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Good Living Kara Sather promotes and advocates for El Dorado wines.

C a l i f o r n i a ’ s O l d e s t N e w s pa p e r   – E s t. 18 51

Monday, January 13, 2020

Volume 169 • Issue 6 | 75¢

mtdemocrat.com

B1

1985 slaying

Another delay announced in murder retrial for Ricky Davis Pat Lakey Staff writer

Democrat file photo by Krysten Kellum

The retrial for Ricky Davis, a man convicted in 2005 of the 1985 murder of a local woman, is now expected to begin April 14.

If murder defendant Ricky Davis was seething beneath his cool exterior in a Placerville courtroom last week, as yet another delay in commencing a new trial in the 1985 stabbing death of a woman at an El Dorado Hills home was announced, the man who has spent 15 years behind bars for a crime he says he didn’t commit certainly didn’t show it. Davis, 54, cocked his head and listened as defense attorney Melissa van der Vijver spoke to him, sitting together in the space where it was hoped last fall a jury would be sitting today, ready to determine whether Davis truly is the person who stabbed Jane Anker Hylton nearly 30 times at a home on Stanford Lane where she was staying

with her young-teenaged daughter to flee an ugly domestic situation involving her husband Archie Hylton. Hylton, 54 at the time of her death in July 1985, had accepted an invitation from Ricky Davis’ mother to stay at her El Dorado Hills home, where Ricky and his girlfriend Connie Dahl also were living, according to court records. Jane Hylton, who reportedly had refused to allow her 13-year-old daughter to accompany the older Ricky and his girlfriend to a party that night, would be stabbed to death in a vicious attack that left blood smeared on walls, soaking into carpeting and other signs of a violent struggle. While El Dorado County sheriff ’s n

See Ricky Davis, page A6

Brian DeBarry throws hat into BOS ring Dylan Svoboda Staff writer Diamond Springs resident Brian DeBarry is running for an El Dorado County Board of Supervisors seat. He is running to represent Brian DeBarry District 3, which encompasses Placerville, Diamond Springs, El Dorado and Camino. One issue is far and away the candidate’s biggest concern: roads, roads, roads. “We need to prioritize our roads funding for maintenance over the build-out of new roads,” DeBarry said. “I’ve lived here all my life and driven these roads for over 50 years. They’re the worst I’ve ever seen them.” He added that quality road maintenance can positively impact myriad areas, such as fire protection, home insurance, traffic, air quality and the environment. A surge in homelessness, especially in District 3, has prompted DeBarry to make the matter a focus of his push for a board seat. “Some people look at the homeless and say ‘OK, well, they’re on drugs,’” he said. “And yeah, many of them are. But there’s a large percentage of them that find themselves in that situation because of real bad fortune and they can’t find their way back. How can you find a job when you haven’t showered in weeks? I feel that our society has created this problem, so it’s our responsibility to fix it.” A seemingly lagging local economy has the candidate concerned. He said he prefers elected officials tackle the problem before it’s too late. “It seems like every time I drive around there’s another business closing or strip mall with empty storefronts,” he said. “I could be wrong but the business community seems to be on the downswing. It needs to be addressed and we all need to get on board with supporting our local businesses.” Though he lacks previous political experience, the 72-year-old said he’s proudly “not a politician.” Instead, he’s running as an everyday man the county needs, he said. A native of Georgetown, DeBarry graduated from Ponderosa High School. He and his wife settled in Diamond Springs where they raised n

See DeBarry, page A7

Democrat photo by Jana Rossi

El Dorado Hills entrepreneur and philanthropist Kevin Nagle, center, poses with his daughters Haley Nagle, left, and Lindsay Hutton at his home. Over the years Nagle has given much back to the community and recently earned some distinguished awards.

Kevin Nagle

keeping dreams local Jana Rossi Staff writer In 2019 Kevin Nagle’s name was synonymous with helping make dreams come true in the world of sports. While the El Dorado Hills resident holds various business interests in the area, including his role as president of the Nagle Company and two venture capital companies, Moneta Ventures and Jaguar Ventures, to locals he is best known for his pivotal roles in helping to keep Sacramento relevant in major league sports. As partial owner of the Sacramento Kings, he was instrumental in twice preventing the team from relocating, first to Anaheim and then to Seattle. He worked alongside then Mayor Kevin Johnson, helping raise enough corporate sponsorships to prove to the league that Sacramento is capable of supporting an NBA team. In addition, by joining forces with a new investor group the city of Sacramento was revitalized with the new Downtown Commons and the promised new arena, Golden

AFTER S TMA CHRIS ! SALE

1 Center — keeping the beloved Sacramento Kings exactly where they belong. His second and possibly more recognized feat came through his relentless work and personal investment that led to Sacramento being awarded an MLS expansion team. As owner of Sac Soccer & Entertainment Holdings (SSEH), the parent company of Sacramento Republic FC, it was Nagle’s influence that brought together investors, making Sac Republic FC the 29th team beginning in 2022. In 2019 Nagle was recognized for his exceptional contribution to the growth of the Sacramento region, receiving numerous awards highlighting his efforts: Humanitarian of the Year by the United Cerebral Palsy Association (UCP), 2019 Sacramentan of the Year by the Sacramento Metro Chamber and most recently the 2019 Distinguished Service Award by Greater Sacramento Economic Council. “I am grateful and overwhelmed,” said Nagle. “There are a lot of great

qualified people in this region. It is a team effort; it’s not just me.” Originally from Moorhead, Minn., he was raised by a single mom, who he described as his source for inspiration. “She really made sure I was disciplined and focused. She never accepted failure as an option,” explained Nagle. He early on became a jack of all trades, from working as a gas station attendant to an order-taker at Jack in the Box, all while attending high school and putting himself through college. “I wouldn’t change that,” said Nagle, referring to having the opportunity to explore the various college systems, beginning at the community college level, as he pursued his degrees — a bachelor’s degree in political science and speech communication from California State University, Long Beach; a master’s degree in business and public administration from the University of Southern California; and later an Executive Management n

See kevin nagle, page A7

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Monday, January 13, 2020

Mountain Democrat mtdemocrat.com

ESSENTIALS OBITUARIES Obituaries on this page are written and paid for by the families or funeral homes. They are edited minimally by the Mountain Democrat. To submit an obituary, call (530) 622-1255, e-mail obits@mtdemocrat.net, fax (530) 344-5092, or visit mtdemocrat.com under “Submission Forms” at the bottom of the website. Include contact information with all submissions.

Joyce Bascombe

Masked men enter Spring Street home, shoot Placerville man Democrat staff

Jan. 22, 1926-Dec. 20, 2019

Joyce Bascombe, 93, of Shingle Springs, passed away on Dec. 20, 2019. She was born on a farm near Esmond, S.D. on Jan. 22, 1926. The family moved to Huron, S.D. and later to St. Charles, Ill., where she graduated from high school. One of Joyce’s first jobs was working for Oper-Radio (which later became the DuKane Corporation) in St. Charles. In 1946 she married George Budde and had daughter Cheryl. In 1952, Joyce and Cheryl moved back to Huron, where Joyce worked for the Bureau of Reclamation until she retired in 1978. At that time, she moved to Shingle Springs to be close to her daughter and family and has lived in the same home until her death. Joyce was predeceased by her parents Russell and Agnes Johnson, and brother Harlan Johnson. She is survived by her daughter Cheryl (Bill) Shirley, grandchildren Alex (Chance), Jordan (Tara) and Greg. She is also survived by great-grandchildren Dakota (Alexis), Lena, Zachary, Clint and Christian. and great-great grandson Bentley. Joyce is also survived by her sisters Shirley (Roland) and Lois Jean (Carl), as well as nephews Lee, Michael and Mark, and niece Jane and their families. She will be buried in South Dakota alongside her parents and brother.

Barbara Byer

Nov. 25, 1936-Dec. 31, 2019

It is with heavy heart to say goodbye to Barbara Joann Byer, born on Nov. 25, 1936. Since being diagnosed with cancer, she fought with strength, stubbornness and grace up until the end. On Dec. 31, 2019, she was embraced by her loved ones that had preceded her. Barbara was born to parents Frederick and Estella Becker (Rodda). She was a wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend. She is preceded in death by her daughters, Suz Ann and Jo Ann Byer. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, William “Bill” Byer, son Jerry Byer, daughterin-law Paula and grandson Deron; her daughter Sheri Ann and son-in-law Daniel Wright; siblings Douglas Becker of Placerville, Joyce Smith of Yuba City, half-sister Arlene Metcalf of Chester along with many nieces and nephews. Barbara grew up in Sutter, Calif., and has lived in Camino, Calif., for the last 57 years. She retired from Lucky’s Market in Placerville and enjoyed spending time with her family and friends and was a member of the Moose Lodge #1979 in Camino. She was very talented in sewing, crocheting and many other crafting projects and owned her own shop for some years. Graveside Services will be held at Sutter Cemetery on Thursday, Jan. 16 at 1 p.m. The family requests donations made in lieu of flowers to: Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, chla.org (323) 660-2450 Snowline Hospice, snowlinehospice.org (530) 621-7820, 6520 Pleasant Valley Road, Diamond Springs, Calif. 95617

A Placerville man was shot Thursday night as he was trying to flee from two masked men who reportedly knocked on the door of and entered his Spring Street home less than an hour before midnight. Three other men, one

of whom answered the door, were inside the residence at the time, according to officials with the Placerville Police Department. Witnesses on scene said that as the masked men entered the home one resident left through a window and was chased around the

LAKE LEVELS Loon Lake, as of Jan. 7 Water elevation 6,389 feet Storage level 42,880 acre-feet Percent full 62% Inflow 20 cfs Outflow 62 cfs

Inflow 4.08 cfs Outflow 6 cfs Echo Lake, as of Jan. 9 Water elevation 0 feet Storage level 0 acre-feet Percent full 0% Inflow 3.83 cfs Outflow 3.83 cfs

Ice House, as of Jan. 7 Water elevation 5,419.2 feet Storage level 25,130 acre-feet Percent full 58% Inflow 13 cfs Outflow 25 cfs

Caples Lake, as of Jan. 9 Water elevation 45.66 feet Storage level 13,071 acre-feet Percent full 59% Inflow 0 cfs Outflow 103.50 cfs

Union Valley, as of Jan. 7 Water elevation 4,813.3 feet Storage level 133,760 acre-feet Percent full 50% Inflow 59 cfs Outflow 0 cfs

Silver Lake, as of Jan. 9 Water elevation 4.02 feet Storage level 1,079 acre-feet Percent full 12% Inflow 8.39 cfs Outflow 12.20 cfs

Stumpy Meadows, as of Jan. 8 Water elevation 4,262.01 feet Storage level 20,000 acre-feet Percent full 100% Inflow 16 cfs Outflow 4.47 cfs

Sly Park, as of Jan. 9 Water elevation 108.03 feet Storage level 33,088 acre-feet Percent full 80.6% Inflow 10.6 cfs Outflow 15.8 cfs

Lake Aloha, as of Jan. 9 Water elevation 6.18 feet Storage level 57 acre-feet Percent full 1%

American River, as of Jan. 9 Flow 60 cfs

wEAThER

Georgetown 43/37 Coloma 50/43 Placerville 44/39 El Dorado Hills 48/41

South Lake Tahoe 39/23

Pollock Pines Camino 39/32 40/34 Somerset 46/39 Fair Play 46/39

Cameron Diamond Springs Park 45/39 47/41

Map shows today’s Highs and overnight Lows

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News release The El Dorado County State of Jefferson is hosting a District 2 county supervisor candidates forum Tuesday, Jan. 14 at the American Legion Hall, 4561 Greenstone Road in Placerville. District 2 includes areas of Shingle Springs, Cameron Park, El Dorado Hills and also the communities of Mt. Aukum, Somerset and Grizzly Flat in south county. Current Supervisor Shiva Frentzen terms out in December. There are six candidates seeking her seat including Ray Nutting, George Turnboo, Ken Pimlott, Kevin Loewen, Tyler Kuskie and Felicity Carlson. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for social hour when hot dogs, beverages and desserts will be offered. A short meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by the forum. The public is invited to attend and time will be allotted for questions and answers. The presidential primary is March 3 — just two months away — but ballots will begin arriving in all registered voters’ mailboxes sometime during the second week of February. Due to some problems with the Department of Motor Vehicles’ motor voter program it is recommended that voters visit the El Dorado County Elections Department or California Secretary of State’s website to confirm registration and party affiliation. On Feb. 11 State of Jefferson will host a forum for the District 1 and District 3 supervisor candidates, same time and location.

Monday

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Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

HigH: 43° Low: 34°

HigH: 44° Low: 37°

HigH: 41° Low: 39°

HigH: 42° Low: 38°

CRIME LOG

Cloudy with showers. High 44F. winds S at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

Cloudy with occasional rain showers. High 43F. winds SSw at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 60%.

Mostly cloudy in the morning then periods of showers later in the day. High 44F. winds S at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

Considerable cloudiness with occasional rain showers. High 41F. winds S at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 60%.

Considerable cloudiness with occasional rain showers. High 42F. winds S at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

The following is from Placerville Police Department logs:

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Dec. 27 8:31 a.m. A 27-year-old man was arrested on Placerville Drive on an outstanding warrant.

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530-344-5058 / dsvoboda@mtdemocrat.net MOUNTAIN DEMOCRAT (ISSN 0745-7677) – Published Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for $104.00 per year (plus tax) by carrier, or by mail (includes applicable tax) in El Dorado County (other rates available upon request) by Mountain Democrat, Inc., 2889 Ray Lawyer Drive, Placerville, CA 95667. Periodical Postage Paid at Placerville, CA. Post Master: Send address changes to the Mountain Democrat, P. O. Box 1088, Placerville, CA 95667

Dec. 28 12:30 a.m. A 35-old-male was arrested on Main Street for a parole violation. 12:32 a.m. A 56-year-old male was arrested on Ridgecrest Court on suspicion of being under the influence a controlled substance.

11:56 p.m. A 22-year-old man was arrested on Coloma Road for evading police.

Dec. 30 4:25 a.m. A 27-year-old man was arrested on Spring Street on an outstanding warrant. 9:05 p.m. Two men ages 41 and 32, along with two females ages 32 and 39, were arrested on Broadway for allegedly using counterfeit money.

Dec. 31 7:32 a.m. Burglary was reported on Placerville Drive.

10:59 p.m. A 41-year-old female was arrested on Broadway for allegedly being under the influence of a controlled substance and in possession methamphetamine.

11:19 a.m. A 22-year-old man was arrested on Coloma Court for obstruction of justice. 11:14 p.m. A 24-year-old man was arrested on Broadway on an outstanding warrant.

11:58 p.m. A store on Broadway was burglarized and lotto tickets were stolen.

Jan. 1 5:59 p.m. A 42-year-old man was arrested on Placerville Drive on an outstanding warrant.

Dec. 29 12:30 a.m. A 27-year-old man was

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3:23 p.m. Burglary was reported on Placerville Drive.

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1:35 p.m. A home was burglarized on Bedford Avenue.

1:48 p.m. Suspect(s) stole license plates on Woodridge Court.

Kevin Christensen Staff writer 530-344-5062 / tfrey@mtdemocrat.net

arrested on Martin Lane on an outstanding warrant.

10:33 a.m. A license plate was reported stolen on Drake Court.

