New Hampshire Magazine November 2021

Page 1

Knock, knock: New Hampshire comedians are ready for the laughs

Jimmy Dunn did it R

NOVE MBE R 2021

magazine

W H AT ’ S S O F U N N Y ? THORNTON WILDER’S “OUR TOWN”

PLUS:

B E S T L AW Y E R S

P.J. O’Rourke Celebrates the Paradoxical Charm of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” Meet New Hampshire’s Best Lawyers The Incredible Edible Egg The Magical Healing Power of Music

THE MONUMENT

OF MIRTH:

Creating the Granite State’s Mount Rushmore of Comedy

THE HEALING POWER OF MUSIC

“Go vegan!”

November 2021

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N E W H A M P S H I R E M AG A Z I N E

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NHMAGAZINE.COM Vice President/Publisher Ernesto Burden x5117 eburden@mcleancommunications.com Editor Rick Broussard x5119 editor@nhmagazine.com Art Director John R. Goodwin x5131 jgoodwin@mcleancommunications.com

Managing Editor Erica Thoits x5130 ethoits@nhmagazine.com Associate Editor Emily Heidt x5115 eheidt@nhmagazine.com Contributing Editors Barbara Coles barbaracoles@comcast.net Bill Burke x5112 bburke@mcleancommunications.com Production Manager Jodie Hall x5122 jhall@nhbr.com Senior Graphic Designer Nancy Tichanuk x5126 ntichanuk@mcleancommunications.com Senior Graphic Production Artist Nicole Huot x5116 nhuot@mcleancommunications.com Group Sales Director Kimberly Lencki x5154 klencki@mcleancommunications.com Business Manager Mista McDonnell x5114 mmcdonnell@nhbr.com Sales Executives Josh Auger x5144 jauger@nhmagazine.com Jessica Schooley x5143 jschooley@mcleancommunications.com Events & Marketing Manager Emily Samatis x5125 esamatis@mcleancommunications.com Business/Sales Coordinator Heather Rood x5110 hrood@mcleancommunications.com Digital Operations Morgen Connor x5149 and Marketing Manager mconnor@mcleancommunications.com

Contributing Photographer Kendal J. Bush kendal@kendaljbush.com VP/Consumer Marketing Brook Holmberg brookh@yankeepub.com

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© 2021 McLean Communications, LLC New Hampshire Magazine® is published by McLean Communications, Inc., 150 Dow St., Manchester, NH 03101, (603) 624-1442. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher assumes no responsibility for any mistakes in advertisements or editorial. Statements/opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect or represent those of this publication or its officers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, McLean Communications, LLC.: New Hampshire Magazine disclaims all responsibility for omissions and errors. New Hampshire Magazine is published monthly, with the exception of February and April. USPS permit number 022-604. Periodical postage paid at Manchester 03103-9651. Postmaster send address changes to: New Hampshire Magazine, P.O. Box 37900, Boone, IA 50037-0900 PRINTED IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

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nhmagazine.com | November 2021


Contents

November 2021

36

55

44 First Things

603 Navigator

603 Informer

84 Local Books

4 Editor’s Note 6 Contributors Page 8 Feedback IMAGES TOP FROM LEFT: P.T. SULLIVAN / KENDAL J. BUSH / KENDAL J. BUSH / COURTESY / P.T. SULLUIVAN / ISOTOCK / MARSHALL HUDSON / SUSAN LAUGHLIN

603 Living reviews by local booksellers

88 Calendar

What to Do This Month

Features

edited by Emily Heidt

34 Transcript

Meet Kadrolsha Ona (KO) Carole.

by David Mendelsohn

36 NH Comedians Are Ready for the Laughs

When the pandemic darkened stages, even the funniest folks struggled to find humor. As clubs and theaters reopen, our favorite local comedians are back and bringing the funny.

10 Give Thanks for These Historic Spots by Rick Broussard

14 Our Town Whitefield

by Barbara Radcliffe Rogers

24 Music Is Magic By Lynne Snierson

28 Blips

NH in the News

by Casey McDermott

by Bill Burke photos by P.T. Sullivan

30 Politics

Red Mayors in Blue Cities?

44 Our Paradoxical Town

by James Pindell

Legend has it that “Our Town” is the most performed play in the country. While we can neither confirm nor deny this claim, there’s no doubt it’s been interpreted in many ways. And yet, a recent performance managed to surprise.

32 What Do You Know? Shinbone Shack

story and photos by Marshall Hudson

recipe by Chef James Haller

94 Health

Is Caffeine Good for You?

96 Ayuh

Egg. It’s What’s for Breakfast.

55 Best Lawyers

photos by Kendal J. Bush

Baked Apple Custard Pie With Rosewater Meringue

by Karen A. Jamrog

by P.J. O’Rourke photos by Kendal J. Bush

The 2022 Best Lawyers in America edition is here. See who in New Hampshire made the list.

92 Local Dish

by Bill Burke

20 Food & Drink

Host a Local Thanksgiving

by Anna-Kate Munsey

ON THE COVER Comedy has returned, right when we could all use some laughs. See what New Hampshire comedians have to say about getting back on the stage, starting on page 36.

Volume 35, Number 9 ISSN 1532-0219

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EDITOR’S NOTE

November Songs Tom Waits, no ray of sunlight, wrote and sang of November: “November’s cold chain / Made of wet boots and rain / And shiny black ravens / On chimney smoke lanes / November seems odd / You’re my firing squad.”

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T

born-and-raised Tom Rush, introducing hat may seem like a bit of a downer music lovers to the fragile but immortal for a musical ode to the month, but lyrics of Joni Mitchell on his seminal 1968 as someone who edits a magazine album “The Circle Game.” When Rush filled with colorful images and engaging sings, in a voice that rocks and creaks like a events, I can attest that this isn’t an easy snow-draped white pine branch, “Now the month to package and sell. warriors of winter they give a cold triumIn many ways, that’s the charm of phant shout / All that stays is dying, all that November. The very heart and hearth of the lives is getting out ...” you know exactly what month is Thanksgiving, which stimulates month this story of love and change is set the travel economy — with folks streaming within for Mitchell’s “Urge for Going.” back to hometowns and family — and boosts Two musical artists who understood the grocery stores and farmers markets for a the seasons of the Granite State better than spell. But for the most part it’s a holiday, and most were the Shaw Brothers, Rick and Ron. a month, with little commercialization. They were folk artists of great stature in I guess that’s why I love it. It’s a month their own right, and they ultimately settled that no one really wants, a kind of temporal into the role as musical ambassadors for insulator between the opposing (but weirdly New Hampshire among other gigs as senior harmonious) feasts of Halloween and Christstatesmen of folk music. mas — the former a celebration of death and The Informer department this month the latter a celebration of a certain birth. is devoted to a new and enduring facet of As a state, a country and a world, we’ve the deep legacy of music and storytelling been preoccupied with death for quite a that the Shaw Brothers left us when Rick while now, calculating the risks of every Shaw passed away early this year. And while interaction and treating gestures of kindthe Shaws didn’t write any original songs ness, like an outstretched hand or a hug, about the month of November, the spirit of with suspicion. We all believe that a rebirth is the month was captured perfectly in their right around the corner, but which corner is rendition of Michael Peter Smith’s classic, the question. Christmas and the promise of “The Dutchman.” It’s a heartbreakingly sweet a brand new year is the answer to that quansong about dementia, of all things, that is dary. Every October has its December, we also an astounding tribute to the power of just have to make it through November. love. To those who know the song, the lyrics, And music, for all its rhythmic and “Long ago, I used to be a young man / And sensual charms, is the closest thing we have dear Margaret remembers that for me,” can to real magic for those who wait for healing, simultaneously create goosebumps, a tear freedom, justice and rebirth. and a smile. So, why the lack of November songs? Veteran journalist Lynne Snierson, Along with Tom Wait’s gut-kick of an anthem who also writes our Seniority department, to the leafless, frostbitten and dreary days of penned the story about the Shaw Brothers’ November, there are “love” songs like Guns final years and days and about the special ‘N Roses’ “November Rain” — not much woman and friends who stood, and sang, more uplifting though. alongside them. See if you can read her tribPerhaps the songs that best capture ute to the magical healing power of music the strange, harsh beauty of these days are without a tear and a smile. focused more on the spirit of the season than Sad, but uplifting. Doomed, but filled the name of the month. with hope. That’s November in a song. “But when the sun turns traitor cold / and shivering trees are standing in a naked row / I get the urge for going,’” sang Concord-

PHOTO BY LYNN CROW PHOTOGRAPHY

STRONG SMART BOLD


P.J. O’Rourke, who wrote “Our Paradoxical Town,” is a bit like the Swiss Army knife of political and social commentary, with book titles ranging from “On The Wealth of Nations” to the “National Lampoon 1964 High School Yearbook” (a personal favorite of our own editor), and multimedia gigs as diverse as “Real Time with Bill Maher” on HBO and “Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me!” on National Public Radio. He’s editor-in-chief of American Consequences, “a digital magazine that pulls back the curtain on American finance and politics.” americanconsequences.com

for November 2021

New Hamphire Magazine contributing photographer Kendal J. Bush took the photos for “Living,” “Our Paradoxical Town” and “Best Lawyers.”

Seacoast-based photographer P.T. Sullivan took the photos for “New Hampshire Comedians Are Ready for the Laughs.” Learn more about him at pt35mm.wordpress.com.

Former editorial intern for New Hampshire Magazine Anna-Kate Munsey wrote this month’s “Food & Drink.” She is a senior at the University of New Hampshire.

New Hampshire Magazine contributing editor and Disney guide author Bill Burke wrote “New Hampshire Comedians Are Ready for the Laughs” and “Ayuh.”

Lynne Snierson, who is New Hampshire Magazine’s longtime “Seniority” author and a frequent contributor, wrote this month’s “Informer.”

Casey McDermott, who writes “Blips” each month, is an online reporter and editor for NHPR. She covers politics, policy and New Hampshire news.

A Note of Thanks

G.K. Chesterton wrote, “I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.” It’s easy to not just acknowledge this, but to feel it, deep in the soul, when I consider the people this magazine counts as vital contributors this year; people and organizations without whom we would not be here at all. Let’s start with you, our readers. And then acknowledge our brilliant and dedicated staff, our parent company, Yankee Publishing, Inc., and our many vendors and suppliers, especially Cummings Printing, which despite paper supply, transportation and labor shortages, has still ensured we can put this magazine into your hands each month. And, of course, our advertisers, who represent the best of what our state has to offer in food and drink, lodging and recreation, shopping and services. We’re honored to be able to share them with you. Sincere thanks to you all and also to the brilliant contributors who filled the pages of our first issue of 603 Diversity, and to the sponsors who made this important work possible. Readers who are subscribers will find a copy of that magazine inserted into this one. Those who aren’t can order one at 603diversity.com. Ernesto Burden —Ernesto Burden

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nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Q4 2021

About | Behind the Scenes at New Hampshire Magazine BUSINESSES UNITING TO SUPPORT DIVERSITY

AUTHENTIC CUISINE: THE VESSEL OF UNITY

THE FUTURE OF DIVERSITY IN NH

603DIVERSITY

Promoting

Positivit

WITH STREET ART IN NASHUA

Manny Ramirez of Positive Street Art

Subscribers to New Hampshire Magazine will find a copy of our new magazine, 603 Diversity, inserted in this November issue.

p.j. o’rourke photo by james kegley; casey mcdermott photo by john w. hession

Contributors


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Send letters to Editor Rick Broussard, New Hampshire Magazine, 150 Dow St. Manchester, NH 03101 or email him at editor@nhmagazine.com.

