

Joe Coyle

CPA/ABV/CFF, CGMA CEO BeachFleischman

Vice President, Quality & Mission Assurance Raytheon Missiles & Defense 

Management consulting and executive search for the aerospace and healthcare fields.

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Senior VP and Chief of Staff for the University University of Arizona

Amy Cohen

Managing Director The Patrick Group

Joe Coyle

Ali J. Farhang

Coyle previously held senior executive positions with Raytheon Missile Systems, Hughes Aircraft, Loral Aerospace and Ford Motor Companies.

Co-host of the Sports Exchange, ESPN Tucson Radio 104.9FM/1490AM.

Marc D. Fleischman

Largest locally owned public accounting and consulting firm in Arizona with offices in Tucson and Phoenix. “Top 200” largest public accounting firm in the nation. Serves more than 7,000 private en-

www.BizTucson.com


SUNSUN CORRIDOR CORRIDOR INC.INC. BOARD BOARD OF OF DIRECTORS DIRECTORS

Marc D. Fleischman

terprises, nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Helps clients enhance profitability, develop strategy, scale growth, save taxes, achieve compliance, improve accountability and protect wealth.

Tom Florino

Senior Manager, Public Policy Amazon Leads economic development for Amazon Studios worldwide. Supports retail operations and corporate expansion in the Western U.S. and Asian-Pacific region. Leads engagement with global emerging markets and indigenous peoples. Manages the economic development compliance team.

Sarah Frost

CEO Banner – University Medical Center Tucson  Banner – University Medical Center South  Nearly 7,000 employees providing exceptional patient care, teaching future healthcare professionals and conducting ground-breaking research.  Opened a $450 million hospital in April 2019.  Partnership between the University of Arizona and Banner allows for aligned leadership of academic research and clinical care delivery.  Banner’s 2019 economic impact in Tucson was $944 million.

Tom Florino

Sarah Frost

Edmundo M. Gamillo

Executive Director Chase Commercial Banking in Southern Arizona With 25+ years in the financial services industry, leads the unit providing banking solutions for Middle Market clients. Chase is the U.S consumer and commercial banking business of JPMorgan Chase &Co. and serves nearly half of America’s households. The firm has 100+ years of history in Arizona through its predecessors Valley National Bank and Gila Valley Bank. In 2019, donated $377,000 to charities in Southern Arizona.

Michael Groeger

VP, Group Commercial & Specialty Sales Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Edmundo M. Gamillo

Committed to helping Arizonans get healthier faster and stay healthier longer. Offers health insurance and related services to more than 1.5 million customers with a focus on connecting people with the care they need. A not-for-profit company and an independent licensee of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Employs more than 2,300 people in its Phoenix, Chandler, Flagstaff and Tucson offices. Inspires health through advanced clinical programs and community outreach.

Michael Groeger

www.BizTucson.com

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Guy Gunther

Mary Jacobs

Guy Gunther

Mary Jacobs

Responsible for deploying and selling fiber in large and small markets across the United States.

Incorporated 1974 Population: 45,184 Median household income: $79,458

Under the CenturyLink brand, Lumen offers high speed internet, fiber, phone and TV services for residential and small business customers. CenturyLink is dedicated to empowering people through technology, both at home and work.

Oro Valley is home to global bioscience and high-tech companies.

Senior Director Mass Markets Fiber Lumen Technologies

Ryan M. Hartman

President & CEO World View Enterprises, Inc.

Ryan M. Hartman

Nancy J. Johnson

Leading the way in the emerging stratospheric economy, unlocking affordable new applications with the introduction of the un-crewed Stratollite flight vehicle. Provide on-demand, scheduled and historical aeria data and analytics from sensors deployed to the stratosphere with persistent coverage, higher resolution and increased value over traditional aerial and space imagery sources.

Town Manager Town of Oro Valley

Nancy J. Johnson CEO El Rio Health

Founded 50 years ago as a small neighborhood health center. The 20th largest health center in the nation, providing fully integrated health care for over 113,000 individuals in the Tucson community.   Offers medical, dental, behavioral health, laboratory, radiology, pharmacy and health and wellness services at their 12 locations across Tucson.  Has a $190 million budget and over 1500 employees.

Lawrence M. Hecker

Managing Partner Hecker & Pew Of Counsel, Sun Corridor Inc. Longtime Tucson attorney. 1993-2020 named among Best Lawyers in America in corporate law; mergers and acquisitions, business organizations, including LLCs and partnerships; corporate governance law, and venture capital law. Practice has been recognized among Best Law Firms in America.  