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was wearing a black or blue ski mask. Other clothing described was a dark-colored, hooded flannel shirt and blue jeans. Both suspects were described as approximately 5 feet, 8 inches to 5 feet, 9 inches tall, with skinny builds. Based on investigative leads and witness statements, police said it appears the victim may have known the suspects and were specifically targeted. Anyone who has information that could help in the investigation is asked to contact Placerville police Det. Luke Gadow at (530) 642-5210, ext. 116.

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backside of the house, on the 700 block of Spring Street, where he was shot twice. The two suspects then fled in an unknown direction. Police were assisted by El Dorado County sheriff ’s deputies and a K-9 unit as they attempted to locate the men but were unsuccessful, according to Placerville police. Police report that the victim, whose name is not being released, was treated for a gunshot wound at an area hospital. One of the suspects, armed with a gun, was wearing a blue ski mask. The other suspect

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mtdemocrat.com Mountain Democrat

Monday, January 13, 2020

A3

MORE renovations coming into frame Kevin Christensen Staff writer Mother Lode Rehabilitation Enterprises Inc. continues to see progress on renovations to its Placerville Drive headquarters. Rough framing on the building moved forward throughout December with completion of roof framing and sheathing on the upper level of the facility, according to a report from architect Charlie Downs who is the project manager. That framing allowed roofing subcontractors to complete a “substantial portion of scope of work.” “We are impressed and excited with how the renovations are coming along,” said MORE executive director Susie Davies. “In a lot of ways the crews are ahead of schedule.” In the report Downs states that remaining thermal insulation work on the upper level will begin in January with drywall production starting toward the end of the month. Roughly 75 percent of the plumbing is complete and 85 percent of mechanical work finished. Minor electrical work remains to be done on the lower level as electricians now begin to wire-up the upper level. Concrete pilasters built to walls bear their load on the north and south sides of the MORE building’s high bay are also done. Davies described MORE’s new art gallery and performance spaces that will have skylights that will bring “natural light and enhance the look of both spaces.” Earlier this month a construction discovery was made by the roofing subcontractor that revealed the high bay’s barrel vault roofing is nearly at the end of its life. “The estimated cost to replace the barrel roof will be approximately $95,000,” Davies said. MORE’s facility was once a bowling alley built in the early 1960s. Some 20 years later the building was converted to accommodate the organization. The $5.5 million cost of renovations is being

Democrat photos by Kevin Christensen

Susie Davies, executive director for Mother Lode Rehabilitation Enterprises, Inc. shows progress made inside the organization’s building since reconstruction began in mid-2019 as Joe Stoddard, owner of New Vantage Productions, shoots video for a film that he will be showing Saturday, Jan. 18 at the Art and Wine with Something MORE fundraiser. funded by a $4.5 million low-interest loan MORE secured through the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development Agency. The remaining $1 million is being raised by MORE through donations and fundraisers like the Art and Wine with Something MORE event Saturday, Jan. 18 at the El Dorado County Fairgrounds. MORE is a nonprofit organization that has served adults with developmental disabilities in the El Dorado County area for more than 50 years.

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Construction crews work on MORE building renovations. Progress was made on the structure throughout December including new pilasters and interior framing.

Contested Camino-area cell tower approved Dawn Hodson Staff writer A new cell tower in the Camino area was approved Thursday by the El Dorado County Planning Commission. The 125-foot high monopine cell tower will be located on the northern terminus of High Hill

Road near the intersection with Carson Road and be built on a leased, 40-by-40-foot fenced area. A development company called Horizon Tower will construct the tower that will be designed to carry four different carriers. Verizon has already committed to being the first carrier to locate on

the tower. The tower will provide cell service as well as wireless high-speed internet service. No generator was proposed for the site in the event of a power failure. That issue emerged later as a major discussion point ■

See CELL TOWER, page A7

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A4    Monday, January 13, 2020   Mountain Democrat mtdemocrat.com

OPINION

Richard B. Esposito Publisher/Editor

Noel Stack Opinion Page Editor

Krysten Kellum Associate Editor

At the Lake

Tahoe Regional Planning Agency celebrates 50 years

T

he year was 1969. And what a year it was. On July 20, 1969, the Vietnam War was raging and American Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the surface of the moon. For much of the decade, America and Joanne Marchetta indeed the world had been mesmerized by the space race. The end of the decade brought us the music festivals of Altamont and Woodstock. The hippie counterculture movement was at its zenith and Elvis was still in the building. The iconic Boeing 747 made its inaugural flight from Seattle to New York City. And the Beatles performed for the last time in public on the rooftop of Apple Records in central London — what a year. As the ‘60s drew to a close, there was another momentous occasion marking the end of the decade. In December 1969 President Richard Nixon signed into law the bi-state compact creating the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. The compact came about as California Gov. Ronald Reagan, Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt and others raised fears that overdevelopment was threatening to destroy Lake Tahoe. Fifty years later TRPA remains dedicated to protecting and preserving Lake Tahoe’s natural environment. Looking back, we’ve proven that by working together collaboratively, protecting the natural treasure that is Lake Tahoe is indeed possible. During the agency’s infancy we worked to curb runaway growth inside the basin, halting unchecked development that was threatening Lake Tahoe’s famed water clarity. Science was proving that Tahoe’s clarity was declining as development continued unabated, paving over wetlands that once filtered polluted stormwater runoff. In the early 1980s a federal judge issued a moratorium on nearly all development inside the basin that lasted close to three years as the agency developed the first regional plan through a consensus process. The following decade, President Bill Clinton called Lake Tahoe a “national treasure that must be protected and preserved.” In 1997 Clinton and Vice President Al Gore convened the first Lake Tahoe Summit and out of that was born the Environmental Improvement Program. In the intervening years Environmental Improvement Program partners — now numbering more than 80 federal, state, local and private entities — have invested more than $2 billion in nearly 700 lakesaving projects. These projects have helped stabilize the lake’s clarity loss, improved mountain streams, enhanced forest health and built bicycle and pedestrian paths. In 2012 with the most recent regional plan update, TRPA embraced the idea of environmental re-development. We discovered a pathway that n

See MArchetta, page A5

Letters to the Editor The fate of EDH to be decided EDITOR: n Jan. 13 the fate of El Dorado Hills will be determined and will you be involved in limiting rampant growth to our community? Are you willing to show up and have your voice heard? What about the fact that Parker and company made a promise to our community about turning the old Executive EDH Golf Course into desperately needed community parks but it never happened? And it never was going to happen. Is this a company we can “partner” with? It was always just a ruse and the Parker Development Company wanted to let it linger long enough that people would forget about those “past-promises.” Parker always planned to do what it damn-well wanted to do and misled the good people of EDH. What kind of “Serrano takeover” is this? It will have a negative impact on property values and approximately 1,600 additional automobiles will be added to the “traffic morass” we now experience. Expect increased pollution and additional crime. And where will all the additional water come from? If Parker paves over the Executive Golf Course and builds homes there it’s a direct slap to the face of the EDH community and its residents. As it’s said: “Once it’s gone, it’s gone as open space forever.” Get involved now or you will have no reason to complain about it later. Be there: 6 p.m., Jan. 13 at District Church. HUGH BACA El Dorado Hills

O

McClintock, democracy, truth EDITOR: ecent letters have talked about McClintock’s disregard for the truth (Donna Skelton) and lack of understanding of democracy (John Garon). Ms. Skelton talks about the testimony of witnesses who spoke the truth as they knew it. That’s the key phrase, as they knew it. That is an important phrase since with no direct wrongdoing in the released phone calls, what we have is second- and third-

R

hand accounts of what this guy told that guy who told me, and testimony of what someone felt. When you take that on top of Adam Schiff ’s dictatorial hearings where witnesses were told by Schiff not to answer questions that he didn’t like from Republicans, not to mention the contact his office had with the so-called whistleblower, you get the kind of kangaroo court and testimony that a Soviet judge would be proud of. And then there’s Mr. Garon saying that it’s McClintock who doesn’t understand democracy. I submit that it’s those Democrats who started to talk of impeachment even before inauguration day and the corrupt FBI agents Stzrok and Page talking in emails of “insurance policies” in case the people made the wrong choice for president. It would seem that it’s the left that has trouble with democracy. Mr. Garon’s idea of democracy would find a lot of support from the Russians and Chinese. GEORGE ALGER Placerville

Iran EDITOR: onald Trump is not acting like a man averse to war with Iran. Following the extra-judicial murder of Iranian Commander Qassem Soleimani, Trump is now threatening to bomb Iranian cultural sites, which would be in violation of the 1954 Hague Convention and the 1972 World Heritage Convention, ratified by both the United States and Iran. Trump’s threatened action recalls the abysmal behavior of ISIS fighters who destroyed countless ancient Christian and Muslim holy sites in Iraq and Syria. Today the Trump administration blocked Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zariff from entering the U.S., where he was expected to address the assassination of Soleimani before the U.N. Security Council on Jan. 9. Flouting international agreements seeming to be a frequent MO of Trump, the barring of Soleimani from entering the country violates a 1947 agreement with the U.N. that the U.S allow foreign officials into the country for U.N. affairs.

D

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See Letters, page A5

The Balancing Act

Roger Niello sells cars but he must really hate drivers

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ow could politician — first an a guy who elected Sacramento is part County supervisor and of one of then three terms in the biggest high-end, the state Assembly. He multi-car dealership termed out in 2010. He organizations in our ran for the Senate but area (Porsche, BMW, lost in the primary to Audi, Acura, Mini Ted Gaines. Niello has Cooper, Land Rover and some good creds — a Jaguar, to name a few) UC Berkeley and UCLA hate his customers so graduate and a CPA. Larry Weitzman You’d think he might much? How could that be? go back to selling cars For his El Dorado County customers and running his many dealerships, and, more specifically El Dorado but who wouldn’t jump at a job offer Hills, traffic is becoming impossible as the direct or of the EDCCDA at with little resolution in sight. And the $200,000-plus annual salary. The prior placeholder was Steve cause can be largely attributed to ... Pedretti, who jumped ship for more Roger Niello. money before this ship hit the fan. While President Ronald Reagan A couple of weeks ago I wrote about had an 11th Commandment (actually the appeal of a County Planning is was California Republican Party Commission decision to allow a Chairman Gaylord Parkinson who development project near Bass Lake Reagan said originally postulated the Road in El Dorado Hills. Concerns rule) that said, “Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican,” I may do were raised about significant traffic issues not mitigated even though so here. there had been a substantial Niello, prior to his alleged caretaker change in circumstances that appointment as El Dorado County would require a new environmental Community Development Agency impact report, notwithstanding director, was a big-time California

The Mountain Democrat welcomes letters up to 300 words. Letters may be edited. We reserve the right to edit submissions. Include your name, address and phone number for verification purposes.

Email: editor@ mtdemocrat.net

the other issues brought about by the new development. Most of this development was a follow-on of the Board of Supervisors’ substantial reduction in traffic impact mitigation fees for the area — a reduction that should never have happened. Besides the supervisors, who is responsible? The quick answer is the CDA, whose head at the time was Roger Niello. Here is how it was accomplished. Although a report from the El Dorado County Transportation Commission in late 2015 states traffic impact funding from sources like Proposition 1B, which had provided more than $1 billion in transportation funding statewide, was going to dry up significantly over the next few years, CDA staff failed to tell the board of the significant projected loss of tens of millions of dollars. Then during the December 2016 hearing at which the TIM fees were lowered, dozens of recommended projects slated for improving traffic flows were simply crossed off. Here are just a few of the projects eliminated: • Widening Bass Lake Road to four lanes from Silver Springs Drive (now

known as Hill Drive, which is north of Bass Lake) to Highway 50, $15.4 million. • Widening of Francisco Drive, various parts of El Dorado Hills Boulevard, $1.7 million. • Widening Latrobe Road all the way to Carson Creek, $9 million. • Widening Latrobe Road (south), Investment Boulevard to Golden Foothill Parkway, $3.6 million. • Widening Green Valley Road from Salmon Falls Road to Dear Valley Road, $12.6 million. • Sophia Parkway from Alexandra Drive to Green Valley Road, construct four-lane divided roadway, $2.1 million. Eliminating these and other necessary road projects, which totaled more than $44 million, from developer-required road improvements so their developments would not negatively adversely affect traffic flow and patterns is how the Board of Supervisors could justify the significant reduction in TIM fees for El Dorado Hills (along with the CDA’s failure to disclose the loss in millions of dollars in state grants from 2016

Snail Mail: Letters to the Editor P. O. Box 1088, Placerville 95667

n

See WEitzman, page A5

Main Office: 2889 Ray Lawyer Drive Placerville 95667


mtdemocrat.com Mountain Democrat   Monday, January 13, 2020  

Outside with charlie

Is downhill or cross-country for you?

I

t is skiing time in the mountains. That takes up a lot of territory, spans a wide variety of experiences and is anything but a one-hop frog.

Downhill skiing Alpine (downhill) skiing is very popular. The resorts are big and complex places, offering an array of services. Terrain ranges from gentle slopes known as bunny hills to steeper trails for intermediate types and some pretty radical, steep terrain for experts. What they all have in common is a spot in the

Letters 

Charlie ferris mountains with a lot of snow. There’s a wide variety of ski shapes, sizes and reasons for choosing what suits you and your skiing ability. Skis today are generally shorter than they used to be, shaped with a narrow middle, lighter and far easier for learning to ski.

Rental skis at resorts are suited for all skill levels. Resort demo shops have skis that are a bit different and can be more radical in shape and size that allows advanced skiers to push their limits. Ski boots for downhill skis lock down, toe and heel, to the binding.

Cross-country skiing The other type of skiing is Nordic, more commonly known as cross-country. Groomed crosscountry trails have a wide middle, bordered by tracks. The tracks are for kicking and gliding

and the wide middle is for skate-type skiing. Both are done on really skinny skis. Only the toe of cross country ski boots lock down to the skis. That’s the reason that cross-country skiing is referred to as “free-heel” skiing. Those skinny skis will work in the backcountry outside of cross-country resorts but cross-country skis made specifically for the backcountry are shorter, shaped and wider. The entire crosscountry experience is vastly different than downhill skiing, especially backcountry n

See charlie, page A6

Continued from A4

To what end? Increasing instability in an already highly volatile region. The expulsion of American troops from Iraq. The end of restrictions on nuclear development

Weitzman 

contained in the Iran nuclear deal. Condemnation by the international community. But I think distraction from his impeachment trial is the end most desired by Mr. Trump. Whatever motivates Mr.

Continued from A4

forward). Niello was in charge of the CDA. He was the head cheese. It was under his watch that these necessary road improvements were brought to the board for elimination, a reprieve for developers to lower their TIM fees that under the General Plan were designed to remedy continuing adverse traffic and safety conditions created by additional growth. I am willing to bet that Niello had no idea what staff was doing and why. Niello appears to be another Robert Mueller. The boss is supposed to run the show, not the other way around. Some of the staff involved in the elimination of

Marchetta 

Trump’s actions in Iraq, he appears to have an itchy trigger finger. I hope there’s an adult in the room. GEORGE LLOYD Placerville

these necessary road and traffic improvements are long gone. The staff that remains and bears responsibility should be fired. Bass Lake Road has hundreds of new homes being built or planned and a new shopping center about to open. The population growth in the area has grown by a factor of 6, yet the plan for a fourlane road and other safety improvements was eliminated in December 2016 and the supervisors bought it. Thanks, Roger. Driving Porsches, BMWs, Jags and Mini Coopers in bumper to bumper traffic is so much fun. Larry Weitzman is a resident of Placerville.