Feedback

emails, snail mail, facebook, tweets

nhmagazine.com, facebook.com/NHMagazine & @nhmagazine

Hello, Mr. Broussard. Just came across your September Editor’s Note. You did ask for UFO stories, so ... A few years ago, my wife and I were driving home from a New Year’s Eve party around 1 a.m. We turned onto Becky Drive near our home in Salem and saw this strange orange object moving quickly and silently in a straight line from west to east. The evidence is blurry and so were we (New Year’s Eve and all), but she did manage to take the attached photo. My friend used some kind of imaging software to enhance the detail, but this is as clear as we could get it. No one I’ve shown it to has been able to tell me what it is, or isn’t. Any ideas? I am a longtime subscriber and enjoy your magazine very much. Keep up the excellent work! Mysteriously yours, – Bob Conte, Salem

Editor’s note: We ran a few theories by Bob in a reply, and he had heard them all and was still puzzled.

Thrifty Activities

My name is Judy Koski, and I subscribe to your magazine and enjoy many articles. I would love to see an article about New Hampshire nonprofit thrift shops. I volunteer at the Newmarket Community Church thrift shop on Route 108 in Newmarket. We constantly get comments that it is their favorite thrift shop because of the variety, cleanliness and friendly volunteers. I am sure there are many such shops in New Hampshire, and it would be helpful if people knew about them. We have a wonderful facilitator, Deborah Grochmal, who coordinates all activities at the shop. We also have a garden at the site that helps supply our food pantry at the church, which supplies more than 100 families about 15 meals each week. Thank you for your consideration. Reduce, reuse, recycle and support our mission of helping others. – Judy Koski, Dover

Editor’s note: Good idea. Maybe we can cover this topic in the new year. 8

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

— Kristen Freer, Portsmouth

News of the Prussians? Just reading my New Hampshire Magazine. As a resident of Massachusetts, I have to say I vehemently object to ... OMG, I got distracted! In retrospect, I enjoyed Bill Burke’s view of how welcoming New Hampshire can be [“Ayuh,” October 2021]. I love Market Basket and long for the day one opens near me! I have spent over 35 years vacationing in New Hampshire and have found all more welcoming than my home state brethren. However, I have to say we are on the verge of catching up! Nice article, Bill!

– Jack Urekew, South Hadley, Massachusetts

illustration by brad fitzpatrick

Blurry But Unforgettable

Hi, my name is Kristen Freer, and I am the board president of Extreme Air of NH, a nationally competitive jump-rope team comprised of Seacoast athletes between the ages of 8-18. Four of our jumpers were selected to participate in this year’s Macy’s Day parade in New York City. This entails “marching” the entire 2.8-mile parade route while performing a jump-rope routine the entire time, and then putting on a performance in Herald Square (in front of Macy’s) at the end of the parade (that will be on national TV). It will be grueling, but the jumpers are ready and super excited! They flew to Ohio for Labor Day weekend to practice with the other 116 jumpers selected from across the country. Attached is some Ohio-local coverage (from WKYC) from that weekend — our four jumpers are prominently and repeatedly shown in these video clips. [A clip is available on the Extreme Air NH Facebook page.] We’d love to make our community aware of this upcoming achievement, and get them to tune in and be on the lookout for these four local athletes. From left in photo: Eilis McKenna, 14, of Newmarket; Katelyn O’Neill, 15, of Londonderry; Margaux Freer, 15, of Portsmouth; and Malia Everett, 18, of Exeter

courtesy photos

Making a Big Jump to National TV

Editor’s note: If you have any solid evidence that our Bay State friends are becoming more like Granite Staters, send it along. On this side of the border, we tend to think that it’s us becoming more like you guys since so many of you are moving up here.


illustration by brad fitzpatrick

Spot four newts like the one here hidden on ads in this issue, tell us where you found them and you might win a great gift from a local artisan or company. To enter our drawing for Spot the Newt, visit spotthenewt.com and fill out the online form. Or, send answers plus your name and mailing address to:

Spot the Newt c/o New Hampshire Magazine 150 Dow St., Manchester, NH 03101 You can also email them to newt@nhmagazine.com or fax them to (603) 624-1310. The October “Spot the Newt” winner is John Ballard of Dover. October issue newts were on pages 4, 29, 83 and 93.

NEED A GOOD REASON FOR SPOTTING THE NEWT? The November prize is a $50 gift card from Woodfield Press, which features whimsical art by Cindy Hendrick on notecards, prints, calendars, keepsake ornaments, paper dolls, coloring books and more. Available from woodfieldcards.com or from the New Hampshire Made retail store, 28 Deer St., Portsmouth. New Hampshire Made is our state’s official promoter of all the good things made right here in the Granite State.

THANK YOU!

T hank

you!

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Thank YOU For 10 Great Years... And 10 more coming right up!

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603 Navigator “Let us remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds.” — Theodore Roosevelt On November 20, connect with history (and enjoy good food) at the Harvest Dinner, an annual fundraiser for The Fort at No. 4 in Charlestown.

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PHOTO BY LEN EMERY


Our Town 14 Food & Drink 20

Give Thanks for These Historic Spots Travel back in time during this season of feasting, remembrance and families reuniting BY RICK BROUSSARD

L

ike a thoroughly brined turkey, the Thanksgiving season is marinated in history, so November is the perfect month to spend a little soak time in New Hampshire’s most historical locations. Many attractions close down after foliage season, but there are still places to touch base with the history of the harvest celebrations and fall feasts that have long been a way to brace our bodies and souls for the long, hard winter. The Fort at No. 4, a mid-18th century stockade, once protected Plantation Number 4, which was the northernmost British settlement on the Connecticut River during the years of the French and Indian War. A recreation of the fort in Charlestown functions as an open-air museum, and is a popular site for reenactments of the struggles and lives of the settlers, armies and Indigenous inhabitants of the region. It was added to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places in July 2020. This fall, The Fort at No. 4 continues its immersive educational activities and experiences, reopening on November 6 and 7 for their Native Heritage Weekend. This is a Native-centered weekend where volunteers representing the Indigenous tribes of our region speak to their heritage. It’s described as “a low-key weekend, with some of our Native friends engaging in activities connected with their cultures, 18th century or otherwise.” The Fort’s popular annual Harvest Dinner is still on for November 20. This yearend celebration is also an end-of-season fundraiser for the museum, in which dinner guests can enjoy a light “starter” reception in the museum’s Parker House, then take

part in a historical “shopping experience” in the Stevens House, visit special exhibits in several of the museum buildings, all while enjoying the period-appropriate music performed by Tobias and Prudence — both regular performers at the Fort at No. 4 who have played at Harvest Dinners for the last several years. After working up an appetite, guests will gather to sit in the Great Hall or Hastings House for a three-course dinner. All by candlelight and firelight.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Fort at No. 4

Period musicians Tobias and Prudence, aka Lawrence Young and Susanne Powers

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 11


603 NAVIGATOR / TRAVEL BACK IN TIME THIS SEASON The pioneering spirit of the fort and grounds lives on most creatively in their plans to host an immersive theater version of “A Christmas Carol” this December — their third such collaboration with the River Theater Company of Charlestown. Visit fortat4.org for more details on these events.

Strawbery Banke

Guided outdoor activities have mostly ceased by November at Portsmouth’s living history museum Strawbery Banke, but you don’t even have to be there to enjoy this year’s Dawnland StoryFest — an annual Indigenous storytelling festival they host that will take place via Zoom on November 13. Preregistration is required, and there’s a suggested donation of $10 for the otherwise-free event. Objects found by archaeologists in the Puddle Dock neighborhood of Strawbery Banke include pottery and stone tools, and demonstrate that Native people had been there for millennia. The event is hosted in connection with Strawbery Banke’s permanent “People of the Dawnland” exhibit. The 2021 Dawnland StoryFest is dedicated to the memory of the life and work of Wolfsong, a well-respected and much-loved Abenaki traditional storyteller from Vermont. Participants will listen to a keynote address by Louise Profeit-LeBlanc, co-founder of the Yukon International Storytelling Festival, and hear traditional Indigenous storytellers from New England and Canada. Additionally, participants are invited to engage in breakout room conversations, a Q&A with the storytellers, and a facilitated Swapping Grounds storysharing session.

Sarah Josepha Hale

The Richards Free Library in Newport helps keep the light of history focused on one particular figure in the history of Thanksgiving, Sarah Josepha Hale. They do this notably each year with their presentation of the Sarah Josepha Hale medal to one acclaimed New England writer. The first one was given to poet Robert Frost, and this August, after a year of pandemic delay, they presented the latest one to New Hampshire nature writer Sy Montgomery (whose latest book, “The Hummingbird’s Gift,” is a delightful treasure.) Born in Newport to parents who believed in gender equality in education, Sarah Josepha was homeschooled by her mother and her brother Horatio, a graduate of Dartmouth College. She became a teacher and, at 25 years old, married David Hale, a Newport attorney. The couple continued the tradition of Sarah Josepha’s parents, discussing academic questions between themselves and encouraging the curiosity of their five children. Hale became a poet, best known for creating the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” and was a groundbreaking female publisher in the male-dominated 19th century whose “lady’s magazines” helped transform the lives of women and girls. Her most significant accomplishment for lovers of our November feast day is her work lobbying President Abraham Lincoln to make Thanksgiving an official national holiday. There are no historic reenactments of this effort on display at the library, but the children’s librarian will have special readings and some other ways to enlighten youngsters about this important and inspirational woman of New Hampshire around the Thanksgiving holiday. Visit newport.lib.nh.us for details.

Abenaki artists create intricate patterns in birch bark, such as the one above, using their teeth.

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This silhouette of Sarah Josepha Hale is by Auguste Edouart, a French-born portrait artist who worked in England, Scotland and the United States in the 19th century. He specialized in silhouette portraits.

COURTESY IMAGES

Register to attend at strawberybanke.org/events/ dawnland-storyfest.cfm.