Lawrence M. Hecker

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ernie Jones

Ernie Jones

Senior Director, Customer Service Strategy and Operations CX Care Operations Comcast Corporation Leads Comcast’s National team Employee Experience and Engagement for over 2000 employees in Tucson, PA, NJ, CO and GA that provide support for residential products and services, Xfinity Mobile and bilingual Spanish-speaking employees specialize in customer service online and through social media channels. Sits on the board of directors for United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona Leadership Council.

Bill Kelley

CFO Diamond Ventures Founded in 1988, the leading real estate development and investment company in Arizona. Mission-driven to provide high quality real estate investments and business ventures that create value for our partners and customers through successful collaboration, careful consideration for the community and attention to business details. As CFO, responsible for corporate financial planning and project financing.

Bill Kelley

Dr. Clinton Kuntz

Dr. Clinton Kuntz CEO MHC Healthcare

Founded in 1957. Arizona’s oldest community health center and the state’s first nonprofit community health center to integrate medical and behavioral healthcare into one facility. Serves Marana and greater Tucson in primary care, behavioral health, dental, radiology, lab, pharmacy, urgent care, women’s health and WIC. 16 health centers in the MHC Healthcare family serve more than 60,000 patients a year and employ more than 550 employees.

Steve Lace

President Tucson New Car Dealers Association VP Royal Automotive Group & Lexus of Tucson

Steve Lace

The Tucson New Car Dealers Association was established 1947 by dealers to offer support for economic development and transportation initiatives.

Robert Lamb

COO GLHN Architects & Engineers Established 1963. Employee-owned company offers services in architecture and mechanical, electrical, civil and technology engineering. 70-plus employees work in Tucson and Phoenix offices.

Robert Lamb

www.BizTucson.com

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

David Larson

Edmund Marquez

David Larson

in 2019 and 102,600 volunteer hours contributed by employees locally in 2019.

Ranked among Tucson’s top 10 commercial contractors.

Edmund Marquez

President BFL Construction Co.

$100 million in annual revenues. 50 FTE. In January 2018, BFL Construction Co. became part of JV Driver Group, an international construction firm headquartered in Canada. Has a Phoenix and Tucson headquarters.

Clint Mabie

Clint Mabie

President & CEO through 12/31/20 Community Foundation for Southern Arizona Created in 1980 to help connect individuals, families and businesses to the causes they care about by serving as a vital link between philanthropy and the community’s needs. In partnership with the community, CFSA has led many multisector initiatives, and with its donors, has awarded more than $200 million to nonprofits.

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Founded the agency in 1996. Southern Arizona’s largest Allstate group. Serves on the boards of Rio Nuevo, Reid Park Zoological Society, Tucson Metro Chamber, Sun Corridor Inc., and Southern Arizona Leadership Council. Chairs the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and is past-chair of the Pima Community College Foundation and Tucson Hispanic Chamber.   Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2004 Businessman of the Year and 2016 Father of the Year.

Kelle Maslyn

Executive Director of Community & Corporate Engagement, Tucson Arizona State University

Xavier Manrique

In 2008, celebrated its 150th anniversary in Arizona, dating from when the Overland Mail came to the state.

ASU is recognized globally as a topranked knowledge enterprise focused on solutions to society’s greatest challenges, advancing a better life for all. Some of these rankings include:

Service was suspended during the Civil War. Returned to Arizona in 1877 with five offices – including Phoenix and Tucson.

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Agency Principal Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

ASU’s nationally and internationally ranked programs prepare nextgeneration innovators while advancing pioneering research, strategic partnerships, entrepreneurship and economic development.

Senior VP, Market Credit Leader, Southwest Division Wells Fargo Commercial Banking

Xavier Manrique

Kelle Maslyn

Today is Arizona’s fourth largest corporate employer. More than $7.6 million donated through 455 grants to nonprofits, schools and community organizations

#1 in the U.S. and Top 5 in the world for global impact in research, outreach and stewardship, #3 in the world for excellence in employer-student connections and #1 in the U.S. for innovation, 6 years in a row.

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Dennis R. Minano

Dennis R. Minano

Retired Managing Director CMM, Vice President Public Policy, Chief Environmental Officer General Motors Corporation Past Chair, Sun Corridor Inc. Sun Corridor Inc. Executive Committee

Omar Mireles

Farhad Moghimi

Executive Director Pima Association of Governments/ Regional Transportation Authority Coordinates regional planning efforts to enhance mobility, sustainability, livability and economic vitality of the region.