Continued from A4

addressed the development mistakes of the past by restoring sensitive lands. This path allowed for new investments in our communities that benefit the economy while also helping to protect and restore the environment. So, this past December was special for many reasons. As TRPA celebrates 50 years since our inception, we reflect on our mission. And we reflect on our failures as well as our successes. As Winston Churchill

said, “Success is not final; failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts.” One of the most significant things we’ve learned over 50 years is that we are more effective as an agency when we work as conveners and collaborators. Silos are for grain, not good governance. It’s the next 50 years where the hard work of protecting Lake Tahoe continues. The mountainous challenges that we face — climate change and adaptation, transportation and

tourism, affordable housing and social justice, to name a few — are in and of themselves daunting. And we won’t find solutions to those challenges by shrinking from them. Lake Tahoe has always inspired bi-partisanship. Because on both sides of the aisle, we see a treasure that’s worthy of taking care of for future generations. Joanne S. Marchetta is executive director of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency.

A5

Announcements AL-ANON is here for you if you are bothered by someone else’s drinking. Call for meeting times. (916) 3342970. www.ncwsa.org/d6-10/ ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS — If you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, that’s our business. 24-hr. answering service (530) 622-3500 www. westernsloped22.org El DORADO COUNTY AMATURE RADIO CLUB Dedicated to all aspects of ham radio. Meetings held on the fourth Thursday of each month at Federated Church, 1031 Thompson Way, Placerville, 7:15 pm. Visitors and non-hams welcome. Info at www.edcarc.net CANTARE CHORALE of the Sierra Foothills performs all styles of choral music and is always looking for talented new members. For information, audition, or to schedule an event see www. cantarechorale.com, call (530) 677-8463. or (530) 676-4432. PLAY CRIBBAGE! **All skill levels** Learn to play by ACC Rules. **Beginner instruction available.** Compete in Weekly Tournaments. Gold Country Cribbers play Wednesdays at 6:00 pm. Call 916-768-4452 for more info! DEMOCRATS – Come meet with the United Democrats of El Dorado County at Denny’s in Placerville, at noon, on the 4th Thursday of the month. Call (530)391-6414 or see edcdems.org for more information. EDC MINERAL & GEM SOCIETY meets monthly on the 3rd Thursday, 7:00 PM, at the American Legion Hall, 4561 Greenstone Rd. Meetings include a presentation and refreshments. Visitors are welcome. We also share interests in earth sciences and lapidary & jewelry arts through field trips, workshops, educational outreach and events. Visit www.eldoradorocks.org. Fleet Reserve Assoc, Br 275, Active Duty or Retired Veterans, USN, USMC, Coast Guard. Regular meeting on 4th Wednesday each month, social 5:30 pm, dinner 6:00 pm, and meeting 7:00 pm. Veterans Memorial Building 130 Placerville Drive, contact Larry (530) 677-3925 GOLD RUSH CHORUS now welcomes both men and women to share the joy of singing four-part harmony in the barbershop style. To learn more or to book a performance, call Howard at (530) 647-6513 or Kent (530) 651-3575 Hangtown Women’s TENNIS Club. Women of every level welcome! Come play for fun & exercise! $30 annual membership includes monthly lessons. Weds 9-11 am. El Dorado High School courts, Acacia St., Placerville. Includes monthly social activities. (925) 250-4656. MARINE CORPS LEAGUE DET 697 Marines & FMF Corpsmen. Meet for social hour at 6 pm, meeting starts 7 pm on second Wednesday monthly Veterans building 130 Placerville Dr. New members always welcome Contact Richard Akin (530) 622-9855. Marshall Hospital Auxiliary is looking for YOU to join our current volunteers. Volunteer interviews February 19 and processing February 24. Different positions available while doing rewarding community work. 626-2643 or 620-2240, leave your name, number and email.

NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS (free) designed for family members and caregivers/friends supporting a loved one living with a mental health condition. 2 support groups are held monthly. For info: namieldoradocounty.org Placerville: 1st Tuesday at 7:00pm; County Gov Center, 330 Fair Lane, Conf-room C. South Lake Tahoe: 2nd Tuesday from 6:00 pm; Library, 1000 Rufus Allen. Do your feet or hands tingle, feel numb, or hurt. The Placerville Neuropathy Support Group meets the 2nd Wed. of each month, 1 PM, Senior Center, 937 Spring St. Except: July, Aug. & Dec. Jan., Feb., March telephone meeting. Call Bev (877)6226298 for instructions. Placerville Senior Softball Club. Welcomes all men and women ball players, slow pitch, 55 and older. Season is April through Sept. Contact Peter Cassella (760) 505-0400 petercassella@yahoo. complacervilleprospectors. org Retired Public Employees Association (RPEA) for CalPERS retirees and spouses meets at Denny’s Restaurant, Placerville, January 20, March 16, May 18, July 20, September 21 and November 16, 2020 at 11:30 am. For information and programs call (530) 919-7515. Senior PEER COUNSELING Seniors 55 and over who are grieving, depressed or having issues related to aging can meet one-on-one with a caring senior, professionally supervised and trained to listen and encourage. Call (530)621-6304 to leave a message and get started. Soroptimist International of Placerville Become a Soroptimist today and change the world. When you join Soroptimist you get the opportunity to help the women and girls of your community, and beyond, realize their dreams. You will make life-long friends; lead a happy and healthier life; and, have a lot of fun! Soroptimist Intl of Placerville meets monthly the 2nd Wednesday night at 6:00 PM and the 3rd and 4th Wednesdays at Noon. Please contact us at 530344-1476 or siplacerville@ soroptimist.net TOPS Club, Inc. meets Tuesday 8:00-11:00 am, Veterans Hall (downstairs) 130 Placerville Dr. For more information call Bonnie (530) 644-4668 Helping millions take off pounds sensibly since 1948. UPPER ROOM DINING HALL located at 1868 Broadway, Placerville. Feeding the hungry 365 days a year. Food served from 4 to 5:30PM daily. Hall opens at 2 pm, open all holidays. Avail for families, seniors, veterans, and any who need a meal. Help us Feed the Hungry. Volunteers and monetary contributions always welcome P.O. Box 484, Placerville CA 95667 or (530)497-5146. VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS POST 2680 & AUXILIARY meet the 2nd Friday of every mo, 6pm Soc ½ Hour & 6:30pm Business Meeting. Veterans Memorial Bldg., 130 Placerville Dr. (530)391-6314 WOMEN VOTERS League of Women Voters of El Dorado County voter education. For information go to lwveldorado.org or (530) 672-3141.

To include your service organization information or meeting announcements call (530) 344-5028.


A6    Monday, January 13, 2020   Mountain Democrat mtdemocrat.com

Charlie 

Continued from A5

skiing. There are no lifts to take you up to the top of a mountain, no trails are and there aren't fancy lodges. Types of backcountry technique include telemark and randonée and each differs from free-heel. Boots for telemark and randonée are more like downhill boots except the bindings are different. The toe locks down for most travel but when heading downhill the heel locks down, too. Some telemark skiers free-heel it all the way with traditional crosscountry boots and bindings.

A ski instructor at Sierraat-Tahoe teaches a class how to navigate the slopes.

Where to go El Dorado County has two downhill resorts. Sierra-at-Tahoe is right off Highway 50 near to Echo Summit and Heavenly Mountain Resort is in the Tahoe Basin off of Saddle Road in South Lake Tahoe. The next closest resort is Kirkwood, located off Highway 88 in Alpine County. Cross-country fans have some choices as well. The Kirkwood Cross-Country Center is off Highway 88 at Kirkwood and features groomed trails, a small lodge, rentals and lessons. Joyce Coker's Hope Valley Cross-Country is country and snowshoe rentals and some groomed housed in a seasonal yurt at Pickett’s Junction (the trails. Find them on Emerald Bay Road in South intersection of highways 89 and 88). She offers true Lake Tahoe, across from Jameson Road. backcountry skiing lessons, the kick-and-glide-inSo what are the big differences between Alpine and the-forest experience, along with rentals, lessons and Nordic skiing? The New York Times Syndication Corporation some snacks at the yurt. ThereSales are lots of people at downhill resorts, which 620 EighthcrossAvenue, New areYork, prettyN.Y. busy10018 and fun places. On the flip-side, Camp Richardson Mountain Sports offers For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Monday, January 13, 2020

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Crossword ACROSS

Monday, January 13, 2020

Edited by Will Shortz

No. 1209

61 Hit 1980s cop 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 show 14 15 16 64 Dutch town with a cheese named 17 18 19 35 “___ till you drop” after it 6 Rocker Lofgren 36 W.W. II zone 65 Light and open 20 21 22 that D.D.E. 10 Story of heroes 66 Deity of Islam commanded 23 24 25 14 Hawaiian 67 Store department 37 Completely with jackets and greeting 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 ties enchanted 15 Grp. with 68 Shaggy beasts 33 34 35 41 The Cyclones of many Mideast the Big 12 Conf. 69 Come from members 36 37 38 39 40 41 behind, in 16 Outpouring from 42 Pimply outbreak scoring 42 43 44 45 46 a volcano 44 Like some batteries and 17 Sweet citrus fruits 47 48 49 50 DOWN baseball leagues from Southern 1 Dallas N.B.A. 51 52 California 45 Did something team, informally 20 Winter Olympics 47 Some chickens 2 Actor Alda 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 need 3 Like Lindbergh’s 51 Angry driver’s 61 62 63 1927 flight to 21 Tack on signal Paris 22 Most frigid 64 65 66 52 Lover boy 4 Crowd activity at 23 ___-bodied 53 “Quaking” trees a stadium 67 68 69 5 ___ Rafael, Calif. 25 Abba of Israel 56 Nightly “NewsHour” 6 “Who knows?!” 26 Only N.F.L. team PUZZLE BY ELLIS HAY presenter 7 Apple tablet that doesn’t have 43 Actor who played 56 Employee’s a logo on its 57 Queen in Disney’s 8 Sign before Virgo 27 Gate fastener reserved parking Andy Bernard on helmets “Frozen” 28 Cheap, in 9 Write quickly space, for one “The Office” commercial and none too ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE names 46 ___ De Vil, “101 carefully Dalmatians” role 58 Brief down period 10 Weather 29 Birth-related T E N J A M A I C A N R U M phenomena from 48 Earth’s longest 59 Circus animal R Y E I M E T S O M E O N E 30 “___ Christmas” the Pacific time divisions, with flippers (holiday song) E E K G O T T A B O U N C E geologically 11 “Doctor Jones, S T O W S H E I R S N A T you’re needed at 31 Edged (out) 60 Wan 49 Homes for nuns C E C E P A N D A C I G S the front desk,” 32 Taters 50 Hatchlings’ home e.g. H E A D B A N D S C R E E 62 Small inlet 38 Chief support I T S G O N E O G L E 12 Currier and ___ 53 *cough, cough* C H E E S E L O W F A T 13 Group of actors 39 “Can ___ you a 54 Point of view, as 63 What a priest, a minister and a D O S T C O M M I S H question?” in an argument 18 Dial on a rabbi might walk G S I X W R A P P A R T Y telephone 40 Zilch 55 Blueprint into C R A N L I A R S T E A R 19 Rent-___ (Hertz H E N P A N I C S E A T O or Avis) Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation I T C H E C K S O U T W I I 24 Hotel units puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 B E T A R E L E A S E A N D 25 Polish, as text Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 A L A R M S Y S T E M Y E S 26 Release Unambiguous For Tuesday, January 14, 2020 1 The Mayflower had three of them

33 Tied, as shoes 34 Be under the weather

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Crossword ACROSS 1 Go ___ over 5 Appends 9 Recessed area in a church 13 Radiate 14 Dishonest sort 15 Recessed area in a kitchen 16 At the big brawl, the jazz musician … 19 “___ Possible,” 2000s kids’ TV show 20 Jimmy of the Daily Planet

31 Savory quality, as 52 In need of from MSG refinement 54 Place where 34 Sports org. that customers wear sets eligibility robes requirements 55 At the big brawl, 35 Refer to the king and queen … 36 At the big brawl, the hairstylist … 59 Yankee nickname until 2016 39 Its symbol resembles a C 60 Book that people take an oath on with two lines across the center 61 Bombard, as with snowballs 40 Drink that can 62 Mrs. cause brain freeze 63 Small argument 41 Bottomless hole 64 Without purpose 42 Waze suggestion: Abbr. DOWN 43 Condition treated with Ritalin, for short

1 Lizard in 21 Chicago insurance ads transports 2 At full speed 22 In dire need of 44 Ryder Cup org. 3 “That’s mine!” fuel 45 Freebie in a hotel 4 Gorged on 24 Radiate bathroom 5 Pretentious 28 Battleship letters 47 Ship’s stabilizer 6 Two tablets or 29 Bottom, to a Brit 51 ___ Tomé and five milliliters, say Príncipe 30 Born, abroad 7 Reduce in status 8 Sporting item ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE that may be waxed M A S T S N I L S E P I C 9 Geometry class A L O H A O P E C L A V A measure V A L E N C I A O R A N G E S 10 Subject of the S N O W A D D I C I E S T saying “Leaves of A B L E E B A N three, let it be” C L E V E L A N D B R O W N S 11 Father and L A C E D A I L S H O P Holy Ghost E T O S M I T T E N I S U go-between A C N E A A A A C T E D 12 Hosp. readout R H O D E I S L A N D R E D S 14 Fanatical groups H O N K B E A U 17 “My bad!” A S P E N S P B S E L S A 18 Actress Campbell H I L L S T R E E T B L U E S of the “Scream” E D A M A I R Y A L L A H series M E N S Y A K S R A L L Y 23 ___ jumbo

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34 Dippable snack item 35 Plotting group 26 Big bashes 37 Aeneas’ love 27 Scrollable features of 38 Went two under Facebook and par on a hole Twitter 43 Each 29 Benefiting from 44 California benzoyl peroxide, baseballer say 46 Title role for Bea 31 Alternatives to Arthur taxis 47 Muscly 32 Sass, with “off” 48 Didn’t demand 33 Informed about 49 Period of time

50 “Mmm!” 53 Singer McEntire 55 What you might get offered if you say “Shake!” 56 Mentalist Geller 57 “The Last O.G.” network 58 News letters

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

Photo courtesy of Sierra-at-Tahoe

cross-country skiers won't see very many people out in the thousands of acres of forest but it's still fun — and it’s quiet. No matter what type of skiing you prefer the sport offers a great time outdoors, slipping and sliding about on the snow. So gear up, do the snow dance and get outside!