Remick Country Doctor Museum & Farm

This attraction is a model working farm in historic Tamworth Village, where Dr. Edwin Remick and his son Edwin, also a country doctor, lived and practiced medicine for a combined 99 years. Along with the Remick homestead, there are barns and outbuildings that provide insights into the early agricultural years of New Hampshire. Although the buildings have been closed to the public since Covid-19 struck, the grounds remain open as long as weather permits. Along with a chance to see the animals of a real working farm, there’s a trail through the nearly 100 acres of farmland to explore. The farm raises and sells beef, pork, lamb and eggs, and curbside pickup is available all year (orders must be received a day in advance). For details, visit remickmuseum.org.

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603 NAVIGATOR / OUR TOWN

The Mountain View Grand is one of the few remaining grand hotels among the many that once flourished in the White Mountains.

Wistful in Whitefield A town that remembers times gone by

BY BARBARA RADCLIFFE ROGERS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY STILLMAN ROGERS

W

hitefield lies in a vale between two hillsides. Approaching either from the south on Route 142/116 or from the north on Route 3, you drop into the center of town. The valley was a natural choice for the railroads making their way through the White Mountains, and the town became a hub for freight and passengers. The Boston & Maine Railroad, Maine Central, and the Concord & Montreal Railroad all passed through Whitefield, served by three separate depots. Take a close look at the current Dunkin’ Donuts on Union Street and you’ll see the unmistakable shape of the former station. Not quite so obvious is a second one, moved from its previous trackside location and now the American Legion Hall, next to the fire station on Route 142/116. A third station was at Hazen, near the current Mount Washington Regional Airport. 14

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

All these train lines converging in one town, with their junctions and sidetracks, required some coordination. Alongside Union Street, where the Boston & Maine and Maine Central tracks intersected, you can still see the ball signal that indicated whether it was safe to pass through. Erected in 1875, the ball was still being used 100 years later, and was the last of these signals in use in the United States. Union Street (Route 3) is Memory Lane for more than rail enthusiasts. Two shops between the old depot and the ball signal will interest fans of vinyl and vintage stereos. Chris’s Nostalgia Shop sells vintage records, cassettes, movies, CDs and other music memorabilia. If you long to hear Lena Horne in the original-cast album of “Jamaica” or the Bee Gees’ 20 greatest hits, or to throw a Motown dance party, Chris’s is the place to look. For the equipment to play those 78s, 8-tracks and VCR tapes, cross the street to Blake’s Electronics. A fan of electronics since

childhood, owner Eric Blake’s shop is an ever-changing collection of new and vintage audio, stereos, televisions, surround-sound equipment and guitars. Union Street leads to Whitefield’s Common and King’s Square where, like the rail lines, three routes intersect — 116, 142 and U.S. 3. This is where the village of Whitefield began in 1815, when Asa King bought the lot that included what later became the Common. His son and son-in-law deeded the Common to the town as a playing field in 1833, and in 1875 the bandstand was added. By 1907, a 15-member band played summer concerts for locals and increasing numbers of tourists. Unlike many New England village centers, King’s Square does not include the typical church. Instead, the two most prominent with their white spires, St. Matthew and the


The ball signal was used for 100 years to control train traffic and was the last one in use in the United States.

Community Baptist Church, stand on a rise overlooking Jefferson Road. Trinity Methodist is at the corner of Maple Street and Lancaster Road, and the tiny Episcopal Chapel of the Transfiguration on Elm Street has held services here each summer since 1895. The most prominent building overlooking King’s Square is the mauve façade of the oncegrand Allard Hotel, now empty, a reminder that tourism played a big role in Whitefield’s history. At the opposite side of the square is a lodging place more in tune with contemporary tourists, the Art Gallery Hostel. Loved by hikers, climbers and cyclists for its easygoing air, budget rates, and common areas where guests can share their day’s adventures, the hostel is run by artist Dave Holmander. His paintings hang throughout the hostel, which doubles as his studio and gallery. Tourists looking for more luxury, fine dining and a few rounds of golf with a view gravitate to the Mountain View Grand. Both the hotel and the view are grand indeed. This sprawling resort is the epitome of the grand hotels that once flourished throughout the White Mountains, the summer refuges of wealthy families escaping the cities’ heat. They arrived by train and were met by a

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 15


603 NAVIGATOR / OUR TOWN

A view of the White Mountains from the terrace of the Mountain View Grand Hotel

coach that brought them up the hill to revel in the view of the Presidential Range spread out before them. The hotel’s story is a long one, and seeing this beautiful building today seems like a miracle to those of us who remember it in the 1990s, porches sagging, windows out, rooflines slumping, and one wing barely standing. The Mountain View’s first guests came by chance in 1865, when a stagecoach headed for Montreal overturned in a rainstorm. The Dodges welcomed the passengers to their farmhouse so graciously that the group stayed on and returned the following summer. Thus began Mountain View House, a hotel that remained in the Dodge family until 1979. It closed in the 1980s and remained empty and deteriorating until new owners saved it with a $20 million restoration in 2002. New rooms and suites were added, as was the full-service spa in the tower. The hotel is on the National Register of Historic Places. Carrying on the Dodges’ farming tradition, the resort maintains herb and kitchen gardens, and a variety of wool-bearing animals — six breeds of sheep, angora goats and rabbits, llamas and alpacas. Yarns produced here are sold in the small farm shop. The resort works closely with local farms and producers to supply its kitchens and has been awarded Certified Local status by the New Hampshire Farm to Restaurant Connection. Across Lancaster Road from the Mountain View Grand’s entrance road is another long-standing attraction that brought tourists 16

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

and White Mountain residents to Whitefield. Founded in 1966 by the late Tom Haas and Gibbs Murray (who is still very much a part of the theater), Weathervane Theater is part of an even older stage tradition in Whitefield. In 1934, New York Times art critic William Chase began bringing singers, actors and dancers from New York to perform at his barn in the summer, a tradition that continued until the Chase barn closed in 1962. In 1966, Murray and Haas took up the banner, opening in a pair of connected barns on Lancaster Road as the Weathervane Theater. When the barns began to feel their age, a fundraising campaign resulted in the current purpose-built theater in 2002, seating 250 and with more staging potential. Murray’s unique gift was — and is — stage design, and the staging has always been a hallmark of Weathervane performances. Theatergoers have several choices for pre-performance dining. Next to the Weathervane, The Inn at Whitefield serves both a dining menu and a pub menu of burgers and sandwiches. The Mountain View Grand has two options, farm-to-table fare in the casual Harvest Tavern, with terrace dining in good weather, or the more formal atmosphere of the 1865 Wine Cellar. Before Friday and Saturday evening performances, those longing for traditional New England comfort food favorites will find the popular Grandma’s Kitchen farther along Lancaster Road, locally famed for the cookedfrom-scratch turkey dinners, chicken pot pie and shepherd’s pie. NH

King’s Square and the town bandstand

Learn more Chris’s Nostalgia Shop (603) 837-7183 / Facebook

Blake’s Electronics (603) 991-2242

Art Gallery Hostel

(603) 770-3970 / daveholmander.com

Mountain View Grand Resort & Spa (855) 837-2100 / mountainviewgrand.com

Weathervane Theater

(603) 837-9322 / weathervanenh.org

The Inn at Whitefield

(603) 837-2400 / innatwhitefield.com

Grandma’s Kitchen

(603) 837-2525 / Facebook


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nhmagazine.com | November 2021 17


603 NAVIGATOR / FOOD & DRINK

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nhmagazine.com | November 2021


Local Thanksgiving

Fixin’s and Fun Relish the season with a little help from some of these Granite State vendors for food, drink and all the rest BY ANNA-KATE MUNSEY

W

ISTOCK

ISTOCK

hat foods and goods were at the first Thanksgiving? Since no one can say definitively, each year we get to design our own feast. Autumn bouquets, spiced cider and free-range turkey cover our tables, complementing the warmth of good company. One thing we do know for sure about that first dinner — the food was certainly local. In that way, we can emulate the inaugural Thanksgiving, and we have an idea — actually, dozens of ideas — for you. Read on to discover a short list of the many local farms, florists, breweries, bakeries and shops that can give your Thanksgiving dinner extra special.

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 19


603 NAVIGATOR / FOOD & DRINK

Locally Raised Meats

Let’s be real — turkey is no longer the go-to for every family’s Thanksgiving. Ham, pot roast, tofu turkey or just skipping this main meat altogether are increasingly popular choices. Whether you’re looking for fresh, locally raised meats or a classic free-range bird, these farms have got you covered. Charmingfare Farm 774 High St., Candia (603) 483-5623 / visitthefarm.com

Templeton Family Organics 176 Kennedy Hill Rd., Goffstown (781) 316-5067 / templetonfamilyorganics.com

East Wind Farm 120 Perry Rd., Strafford (603) 269-6203 / eastwindfarm.wordpress.com

The Inn at East Hill Farm 460 Monadnock St., Troy (603) 242-6495 / east-hill-farm.com

Hart’s Turkey Farm Restaurant 233 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith (603) 279-6212 / hartsturkeyfarm.com

Vernon Family Farm 301 Piscassic Rd., Newfields (603) 340-4321 / vernonfamilyfarm.com

Looking for a thoughtful host or hostess gift that doubles as décor? Or just looking to spruce up your own Thanksgiving spread with colors of warm gold, deep red and bold burnt orange? Look no further than these delightful flower shops and farms.