Omar Mireles

Programs federal, state, regional and local funding for all regional transportation investments.

Founded 1975

Manages the locally funded RTA and its 20-year, $2.1 billion regional transportation plan

President HSL Properties 

Owns and operates 38 apartment communities in Arizona, including 31 in the Tucson metro area, totaling more than 10,000 apartment homes. HSL is currently developing three apartment communities in Pima County, including The Flin in downtown Tucson. The company also owns and operates hotels and resorts, including the El Conquistador Tucson, a Hilton Resort, and The Ritz Carlton, Dove Mountain.

Mark Mistler

CEO – Tucson & Southern Arizona BBVA Ranks among the top 25 largest U.S. banks with 672 branches and 15 Southern Arizona branches. Benefits Southern Arizona charitable organizations through employee volunteerism and financial contributions.

Mark Mistler

Tom Murphy

Mayor Town of Sahuarita Population – 32,232 Median Household Income – $73,579 Full-time-equivalent employees – 144 Incorporated in 1994. Arizona’s fifth youngest town.

Farhad Moghimi

Focus on economic development is embodied in Sahuarita Advanced Manufacturing and Technology Center (SAMTEC), a project that will establish a high-tech business incubator and offer opportunities to firms seeking relocation or expansion. Known for its well-maintained infrastructure, great schools, pristine neighborhoods, highly educated population and strong community spirit.

Tom Murphy

www.BizTucson.com

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Steve Odenkirk

Barbi Reuter

Steve Odenkirk

Executive Director, Southern Region Manager Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Member FDIC Founded in 2003. Offers a full spectrum of loan, deposit and treasury management capabilities with 10 offices in Tucson, Greater Phoenix and Flagstaff. Earned the 2018 Corporate Philanthropy Award from the Phoenix Business Journal.

Jon Post

Walter Richter

Jennifer Preston

Lead Human Resources Manager Caterpillar Resource Industries Sales, Services and Technology  Caterpillar is the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives.  Tucson is home to the Tucson Mining Center.  Our Proving Grounds and Tinaja Hills Demonstration and Learning Center are located in Green Valley. 

Ranked No. 1 regional bank by S&P Global Market Intelligence for 2018 and in the Top 10 on the Forbes “Best Banks in America” list from 2016 to 2019.

Barbi Reuter

Jon Post

Founded in Tucson in 1985.

Vice Mayor Town of Marana Marana native owns the 6,000-acre Post Farms and the Marana Pumpkin Patch. Crops include cotton, wheat, corn and alfalfa. Elected Marana vice mayor in 2013. Served on the board of directors for Trico Electric Co-Op, Cortaro Water Users Association and Cortaro Marana Irrigation District. Served as chairman of Marana’s Planning and Zoning Commission and was president of the Marana Junior Rodeo Association.

CEO/Principal Cushman & Wakefield|PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services Leading independently owned, full-service commercial real estate company. Licensed in Southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, provides services in office, retail, industrial, medical, multifamily and land sectors.

Walter Richter

Public Affairs Administrator Southwest Gas Corporation  Founded in 1931.  Southwest Gas serves more than two million residential, commercial and industrial customers in parts of Arizona, Nevada and California.     Works with local, state and federal government officials to help create policies that result in lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions by utilizing Compressed Natural Gas in vehicles and the direct use of natural gas in homes and businesses. 

Jennifer Preston

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Adriana Kong Romero

Steven E. Rosenberg

Adriana Kong Romero

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Through its commitment to the community, has invested more than $3 million in grants and matching gifts to local nonprofits over the past five years.  

Arizona’s preeminent land-use law firm with in Phoenix and Tucson. Specializes in zoning, land use, entitlements, development agreements and project approvals. 

Senior VP Tucson Market President  Bank of America 

Last year, employees volunteered more than 2,200 hours in service to the community and provided more than $296 million in loans to Tucson businesses.

Steven E. Rosenberg

Partner/Owner Lazarus & Silvyn, PC

Predominantly representing private property owners in zoning and economic development entitlements. Also represents local jurisdictions to drafting land use codes and ordinances. 

Publisher & Owner BizTucson Magazine The Region’s Business Magazine

Silvyn serves on the Arizona State Land Board of Appeals and on the Tucson Airport Authority Board of Directors.