Ricky Davis 

Continued from A1

detectives and District Attorney’s Office investigators have suspected since early on that Ricky’s anger over being denied escorting young Autumn Anker to go partying is what triggered the deadly assault, Davis always has maintained that he is innocent. He and Dahl said from the outset that they came home to find Autumn standing outside the house, ostensibly waiting for them to return home, and that the trio discovered the nightmare only as all went inside. Dahl’s account was publicized by the Mountain Democrat at the time, a couple days following Anker’s slaying, after she led a reporter through the house and showed the killing scene, speculating that whoever had committed the murder had lain the victim’s body back onto a bed in the room where she was to sleep. That detail in the story, along with other statements made by Dahl under questioning two decades later by cold case investigators from El Dorado County, would lead to Ricky Davis’ arrest and eventual conviction in 2005 for the killing. Dahl had changed her original account of an “unknown intruder” being responsible to explaining, in gruesome detail, how she had assisted her then-boyfriend in killing the older woman. The first jury to hear the case hung up, announcing it couldn’t reach a verdict. The next jury, although announcing it was deadlocked at one point during deliberations, eventually would find Ricky Leo Davis guilty of slaying Jane Anker Hylton. Languishing in state prison at Solano since 2005, Davis became in contact with attorneys with the Northern California Innocence Project out of Santa Clara University, with one lawyer in particular dedicating her time to show the verdict should be overturned. When DNA evidence tested with more modern techniques indicated biological matter found under Jane Hylton’s fingernail and on her nightgown by a male could not scientifically be linked to Davis nor the deceased former husband — and with those new findings presented to a Superior Court judge in Placerville — Davis’ conviction was thrown out and a new trial ordered. Judge Kenneth Melikian, after poring for 10 months through thousands and thousands of past trial transcripts and other case documents, last spring tossed the verdict and ordered a new trial. He also has ruled that despite the fact that primary witness Connie Dahl has since died, her death reportedly from a drug overdose occurring in 2014, the jury sitting during the new trial will hear her testimony read from a transcript of the 2005 proceeding. And despite the fact that Davis consistently has refused to waive his Constitutional right to speedy court proceedings, he has been overruled as Judge Melikian found the defendant’s need for a thorough, competent defense outweighs his 6th Amendment right. Attorney Melissa van der Vijver, well respected locally for her record as a criminal defense attorney, is in poor health, with her condition part of the record as the delays in the case have been explained and justified. Getting up to speed on the complicated matters affecting the defendant’s future also have contributed to myriad delays — the most recent of which occurred last Tuesday before Judge Melikian. The magistrate last fall had ordered Davis’ new trial to begin in February 2020, with jury selection beginning this month, but after conversations last week in the judge’s chambers with van der Vijver and El Dorado County deputy district attorney Jay Linden, it was announced in open court that the trial now will likely take place beginning April 14, with jury selection taking up much of the month of March. The defense attorney’s health situation again was named as the catalyst for the change of dates. The next appearance for readiness and settlement where attorneys discuss any new matters that could affect the case scheduling and or outcome is set for Monday, Feb. 3, in Melikian’s Dept. 2 courtroom in downtown Placerville. As the judge carefully questioned Davis last week as to his understanding of the reasons for yet another delay, and exacted the defendant’s responses, the man who has sat waiting for freedom for a crime he insists he did not commit, answered, “Yes, Your Honor,” and “I understand, Your Honor,” as his attorney sat at his side.


mtdemocrat.com Mountain Democrat   Monday, January 13, 2020  

A7

comics n SHOE by Jeff MacNelly

Courtesy graphic

The site for the tower was moved several hundred feet southwest of its originally proposed location in Camino and will now be in a grove of trees on the northern terminus of High Hill Road near the intersection with Carson Road.

Cell tower 

Continued from A3

among commissioners. Public comment at two hearings held before the agricultural commission regarding the cell tower were primarily focused on the aesthetics of the proposed tower, fire safety and the potential impact on animal migration, noted county planner Aaron Mount. As a result of those comments, the site for the tower was moved several hundred feet southwest of its original location and it will now be in a grove of trees. Mount recommended that the new tower receive a conditional use permit based on the commission adopting a mitigated negative declaration for the project and the conditions attached to it. Speaking on behalf of the project was John Merritt, president of Empire Media Corporation. Merritt assured commissioners that the tower was needed because of gaps in coverage and capacity, especially during Apple Hill season. He promised it would help grow business in the area and that relocating the tower site would render it virtually invisible because of the tree cover. Much of the discussion then moved on to why plans for the new cell tower didn’t include putting in a generator in the event of a power shutdown by PG&E. As an alternative the applicant proposed using back-up batteries. Merritt said in all likelihood a generator would be installed that would kick in once the batteries were exhausted, which would typically be after eight hours. Batteries appeared insufficient once Commissioner Jeff Hansen informed the commission that the state legislature will soon be considering legislation that would require cell towers to have 72-hours worth of back-up power in the event of a power shutdown. Breeann Moebius, an attorney in the county counsel’s office, said a condition of approval could include adding a generator. Commissioner James Williams then questioned why no sound analysis had been done beforehand to examine the effect of having a generator at that site. He went on to suggest that perhaps the project was not yet ready

DeBarry 

for approval given that the issue of the generator was not resolved. In response Mount said any generator put in would have to meet county standards. Asked how soon the tower will be built, Merritt said he expected it to be constructed in the first quarter of this year. Members of the public were then given a chance to comment on the project, with most supportive of the new tower. Paul Bush of Madroña Vineyards called “this kind of cell service imperative” saying it will help tourists with traffic navigation while not impacting agricultural use. Chris Delfino of Delfino Farms and the president of the Apple Hill Growers Association said the technology was needed given how much the tourist industry in the area has grown. Laurel Brent-Bumb, CEO of the El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce, said there was an “exceptional need” for the tower, calling it an economic development issue that will also help first responders. Gordon Helm, the interim president of the El Dorado County Farm Bureau and President of the El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce, noted that with technological changes coming, even in farming, the tower was needed to avoid hindering the use of that technology. Most in opposition to the tower were Joan and Stanley Geel, who have lived in the area for 30 years and only recently sold their property. They expressed concern about the amount of noise from a generator, danger from fire, the visibility of the tower, how it might affect local farmers financially and the effect of the structure on soil erosion and stability. After further discussion the commission voted to approve the cell tower with some additional conditions including that a generator be installed and a noise study be done to ensure the generator meets county noise standards. That motion was approved by Commissioners Gary Miller, Jon Vegna and Jeff Hansen. Commissioner James Williams voted no. The District 5 seat on the commission is currently vacant.

n TUNDRA by Chad Carpenter

n RUBES by Leigh Rubin

n SPEED BUMP by Dave Coverly

sudoku Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9

Continued from A1

their two sons Randy and Tim. He worked on land-use and transportation issues for several decades, serving for local surveyors, the El Dorado County Department of Transportation, El Dorado County Irrigation District and eventually 23 years with Caltrans. He is the founder and editor of the publication “The Miner’s Inch,” which aims to educate county residents with a light-hearted approach. Brian is the son of Fred DeBerry, who served as the El Dorado County surveyor for 20 years.

Kevin Nagle 

DeBarry is a member of the Morning Star Lodge No. 20 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, American Legion, Native Sons of California and E Clampus Vitus. He is running to replace current supervisor Brian Veerkamp, who is termed out after having been on the board for eight years. Former Placerville mayor Wendy Thomas has also announced her candidacy for the seat. The primary election will be held March 3, 2020.

Continued from A1

Certificate in Medical Marketing from the UCLA Anderson School of Management. After interning for the state Assembly speaker of California, Nagle worked for EF Hutton as an investment banker, but it was pharmaceuticals that he turned his attention to and he joined the Upjohn Company in 1980. By 2001, after spending years in various management positions in the pharmaceutical world, Nagle co-founded EnvisionRx, a health care and pharmacy benefit management company in El Dorado Hills. He sold the successful business to the Rite Aid Corporation in 2014. Nagle moved from Southern California in 1994 after visiting friends and falling in love with the area. “It was for a quality-of-life change for my children,” said Nagle, referring to daughters Haley and Lindsay. “My children are my greatest asset. They are wonderful human beings.” In 2011 he partnered with Tony Mansour of the Mansour Company to help grow El Dorado Hills Town Center, which is currently home to a variety of restaurants and specialty shops. Back then he said, “El Dorado Hills is a great place to live and this is its center.” He continues to work on drawing in new businesses. “I love El Dorado Hills,” said Nagle, promising, “2020 should be a really great year for Town Center and for the people who come.” In the meantime, he said he thinks there is one solution that would allow El Dorado Hills to reap its fair share — cityhood — and he’s considering building a coalition to help determine whether that is the direction the community should head.

Solutions to puzzles in Classified section of newspaper.

horoscope by Holiday Mathis n today ARIES (March 21-April 19). You’ll do what others would consider risky, scary or difficult. You’re not trying to prove anything. This is either where life has led you or where your interests have culminated. This is just who you are. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’ve amassed a number of tricks and methods in your toolbox, and now is the time to stay in touch with your resources. Think about what your best moves are so that when the time comes you’ll remember to use them. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Tensions will rise, though you’ll rise higher if you interrupt the escalation by excusing yourself for 15 minutes. Get away. Get calm and comfortable. Once you’re out of the fray, you’ll see the situation in a new light.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’re not going to stop anything by fighting it head-on today. Accept and redirect. Make contact with the thing you want to eliminate from your life, but only enough contact to nudge it in a direction away from you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You’ll experience sensations that keep you on your toes. Tiny distractions, a buzzy feeling, nervousness, they’re all indications of heightened awareness. They will pass. Find the gift in them before they do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Better to take action out of a fiery desire for the result, or because you’re in love with the promise of the task, than to take action out of a sense of obligation. When love is involved, hard things become easy.

CANCER (June 22-July 22). It is the aim of your side to suppress evil and uphold the virtuous. The aim of the other side is exactly the same. The only differences are differences of definition. Of course, that is everything.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). It seems like not that long ago you simplified your life, and now it’s gotten a little too full and cluttered again. The secret to staying evergreen is to regularly organize, tidy and purge.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Your mind is quick to assign a meaning and a reason to every feeling that comes up. This unnecessarily complicates matters. When you let feelings surface and fade without attaching a story, you move lighter through life.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You have something that works for you. Now make it work even better through consecration. Make it sacred. Through your intention and blessing, what’s yours will become more powerful, protected and sealed to you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Now that you are starting to see some progress in this journey, the most important thing is to stay on the same path. Do not seek a new destination. Consolidate and stick to the mission.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When you see what you want, you like to get it immediately. Try not to be impatient though. In today’s case, waiting can prevent a much bigger frustration later. Give it at least 48 hours.


A8    Monday, January 13, 2020   Mountain Democrat mtdemocrat.com

powered by

Fri 1/17

Featured

Wobbleland - Friday @ 6pm / $65 Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, 99 Grove Street, San Francisco ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Wobbleland w/ Zeds Dead @ 6pm Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, 99 Grove Street, San Francisco

"The Glass Menagerie"

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 8pm / $11

The Campbell Theater, 636 Ward St, Martinez Whiskerman w/ Rainbow Girls

Featured

@ 8pm The Independent, 628 Divisadero St., San Francisco

Indian Cooking Class Private (2020-01-20 starts at 11:00 AM)

Editor's Voice

10-Minute Play Festival

@ 10am / $220 Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Francisco ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Indian Cooking Class Group (2020-01-20 starts at 11:00 AM) @ 10am / $137.50 Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Francisco

Lindsey Webster @ 7pm / $29-$59 Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, Napa Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy @ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

@ 8pm War�eld, 982 Market St., San Fran‐ cisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Fri 1/24

Re�exology (2020-01-20 starts at 4:00 PM)

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy

Featured

@ 3pm / $120 Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San Francisco

@ 3pm / $65

Forejour - Tribute to Foreigner & Journey

Francisco

@ 8pm / $18-$25 Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa

Indian Cooking Class Private (2020-01-20 starts at 6:00 PM)

@ 9pm / $29-$59 Napa

@ 5pm / $220 Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Francisco

@ 7:30pm / $10-$15 Ace of Spades, 1417 R St., Sacra‐ mento

An Evening At the Improv @ 9pm / $27.29 Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

Indian Cooking Class Group (2020-01-20 starts at 6:00 PM) @ 5pm / $137.50 Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Francisco

@ 7:30pm / $11.49-$27.24 Dance Fridays - Salsa and Bachata Dancing with LIVE Salsa Bands, Bachata Room, Beginning Dance Lessons for ALL, SF's Hottest Dance NightClub Dance Fridays, 550 Barneveld, San Francisco. sal‐ sacrazy@gmail.com, 877-326-2311

SF Sketchfest Presents: Fake TED Talks

Featured

@ 10:30pm / $35 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

Sun 1/19 @ 11am / $16

Punch Line Comedy Club - Sacra‐ ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy

@ 7pm / $32-$42 mento, 2100 Arden Way, Sacra‐ SF Sketchfest Presents: The Loft Theatre, 1001 mento The Greatest Generation Heavenly Village Way, //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 7:30pm / $30 South Lake Tahoe SF Sketchfest Presents: Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ Leif Vollebekk at Swedish James Bonding bus Avenue, San Francisco @ 1pm / $30 American Hall //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ @ 7pm / $15-$18 An Evening At the Improv @ 8pm / $22.71 Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

Sheila E @ 7:30pm / $40.82-$54.58 South Shore Room at Harrah's Lake Tahoe, 15 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

Meat Loaf Presents: ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

"BAT: The Greatest Hits of Meat Loaf" @ 7:30pm / $19.75-$24.75 Crest Theatre, 1013 K Street, Sacramento

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Editor's Pick Russian National Ballet w/ Swan Lake

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Makeup & Mimosas: Drag Brunch with a Punch!

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Francisco

Golden State Warriors vs. Utah Jazz

Editor's Pick Dan Cummins: Toxic Thoughts Tour

@ 7:30pm / $25 Punch Line Comedy Club - Sacra‐ mento, 2100 Arden Way, Sacra‐ mento //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 7:30pm Three Stages at Folsom Lake Col‐ lege, 10 College Parkway, Folsom

San Francisco Ballet w/ Cinderella-Theater

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SF Sketchfest Presents: The Black Version @ 7:30pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

San Francisco Ballet w/ Cinderella-Theater @ 8pm War Memorial Opera House, 455 Franklin St., San Francisco

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An Evening At the Improv @ 9pm / $27.29

Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

10-Minute Play Festival

@ 7:30pm / $10-$12 @ 7:30pm The Winters Theatre Company in‐ War Memorial Opera House, 455 augural 10-Minute Play Festival Franklin St., San Francisco features eight original short plays. //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Winters Community Center, 201 SF Sketchfest Presents Railroad Avenue, Winters. Found Footage Festival: jimhewlett@yahoo.com

After Dark

DJ Soltrix at Dance Saturdays MAIN ROOM BachataCrazy Nights (Salsa y Mas)

@ 7:30pm / $16.73-$35 DJ SOLTRIX returns to Dance Sat‐ urdays BachataCrazy Nights //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Bachata, Salsa y Mas plus Dance Aaron Watson Lessons for ALL at 8p in multiple @ 7pm / $25 rooms of Dance Dance Saturdays Ace of Spades, 1417 R St., Sacra‐ with DJ SOLTRIX Bachata in the mento Main Room Dance Fridays & Sat‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// urdays - Space 550, 550 Barneveld Avenue, San Francisco. sal‐ Featured sacrazy@gmail.com, 877-3262311

@ 7pm / $50

@ 7pm / $60-$2250 Chase Center, 300 16th Street, San Francisco ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Orq. NRUMBA - LIVE Salsa, Bachata y Mas, Dance Lessons 8p

@ 7pm / $5-$10 Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, Napa Golden State Warriors Parking : Warriors v Jazz

@ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

Chase Center, 300 16th Street, San ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Electric Feels: Indie Rock + Indie Dance Party

Locals Night Feat: DAVID RONCONI BAND

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Editor's Pick

REIKI FOR THE COMMUNITY (2020-01-20 starts at 4:00 PM)

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San

Lindsey Webster

@ 7:30pm / $10-$12 Winters Community Center, 201 Railroad Avenue, Winters. jimhewlett@yahoo.com Winters Theatre Company presents its inaugural 10-Minute Play Festival. The festival features eight 10-minute plays written by local playwrights.