Paradise Farm 468 Center Rd., Lyndeborough (603) 345-0860 / paradisefarmnh.com

White Gates Farm 2153 Cleveland Hill Rd., Tamworth (603) 662-7556 / whitegates-farm.com

Apotheca Flowers & Café 24C Main St., Goffstown (603) 497-4940 / apothecaflowershoppe.com

Florists

Paisley Floral Design Studio 2107 River Rd., Manchester (603) 493-8386 / paisleyfloraldesign.com Seacoast Florist 29 Lafayette Rd., North Hampton (603) 926-7687 / seacoastflorist.com Silver Lake Floral Design 20 Plains Rd., Silver Lake (603) 569-8463 / silverlakefloraldesign.com Spring Ledge Farm 37 Main St., New London (603) 526-6253 / springledgefarm.com

Vernon Family Farm in Newfields

Baked Goods and Sweets

Carbs, carbs and more carbs is the only way to load up your Thanksgiving plate. From buttery biscuits to hearty breads to crumbly cornbread, these charming bakeries each offer a variety sure to please everyone. And, after that tryptophan-induced catnap, you’re sure to be craving a sweet treat — or three or four. Choose a classic apple or pumpkin pie, or try something new such as cupcakes, cookies or even donuts. You truly can’t go wrong with a sugary treat. Crosby Bakery 51 East Pearl St., Nashua (603) 882-1851 / crosbybakerynh.com

Vintage Baking Company 41 Route 302, Glen (603) 383-7211 / vintagebakingcompany.com

cake. vegan bakery 1 Washington St., Dover (320) 266-8023 / cakeveganbakery.com

Old Village Bakery 50 Seavey St., North Conway (603) 356-8989 / oldvillagebakerynh.com

Crumb Bum Bakery 97 Main St., Littleton (603) 575-1773 / crumbbumbakery.com Dulces Bakery & Café 87 Amherst St., Manchester 603-606-2613 / dulcesbakerynh.com Laconia Village Bakery 660 Main St., Laconia 603-527-1414 / laconiavillagebakery.com Sweet Dreams Bakery 100 Portsmouth Ave., Stratham (603) 772-8432 / sweetdreamsbakerynh.com

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With hundreds of craft beer selections, hard ciders in numerous fruity and spiced flavors, quaint wineries, and even kombucha breweries across the state, try something new or stick to an old favorite to toast this holiday season. Auspicious Brew 1 Washington St., Dover (603) 953-7240 / auspiciousbrew.com Contoocook Cider Company 656 Gould Hill Rd., Contoocook (603) 746-1175 / contoocookcider.com Fulchino Vineyard 187 Pine Hill Rd., Hollis 603-438-5984 / fulchinovineyard.com Hermit Woods Winery & Deli 72 Main St., Meredith (603) 253-7968 / hermitwoods.com Sap House Meadery 6 Folsom Rd., Center Ossipee (603) 539-1672 / saphousemeadery.com Seven Birches Winery 22 S. Mountain Dr., Lincoln (603) 745-7550 / sevenbirches.com

More of a beer person? There are close to 100 breweries in the state, so chances are good there’s a great option near you. Check out our own map and directory at nhmagazine.com/beer.

COURTESY PHOTO

Alcohol


Music

Did you know that New Hampshire has nine official state songs? If, somehow, you get tired of these, consider complementing your feast’s great food and drink with some music by a local artist. Stream these artists or grab a CD and get groovy. COURTESY PHOTO

Maddy Roop maddyroop.com Tendercrop Farm in Dover

Farmstands and Specialty Shops

PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

Whether you forgot something last minute, are visiting from out of town, or simply don’t feel like preparing that one item, farm stores are here for you. These places are a one-stop-shop for everything local and delicious: fruits, vegetables, jams, soups, cheeses, breads, desserts and many more yummy options. Applecrest Farm Orchards 133 Exeter Rd., Hampton Falls (603) 926-3721 / applecrest.com

Mack’s Apples & Farm Market 230 Mammoth Rd., Londonderry (603) 434-7619 / macksapples.com

Brookford Farm 250 West Rd., Canterbury (603) 742-4084 / brookfordfarm.com

Market & Cafe at Emery Farm 147 Piscataqua Rd., Durham (603) 742-8495 / emeryfarm.com

Harman’s Cheese & Country Store 1400 Route 117, Sugar Hill (603) 823-8000/ harmanscheese.com

Tendercrop Farm at the Red Barn 123 Dover Point Rd., Dover (603) 740-4920 / tendercropfarm.com

LaValley Farms 1801 Hooksett Rd., Hooksett (603) 485-3541 / lavalleyfarms.com

Zeb’s General Store 2675 White Mountain Hwy., North Conway (603) 356-9294 / zebs.com

Seacoast Wind Ensemble seacoastwindensemble.org The Crab Shack Band thecrabshackband.com The Grim Brothers thegrimbrothers.com Voices from the Heart voicesfromtheheart.org

Check out some more ideas from our Cubicle Concerts series at nhmagazine.com/cubicle-concerts.

Maddy Roop

Add Matlaw’s to your Holiday shopping list!

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 21


603 Informer “My heart, which is so full to overflowing, has often been solaced and refreshed by music when sick and weary.” — Martin Luther

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PHOTO BY P.T. SULLIVAN


Blips 28 Politics 30 What Do You Know? 32

Music Is Magic The Shaw Brothers’ legacy inspires a nonprofit organization that brings the healing power of music to seniors BY LYNNE SNIERSON

F

“I’ve been an entertainer all of my life, but after I started playing for seniors, I found I really liked it. This is the best job I’ve ever had.”

or decades, Charlie Dawson entertained passengers sailing on the Royal Caribbean Cruise Line, and throughout his celebrated career he’s performed for appreciative audiences in a variety of other well-known venues at locations far and wide. Nevertheless, his current work with the Music Is Magic Fund is his greatest gig of all. “I’ve been an entertainer all of my life, but after I started playing for seniors, I found I really liked it. This is the best job I’ve ever had. This is fantastic. I really love this work,” says the 74-year-old musician, singer and songwriter. The Music Is Magic fund is a nonprofit organization established to honor the memory of Ron and Rick Shaw, the identical twins better known as the Shaw Brothers,

while bringing the healing power of music to people in a congregate living facility. Ron and Rick Shaw, with their blended baritone voices, were singers, storytellers, poets composers and balladeers, and they became a New Hampshire and New England institution. As the liner notes on one of their CDs extols, they were loved by audiences of all ages and all walks of life: white collar, blue collar and no collar. During the 22 consecutive summers the brothers headlined Portsmouth’s Prescott Park Festival, their universally popular concerts — which were a mix original work, traditional folk classics and contemporary music — attracted crowds like no other act could, typically drawing more than 10,000 to the waterfront landmark.

PHOTO BY P.T. SULLIVAN

— Charlie Dawson

The Music Is Magic fund, which was established in memory of beloved New Hampshire musicians, the Shaw Brothers, provides free music and entertainment at the Edgewood Centre in Portsmouth. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 23


603 INFORMER / MUSIC IS MAGIC

Macintosh explains that she and Rick had been listening to the old Shaw Brothers tapes and music was the way to reach him. “It was astonishing. He lit up. He came to life,” she says. “It’s a fact that one of the only activities that activates, stimulates and uses the entire brain is music. Establishing Music Is Magic so that entertainers could come and perform for others gave Rick a purpose. In the moment, he recognized what we were doing.” Ali Nesman, The Edgewood’s life enrichment specialist, understood the power of the music as well and came immediately on board to lend her considerable talents.

Many of the Shaw Brothers’ renowned fellow musicians, like Dawson, Brian Corcoran and Bill Staines, among others, began performing there regularly, and the all-volunteer Song Circles became monthly events the residents and staff looked forward to. “I’ve worked with Ali and she’s absolutely wonderful. She’s the boots on the ground,” says Macintosh. “They have a budget and are limited in what they can do, but because we’re an adjunct, we can do the extra they can’t afford. We’re the cherry on the cake,” she adds.

CPURTESY PHOTOS

The anthem “New Hampshire Naturally,” with music and lyrics by the Shaw Brothers, was adopted as an honorary state song by the Legislature in 1983. Throughout their long careers starting as undergraduates at UNH, Rick and Ron Shaw made people happy with their music and inspired people to sing along. Sallie Macintosh was Ron Shaw’s significant other for 30 years, and with limitless energy and a wealth of ideas, she is the driving force of Music Is Magic. “Rick was living with Ron and me, but by January 2017, Rick’s Alzheimer’s disease had progressed to the point that he needed to go live at The Edgewood,” says Macintosh. “Colleagues and old friends of Rick and Ron started to visit him there and make music for him, and this became the ‘Song Circles,’ which we then happily opened to any resident to enjoy. It was like a party, and we all enjoyed the music,” she adds. “Sadly, in March of 2018, Ron’s cancer also progressed and then he was admitted to Edgewood. For the last eight days of his life, he and Rick were able to be together again,” she says. “A day or two before Ron died on April 1, 2018, I came up with the idea of the Music Is Magic Fund to help people be reached through music. I wanted to make sure that the entertainers were paid something. I told Ron about it and he was very supportive.” Macintosh adds, “Ron always said that music is magic.”

From left: Brian Corcoran, Ron Shaw, Rick Shaw, Charlie Dawson and Tom Bartlett at the Edgewood Centre

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This Song Circle at The Edgewood Centre featured Conor Makem, Ruth Zax, Rick Shaw, Pat Obrien, Stan Mullaney, Tom Bartlett, Dave McLean (with Tyler Foss and Ray DeMarco unpictured).

By the beginning of 2020, the program was so successful that they were planning an entire year ahead, and everyone was excited about all the programs in addition to some summer fundraisers. Then the pandemic hit. The Edgewood, like all other congregate living groups, went into lockdown for the rest

of the year and into 2021 until the Covid-19 vaccine became available. “My background is technical,” Dawson says. “When Covid came, I was able to turn my home recording studio into a streaming video studio and started doing my shows for them on Zoom and livestreams. They really

liked it when I put my shows on tape. I donated a lot of my work to the Music Is Magic Fund. Ali from Edgewood was the first to jump up and say we can make this work. She had the technical know-how and the will to make it happen,” he adds. During Covid, the demand for Dawson’s shows grew, and he agreed to do a show every Monday. “We put together a Zoom every week, and the videos worked very well. But the Music Is Magic Fund is the key,” says Dawson, who donated much of his time and effort. “Believe me when I tell you, this is work — hard work. There is a large cash outlay and there is a lot involved to make it really good quality.” The Shaw Brothers had always wanted to produce a special CD of Christmas songs, but somehow never got around to it. Macintosh says, with the help of Dawson and others, they were able to produce one from old tapes of the brothers’ recordings. It was released with an initial run of 300 and half of them sold quickly. It continues to be a successful fundraiser for the project. “Every penny of each one sold goes to Music Is Magic,” Macintosh says. CDs are available at shawbrothersmusicmagic.com.

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nhmagazine.com | November 2021 25


603 INFORMER / MUSIC IS MAGIC “This is done in Rick and Ron’s name. They made so many people so happy, to be able to do this means the world to me,” says Macintosh, who sadly lost Rick on January 28. “It is such a saving grace for me. This is part of why I say that Music Is Magic benefits me more than anyone else. To be able to be part of something positive that gives people joy like Rick and Ron always did gives me purpose and we all need that.” NH

From left: Ron Shaw, Sallie Macintosh and Rick Shaw

Though the project was able to stage some live outdoor concerts from June through October in the courtyard at The Edgewood, once the cold weather returned, all the performances would have to go back to virtual. “I have many offers to go back out and work, but songs for seniors is what I do now,” says Dawson. “I was the only one who performed consistently all last year, and I’ll keep doing it and continue to give them

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my time. Maybe this year I can bring some guests into my studio for the shows,” he adds. “Music Is Magic is a wonderful thing for what it is doing for the seniors. I can tell you that there is nothing like live music for them. It reaches them in a way nothing else can. It absolutely took me off my feet. What I’m doing is important.” No one knows that better than Macintosh, who is the keeper of the Shaw Brothers flame.

All funds raised from “Christmas with Friends” benefit the Music Is Magic Fund. You can learn more and purchase the CD at shawbrothersmusicmagic.com.