Provides in-depth coverage of business news, including economic development, bioscience, aerospace & defense, technology, commercial construction, downtown revitalization, real estate, homebuilding, university research, arts, education, tourism, agriculture, philanthropy and nonprofits.

Kevin Stockton

Produced quarterly in print and online at BizTucson.com, the magazine has received national awards. BizTucson News Update, launched in 2020, is a digital newsletter, delivered twice weekly, covering regional news.

Jeffrey S. Rothstein

VP & Head of Legal Roche Tissue Diagnostics A world leader and innovator of tissuebased cancer diagnostic solutions. Provides 250-plus cancer tests with related instruments globally to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually.

Jeffrey S. Rothstein

Regional President & Market CEO Northwest Healthcare

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

An integrated network of healthcare services including Northwest Medical Center, Oro Valley Hospital, Northwest Medical Center Sahuarita, Northwest Emergency Centers, Northwest Urgent Care Centers and affiliated physician practices, employing more than 80 outpatient providers in 15 specialties. Will open Northwest Medical Center Houghton and Northwest Transitions Skilled Nursing and Inpatient Rehabilitation facility in 2021. Offers online check-in for emergency room and urgent care visits and online scheduling for in-person and virtual primary care appointments. Employs more than 3,000 people.

Kevin Stockton

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SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James V. Stover

Col. Sandra L. Wilson

James V. Stover

Col. Sandra L. Wilson

With our partner Care 1st, we serve about 480,000 Arizonans across all 15 counties through Medicaid, Medicare Advantage, and Markeplace health plans using a whole-health, communitybased approach to healthcare. 

Assists wing leadership in the management of more than 1,800 members of the Air National Guard’s largest F-16 and Remote Piloted Aircraft wing.

Medicaid President Arizona Complete Health 

Offices in Tucson, Tempe, Yuma, Casa Grande, Sierra Vista employ nearly 2,000 with emphasis on supporting diversity and inclusion.

Jim Tofel

A subsidiary of Centene, a Fortune 500 company, a diversified, multi-national healthcare enterprise that provides services to government-sponsored healthcare programs, focusing on underinsured and uninsured individuals.

Jim Tofel

Managing Member of Development Tofel Dent Construction Formed in 1984. A third-party general contractor specializing in multi-family, hospitality and commercial construction throughout the Southwest.

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Steven G. Zylstra

Liaison to Board of Directors Department of Defense  162nd Vice Wing Commander Morris Air National Guard Base

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO Arizona Technology Council The state’s premier trade association for technology- and science-driven companies. Connecting and empowering Arizona’s community of innovation, AZTC is the driving force behind making the state the fastest-growing tech hub in the nation. AZTC works to further the advancement of technology through leadership, education and advocacy. Fostering a climate of creativity, innovation and community, AZTC works to create a destination for companies to be, thrive and stay.

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. RECENT BUSINESS EXPANSION AND RECRUITMENT SUCCESSES

Jobs & Companies Keep Coming to Tucson The economic slowdown from the COVID-19 pandemic has not put the brakes on Sun Corridor Inc.’s work to bring new and innovative companies to the region. “We haven’t slowed down a bit,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO at Sun Corridor Inc. “Since the start of the fiscal year in July, we added 24 new opportunities to the pipeline. That is outpacing the number of projects we had added to the pipeline during the same period last year. “We’re seeing strong interest from the bioscience and medical device sector that we haven’t seen for years that has to do with COVID and the science that’s going on here.” The following is a list of companies that relocated, set up operations or expanded in the Tucson region in 2020. Company information provided by Sun Corridor Inc. Catholic University of America

The Catholic University of America, based in Washington D.C., opened its first satellite campus last fall in a unique partnership with Pima Community College, giving Tucsonans the opportunity to get a bachelor’s degree from a private, Catholic university locally. COMSovereign Holding Corp.