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Amber Liu w/ Meg & Dia

Saturday Jan 25th

Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The White Buffalo @ 9pm The Independent, 628 Divisadero St., San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Wyclef Jean //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm Harlow's, 2708 J Street, Sacra‐ mento

@ 8pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

SF Sketchfest Threesome

Swedish American Hall, 2174 Mar‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ket Street, San Francisco

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy

Poppy

Trippie Redd ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

bus Avenue, San Francisco

@ 7:30pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// bus Avenue, San Francisco ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Trombone Choir: two session workshop

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 11pm War�eld, 982 Market St., San Fran‐ @ 8pm / $22.71 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly @ 7pm / $130 "Jean Genies & Nott the cisco Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake Village Way, South Lake Tahoe Jan 20th - Jan 27th //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Hoople" Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Drew School, 2901 California @ 8:30pm 89449 "You'll Catch Flies" Street, San Francisco Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 8pm / $13.50-$24.50 Featured //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Mission Street, San Francisco Jacquees - King of R&B New Conservatory Theatre Center, Level 2-200 Hour Medi‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Featured Tour 25 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran‐ tation Teacher Training Celebrity Housewives Live @ 8pm / $29.50-$39.50 cisco @ 9pm / $2,200-$2,800 @ 9pm The Masonic, 1111 California St, //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Jan 20th - Jan 26th August Hall, 420 Mason St, San San Francisco Stay Silly Comedy Anchor Meditation, 2118 Union Francisco //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 8pm / $8.50 Street, San Francisco //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Marteen Punch Line Sacramento, 2100 Ar‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Dopapod w/ Organ @ 8pm den Way, Suite 225, Sacramento Freeman Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Jeremy Jordan With //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm Mission Street, San Francisco An Evening At the Improv Re�exology (2020-01-21 Pianist/Host Seth Walnut Creek Wedding The Independent, 628 Divisadero //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm / $22.71 starts at 10:00 AM) St., San Francisco Rudetsky Fair The Soul Rebels Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake @ 9am / $120 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 5pm / $52.50 @ 9pm @ 12pm / Free-$15 Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San Roddy Ricch The Independent, 628 Divisadero Herbst Theatre at the San Walnut Creek Marriott, 89449 Francisco @ 9pm St., San Francisco Francisco War Memorial 2355 N Main St, Walnut //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// The Regency Ballroom, 1290 Sut‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Building, 401 Van Ness Creek "Missed Connections" Indian Cooking Class ter Street, San Francisco Magic After Dark Starring Ave, San Francisco SF Sketchfest Presents: //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Group (2020-01-21 starts at @ 9pm / $5 Robert Hall PianoFight, 144 Taylor Street, San Acoustic Sunsets Feat: Outtake-o-rama with the Lindsey Webster 11:00 AM) @ 9pm / $32-$42 Francisco Bloom�eld Bluegrass Band voice cast of Futurama @ 9:15pm / $29-$59 @ 10am / $137.50 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 1pm / $30 & the LoWatters Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Village Way, South Lake Tahoe Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ @ 5pm / $5-$12 Napa Francisco //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// bus Avenue, San Francisco Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Dan Cummins: Toxic //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Napa Magic Fusion Starring Matt Bill Bellamy Re�exology (2020-01-21 Thoughts Tour //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9:45pm / $27.50 10-Minute Play Festival Marcy starts at 4:00 PM) @ 9:45pm / $25 Pennywise Punch Line Comedy Club - Sacra‐ @ 7pm / $32-$42 @ 2pm / $10-$12 @ 3pm / $120 Punch Line Comedy Club - Sacra‐ @ 6pm / $29.50 mento, 2100 Arden Way, Sacra‐ The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly The Winters Theatre Company in‐ Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San mento, 2100 Arden Way, Sacra‐ Ace of Spades, 1417 R St., Sacra‐ mento Village Way, South Lake Tahoe augural 10-Minute Play festival Francisco mento mento //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// features eight 10-minute plays //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// written by local Yolo County play‐ SF Sketchfest Presents: Indian Cooking Class Thrice SF Sketchfest Salute to Magic Fusion Starring Matt wrights. Winters Community Cen‐ @ 7pm Set List Private (2020-01-21 starts The Chris Gethard Show ter, 201 Railroad Avenue, Winters. Marcy War�eld, 982 Market St., San Fran‐ @ 10:30pm / $25 at 6:00 PM) @ 10:30pm / $25 jimhewlett@yahoo.com @ 7pm / $32-$42 cisco Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ @ 5pm / $220 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// bus Avenue, San Francisco Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San bus Avenue, San Francisco Village Way, South Lake Tahoe //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// San Francisco Ballet w/ Francisco @ 4:30pm / $32-$42 ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 8pm Great American Music Hall, 850 O'‐ Farrell St., San Francisco

An Evening At the Improv

Sun 1/26

Tue 1/21

Thu 1/23

Featured

Sat 1/18

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

SF Sketchfest Spotlight on "Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell"

@ 7pm Harlow's Night Club - Sacramento CA, 2708 J St, Sacramento

@ 4pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

SF Sketchfest Presents: The Margaret Cho Podcast

Leif Vollebekk

@ 6pm / $65 Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, 99 Grove Street, San Francisco

Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

@ 6pm Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, 99 Grove Street, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

Bill Bellamy Punch Line Comedy Club - Sacra‐ mento, 2100 Arden Way, Sacra‐ mento

@ 7:30pm / $14.75-$19.75 Crest Theatre, 1013 K //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Street, Sacramento YBN Cordae Featured

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Theo Katzman //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Lindsey Webster @ 6:30pm / $29-$59 Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, Napa

@ 8pm / $25 The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Boule‐ vard, San Francisco ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Ali Wong: The Milk & //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy @ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

Money Tour

@ 9:30pm / $49.50-$99.50 The Masonic, 1111 California St, San Francisco

Mon 1/20

Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom San Francisco Ballet w/ Cinderella-Theater

@ 8pm / $24 Downtown Theatre, 1035 Texas Street, Fair�eld

@ 9am / $65 Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San Francisco

SF Sketchfest Presents: Sawbones with Justin and Sydnee McElroy @ 4pm / $20 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

Randy Houser @ 8pm / $27.50 The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Boule‐ vard, San Francisco

SF Sketchfest Presents: Morti�ed

Winter Gala

@ 8pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

Leezythegifted LIVE @ Brick & Mortar

EarthGang: Welcome to Mirrorland Tour

Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Mission Street, San Francisco

@ 8pm / $25 The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Boule‐ vard, San Francisco

An Evening At the Improv

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

To List Your Event Online and In Print Visit: mynorcalevents.com Email: nstack@villagelife.com

Editor's Pick Carolina Lugo & Carolé Acuña's "Ballet Flamenco" @ 7pm / $10.99 Peña Pachamama, 1630 Powell St, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 9pm / $22.71

Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 8:30pm August Hall, 420 Mason St, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Desi Comedy Fest

Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

@ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

18th Annual 'Pink Ice' ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 8pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

Patrick Watson

@ 2pm War Memorial Opera House, 455 Franklin St., San Francisco

@ 6pm / $40 Desi Comedy Fest is the largest South Asian comedy festival in //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// America. "Desi" countries include @ 7:30pm Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Featured Harlow's Night Club - Sacramento India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan CA, 2708 J St, Sacramento and Sri Lanka. India Community //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Center, 525 Los Coches St, Milpi‐ Sean Carscadden Trio tas. info@DesiComedyFest.com @ 8pm / $5-$12 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main Street, Magic Fusion Starring Matt Napa Marcy

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm / $20

For event details and even more listings visit us online! mynorcalevents.com

Cinderella-Theater

@ 4:30pm / $32-$42 ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 6pm / $85-$100 The 18th Annual 'Pink Ice' @ 9am / $120 Winter Gala to bene�t Verlocal, 105-109 Bartlett St, San community programs and @ 7:30pm Francisco //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// college scholarships Sun‐ War Memorial Opera House, 455 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// SKITZ THA RIPPA rise Banquet Hall and Franklin St., San Francisco Editor's Pick REIKI FOR THE @ 8:30pm / $20 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Event Center, 620 Orange Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Unauthorized Rolling COMMUNITY (2020-01-20 SF Sketchfest Presents: Drive, Vacaville. akatuo@‐ Mission Street, San Francisco Stones starts at 10:00 AM) Oh No, Ross and Carrie gmail.com, 707-290-5721 //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 7:30pm / $35 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

Re�exology (2020-01-20 starts at 10:00 AM)

@ 1pm / $25 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Mystery Science Theater 3000

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 7:30pm

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

SF Sketchfest Presents: Fake TED Talks

Sons of Apollo With Tony MacAlpine

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 7:30pm / $25 ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Wobbleland

@ 5pm / $137.50 Verlocal, 41 Newburg St, San Francisco

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy

Sat 1/25 SF Sketchfest Presents: improv4humans

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

@ 7:30pm / $25 ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Wobbleland - Saturday

Indian Cooking Class Group (2020-01-21 starts at 6:00 PM)

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

SF Sketchfest Presents: Doughboys with Mike Mitchell and Nick Wiger @ 7:30pm / $35 Cobb's Comedy Club, 915 Colum‐ bus Avenue, San Francisco

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How Did This Get Made Live! @ 8pm / $50 The Masonic, 1111 California St, San Francisco

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Shakey Graves @ 8pm / $30 THE INDEPENDENT, 628 Di‐ visadero St, SAN FRANCISCO

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Big Head Todd & the

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Monsters with JD Simo

The Used @ 7pm / $37.50 Ace of Spades, 1417 R St., Sacra‐ mento

@ 8pm / $40-$60 Uptown Theatre Napa, 1350 3rd St, Napa

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Carol C of Si Se

Magic Fusion

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm / $32-$42

Magic Fusion Starring Matt Marcy

Wed 1/22

The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

Magic Fusion Starring Robert Hall

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

@ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe

@ 9pm Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Mission Street, San Francisco

RiFF RAFF

@ 7pm / $32-$42 The Loft Theatre, 1001 Heavenly

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

An Evening At the Improv

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// @ 9pm / $22.71

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

////// The best place to promote your events online and in print. ////// Visit us @ https://mynorcalevents.com/

@ 8:30pm Brick & Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Mission Street, San Francisco

Harveys Cabaret at Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Hwy 50, Stateline, NV 89449

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

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Good Living in

el

dorado

county

Kara Sather advocates for El Dorado Lee Hodo Democrat contributor

W

ith a cell phone in each hand, a shock of blond hair and a whirlwind of energy, Kara Sather is not difficult to spot. Sather, executive director of the El Dorado Winery Association (EDWA), can be found at numerous functions, in each corner of the county, nearly any time of day or evening. Tending to the marketing and promotion of the organization’s 40-plus member wineries requires an all-out effort of long hours, political dexterity and real talent. Appointed EDWA’s director in 2017, Sather seemed perfectly poised for the commitment. Born in Edmonton, Alberta, she came to this career path via a roundabout background of education and life changes. Preparing for a bright future, Sather received a degree in economics from the University of Alberta in 1992. She was married that summer and moved to British Columbia. By the late 1990s she was the marketing and promotions manager for Coast Capital Savings, the second largest credit union in Canada at the time. When her then-husband’s work took the family to the States, Sather took care of their three children full time. After hopscotching across the country — from Michigan to Florida, Massachusetts and Washington State — the family finally settled in El Dorado County in 2011.

wines

concert series, a kids’ zone, a car show and purveyors. Sather’s interface with EDWA through David Girard Vineyards hadn’t gone unnoticed. During her employment there, she had served on various EDWA committees. When EDWA finished up a long-term contract with a marketing company and elected to hire a director, the board approached her to interview for the position. Eventually, she was hired full time.

Many tasks

Part time to full time Eventually, with all three children in school in El Dorado Hills, Sather’s break into the wine business came with a job offer from David Girard Vineyards. What started as a part-time gig pouring for wine Democrat photos by Kevin Christensen events morphed into hosting at Kara Sather, executive director of the El Dorado Winery Association, is ready to welcome visitors the winery tasting room. Then vineyard owner David Girard asked to the new El Dorado Wine Movement Center, 304 Main St. in Placerville. her to oversee all the winery’s After four years, the winery in Auburn and specializing in events, including a full slate of decided to curtail its events activity. nationwide community events. As concerts, wine club release parties Now with solid event planning a senior manager, she organized and weddings, plus the aggressive and promotion experience, Sather Roseville Downtown Tuesday Nights, marketing required for each event. took a job with EzEvents, based a 13-week event that included a

As director, Sather’s job is to invigorate the association’s marketing and membership initiatives. In addition, she tends to local and national government issues facing wineries and the industry as a whole. As a regional leader, she interfaces with other regional directors at the Wine Institute, the largest advocacy and public policy association for California wine, paying careful attention to rules, regulations and opportunities for wineries. The busy advocate also makes sure that EDWA programs and initiatives are in sync with the El Dorado County tourism industry. She personally and professionally supports El Dorado County’s Center for Violencefree Relationships. Recently she spearheaded an EDWA fundraiser to support the center’s services to victims of domestic violence. Two years after taking the helm of EDWA, Sather is particularly proud of several key initiatives. One has been building a greater sense of community among winery members through quarterly tastings, where winemakers and hospitality employees gather to taste one another’s wines and socialize. Additionally, she has developed a partnership with Sacramento’s Old Town district, culminating in a yearly outdoor tasting event exclusively featuring more than a dozen El Dorado wineries in Old Town.

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See KARA SATHER, page B8

Barton Health welcomes first baby of 2020 B Barton Health

Courtesy photo

Care team members Tami Harrison, RN, and Megan Jewell, MD, top left, joined Barton Health’s celebration of welcoming the first baby born at its Family Birthing Center in 2020, Everett James Haen, bottom center, with parents Robert Haen and Shaina Willen, MD.

arton Health is delighted to announce the first baby of 2020 has been delivered at its Family Birthing Center at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 7. Everett James Haen was born to South Lake Tahoe natives Robert Haen and Shaina Willen, MD. Everett weighed 6 pounds and 15 ounces at birth and measured 19.5 inches long. As the first baby of the new year, Everett puts “family” in Family Birthing Center with a rich history in the area and deep roots at

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Barton. His father Robert, a local contractor and business operator, was born at Barton as was Robert’s sister, who manages Barton Memorial Hospital’s Reprocessing Department. Everett’s mother, Shaina, is a pediatrician with Barton Health and the daughter of an OB/GYN physician at Barton. Everett’s 2-year-old sister Elise is also a Barton baby and shares that she is ready to be a big sister. Barton Health eagerly awaited the arrival of its first baby of the new year and presented the parents with a wagon filled with gifts donated by local businesses and organizations, a tradition

of the health care system and community to celebrate the occasion. In 2019, 299 babies were delivered at the Family Birthing Center, located at Barton Memorial Hospital in South Lake Tahoe. Comprised of registered nurses, lactation consultants, board-certified obstetricians and pediatricians, the Family Birthing Center offers families private suites for labor, delivery and recovery. Barton has one of the lowest Cesarean section birth rates in California and holds a Blue Distinction designation for its healthy outcomes for mothers and babies.

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Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY

Monday, January 13, 2020

prospecting In the

KNOW Monday, Jan. 13 Marshall Hospital Auxiliary is looking for individuals to join its current volunteers. Volunteer interviews will be held Feb. 19 and processing to Feb. 24. Many different positions are available while doing rewarding community work. Call (530) 626-2643 or (530) 620-2240, leave your name, phone number and email. El Dorado County Republican Central Committee meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at Park Community Church, 3901 Wild Chaparral Drive in Shingle Springs. Want to feel good and experience personal growth? If you are 55 years and up, Senior Peer Counseling of El Dorado County is offering an opportunity for volunteers to become peer counselors and join the team. Call (530) 621-6304 for more information. Applications are being accepted now. Training begins in March 2020.