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603 INFORMER / IN THE NEWS

Blips

Monitoring appearances of the 603 on the media radar since 2006

Ali Feller on the Run

A young Hopkinton mom becomes an unlikely face of the running world BY CASEY McDERMOTT If you’re a runner with a story to tell, Ali Feller wants to hear it. And before you start second-guessing the speed of your last few laps or questioning whether your jog around the neighborhood really makes you worthy of that title, she wants to make one thing clear: “If you run, you’re a runner; it’s that simple.” After all, there was a time when Feller could’ve never imagined herself as a runner — much less as the face of “Ali on the Run,” a podcast and online community that’s found popularity among marathoners and quarter-milers across the globe. Long before thousands were tuning in to hear her chat with Olympians like breakout bronze medalist marathoner Molly Seidel and steeplechase silver medalist Courtney Frerichs, Feller was just trying to keep up with her first few miles. As a kid growing up in Hopkinton, dance was her sport of choice. “You can call Mr. Martin, my fifth grade gym teacher at Maple Street [Elementary] School, and he will tell you that the mile on Presidential Physical Fitness Test Day was not my strength,” she confides. She turned to running as a twenty-something, in part, out of frugality: She was living on a writer’s salary in New York City, and she couldn’t afford a gym membership.

Ali Feller (left) with Olympic bronze medalist marathoner Molly Seidel

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“My first run was in jazz sneakers, which I do not recommend,” she says now, with a laugh. At the time, she didn’t have a GPS or a fancy app to track her progress, so she learned to measure her distance in other ways: by the number of lampposts she passed on her route along the East River, or the ease with which she could make it to the dog park exactly one mile from her front door. Soon, she channeled this newfound passion into a running blog — which grew into a running podcast, which now

boasts more than 400 episodes, 6 million downloads and 2,000+ five-star ratings on iTunes. Feller’s show is having something of a breakout year, thanks in part to the buzz surrounding track and field at this year’s Olympics and Paralympics, in part to the authenticity Feller brings to her public persona. Her Instagram feed features candid reflections on racing, raising a young daughter or rediscovering the beauty of her home state as a newly resettled New Hampshire resident. Her podcast doesn’t

COURTESY PHOTOS

Ali Feller


PHOTO COURTESY ANDROSCOGGINVALLEYTOUR.COM

shy away from conversations with some of the sport’s most famous names about body image, mental health and more. “It’s been really cool to chase down those stories and to see what resonates,” Feller says. “And it’s not just the gold medal stories — it’s the stories of disappointment, it’s the stories that are more than just people showing up and competing. Who are they, as people, and what hurdles have they faced to get to that starting line?” Returning home to Hopkinton in 2020 has given Feller the chance to explore a new side of her home state. She’s a regular announcer at races hosted by Millennium Running, and she’s logging some longoverdue miles on some amazing trails she never realized were right in her backyard. All the while, she’s also introducing her daughter to the joys of the local ice cream stand, the Hopkinton Fair and hikes up Mount Kearsarge. “I’m getting to see this town in a way that I never knew, both as a runner and as a mom,” she says, “and that’s really, really special.” NH

Apologies to those of you lucky enough to already know all about Garnet Pool in Gorham: The secret’s out. The popular travel site Atlas Obscura published a detailed guide to finding the off-thebeaten-path pool, dubbing it “one of the most serene swimming holes in the White Mountains.” If you’re worried about crowds, perhaps you can take comfort in knowing that only a few brave souls are likely to venture out for a dip this time of year. If you’re tuning in to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade, keep your eyes peeled for a few local athletes marching — or skipping — along. Four teens from Extreme Air of NH, a competitive jump-rope troupe, will be showing off their skills alongside peers from across the country. We’re told they’ll be jumping the entire 2.8-mile route of the parade before capping off with a performance in Herald Square. (Read more on page 8.) nhmagazine.com | November 2021 29


603 INFORMER / POLITICS

Red Mayors in Blue Cities? What new political surprises might we see? BY JAMES PINDELL / ILLUSTRATION BY PETER NOONAN

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his fall, the political conversation in New Hampshire has turned to the dozen mayoral contests around the state. This is as it should be with no presidential race, no congressional races or Statehouse races this year. All politics is, literally, local. On the ballot are issues like crime, tax, education, and how to best govern in a pandemic. That said, here’s a simple request: Before we get into the 2021 elections, can we answer one of the most unresolved questions about the previous mayoral elections? How is it that New Hampshire, one of the biggest swing states in the nation, elected Democrats to lead nearly every city in the state except in the two most liberal cities where, somehow, Republicans are in charge? The situation, when viewed from 30,000 feet, never fully made sense. Well, one part of it did. While Republican Donald Trump was president, the Democratic base was especially fired up for every election. Democrats won races — or came close — for special elections ranging from state representative to races for U.S. Senate in the Granite State in districts where they should have. This

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translated into mayoral races as well. That Democrats turned out to elect mayors in Manchester or Nashua or even more Republican-leaning Laconia should not be the biggest surprise given this context. It also helped that Democrats, in general, recruited strong candidates to run for these offices. But such a scenario also makes it even more perplexing that Republicans were able to win in places like Keene and Portsmouth — two of the most-Democratic cities in the state. Each, it seems, happened for reasons only particular to that city. Keene, after all, had a recent history of electing a moderate Republican mayor. So when the latest Republican candidate, George Hansel, came along without much of an opponent, it wasn’t a crazy idea that he could be elected. Hansel is seeking a second term this fall and his opponents have never held office. One is facing federal prosecution for her role in a bitcoin scheme. How Portsmouth ended up with a Republican mayor had really nothing to do with national politics. First, the driving issue in the city last time was a controversial development project for which Republican Rick

Becksted was an opposition leader. Second, in Portsmouth no one runs for mayor. The top vote-getter among the nine city council members is given the title. This means that a Republican didn’t exactly win a race for Portsmouth mayor, he just happened to do well in a multicandidate election for council. While Hansel in Keene looks to be reelected, the picture in Portsmouth looks murkier, local election watchers say. There are Democrats who currently hold the same position Becksted does regarding the development, and he’s endured criticism from the liberal wing of the city for his handling of the pandemic. To be sure, other places, like deeply Democratic Concord, have Democratic mayors. Claremont, a city that has become more Republican in the last decade, has a Republican mayor. Manchester, where the mayoral contest gets the most attention just for being in the state’s largest city, has a Democrat in the driver’s seat as mayor for another term. Those are things one might expect. Our current situation, however, is something of a surprise. Here’s to whatever surprises we might see after the 2021 elections. NH


603 INFORMER / ARTISAN

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603.668.5588

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PalaceTheatre.org nhmagazine.com | November 2021 31


603 INFORMER / WHAT DO YOU KNOW?

A replica of socialite Florence Brooks’ Shinbone Shack and “The Barn,” recently added as an event center.

Shinbone Shack

From the ease of city life to the hardships of country living

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hen worldly, wealthy, socialite Florence Brooks arrived in an isolated area of Stoddard in 1918, the townspeople had something new to talk about. Brooks was an independent woman in her early 40s from New York City, and why she decided to visit the backwoods area of this small town was fodder for speculation and gossip. Brooks was an educated woman from a family whose wealth went back generations, and she had lived the privileged life of a young debutante, attending private schools in Connecticut, New York and Europe. She had traveled extensively and was accustomed to a life of luxury in New York City. Stoddard farmers eking out a living on rocky farms did not understand why Brooks would swap her city life of ease for the hardships of country living in this remote area. Brooks fell in love with the picturesque setting of an old sawmill pond surrounded by mountains and isolation. Enthralled with the unspoiled beauty and solitude of 32

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this little valley, she decided to make it her own. She bought a two-acre plot at the site of the old sawmill and named it Woods Mill Manor. Neighbors watched with curiosity as the New York socialite prepared to build her manor. First, a small cottage would be built, a simple cabin in the woods, which would be her seasonal home while her dream manor was constructed. Brooks had inherited much of her family’s fortune, enabling her to dream big, maintain a life of privilege, and be generously involved in philanthropic causes. Over her lifetime she donated several hundred thousand dollars to various charities. During World War I, she was active in the Red Cross and the lesser-known Blue Cross, which cared for horses and dogs that had served on the battlefields. Brooks not only shared her money with the causes she supported, but also donated her time and energy. In 1919, Brooks met Arthur Aten, who would become her fourth husband. The

COURTESY PHOTO

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MARSHALL HUDSON

Florence Brooks was said to be equally comfortable dressed in hunting garb and toting a shotgun in Stoddard or dressed in furs and dripping with diamonds as a New York City socialite.

rumor was that she agreed to marry him if he would build her the cabin on her new property. In a somewhat nontraditional marriage, Florence Brooks-Aten continued to travel between Europe and her home


In addition to restoring the property, the current estate owners completed the Adirondack-style lodge Brooks had dreamed about.

in New York doing charity work for the next couple of years, while Arthur Aten remained in Stoddard, living in a tent throughout the winter and building her cabin in the woods. In 1922, with the cabin completed, Aten suddenly left Stoddard. Scuttlebutt was that he had been handed a one-way ticket to Hawaii and sent packing by his wife when an affair with a neighboring woman was discovered. Brooks-Aten’s newly constructed cabin in the woods was given the moniker “Shinbone Shack” when the bones of a moose were discovered during excavation at the cabin site. The shinbones were mortared into the fireplace hearth and served as an unusual conversation starter. Brooks-Aten was happy with her Shinbone Shack, but her ultimate plans were more extravagant. She dreamed of a large Adirondack-style “great camp” and retained Augustus Shepard, a noted architect of such camps, to design her an elegant lodge. The lodge would serve as a lavish retreat from the city where she could entertain her society friends and allow them to experience the beauty of nature, but in a luxuriously comfortable manner.

The restored millpond dam and gardens

Brooks-Aten began buying up parcels of land adjoining her Shinbone Shack. Word spread that she was anxious to increase her holdings and was paying outrageous prices for remote woodland. Over the next several years, she purchased some 1,200 acres from neighboring landowners willing to sell their unproductive land for top dollar. To access her new country estate, an expensive two-mile-long road was constructed into the valley using gravel hauled from miles away. An elegant stone arch bridge was built over Otter Brook, which crossed beneath her new road. To take better advantage of her waterfront, the millpond was enlarged. The old sawmill dam was reconstructed, and a picturesque waterfall spillway added. The spillway was framed with two ornamental millstones, remnants from a 1700s gristmill that once stood on the site. To enhance the view from her lodge, stonemasons built a walled garden across the pond from her windows with high stonewalls, arched doorways, stone staircases and a corner turret. Exotic plants and Italian statues completed the garden.