COMSovereign Holding Corp. announced manufacturing operations to open in Tucson, creating 300 jobs and a total economic impact of $438 million. The company will manufacture wireless radio components, including equipment for emerging 5G wireless phone networks. COMSovereign Holding Corp. has signed an agreement to www.BizTucson.com

acquire a 140,000-square-foot building on 12.7 acres at 5120 S. Julian Drive. The building purchase with full-scale production is set to start at the facility by the end of the first quarter of 2021. Distant Focus

Distant Focus is an R&D manufacturing and engineering firm that specializes in optical and sensing technologies. The firm has relocated its headquarters to Tucson from Illinois to take advantage of the region’s strengths in optical sciences. Distant Focus will hire 15 optical engineers, highly skilled technicians and machinists, as well as general production workers. Over the next five years, Distant Focus’ economic impact will be over $27 million. DoorDash

DoorDash, the nation’s leading lastmile logistics platform, announced it will establish DashMart service in Tucson. DashMart is a new type of convenience store, offering household essentials and local restaurant favorites to customers’ doorsteps. DashMart offers thousands of convenience, grocery and restaurant items, from ice cream and chips, to cough medicine and dog food, to spice rubs and packaged desserts from local restaurants. DashMart stores are owned, operated and curated by DoorDash. Tucson is one of the first mid-sized markets for the DashMart concept. DashMart has leased 8,000 square feet of space for its new operations at 3981 E. Grant Road. The company plans to add 20 jobs, with additional potential future employment based on demand.

Modular Mining

Modular Mining, the global leader in the delivery of real-time, computerbased mine management solutions, unveiled its new Customer Experience Center during a ribbon cutting ceremony last January. Located in the company’s Tucson corporate headquarters, the CEC’s opening coincided with Modular Mining’s 40th anniversary and celebrated the company’s continued growth and positive trajectory in both Tucson and the mining sector. The company employs more than 800 people globally, with nearly 350 located in Tucson. Nanomoneo

After a competitive, multi-state process, Nanomoneo, a biotechnology instrument company, announced that it selected the University of Arizona Center for Innovation in Tucson for its new applied research operation. The newly formed venture-capital-backed company is working on solutions that allow consumers to “see” things that are not normally visible with the naked eye. The company plans to hire 14 people over the next five years, including research scientists, engineers and research support. The total economic impact is estimated at $17 million. The company will be located at the UA Center for Innovation at the UA Tech Park at Rita Road. PVB Fabrications, Inc.

PVB Fabrications, Inc., primarily a multi-disciplined general contractor and provider of quality welding and fabrication services for the commercial, utility, continued on page 122 >>> Winter 2021 > > > BizTucson 121


SUN CORRIDOR INC. INVESTORS & STAFF continued from page 105 government, heavy industrial and mining sectors, announced plans to expand its headquarters in Marana. PVB has purchased 10 acres on West Tangerine Road and is planning the construction of a new corporate headquarters to consolidate operations into one location. PVB currently employs 375 people. The full expansion over five years will add an additional 169 jobs primarily in operations, project management, quality control, engineering, business development and finance. Sandvik Materials Technology

Sandvik Materials Technology, a world-leading developer and manufacturer of advanced stainless steels and special alloys, announced plans to expand its operations of precision medical wire and wire-based components to Tucson. Sandvik has leased 8,800 square feet of space at 2424 E. Aragon Road near the Tucson International Airport. The full expansion over five years will add an additional 20 jobs primarily in operations and manufacturing. The facility is scheduled to be operational in early 2021. Vector Launch Inc.

Vector Launch Inc., a microsatellite launch company founded in Tucson, Arizona in 2016, announced that it will restart operations and remain in Tucson after a competitive, multi-state process. Verifone

Tucson welcomed Verifone to the community with the announcement of a new customer service and tech support operation, bringing 168 jobs and a total economic impact of $174 million over the next five years. The company has opened operations at 5151 E. Broadway. Verifone provides a unified platform to perform seamless payment experiences with any payment method. Biz

INVESTORS Burns & McDonnell Business Development Finance Corporation

DPR Construction

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Freeport-McMoRan GEICO Hacienda Del Sol Resort Hughes Federal Credit Union Long Realty Nova Home Loans

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1. Cathy Casper, Senior VP

Rancho Sahuarita

2. Sydney Chong Marketing Coordinator

Trico Electric Cooperative

3. Susan Dumon VP, Economic Development

Venture West

4. Daniela Gallagher VP, Economic Development

Visit Tucson

5. Danielle Gonzalez Administrative Receptionist

Westland Resources

6. Angela Kish Controller 7. Skye Mendonca Corporate Administrator 8. Jeff Powell Economic Development Coordinator 9. Laura Shaw Senior VP

1985 E. River Rd, Ste 101 Tucson, AZ 85718

Winter 2021

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CBRE

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Caliber Group

520.243.1900

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10. Joe Snell President & CEO 11. David Welsh Executive VP

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