Tuesday, Jan. 14 The Widows Club meets at 9 a.m. every Tuesday morning at the Golden Waffle Café, 1449 Broadway in Placerville. The club is created to give support and friendship to help people through the grieving process. For more information call Don at (530) 363-7476 or Nancy at (530) 622-8276. The Placerville Senior Center is hosting three cell phone classes in January. Having trouble hearing or seeing your iPhone or Android smartphone? Come to one of the free cell phone classes and learn how to make your phone louder, send text messages, connect to Bluetooth devices, operate basic functions and much more. iPhone classes are Jan. 14 and 28 and the Android class is Jan. 23. Space is limited. Call (530) 621-6227 to register. Marshall Medical Center is having a series All About … Having A Baby sponsored by Marshall Community Health Education on Tuesdays from Jan. 14 through Feb. 18 from 6-8:30 p.m. in Placerville. The series is a six-part series to prepare mothers for parenting. It includes having a healthy pregnancy, childbirth preparation, breastfeeding, baby care information, guest speakers, baby shower and more. Come meet other new parents and have fun while getting ready for the new baby.  Pre-registration is required. Call Community Health Education at Marshall Medical to register and to obtain more information at (530) 6262990. There is no fee.

Lois Guy keeps on walking — at 100 Thomas Frey Staff writer

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t the age of 100, Lois Guy finds time to walk the beautiful rolling hills by her home in El Dorado on a consistent basis. The centenarian enjoys walking and the walking she does now is a lot easier than the walking she did growing up in Plainfield, Iowa. Each morning when it would be snowing, Guy, who was born Nov. 15 1919, and her three brothers followed in their father’s footsteps to the school bus stop on a mile and a half trek through deep snow.  “She has stories of walking through the snow to school. Her father would walk across the fields and the kids would follow and step in his footsteps,” said her daughter Kathy Roberts who currently lives in El Dorado. Guy grew up on a farm with no running water or electricity. Her mother died when she was young so Lois and her father would cook on an old iron stove where they had to build the fire. The family was resourceful and baked its own bread and biscuits, used eggs from the family’s chickens, milked the family’s cows and picked fruit and vegetables from the garden to eat.

First-hand lesson When Lois was 9, she experienced first hand the fallout of The Great Depression in 1928. She had saved up $11, which is the equivalent of $161 today, and when she went to the bank to collect her money, the bank had gone bust and she lost the money she had saved up. “I was just a kid and it meant a lot to me,” Guy said. She said that aside from her losing her money, her family wasn’t impacted too much by The Great Depression because the family was self sufficient at the farm. In high school, Lois said most of what she did socially was through the church. She said she doesn’t remember newspapers too much growing up and that she would get most of her news from radio or by socializing at church. Guy earned the title of valedictorian at her high school and after she graduated, she moved about 30 miles to

Democrat photo by Thomas Frey

Lois Guy of El Dorado turned 100 years old Nov. 15, 2019. She grew up in Iowa and has lived in Placerville for more than 20 years. Waterloo, Iowa to attend business college.

Big changes While in Waterloo, World War II began. All three of her brothers served and were deployed. Guy said that she and everyone in the United States was impacted by the war because of rationing. There was rationing on gas, sugar, food and they had to save metal cans. Even coins were changed due to a fear of a copper shortage. After she graduated, she continued to work in Waterloo, but one day, she wanted to move somewhere warmer and she packed up her stuff and her son and moved to sunny Los Angeles. Once in California, she lived just a few blocks away from Douglas Aircraft. She walked down there, walked in and came out with a job as an executive secretary. Over the span of her career, she worked for Lockheed and Northrup where she routinely had a top security clearance. While working, Guy never had the advantage of using a computer. Instead, she spent most of her career working on a typewriter and she knew how to write shorthand. “It was the time when there was a lot of secret work going on,” Guy said.

Some key moments While working, Lois and her husband Edward Guy Sr. raised a family with four

children — Edward Guy Jr., Richard Guy, Don Smith and Kathy Roberts — which Lois said was one of the top moments of her life that has now spanned longer than a century. Guy has seen her share of natural disasters. Growing up, her family had a cellar stocked with food and living supplies in case of a tornado. A couple of times, her family had a close call and stood on the steps of the cellar as tornadoes got very close to their home.  At the age of 74 at 4:30 a.m. on Jan. 17, 1994, Lois and her husband were sleeping in their Los Angeles home and woke up to a 6.7 magnitude earthquake. The water in their pool was crashing like a wave in the ocean. The house was knocked off the foundation and they were without power for five days. Lois and her husband had earthquake insurance, but it took six months to pay off. While waiting for the insurance money, they lived in a friend’s motorhome in their backyard. When the insurance money arrived, rather than fix up the home, they moved to Santa Paula. They couldn’t escape catastrophe there either. About a year after moving to Santa Paula, Lois and her husband had to be airlifted out of their home due to flooding. A few months later, it flooded again. “We’ve had more than our share of natural disasters,” Guy said.

The Widows Club meets at 9 a.m. every Wednesday morning at Beef and Brew, 4232 Fowler Lane in Diamond Springs, and Denny’s, 3446 Coach Lane in Cameron Park. For more information call Don at (530) 363-7476 or Nancy at (530) 622-8276. Marshall Medical Center is having a Mental Health First Aid class sponsored by the El Dorado County Mental Health Department and Marshall Medical n

See know, page B4

Coming to El Dorado County After about four years of living in Santa Paula, Lois’ husband died and she moved up to El Dorado to live closer to some of her children, including her daughter Kathy. She spends her time reading, walking, gardening several types of flowers including petunias, roses and a variety of different shrubs. She has four kids, nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. She has been a member of the Placerville Shakespeare Club for about four years.

“I like the social part of it that you get to meet a lot of people and we have meetings twice a month,” Guy said. “They do a lot of good, they provide scholarships for kids who want to go to college and they do several other things where they provide money for people who need it.” Guy never smoked and ate a lot of fruits and vegetables growing up and has continued to eat well as an adult. When asked what the secret to living to 100 is, Lois said with a laugh to, “just pick the right ancestors.”

Holidays made happier with community donations Tori Roberts

Wednesday, Jan 15

Photo courtesy of Lois Guy

Lois Guy after being named valedictorian of her high school in Iowa around 1938. Guy then went to a business college in Iowa before moving to Los Angeles.

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fter hearing about food insufficiency with older adults and with the holidays approaching, Elder Options reached out to one of the contracting public agencies to see how it could help. The goal was to help address hunger in El Dorado County and reach out to some of the older residents by collecting and delivering foodstuffs to these older adults. Initially Elder Options staff received a list of families considered low income that could absolutely benefit from extra food. As the list was reviewed, Elder Options received additional names that would enjoy having the staples. The staff agreed that it would only put the word out to employees and active Elder Options client/families to help with the collection. The canned goods, pasta, crackers, tuna, etc. were slow in coming in and the staff was getting worried. Fifty re-useable

shopping bags were waiting to be filled for the 50 families on the lists. A reminder went out and oh, my goodness — the world conspired and delivered. Daily drop offs began to take over the offices. The bags were filled and then re-filled as more food came in. People dropped off checks, cash and instructed the staff to purchase what was needed so a shopping trip was planned too. A sample bag was weighed and each bag was 25-plus pounds each. The filled bags were completed with a card and some cash and delivered the week before Christmas by Elder Options employees/ families and county staff. The recipients were so grateful. All were quite surprised and tears were seen when they understood the gift. More than 1,200 pounds of good useable staples and canned goods were collected and delivered to 50 families. “It does take a village” and the staff of Elder Options says thank you. What an experience.

Do you have an interesting story to share?

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Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY  

Monday, January 13, 2020

50 STORIES FOR 50 YEARS

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020 is New Morning Youth & Family Services 50th year anniversary. Throughout the year there will be 50 years’ worth of stories about the New Morning Shelter. Readers will see stories from staff and board of directors. There will be stories about the children who the agency has served through the eyes of the staff and some stories directly from the clients.    It is hoped that you enjoy reading the 50 Stories for 50 Years series. 

Story No. 2 I was born and raised in Placerville. I have known poverty and homelessness all of my life. I would spend many days at the New Morning shelter because there was no food, heat or shelter at the homeless camps. In addition, a New Morning therapist would meet me at my school and help me deal with the chaos in my life. During middle school I was in foster care for two years. I observed that my foster parents (educated professionals) had a very good life — a nice home, swimming pool and vacations. I decided that education was my way out of poverty, so I began to study for my classes. I went back to my family in high

school, but my family still experienced homelessness, so we would seek relief at the New Morning Shelter and other services offered by New Morning Youth Family Services (Advocacy and Foster Youth Launch program). I graduated from high school with academic honors and currently attend San Francisco State University in the scholars program. I am achieving my goals with the assistance of New Morning and other community partners. — Written by a previous shelter child. She would like to remain anonymous. For 50 years, New Morning has provided a safety net of services to youth and their families in El Dorado County. These services include the only 24-hour Emergency Youth Shelter in the county for homeless, runaway and in-crisis youth. It provides professional counseling services to children age birth to 18. New Morning supports children and youth who are victims of abuse, struggling with alcohol and drug issues, experiencing trauma and facing school failure. The nonprofit provides parent education; assists youth who are aging out of foster care; and provides Latino Outreach services to Latino neighbors to help them become fully productive members of the community.

Free tax aid available News release

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olunteer income tax counselors will be available at various locations throughout El Dorado County starting Feb. 1 through April 15. The service is free and available to all middle- and low-income taxpayers, with special attention to seniors. The American Association of Retired Persons, in conjunction with the Internal Revenue Service and the California Franchise Tax Board provide this service to all ages. Electronically filing is available at all locations. This method ensures that returns are processed faster and with fewer errors, providing for quicker refunds. Those desiring to use the service of the Tax-Aide program should make an appointment to secure a date, time

and location convenient for them. Appointments are available Monday through Saturday, depending on the site. For appointments at the Placerville Senior Center call (530) 903-8151; at Gold Country Retirement in Placerville or the Mother Lode Lions Hall in Diamond Springs call (530) 303-8115; for Pollock Pines Community Church call (530) 497-0368; for Cameron Park Community Center call (530) 303-7046; for Garden Valley Fire Department call (530) 334-8175. Beginning Jan. 15 leave a message and receive a call back. For the South Lake Tahoe area no appointment is necessary at the South Lake Tahoe Senior Center, Monday from noon to 4 p.m., Thursday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Lake Tahoe Community College Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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B4

Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY

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Monday, January 13, 2020

FINANCIAL FOCUS Is market timing a smart investment strategy? You may have heard that timing is everything. And in many walks of life, that may be true — but not necessarily when it comes to investing. To understand why this is so, let’s look at three common mistakes investors make: Selling investments and moving to cash when stocks are predicted to drop — If you follow the financial news on cable TV or the internet, you’re eventually bound to discover some “experts” who are predicting imminent, huge drops in the stock market. And on rare occasions, they may be right — but often they’re not. And if you were to sell some of your stocks or stockbased investments based on a prediction and move the money to cash or a cash equivalent, you could miss out on possible future growth opportunities if the predictor was wrong. And the investments you sold still could have played a valuable part in your portfolio balance. Selling underperforming assets in favor of strong performers — As an investor, it can be tempting to unload an investment for one of those “hot” ones you read about that may have topped one list or another. Yet there’s no guarantee that investment will stay on

Know

Suzy O’Neal Edward Jones Financial Advisor top the next year or even perform particularly well. Conversely, your own under-performers of today could be next year’s leaders. Waiting for today’s risk or uncertainty to disappear before investing — Investing always involves risk and uncertainty. Instead of waiting for the perfect time to invest, you’re better off building a portfolio based on your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon. All these mistakes are examples of a risky investment strategy: trying to “time” the market. If you try to be a market timer, not only will you end up questioning your buy/ sell decisions, but you also might lose sight of why you bought certain investments in the first place. Specifically, you might own stocks or mutual funds because they are appropriate for your portfolio and your risk tolerance and they can help you make progress toward your long-term financial goals. And these attributes don’t automatically disappear when the value of these stocks or funds has dropped, so you

could end up selling investments that could still be doing you some good many years into the future. While trying to time the market is a difficult investment strategy even for the professionals, it doesn’t mean you can never take advantage of falling prices. In fact, you can use periodic dips in the market to buy quality assets at more attractive prices. Suppose, for example, that you invested the same amount of money every month into the same investments. One month, your money could buy more shares when the price of the investment is down — meaning you’re automatically a savvy enough investor to take advantage of price drops. While your money will buy fewer shares when the price of the investment is up, your overall investment holdings will benefit from the increase in price. Buying low and selling high sounds like a thrilling way to invest. But in the long run, you’re better off by following a consistent investment strategy and taking a long-term perspective. It’s time in the market, rather than timing the market, that helps keep portfolio returns moving in the right direction over time. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by local Edward Jones financial advisor, Suzy O’Neal, (530) 676-5402.

Continued from B2

Center Thursday and Friday, Jan. 15 and 16, from 1-5 p.m. in Placerville. Learn of the signs and strategies to assist persons when dealing with mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, etc. Registration is required for this free class. Call Community Health Education at Marshall Medical to register and to obtain more information at (530) 626-2990. Vitalant (formerly known as BloodSource) will hold a blood drive at the Elks Lodge, 3821 Quest Court in Shingle Springs from 1:30-5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15 to meet the community’s need for blood and blood products. Walk-ins are welcome. As a thank you, donors can enter a drawing to win a trip to Mexico, Hawaii or Disneyland. For more information call (877) 258-4825. The Random Strangers hosts the singer/ songwriter open mic Wednesday, 7:30-10:30 p.m. at Powell’s Steamer Co., 425 Main St. in Placerville. For more information call (530) 6261091. Placerville Public House, 414 Main St. in Placerville, is having Karaoke with One Leg Chuck every Wednesday night from 8-11 p.m. For more information call (530) 303-3792.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16 Face in a Book, 4359 Town Center Blvd., Suite 113, in El Dorado Hills, hosts storytime for toddlers, preschoolers and their big people Mondays and Thursdays, 10-10:30 a.m. For

more information call (916) 941-9401 or go to getyourfaceinabook.com. El Dorado County Republican Women Federated meets on the third Thursday at noon at the Golden Waffle Café, 1449 Broadway in Placerville. No need to RSVP and no cost to attend. Lunch or breakfast are available for purchase. Placerville Women’s Club will have their monthly luncheon at Cold Springs Golf Club, 6500 Clubhouse Drive in Placerville. Guest speaker will be lawyer Al Hamilton. He will discuss the new laws going into effect this year and will make us aware of some of the scams and schemes prevalent in the area. If you would like to join call Pat at (530) 626-4559 or Linda at (530) 621-1046. Social hour begins at 11 a.m. and lunch is served at noon. Plexus Worldwide is hosting the Shingle Springs/Cameron Park Chamber of Commerce mixer at the chamber office, 4095 Cameron Park Drive in Cameron Park, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Jan. 16. For more information call (530) 677-8000. Wings Over Water-aquatic birds of the Pacific Coast — Join naturalist and guide John Kipping for a lecture and slide show in the Coloma area on the wealth, lifestyles and diversity of native birds ranging from eagles to shorebirds, ducks to puffins, 6-7:30 p.m. Kipping is a former biologist for Audubon Canyon Ranch. For more information email julie@ ARConservancy.org or call (530) 621-1224.