A stone powerhouse with an 8-foot-high waterwheel was built below the dam. The rotating waterwheel drove a generator inside the powerhouse that provided electricity to the lodge. Sadly, Brooks-Aten’s fortune was fully invested in the stock market, and the 1929 crash suddenly left her with nothing. Her investments, savings and revenue streams were all gone, and her outstanding debts and obligations amounted to more than she could raise. Her dreams for the construction of her Woods Mill Manor collapsed with the stock market. BrooksAten had invested nearly half a million dollars into her estate, frequently overpaying for property, labor and materials. Those to whom she owed money demanded payment, and her property was tied up in the courts while creditors sued over her assets. In the end, everything was sold to pay down her debts. The Shinbone Shack, the unfinished grand lodge, and the surrounding acreage was valued at more than $200,000 but sold at auction for only $9,800 due to the depressed economy of the mid-1930s. With her money gone and dreams shattered, Brooks-Aten’s health suffered. Her Shinbone Shack and New York City apartment were sold to pay off debts, so she moved into a small house in Swanzey, where she lived until her death in 1960. A newspaper clipping suggests she might have taken a job in a local mill for a small source of income. The present owners of what was once Florence Brooks-Aten’s estate have restored much of her dream. Her unfinished Adirondack lodge with its unique pole roof trusses accenting the great hall is now completed. The stone arch bridge and stone powerhouse with waterwheel still function. The millpond dam decorated with millstones, and the high stonewalled garden have been restored to their picturesque beauty. Shinbone Shack was too deteriorated to be saved, but a replica was constructed capturing the style and spirit of the original building. Salvaged elements from the original building, including the brick hearth containing the depression of the shinbones, were reused in the replicated building. A modern bathroom was added as authenticity does have its limits, but I don’t think worldly, wealthy, independent, socialite Florence Brooks would mind indoor plumbing in her little cabin in the woods. NH

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603 INFORMER / TRANSCRIPT

Super Nice Photo and interview by David Mendelsohn Meet Kadrolsha Ona Carole, a genuine comic book superhero who quietly walks Manchester’s mean streets, always ready to swing into action (or prayer). KO battles the dark side through her powers of positive energy, banishing wickedness with her swift sword of kindness. Being a superhero takes time, but she also cultivates such talents as healer, ghost hunter, director, psychic, producer, actor and horse person. KO summons her strength from the infinite light, so next time you need a boost, just look ... look ... up in the sky — or, better yet, within — for a potent dose of KO’s positive “kapow.”

I am totally a superhero! In my comic books, I am called Kadrolsha Ona, or just plain KO. A side note: I am indisputably the first person in comic book history to be a superhero doing what she does in real life between the pages of a comic book. My comic book character came to life at the O Comic Con in Iowa. Charles Moisant of Silver Phoenix Entertainment walked up to me and asked if I wanted to be in a comic book. I said, “Hey, dude, who doesn’t want to be in a comic book? Yes! But it has to be real.” The rest is history. Best move I ever made was to trademark the name Queen of the Paranormal. I was doing a radio interview on the old WNDS. This gentleman called in and said, “I dub you Queen of the Paranormal.” It stuck! Been using it ever since. I am a former police auxiliary officer. I drove a police car, carried a gun, and was also a constable for the town of Andover, Massachusetts. Questioning in police work is similar to a psychic doing a reading. One question leads to another and, before you know it, it’s like reading someone’s mind.

In my comic books, the stories are real and have all happened. Except for the “Haunting Tales of Batchelder’s Grove.” In that comic book series, I am real and doing what I do in life like in my other comic books, but the other characters aren’t real. They are based on fantasy. I travel all over the nation appearing and signing autographs and selling pictures, ghost-hunting products and comic books. I still visit psychic fairs. I bring a few people with me and we all visit the same psychic. Nine out of 10 times we all got the same readings. That is why I say most are bogus and pull on your heart strings for a buck. Not good. I feel 98% of all psychics are full of crap. It’s the 2% that are exceptional at their craft. Fighting evil with positivity is what I am all about. In the children’s book series I am writing, there are hard-hitting life lessons with a positive lesson to be learned. The spirit remains when you die. I said that and I stand by it. The spirit is energy, and energy has always been here and will always remain.

The Power of Positive Pulp KO’s exploits in psychic derring-do have appeared in four different comic books to date, all with writer Brian K. Morris of Rising Tide Publications. She is two issues into a six-book series published by Silver Phoenix Entertainment, and then there is the “Celebrity Ghost Hunters” comic book with artist Eric Hawkins. “We replicated a video paranormal investigation we did at Kings Park, New York, that went viral,” KO says. “It’s super-cool.” But her current fave of all her own cartoon chronicles is “Queen of the Paranormal Adventures: The Healing” with artist Paul Quinn. She says she’s under contract for two more issues of that title and they should be ready by spring 2022. Credits: Big thanks to Dean and Laurel Abagis for their invaluable assistance in pulling off this shot. Note: Ona can be reached directly at queenoftheparanormal.com.

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Knock, knock: what’s so

F­ -uNNY?

BY BILL BURKE / PHOTOGRAPHY BY P.T. SULLIVAN 36

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Jimmy Dunn was onstage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom a few years back, and things weren’t going well. He was part way through an opening set for southern rockers 38 Special, when a particularly critical patron rose from his seat, shouted, “you suck,” and whipped a cardboard table tent at him. “I don’t move,” Dunn says. “It went right by my ear. I go, ‘You know what? Maybe I do. Maybe I’m not the funniest guy today. But I have bad news for you – my little brother is the head bouncer of this establishment and you’re about to hit stairs 8, 11 and 17 on your way out to Ocean Boulevard.’”

New Hampshire funnyman Jimmy Dunn says audiences are ready to laugh, and comics are ready to deliver.

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J

immy Dunn was onstage at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom a few years back, and things weren’t going well. He was part way through an opening set for southern rockers 38 Special, when a particularly critical patron rose from his seat, shouted, “You suck,” and whipped a cardboard table tent at him. “I don’t move,” Dunn says. “It went right by my ear. I go, ‘You know what? Maybe I do. Maybe I’m not the funniest guy today. But I have bad news for you — my little brother is the head bouncer of this establishment and you’re about to hit stairs 8, 11 and 17 on your way out to Ocean Boulevard.’” Sometimes knowing the right people can help. “I said, ‘I have about 8 minutes left. Anyone else want to tell me how I’m doing?’” So maybe Dunn wasn’t funny that night. But that story is. And he definitely is — which is why he may be one of the best people to gauge the state of comedy in New Hampshire. “In a word, I’m optimistic,” Dunn, founder of the Hampton Beach Comedy Festival, says of the state’s standup scene. “People are dying to come back out for laughs. Comedy is going to come roaring back, and I think once comedians realize people don’t want to hear Covid jokes anymore, that’ll be helpful. Everyone is doing the same first 15 minutes, and I learned quickly that people just don’t want to hear that.”

A little more than 19 months ago,

rooms were booked, people were saying funny things into microphones, and New Hampshire was having a good chuckle. But then the pandemic came, and things weren’t quite so humorous. 38

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Travis Pastrana drove to a new record time of 5 minutes 11.54 seconds, at the Mt. Washington Auto Road in 2017,

Dunn, founder of the Hampton Beach Comedy Festival, in front of a full house at McGuirk’s Ocean View Hotel nhmagazine.com | November 2021 39


“It put me right out of business overnight,” says Alana Foden, founder of Comedy On Purpose, which produces shows throughout southern New Hampshire. “But we are starting up again.” Foden started Comedy On Purpose, in part, to provide stage time for comedians learning the craft. Her formula: a group of 10-12 performers made up of three beginners, three intermediate comics, three top performers and a headliner to close the show.

“There wasn’t a lot of opportunity when I was getting started. It was a catch-22 — if you’re not good enough, you can’t get on stage. But how can you get better if you can’t get on stage?”

PHOTO BY SID CEASAR PHOTOGRAPHY

— Alana Foden

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Foden’s first 5-minute set took place at the Comedy Connection on a night hosted by the late Kevin Knox. Despite a strong contingent of family and friends who made the trek to Boston to support her, the nerves kicked in. “When I stood up, my brain sat down,” she recalls. “I felt like I was going to be physically ill,” she says of catching the standup bug. “And then after, when I was done, I was so relieved. I couldn’t sleep that night. You go over it in your head — over and over again.” That’s the challenge here in New Hampshire. Dunn, who has appeared on Letterman, Conan and was one of the stars of the CBS sitcom “The McCarthys,” found a creative way around that particular obstacle in his formative years. “One of my first jobs was running one of those carnival games where you roll a ball and the little horses would run down the track,” he says. “I had a microphone and I used to heckle people. My favorite part was when they’d heckle me back.”

Dan Miller (top) and Carolyn Plummer at the Hampton Beach Comedy Festival nhmagazine.com | November 2021 41


Hedwig and the Angry Inch at the Seacoast Repetory Theatre

Monument to Mirth: Creating the Granite State’s

ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN R. GOODWIN

Mount Rushmore of Comedy

M

aybe there’s something in the water, because there are some truly funny people who have called New Hampshire home over the years. When the Mount Rushmore of New Hampshire Comedy is finally chipped from frost-heaveshattered asphalt there are some solid choices. (“We should put it where the Old Man used to be,” Juston McKinney says. “That’s gone, and people still go up there to look.”) When he was in Manchester promoting his Crystal Head Vodka prior to the pandemic, actor Dan Aykroyd — who knows funny — offered his take on Adam Sandler’s place in the entertainment world. “I want to go on the record to say that his gift is one of the greatest things to his generation,” Aykroyd said. “He gave young men a confidence to be funny and to be bold and to go out there in the world and make a mark with compassion and with heart. If you look at his movies, they’re full of heart and compassion and very, very funny. He’s one of my favorite contemporary performers, and straight-up empire builders. He keeps his friends working and everyone who works with him loves the experience. He’s truly one of the world’s comic giants.” It’s hard to argue with box office receipts. “Adam Sandler has to be right there in front,” Jimmy Dunn says. “Then Sarah Silverman and Seth Meyers. And Al Kaprelian. Then maybe me.” Dunn’s got a persuasive argument: He’s the only New Hampshire standup who has starred on a sitcom, written for a sitcom, and appeared on Letterman and Conan. “Maybe sneak me in right on the edge,” he says. McKinney also has a few thoughts on the nonexistent but probably very necessary monument to New Hampshire comedians. “Those are the obvious three names,” he says of Sandler, Silverman and Meyers. “But here’s the thing — put me up there, because I don’t think Jimmy Dunn was born in New Hampshire. It’s like being the President. You have to be born here to be included. So, we’ll give Jimmy a statue in the parking lot of the liquor store down on the Massachusetts border.”