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Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY

Monday, January 13, 2020

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ASK A CARE MANAGER Changing the conversation: Ageism

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ree samples allure us often; it might be down the big box store aisle, a popular television commercial, an ad on social media or at popular events. At a recent fair I attended, I received a free sample of “anti-aging” products, along with other older adults, who were hooked by the spiel. Normally I would have declined, but I got caught up in the conversation of “reducing wrinkles” and the challenge to accept and try the product. I currently write this article with swollen eyes and an aversion to not staying committed to the candor of ageism. According to the Framework Institute, “Ageism is discrimination against older people due to negative and inaccurate stereotypes” — Framework Institute, 2017). In 2001 a survey by Duke University’s Erdman Palmore,

Deon Batchelder, Clinical Supervisor Elder Options Ph.D., it was revealed that the most frequent type of ageism — reported by 58 percent of respondents — was being told a joke that pokes fun at older people. Thirty-one percent reported being ignored or not taken seriously because of their age. The study appeared in The Gerontologist (Vol. 41, No. 5). Since then the only change has been the increased population of older adults. As a gerontologist, care manager and educator in the field of aging, I’m constantly aware of the negative messages and images that have been accepted and become a norm

in our society. Ageist comments can be subtle or meant as well-intentioned such as: addressing an older woman as “young lady” or using terms as “sweetie, honey and hon” to the older population. First, we know we aren’t young and second, unless you know the person personally they are not your hon, sweetie or honey. These are derogatory terms and demeaning to older adults. Recently, I had this conversation with a medical assistant during a visit with my husband to see his doctor. She greeted him with, “Hi hon how are you doing today?” I asked if she greeted all the clients that way and she said the “older men liked it.” I haven’t decided if they are placating or think it makes the older adult feel better because they are older. Ageism is evident in the barrage of commercials for older adults that need help — it used to be “the clapper, clap on/

clap off,” the “help I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” medical alert, to the more updated “lack of sexual energy” and “depends” (adult diapers). It is evident in the multi-million dollar ant-aging products and surgeries, which subtlety suggest that by buying these expensive products and services we can erase the visible indicators of aging. This phenomenon has morphed into other areas. Older people are treated differently by doctors with the common phrase, “You’re aging or it is a part of aging.” Its presence is felt in the workplace with bias toward the older adult’s ability to adapt, learn technology, productivity and retirement policies. Sadly it is seen in younger people who discriminate against their own imminent aging self. I realized that I had entered this discrimination arena when I went to buy a pair of running shoes.

I had previously looked at shoes and couldn’t decide, so when I went back the young sales rep got frustrated at my inability to recall the exact name of the shoe. He asked the manager of the store, who shrugged me off and both non-verbally decided I didn’t know what I was talking about and walked into the back of the storeroom. I had witnessed this when I would take my mother-in-law shopping for specific items like a computer or TV. So I boldly explained that I might not look like your “runner,” but I was running marathons before they were born or in diapers. I also informed them that I had completed 16 marathons and countless 5 and 10 ks and that I would take my money to a quality store that doesn’t practice ageism. As I walked out the door, I knew I hadn’t made a difference and they didn’t care. There is a “gaining momentum” amongst

eight leading aging organizations (LAO) to reframe public perceptions and reduce the stigma of aging. These LAOs include AARP, American Federation for Aging Research, American Geriatrics Society, Gerontological Society of Aging, Grantmakers in Aging, National Council on Aging and the National Hispanic Council. The FrameWorks Institute along with the above advocates for aging are “framing strategies to advance aging and address ageism as policy issues.” We, the older Americans, must rally and change the conversation and communication as it relates not only to our current quality of life, but to our future “aging” youth. Unlike the “isms” of color and gender, we can change the “ism” of aging, as it includes everyone. FrameWorks suggests ideas to help change our perceptions: “As we get older, we ■

See CARE, page B8

The Public Square

A local marketplace to find what you are looking for… To post your message, call us at 530-622-1255, Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Lost & Found FOUND - 2 Bikes Placerville Refer to PG19-2154 (530)642-5210 FOUND - Bike in Poll Pines, Ref.#20-183. Power box in EDH, Ref.#20-07. Please call (530)621-5763 to describe and claim.

Employment Business Services Assistant: El Dorado Union HSD, $19.32-$23.46/hr, 20hrs/wk, 11 mo/yr, District Office, to apply visit: www.eduhsd.net, submit application @ 4675 Missouri Flat Rd., Placerville, CA 95667. (530) 622-5081 ext. 7228, EOE, D/L 1/17/20, 4:30 pm

Employment

Employment

Administrative Assistant: Fulltime Executive Assistant at El Dorado Savings Bank, Placerville CA. Duties: Executive Assistant to the CEO, Chairman and CFO. Process Board minutes, correspondence and perform other duties as assigned. Experience: Excellent Word and Excel experience and strong organization skills. Experience handling sensitive information. Legal Assistant background a plus. E-mail your resume to jobs@eldoradosavings.com. EOE Chef, Line Cook & Wait Staff needed for Country Club. Breakfast and lunch, Sundays req’d. Email resume to jbement@coldspringsgolf.com Salary DOE.

wanna sell? 622-1255

Looking to join a great team?

Para Technician II (Long Term Sub): El Dorado Union HSD, $19.30/hr, 28 hrs/wk at El Dorado H.S., to apply visit: www.eduhsd.net, submit application @ 4675 Missouri Flat Rd., Placerville, CA 95667. (530)622-5081 ext. 7228, EOE, D/L 1/17/20, 4:30 pm

n sudoku solutions

Solution to Puzzle 1

Kamps Propane seeking Delivery Driver, pay DOE, no phone calls, EOE. Apply in person at 3275 Bradley Drive. Placerville or email resume wbrowne@ kampspropane.com

Kamps Propane seeking Service Tech, pay DOE, no phone calls, EOE, Apply in person at 3275 Bradley Drive, Placerville, or email resume to wbrowne@ kampspropane.com Immediate opening for RV Park Manager with maintenance skills and experience. The job offers free space rent and additional compensation. Must have own RV. Email: campchiquita@live.com

For Sale For Sale-Brand new, never used, wheelchair $80 & Rollator $45. Call (530)672-2080 Round Pen Panels. Eleven + one gate. $300 for all. (916)849-0420 Black dog kennel, 10’ x 5’ x 6’ high. $150 (916)849-0420 Heavy duty cyclone dog kennel. 10’ x 10’ x 6’ high. $350.00. (916-849-0420

We are currently accepting applications for the following positions:

Make a difference; shop and/or volunteer at a Snowline Hospice Thrift Store! Join the volunteer family at Snowline Hospice Thrift Stores. (530) 344-4433

• Caregiver - Full Time - PM Shift • Certified Nursing Assistant - Full Time • Maintenance Tech - Full Time • Dietary Aide - Health Center • Server - Full Time • Chef Cook - Full Time • PT ALU Activities Assistant - 30+ hrs a week, Saturdays a must

Rentals Pollock Pines 1/1 apt. for rent. $735 month + dep, no pets or smoking. 5810 Pony Express Trail. Call Laura (manager) (530)680-6085 Did you know Snowline Hospice Processing Center is a Certified Microsoft Refurbisher? Donated hard drives are wiped clean to Department of Defense standards. (530) 626-1641

Please bring in your resume or email it to goldcountry@rhf.org Gold Country Retirement Community, where we enhance the quality of life, are committed to exemplary service, and are dedicated to excellence.

20 19

Voted Best Seni Commun or ity

NEED EXTRA CASH? Business Delivery & Coin Retrieval The Mountain Democrat is accepting applications for a part-time early morning route driver delivering newspapers to businesses and retrieving coin from racks & dealers. Company vehicle provided. Flexible 4–6 hour shift — Monday, Wednesday, & Friday. Must have a valid driver’s license, and a good DMV record. If you are able to lift 40 lbs. and are dependable give us a call (530) 344-5048 Apply to the Circulation Manager at the Mountain Democrat, 2889 Ray Lawyer Dr, Placerville, 95667.

Residential Apartments-Assisted LivingSkilled Nursing 4301 Golden Center Drive, Placerville TDD # (800) 545-1833, Ext. 359 Lanuage Assistance (562) 257-5255 (530) 621-1100 RCFE#090317665 goldcountryretirement.org

or email: ibalantine@mtdemocrat.net

PET FRIENDLY

Solution to Puzzle 2

Rentals

Rentals

PLACERVILLE-88 cents a square foot, includes utilities, 200sf – 720sf each, office, stora ge, light industrial? 4600 Missouri Flat Rd, (530) 622-2640

wanna sell? 622-1255

NEW TODAY Pollock Pines home for rent, 2/1, yard, washer/dryer hookups, garage, everything new inside, no pets. $1200 mo + dep, (831)636-7423

Cambridge Garden Apartments

Cameron Park 1, 2, 3 bedrooms, close to freeway, covered parking and pool. small pets aCCepteD.

(530) 677-6210

On-Site Mgmt.

Newspaper Delivery

You Could Be Running Your Own Business

If you’d like to be your own boss and work just a few hours a night — become a Mountain Democrat Newspaper Distributor. It’s your own business. You pay no fees or dues. And you can increase your profits from your own services & sales efforts. Routes currently available in the Placerville, Diamond Springs & Cameron Park areas Submit a résumé or application today. 2889 Ray Lawyer Dr., Placerville

Attn: Ian

Or email: ibalentine@mtdemocrat.net

You must be 18 or older, have a valid driver’s license, well-maintained vehicle and proof of auto insurance.


B6    

Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY

Monday, January 13, 2020

FOOTHILL DINING: Delicious recipes that create culinary memories Food personality and chef Miriam Pascal follows up her bestselling cookbook with “More Real Life Kosher Cooking — Delicious Recipes that Create a Lifetime of Culinary Memories.” Many cooks love to prepare simple but delicious meals and Pascal knows how to create tasty and just-plainfun recipes, which she shares on her popular blog and in her bestselling cookbooks. She shows home cooks how to create memorable dishes with approachable recipes using simple, common sense preparation. “Food has the power to be transformative. I’ve always striven for recipes that are approachable and doable. Recipes that will make you say, ‘I can do that!’ Recipes that will get you in the kitchen making food but more importantly, making memories,” Pascal said. “More Real Life Kosher Cooking — Delicious Recipes that Create a Lifetime of Culinary Memories,” Mesorah Publications, November 2019, contains more than 150 doable recipes complete with beautiful photographs. Each recipe is made with accessible, easy-to-find ingredients and instructions and has “plan ahead” and/or freezer tips. Here are two recipes from the book.

Wontons in Garlic Sauce This recipe began with Pascal’s obsession with wontons and garlic sauce from a particular Chinese

Photos reprinted with permission from “More Real Life Kosher Cooking” by Miriam Pascal

restaurant that’s nowhere near her home so she recreated it. Since then these wontons have become the stuff of Pascal family legend. Meat yield: 10-12 servings Wontons 1½ pounds ground beef 2 tablespoons soy sauce ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, preferably a mix of black and white 4 scallions, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 50 wonton wrappers, approximately Garlic Sauce 1 (18-ounce) jar hoisin sauce 1 cup soy sauce 1 cup rice vinegar 1 cup honey 2 teaspoons sriracha 1 teaspoon ground mustard ½ teaspoon ground ginger ½ cup water 12 cloves garlic, minced

Public Notices  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001426 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEl SAlES CONSUlTANTS, located at 4080 Windsor Point Pl., El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 Registered owner(s): Michael Woodmansee, 4080 Windsor Point Pl., El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Michael Woodmansee MICHAEL WOODMANSEE I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 17, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13 7268 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001427 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 1. WAYFINDER CHRISTIAN ACADEMY, 2. WAYFINDER INNOVATION, 3. WAYFINDER DEVElOPMENT FOUNDATION, 4. WAYFINDER EXPEDITION lEARNING, located at 4960 Robert J Mathews Parkway, Suite A, El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 Registered owner(s): El Dorado Christian Education, 4960 Robert J Mathews Parkway, Suite A, El Dorado Hills, CA 95762 This business is conducted by a Corporation, State of Incorporation: CA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: June 13, 2019. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Travis Johnson TRAVIS JOHNSON, CEO I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 17, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13 7270 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001428 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAMERON PARK CAR WASH, located at 4126 Cameron Park Drive, Cameron Park, CA 95682/Mailing Address: 7920 Old Auburn Rd., Citrus Heights, CA 95610 Registered owner(s): Pastor Auto Care Inc, 7920 Old Auburn Rd., Citrus Heights, CA 95610 This business is conducted by a Corporation, State of Incorporation: California. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Randy J Pastor RANDY J PASTOR, VP, CFO I declare that all information in this

statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 18, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13 7274 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001447 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JD MORGAN GlASS AND WINDOWS, located at 7271 Grizzly Flat Rd., Somerset, CA 95684 Registered owner(s): Justin Morgan, 7271 Grizzly Flat Rd., Somerset, CA 95684 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: December 23, 2019. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Justin Morgan JUSTIN MORGAN I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 23, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/30, 1/6, 1/13, 1/22 7293 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001380 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: lOVE TO CARE, located at 3987 Missouri Flat Rd. 340 #398, Placerville, CA 95667 Registered owner(s): Lilla Mirella Rybicka, 3987 Missouri Flat Rd. 340/398, Placerville, CA 95667 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: December 5, 2019. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Lilla Mirella Rybicka LILLA MIRELLA RYBICKA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 9, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION.

sliced scallions, optional, for garnish additional sesame seeds, optional, for garnish 1. Prepare the wontons: Combine beef, soy sauce, sesame oil, sesame seeds, scallions and garlic in a large bowl and stir gently until just combined. 2. Place about 2 teaspoons meat mixture onto the center of a wonton wrapper. Brush a small amount of water along the edges before pressing them together to help keep them sealed. Bring the edges together to form a wonton. Set aside and repeat with remaining meat and wonton wrappers. 3. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Drop a few wontons into the boiling water and cook for about 6 minutes, until the meat is cooked through. Work in batches to avoid overcrowding the pot. Remove wontons with a slotted spoon and place on parchment paper, not touching each other. Set wontons aside. 4. Meanwhile, prepare the garlic sauce: Combine all sauce ingredients in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat; simmer mixture for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens. 5. Just before serving, toss cooked wontons in sauce and warm through. If desired, garnish with sliced scallions and sesame seeds. Plan ahead: Wontons can be frozen, without sauce, either before cooking (boil just before serving; if boiling frozen, add 1 minute to cooking time) or after cooking. Sauce can be prepared up to three days ahead and stored in the fridge. Combine wontons and reheated sauce just before serving.