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There were also nights spent sitting on the back steps of the Casino Ballroom, listening to greats like George Carlin give a masterclass on standup. He learned that to get good, he’d have to get onstage. Early on, he put 70,000 miles on his car in one year driving to gigs. “I was lucky — I developed in Boston during the heyday,” he says. “To develop as a comic in New Hampshire is difficult because you just have to get onstage, and there’s just not as much stage time here as there is down in Boston. We have great bigger venues here like the Casino and the Colonial. But the smaller ones, the open mics, we don’t have as much of that.” Those venues, which can be ideal for comedy, have begun to fill up again. The Rex Theatre in Manchester, where Dunn performed earlier this year, hosted an evening of stories with Lenny Clarke and runs a Friday Night Comedy at the Rex series; the Casino Ballroom brought in Sebastian Man-


“People ask me, ‘Why aren’t you more famous?’ I don’t know — but I have a hunch. I live where Walter White hid out from the feds on ‘Breaking Bad.’ That’s where I went to further my career.” – Juston McKinney

iscalco, David Spade and Tom Segura; and Dunn and Boston comic Tony V headlined the Palace in October. “The Palace is one of the best theaters I’ve ever worked in,” says Jim Roach, president of JJR Entertainment, responsible for booking some of the biggest comedy names in the region, including Dunn, Juston McKinney and Bob Marley. “The balcony there is designed so well. It’s right on top of the stage, as close as you can possibly get. The intimacy in that room is amazing. It’s a great, great room.” So good, McKinney will shoot his third comedy special there in the spring. “It’s a great place,” McKinney says. “It’s a great venue to tape in. We’ve done it there before and the crew is familiar with it and it’s one of my favorite venues to perform at.” McKinney — who has performed on “The Tonight Show” three times (twice when it was hosted by Jay Leno and once with Conan O’Brien), starred in the Showtime special “Unsportsmanlike Comedy with Rob Gronkowski,” and had roles in “The King of Queens” and the films “Zookeeper” and “Here Comes the Boom,” among others — lives full time in Newmarket, which isn’t necessarily known as Hollywood East. “People ask me, ‘Why aren’t you more famous?’” McKinney says, laughing. “I don’t know — but I have a hunch. I live where Walter White hid out from the feds on

‘Breaking Bad.’ I live where Ghislaine Maxwell hid out. That’s where I went to further my career.” Jokes aside, it came down to quality of life and family, he says. He lived in Los Angeles for five years, but opted to return to his home state to raise his children. And while the location may add obstacles to building a career in the public eye, it can be done. “For me, the biggest struggle about being in New Hampshire is trying to stay relevant and in the game,” McKinney says. “What Jimmy Dunn did was amazing — getting cast on a sitcom while living here. I can’t bank on that happening. That’s a long shot.” But then the performer — constantly looking for what’s funny — who is never far below the surface, returns. “My wife said to me that if we stayed in Los Angeles, we wouldn’t have had kids,” he says. “I told her we would’ve had kids, just not these kids. Maybe they would’ve been better than these kids.” He also has good things to say about the comedy community in the Granite State. While it can occasionally be difficult to find stage time (McKinney runs a workout room for other comedians to hone their acts in Newburyport), it’s a fairly close-knit group. “I think it’s a supportive community,” he says. “We all understand we’re going

through the same stuff. I think there’s a bond there because of that.” McKinney also says while there’s “no shortage of talent in this state,” there are people who help make opportunities for others. “Jim Roach has been huge,” he says. “I started working with Jim after I was on ‘The Tonight Show’ with Conan O’Brien. He’s been a huge help for my career.” Roach also helped Marley — who peppered fans with daily online videos and kept working through much of the shutdown — string together a number of shows at the Colonial Theatre in Laconia, and at the Surfside just over the state line in Salisbury. “The Surfside has tents outside on a deck,” Roach says. “Bob did 25 shows under the tent. And the thing about Bob Marley is he changes his show every time he comes back to a venue. Watching Bob from the first show at Surfside to the last show, every night it was a different show. Every night he was pulling, working and moving. The first show was completely different from the last show. I’ve never seen anybody do that. It was just incredible.” McKinney is shooting a special, Foden’s Comedy On Purpose nights are hitting their stride, and following his comedy festival, Dunn’s calendar is filling up quickly. According to the pros, it’s a sign that audiences want to laugh, and comics are ready to deliver. “Comedians had a year and a half to write new jokes,” Dunn says. “And a lot did. I think it’s going to be fun. I forgot how much I missed it. Even the lousy gigs, and I did a few of those. It’s still better than being locked up in the house.” NH

Be Entertained Jimmy Dunn jimmydunn.com

Juston McKinney justonmckinney.com

JJR Entertainment jjrentertainment.com

Comedy On Purpose facebook.com/AlanaFoden

The Rex Theatre

palacetheatre.org/rex-theatre

Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom casinoballroom.com

Colonial Theatre coloniallaconia.com

Claremont Opera House claremontoperahouse.info

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OUR PARADOXICAL

TOWN e all know the play, or think we do. We’ve all seen it or read it in high school or college. Even my children’s grade school staged it — never mind the difficulty of keeping the third grade extras from fidgeting in their cemetery chairs and finding a wise, avuncular, pipe-smoking 12-yearold to proclaim, “There’s some scenery for those who think they have to have scenery.” (One of the arbors fell over.) V

W

By P. J. O’Rourke Photography by Kendal J. Bush

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From left: Actors K.P. Powell, Madeline Kendall and Kate Kenney perform in “Our Town” outdoors in Peterborough in August.

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Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” is such good dramaturgy that that it can withstand the most clumsy stagecraft. It even withstood a 1940 Hollywood movie version starring William Holden and Martha Scott as George and Emily with an untoward happy ending where Emily doesn’t die after all. (An ending approved by Thornton Wilder himself, who perhaps thought movie audiences weren’t quite smart enough for the theatrical version.) No matter what, we remember the power of the play. To use a metaphor baseballloving George Gibbs would appreciate, it runs life’s bases. As the Stage Manager says in his prologue after the initial intermission, “The First Act was called the Daily Life. This act is called Love and Marriage. There’s another act coming after this: I reckon you can guess what that’s about.” We remember the play’s power, but we tend to forget how difficult that power is to summon in its strongest form. From August 4 through August 15, Tom Frey directed the venerable and celebrated Peterborough Players in a wonderful production of “Our Town.” A sense of wonder is what the play creates when it’s done exactly right. But Tom and the Players had a number of other things to wonder about before they got a chance to wonder about the plain yet confounding instructions author Thornton Wilder is said to have given: “‘Our Town’ should be performed without sentimentality or ponderousness — simply, dryly, and sincerely.” First there was the “dryly” issue. Due to Covid worries the play had to be outdoors. “Our Town” performed in a town experiencing the out-of-town weather of a monsoon season. A small common was chosen, off Main Street between the Monadnock Center for History and Culture and the Guernsey Building. The latter is a remnant of an agricultural past. It once housed the American Guernsey Cattle Club. Thus the play was plopped down midst more yesteryear than Thornton Wilder, in his concern with eternity, meant to evoke. Which lead to the “sentimentality”issue. “Our Town” performed downtown in the town that lays claim to being “Our Town.” The signs at the town line on Route 101 and Route 202 read, “Welcome to Our Town.” I don’t know if this causes “ponderousness” in the audience, but it could 46

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distract from “simply” and maybe even from “sincerely.” The Peterborough Players addressed the problems deftly. Two performances were canceled by the weather, but an additional performance was squeezed in and, thanks to some frantic seating rearrangements by Advancement Director Beth Brown, staff and volunteers, everyone who bought a ticket got to see the play. No proscenium stage could be built that would withstand the rain and wind. So Scenic Designer Charles Morgan created a backdrop from artfully stacked and jumbled crates, boxes, trunks, suitcases and so forth that blocked the view of Peterborough itself and could be covered with a tarp after the show. The change from the traditionally stark “Our Town” set worked ingeniously. Instead of being in front of an almost empty place where everything is to be imagined, you were in front of an almost full space — a sort of attic of the mind — where everything is to be imagined. As the characters were introduced and started to speak, the wall of storeroom clutter seemed to fade more from backdrop to background until the emptiness Wilder wanted on stage was achieved. Part of the effect was also due to the brilliance, as it were, of Lighting and Sound Designer Kevin Frazier. He positioned the stage so that the First Act was in sunlight. Then, as the tone of the play darkened (which it does in the Second Act, sooner than you may recall), the shadow of the Guernsey Building began to fall across the stage until, by the Third Act, in the cemetery, the players were artificially illuminated in a way both eerie and appropriate. Tom Frey’s ethnicity-blind casting came as a surprise, but only a very momentary one. We’re accustomed to regarding “Our Town” as a white bread play set in a white bread place and time. (Though, in fact, pre-sliced commercial white bread wasn’t introduced until 1928, long after the play’s time span of 1901 to 1913.) A few seconds of seeing a mix of peoples on the stage was a reminder of the universality of the play, and a few more seconds had the viewer too engaged in that universality to take further notice. Every player was perfect for the part. Erick Pinnick lent Dr. Gibbs a faultless note of good-humored resignation. Aliah Whitmore portrayed Mrs. Gibbs with an

From left: Actors Bradley Baker, Gordon Clapp and Erick Pinnick

exact touch of dreaminess mixed into her busy concerns. Tracey Conyer Lee, as Mrs. Webb, adopted the correct minor key of asperity to distinguish her busy concerns from those of Mrs. Gibbs. And Steven Michael Walters, as newspaper editor Mr. Gibbs, added bemusement — and amusement — to a play with comic moments that are too often ignored. Young George Gibbs, who can seem feckless and empty-headed in the wrong hands, was provided with a beguiling sense of fun by K. P. Powell. Kate Kenney gave


COURTESY PHOTO

the young Emily Webb the radiant spark that’s so necessary if that spark is to be dimmed, which Kenney did with mastery in the last act. Together they shone in what may be (except for Emily’s last speech in the Third Act) the most difficult scene in the play. In the Second Act, George and Emily fall in love at the soda fountain without saying so, even to themselves. It is not (unlike Emily’s last speech) Thornton Wilder’s strongest piece of writing. He seems to have had little, if any, romantic

life of his own and appears to have been puzzled by adolescent emotion in a way that he wasn’t puzzled by any other human emotional condition. But Powell and Kenney pulled it off. And Gordon Clapp cannot be overpraised for the job he did as Stage Manager. Clapp has a roster of stage, screen and TV credits longer than a list of 2021 rainy days. He is perhaps best known for 12 seasons as Detective Greg Medavoy on “NYPD Blue.” He policed himself carefully in the one law of being Stage Manager. He blended

James Whitmore, who frequently acted with the Peterborough Players, performs as Stage Manager for their 2008 production of “Our Town.”