Roasted Vegetable Soup

What started out as a fridge full of produce that had to be used up has morphed into an all-time favorite soup. Roasting the vegetables brings out their flavors, resulting in a healthy soup that’s packed with flavor and so filling. Feel free to customize soup based on whichever veggies happen to be available. Yield: 6-8 servings Roasted vegetables 2 large zucchini, diced 3 medium yellow squash, diced 2 red bell peppers, diced 2 onions, diced 1 pound frozen cauliflower florets, defrosted ¼ cup oil 1 tablespoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon black pepper n

See DINING, page B7

• E-mail your public notice to legals@mtdemocrat.net • Be sure to include your name and phone number

THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/30, 1/6, 1/13, 1/22 7294 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001449 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TOTAl CARE, located at 3987 Missouri Flat Rd. 340, Placerville, CA 95667 Registered owner(s): Sylwia Baker, 3987 Missouri Flat Rd. 340, Placerville, CA 95667 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: July 8, 2019. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Sylwia Baker SYLWIA BAKER I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 23, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 12/30, 1/6, 1/13, 1/22 7295 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001464 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OUTBREAK BREWING CO, located at 640 Main St., Placerville, CA 95667/Mailing Address: 3127 Sly Park Rd., Pollock Pines, CA 95726 Registered owner(s): 1. Tim Daniel, 3127 Sly Park Rd., Pollock Pines, CA 95726, 2. Shannon Daniel, 3127 Sly Park Rd., Pollock Pines, CA 95726 This business is conducted by a Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: July 19, 2014. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Tim Daniel TIM DANIEL I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 30, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 1/6, 1/13, 1/22, 1/27 7307 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001465 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GEARTOOTH AlEWERKS, located at 640 Main St., Placerville, CA 95667/Mailing Address: 3127 Sly Park Rd., Pollock Pines, CA 95726 Registered owner(s): Tim Daniel, 3127 Sly Park Rd., Pollock Pines, CA 95726 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: December 27, 2019.

Signature of Registrant: /s/ Tim Daniel TIM DANIEL I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 30, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 1/6, 1/13, 1/22, 1/27 7308 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001466 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STUCKEY & COMPANY APPRAISAl, located at 3450 Palmer Dr. #4235, Cameron Park, CA 95682 Registered owner(s): Linda Stuckey, 3450 Palmer Dr. #4235, Cameron Park, CA 95682 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: January 1, 2017. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Linda Stuckey LINDA STUCKEY I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 30, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 1/6, 1/13, 1/22, 1/27 7309 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE NO. 2019A0001467 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 1. TBC, 2. THE BEST ClEAN, located at 4720 Holly Dr., Shingle Springs, CA 95682/Mailing Address: PO Box 864, Shingle Springs, CA 95682 Registered owner(s): Sonia Gonzalez, 4720 Holly Dr., Shingle Springs, CA 95682 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: December 30, 2019. Signature of Registrant: /s/ Sonia Gonzalez SONIA GONZALEZ I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000.00).) This statement filed with the county clerk of El Dorado County on December 30, 2019. NOTICE-IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK, EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. THE FILING OF THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT OF ITSELF AUTHORIZE THE USE IN THIS STATE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME IN VIOLATION OF THE RIGHTS OF ANOTHER UNDER FEDERAL, STATE, OR COMMON LAW (see section 14411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions Code) 1/6, 1/13, 1/22, 1/27 7310

COUNTY OF El DORADO, CAlIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the County of El Dorado, State of California, that sealed bids for work in accordance with the Contract Documents for the Missouri Flat Road / Industrial Drive Temporary Signal Project will be received by the Department of Transportation, at the front counter of 2850 Fairlane Court, Building C, Placerville, California, until Friday, January 31, 2020 at 2:00 PM, at which time bids will be publicly opened and read by the County of El Dorado Department of Transportation. No Bid may be withdrawn after the time established for receiving bids or before the award and execution of the Contract, unless the award is delayed for a period exceeding sixty (60) calendar days. Bids must be executed in accordance with the instructions given and forms provided in the Contract Documents furnished by the County of El Dorado Department of Transportation through Quest Construction Data Network (Quest). The Proposal including the Bidder’s Security, Payee Data Record, and CA 590 Form shall be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly marked: “MISSOURI FlAT ROAD / INDUSTRIAl DRIVE TEMPORARY SIGNAl CONTRACT No. 4455 TO BE OPENED AT 2:00 P.M. ON JANUARY 31, 2020” The project is located at the intersection of Missouri Flat Road and Industrial Drive in the County of El Dorado. The Work to be done generally consists of, but is not limited to: Installation of a temporary signal system, including wood poles, wire, and signal equipment. The Work also includes hot mix asphalt, asphalt removal, and traffic striping. Other items or details not mentioned above, that are required by the Contract Documents must be performed, constructed or installed. Bids are required for the entire Work described herein. The Contract time is TWENTY (20) WORKING DAYS. Working days will be broken up into a FIFTEEN (15) day portion and a FIVE (5) day portion as described in Article 5 of the Agreement. For bonding purposes the anticipated project cost is less than $200,000. A pre-bid meeting is scheduled for this Project on January 22, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. at the County of El Dorado Department of Transportation, 2441 Headington Road, Placerville, CA. The meeting will be held in the downstairs conference room. Attendance at the pre-bid meeting is not mandatory. The Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, may be viewed and/ or downloaded from the Quest website at http://www.questcdn.com. Interested parties may also access the Quest website by clicking on the link next to the Project Name or entering the Quest project # on the Department of Transportation’s website at http://www.edcgov.us/Government// DOT/BidsHome.aspx. Interested parties may view the Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, on the Quest website at no charge. The digital Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, may be downloaded for $15.00 by inputting the Quest Project #6598228 on the websites’ Project Search page. Please contact QuestCDN.com at (925) 233-1632 or info@questcdn. com for assistance in free membership, registration, downloading, and working with this digital project information. To be included on the planholders list, receive notification of addenda, and to be eligible to bid interested parties must download the Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, from Quest. Those downloading the Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, assume responsibility and risk for completeness of the downloaded Contract Documents. The Contract Documents, including the Project Plans, may be examined in person at the Department of Transportation office at 2850 Fairlane Court, Placerville CA. However the Department of Transportation will no longer sell paper copies of the Contract Documents. The cross sections and the Revised Standard Plans will be provided as supplemental information in pdf format as part of the Contract Documents on Quest’s website to all planholders who acquire the Contract Documents digitally through Quest: CONTRACTORS lICENSE ClASSIFICATION: Bidders must be properly licensed to perform the Work pursuant to the Contractors’ State License Law (Business and Professions Code Section 7000 et seq.) and must possess a ClASS A license or equivalent combination of Classes required by the categories and type of Work included in the Contract Documents and Plans at the time the Contract is awarded, and must maintain a valid license through completion

and acceptance of the Work, including the guarantee and acceptance period. Failure of the successful Bidder to meet this Contract requirement will result in the forfeiture of the Bidder’s security. CONTRACTOR REGISTRATION: No contractor or subcontractor may bid on any public works project, be listed in a bid proposal for any public works project, or engage in the performance of any contract for public work unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1. D I S A D VA N TA G E D BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (DBE) PARTICIPATION: Bidder will take all necessary affirmative steps to assure that minority firms, women’s business enterprises and labor surplus area firms are used when possible. PREVAIlING WAGE REQUIREMENTS: Contractor’s attention is directed to the requirements of Division 2 Part 7, Chapter 1 of the California Labor Code, including but not limited to Sections 1773, 1773.1, 1773.2, 1773.6, and 1773.7. The general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the Work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations. Interested parties can obtain the current wage information by submitting their requests to the Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Labor Statistics and Research, PO Box 420603, San Francisco CA 94142-0603, Telephone (415) 703-4708 or by referring to the website at http:// www.dir.ca.gov/OPRL/PWD. The rates at the time of the bid advertisement date of a project will remain in effect for the life of the project in accordance with the California Code of Regulations, as modified and effective January 27, 1997. Copies of the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the Work is to be done are also on file at the Department of Transportation’s principal office, and are available upon request, and in case of projects involving federal funds, federal wage requirements as predetermined by the United States Secretary of Labor have been included in the Contract Documents. In the case of federally funded projects, where federal and state prevailing wage requirements apply, compliance with both is required. This Project is funded in whole or part by federal funds. Comply with Exhibit D of the Draft Agreement and the Copeland Act (18 U.S.C. 874 and 29 CFR Part 3), the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a to 276a-7 and 29 CFR Part 5), and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 327-330 and 29 CFR Part 5). If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and the general prevailing wage rates determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, Contractor and subcontractors must pay not less than the higher wage rate. The Department of Transportation will not accept lower State wage rates not specifically included in the Federal minimum wage determinations. This includes “helper” (or other classifications based on hours of experience) or any other classification not appearing in the Federal wage determinations. Where Federal wage determinations do not contain the State wage rate determination otherwise available for use by Contractor and subcontractors, Contractor and subcontractors must pay not less than the federal minimum wage rate which most closely approximates the duties of the employees in question. AWARD OF CONTRACT: As a condition of award, the successful Bidder will be required to submit payment and performance bonds along with evidence of insurance prior to execution of the Agreement by the County. Failure to meet this requirement constitutes abandonment of the Bid by the Bidder and forfeiture of the Bidder’s security. Award will then be made to the next lowest, responsive, responsible Bidder. RETAINAGE FROM PAYMENTS: The Contractor may elect to receive one hundred percent (100%) of payments due under the Contract from time to time, without retention of any portion of the payment by the County, by depositing securities of equivalent value with the County in accordance with the provisions of Section 22300 of the Public Contract Code. Securities eligible for deposit hereunder are be limited to those listed in Section 16430 of the Government Code, or bank or savings and loan certificates of deposit. Reference the Contract Documents package, which includes the Notice to Bidders, Plans, Specifications, Draft Agreement and Proposal for contractual requirements not listed in this “Notice to Contractors” newspaper advertisement. 1/10, 1/13, 1/15, 1/17, 1/22, 1/24 7346


Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY  

Monday, January 13, 2020

Dining 

B7

Continued from B6

Soup 4 cups vegetable broth about 6 cups water 2 bay leaves 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1. Prepare the roasted vegetables: Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. 2. Place vegetables, oil, salt and

pepper into a bowl. Toss to combine. Divide between prepared baking sheets. Roast for 50-60 minutes, until vegetables are starting to brown. 3. Prepare the soup: Place roasted vegetables, along with any juices, into a large soup pot. Add soup ingredients and bring to a boil. 4. Simmer for about 1 hour. Discard bay leaves. Using an immersion

blender, blend soup well, for about 3 minutes, until fully smooth. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. Plan ahead: This soup can be prepared ahead and frozen in an airtight container.

OvertimeCook.com, one of the world’s leading destinations for kosher recipes, with hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors. A self-taught cook and baker, she shares her passion for recipes, food and photography on her website, as well as in her popular food column in Mishpacha Magazine’s Family Table.

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B8    

Good Living — IN EL DORADO COUNTY

Monday, January 13, 2020

Kara Sather 

Continued from B1

Retooling EDWA events

Courtesy photo

The magic of Cirque du Soleil is coming to Sacramento in January and February.

Cirque du Soleil coming to Sac News release

C

irque du Soleil with AMALUNA comes to Sutter Health Park (formerly Raley Field) in Sacramento beginning Wednesday, Jan. 22, through Sunday, Feb. 23. AMALUNA invites the audience to a mysterious island governed by goddesses and guided by the cycles of the moon. Their queen, Prospera, directs her daughter’s coming-of-age ceremony in a rite that honors femininity, renewal, rebirth and balance — which marks the passing of these insights and values from one generation to the next. In the wake of a storm caused by Prospera, a group of young men lands on the island, triggering an epic, emotional

Care 

story of love between Prospera’s daughter and a brave young suitor. But theirs is a love that will be put to the test. The couple must face numerous demanding trials and overcome daunting setbacks before they can achieve mutual trust, faith and harmony. Tickets are available for purchase by visiting cirquedusoleil.com/amaluna or by calling 1-877-924-7783. Stay connected with Amaluna on Twitter @Cirque #Amaluna, follow Amaluna and Cirque du Soleil on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr and Google +. For more information about Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group go to cdsentertainmentgroup.com.

Continued from B5

gain momentum, with the force of built-up experience and wisdom.” “Our society is not treating older people as equals, but instead is marginalizing their participation and minimizing their contributions.” Try the following “change ideas:” Talking affirmatively about changing i.e., “As Americans live longer and healthier lives.” “Let’s find creative solutions to ensure we can all thrive as we age,” use more neutral and inclusive terms like, “older people/Americans and we and us.” We worry about aging, fear of losing independence, self loss due to chronic illness/falls, hospitalization, cognitive impairment, loss of family/friends and ultimately fear of death. However as a society we can lessen the stereotyping of older people through civic and community lifestyles by supporting greater health and well-being and intergenerational social engagement. We all must confront ageism by accepting our bodies will age and change and validating aging as a meaningful time of life. Batchelder is a certified care manager and the clinical supervisor for Elder Options Inc. She brings a wealth of knowledge about POLST, Parkinson’s disease, VA benefits and entitlement and waiver programs to the Elder Options team. Her passion for care management grew from a commitment to advocate and support older adults, disabled and vulnerable populations. For more information go to elderoptionsca.com.

Since the El Dorado Winery Association relies, to a great degree, on receipts from its major wine events, it is crucial to keep them vital and profitable. Sather spearheads a committee of dedicated vintners whose volunteer hours help keep these events running. Under her direction the two most significant annual events, WINEderlust and Passport, have been retooled to reflect goals for the El Dorado wine region: increased foot traffic to wineries and keeping EDWA’s coffers healthy. WINEderlust, held in September, moved to downtown Placerville in 2019. Guests enjoyed locally produced food and wine while doing business with local merchants. The event was a resounding success, both financially and in terms of tripling the number of attendees from previous years. Perhaps the most daunting project has been the retooling of Passport, which is approaching its 29th year. Sather explained that although the event has been consistently successful, “We wanted to get ahead of the game and keep the Passport event fresh.” She said, “In order to appeal to an evolving visitor profile and to give member wineries a break from the rigorous two-weekend commitment of staff and expenses, we set out to make major changes.” The biggest move was changing Passport from two weekends to one weekend over three days — giving wineries a smaller window for maximum impact and giving attendees a concentrated time to visit. “Most importantly, it was imperative that we infuse the fruits of our EDWA promotion and marketing efforts in describing what delineates us from other regions in spirit and culture,” she said. “We’re rebranding the event as ‘The Great Out There,’ to capture not only the culture of our region’s wineries but the county’s vast bounty of wines and food products, as well as the diverse grape varieties grown in our mountain vineyards. Going forward, ‘The Great Out There” will replace Passport as the event’s name. This year we are asking winery members to bend previous restrictions and really show off what makes them exceptional.” Passport 2020 — The Great Out There runs Friday through Sunday, April 17-19.

Downtown wine movement

The comfortable setting at the El Dorado Wine Movement Center will be the perfect place for Kara Sather, executive director of the El Dorado Winery Association, and other staff to share information about the unique wine country in El Dorado County. Another major undertaking for Sather and EDWA is the El Dorado Wine Movement Center, 304 Main St. in Placerville. Housed next to the Cary House Hotel in the heart of downtown, in what used to be the Hart Lounge, it eventually will serve as a visitor center to showcase the wines of the region. A new concept for EDWA, the space will offer remote member wineries access to Placerville’s busy downtown through tastings and other events and visitors will get expert advice on how to plan their winery visits. The staff at the center will educate visitors about the El Dorado wine region’s specialties and the long history of winemaking here. The facility will also offer a cohesive link to regional businesses, shops, artisans and restaurants. With all of the plates Sather has spinning, her hope for EDWA winery members in the future is “global recognition for the quality of our wines and the visitor experience in our region,” she said. She slyly added, “And more hotel rooms to accommodate all of those new visitors.”

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Mountain Democrat, Jan. 13, 2020  

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