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From left: Actors Aliah Whitmore, Gordon Clapp and Erick Pinnick onstage with the Peterborough Town House in view

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The Thornton Wilder/Peterborough Connection The Peterborough Players staged their first production of “Our Town” in 1940 with Thornton Wilder himself consulting. It has since become the Players’ most-produced play, all leading up to this summer’s unique outdoor production. Although it’s commonly assumed (at least here in New Hampshire) that the play is set in a fictionalized Peterborough, Wilder’s connections to the town go even deeper. He was a frequent guest of the artist residency program at the nearby MacDowell retreat. It was there that Wilder wrote, at least in part, some of his most famous works including “Our Town,” “The Bridge of San Luis Rey” and “The Skin of Our Teeth.” He was the first recipient of the treasured Edwin MacDowell Medal and a close friend of founder Marian MacDowell, once writing to her, “I am one of your loyalest and most indebted boys … I hope it will not be long before one of these Sunday evenings you will again be trying to shoo me out of the kitchen. I am a Peterboroughvian for good.”

Thornton Wilder, at left, offers advice to Bertrand Mitchell, Jennifer Holt and Johnny Stearns during rehearsals for the first Peterborough Players production of “Our Town” in 1940.

Wilder takes pains to make the town as humdrum as possible:

Stage Manager: Nice town, y’know what I mean? Nobody very remarkable ever came out of it, s’far as we know. PHOTOS BY KENDAL J. BUSH

COURTESY PHOTO

himself into the action of the play, never leaving the audience a chance to ponder (per the author’s worry about ponderousness), “Who is this guy? Why’s he there? What’s he doing?” These are just a few of the questions that can nag an audience when “Our Town” isn’t acted and directed flawlessly. Not that they aren’t legitimate questions, but they shouldn’t arise in the middle of the action. They should haunt the audience after the Stage Manager says, “Most everybody’s asleep in Grover’s Corners ... You get a good rest, too. Good night.” I asked Tom Frey, “Why is a really good version of ‘Our Town’ so hard to do?” He said, “It’s a play that’s weirdly resistant to acting.” Each actor could be said to be balancing on a ball. A single sweeping “theatrical” gesture and equilibrium is lost. A tilt in one direction means a slip into bathos. A lean in another direction turns toward mawkishness. And any lurch rolls us into the perils of nostalgia. “It’s not right to make it a museum piece,” said Frey. He pointed out how the actors were dressed (thank you, costume designer Jane Alois Stein) in clothing that was “non-period period,” to evoke a sense of other time rather than old-timey. Thornton Wilder seems to have been trying to inoculate the play against nostalgia. The opening act of “Our Town” is set 37 years before it was first performed in 1938 and therefore was already in danger of being about the good old days. But so many momentous — and calamitous — events marked the intervening years. The horrors of WWI, the disruption of manners and mores and shaky financial boom of the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the rise of war-mongering totalitarianism in Germany, Italy, the Soviet Union and Japan pushed 1901 into a certain “no place” that Wilder desired. In his 1957 Preface to a collection of his plays Wilder wrote, “When you emphasize place in the theater, you drag down and limit and harness time to it. You thrust the action back into past time, whereas it is precisely the glory of the stage that it is always ‘now’ there.” He also wrote that “the theatre is admirably fitted” to have “one foot planted in the particular ... yet it tends and strains to exhibit a general truth.” Grover’s Corners is no place in particular.

And to show how limited the town’s horizons are:

Mrs. Gibbs: Only it seems to me that once in your life before you die you ought to see a country where they don’t talk in English and don’t even want to.

Pace as well as place is vital to “Our Town.” “It sneaks up on you if it’s done well,” said Tom Frey. “It’s cumulative.” Moved along too quickly it becomes a “That’s Life” slide show. Too slowly and the humdrum becomes a drumbeat and the narrow horizons close in. Which is the reason that it’s the only play I know where the intermissions are an integral part of the performance. Between going to the bathroom, getting a cold drink, and sneaking a smoke, each act has to be digested or the mind isn’t ready for the next.

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Actors Kate Kenney, Steven Michael Walters, Kraig Swartz, Gordon Clapp, K.P. Powell and cast prepare for a wedding in Grover’s Corners.

“It’s a masterpiece,” said Tom. “Wilder gets there before we do. It’s always different.” Different with every production, and different to every member of the audience. Sad, maybe, to the young. Admonishing to the middle-aged. And for those of us who are getting old it is, as Tom Frey put it, “Life-affirming in a rough-edged way.” But you can see “Our Town” any number of times at any period in life and have every one of those feelings and many more, sometimes (this time) all at once. One thing that doesn’t change is Peterborough’s love of “Our Town.” Some local boosterism is involved, no doubt. Wilder spent time in June 1937 at Peterborough’s MacDowell Colony artists’ retreat and drew inspiration from his whereabouts. But he’d been making notes for the play since the early 1930s when he lived in Chicago, and he wrote the last act in Zurich. Wilder de-localizes Peterborough, which 50

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was in fact a prosperous mill town with environs that had been a summer retreat for Boston’s prosperous since well back into the 19th century. His attempt to catch the New Hampshire way of speaking is approximate at best. (“I declare” could stand to be said a bit less often.) He has the Stage Manager give us a longitude and latitude that would put us out in the ocean off Rockport, Massachusetts. He moves Mount Monadnock from west to east, either on a whim or for the vague religious symbolism that Wilder slipped into his play. He pushes the dates on the cemetery headstones back a century, perhaps to prolong eternity or to tease the town for its torpor. He doesn’t do a flattering sketch of “Our Town.”

Lady in a Box Seat: Oh, Mr. Webb? Mr. Webb, is there any culture or love of beauty in Grover’s Corners? Mr. Webb: Well, ma’am, there ain’t much ...

In fact, Peterborough is soaked like its weather this summer with culture and love of beauty. It is home to America’s first tax-supported free library, founded in 1833 and recently restored and expanded. The MacDowell Colony fed and sheltered Thornton Wilder. The Peterborough Players have performed “Our Town” eight times, starting in 1940 when it was fresh off Broadway. There is the Mariposa Museum and World Culture Center, live music and other performances at the Peterborough Town Hall, and a lecture series, the Monadnock Summer Lyceum. Downtown Peterborough is filled with restaurants, cafes, art galleries and antique shops. We have a first-rate, first-run movie theater, a ski resort just 15 minutes up the road, and what is to my mind the best bookstore in the state, The Toadstool Bookshop. All this did not spring from the Grover’s Corners we see on stage. I asked Tom Frey,


Top: The author and other audience members engrossed with Wilder’s eternal question: “Do people ever realize life while they live it? Every, every minute?” Center left: Assistant Stage Manager Vanessa C. Hart prepares the stage between acts. Center right: From left, Stage Manager Julia Perez, Second Company member Thendral Prabu and sound engineer Alex Trombly of AMT Productions run the technical aspects of the production. Bottom: In a moment echoing the play’s famous ladders, Players photographer Eric Rothhaus takes a picture while Artistic Director Tom Frey looks on. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 51


Mourners gather for a funeral in “Our Town.” During one evening’s performance a light rain began during the scene, almost as if cued by the Stage Manager.

52

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“Yes, an awful lot of sorrow has sort of quieted down up here.” The cast of “Our Town” embarks on the all-important third act — Gregory Coulter, Bridget Beirne, Daniel Velez, Kraig Swartz, Aliah Whitmore, Moses Fisher, K.P. Powell, Erick Pinnick, Tracey Conyer Lee, Steven Michael Walters, Bradley Baker, and Philip Kershaw.

“How connected to Peterborough is ‘Our Town?’” He said, “Deeply — and not at all.” Here the award for depth of feeling goes not to Thornton Wilder for embracing Peterborough but to Peterborough for embracing his play. And, in a larger paradox, America loves “Our Town” too. According to the program notes, the play “is performed at least once each day somewhere in this country.” Yet the play is hardly American in style. It’s a severe piece of high modernism with a minimalist purity and various openings and closings of the fourth wall that still surprise 83 years after it was first performed. We Americans like a busy stage with singing and dancing “for those who think they have to have singing and dancing.” Wilder was inspired by Japanese Noh theatre and Chinese opera. (You call that singing?) Nor is “Our Town” American in form. There are no heroic strivings, no villainous schemes, no melodramas, no triumphs, no furious angers, no Carl Sandberg stormy, husky, brawling big shoulders, no Walt Whitman bear hug given to our wild and motley nation. Thornton Wilder was a high modernist to a fault — a great admirer of Gertrude Stein’s daunting work and obsessed with the supposed splendors of James

Joyce’s impenetrable “Finnegans Wake.” Wilder, however, had things modernism lacked even when it was still very modern and in mode: A contention against absurdity, a willingness to engage in wisdom’s hide-and-seek, and a discernable message. As Tom Frey put it, “It strikes one of the deepest chords you can strike — makes us realize that we’re not living life every minute.” And the more mundane the moment,

the more we should realize it’s a treasure. Of course, if we were to fully make that realization, we’d be insufferable — emptying the dishwasher with a thrill, rapturously ironing shirt collars, relishing each fill-up at the gas station, and stopping not only to smell the roses but to sniff the garden manure and bug spray with equal gusto. But humankind has behaved in far more insufferable ways than that. The “Our Town” approach might be worth a try. NH

“You get a good rest, too. Good night.” The cast applauds Gordon Clapp at curtain call. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 53


Congratulations to our 2022 BEST LAWYERS

4 Lawyers of the Year | 13 Best Lawyers | 2 Ones to Watch 2022 Best Lawyers

Edward M. Kaplan

Christopher J. Pyles Margaret H. Nelson

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Lawyers of the year

Beth G. Catenza

Melissa M. Hanlon

Peter A. Meyer

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Elise H. Salek

ones to watch Peter A. Meyer

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New Hampshire | Massachusetts | Maine | Rhode Island | Connecticut Sulloway.com | Info@Sulloway.com | 603-223-2800

Trusted Advisors for Changing Times


The

Best Lawyers in the Granite State

Every year the national polling firm Woodward/White performs its exhaustive search for the country’s top attorneys and publishes the results in one comprehensive volume:

“The Best Lawyers in America.” The 28th edition, for 2022, has just been completed. Here is the New Hampshire contingent, plus we asked nine “Lawyers of the Year” to share a favorite quotation and to tell us why they love what they do. PORTRAITS BY KENDAL J. BUSH

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

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• 2022

The List

Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

Administrative/ Regulatory Law

Banking and Finance Law

Bruce W. Felmly McLane Middleton

Kristin A. Mendoza Abridge Law

Kristin A. Mendoza Abridge Law

Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Littleton / (603) 444-4008 primmer.com

Wilbur A. Glahn III McLane Middleton

Julie R. Morse Orr & Reno

Lyndsee D. Paskalis Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken

Steven M. Gordon Shaheen & Gordon

James F. Raymond Upton & Hatfield

Jon B. Sparkman Devine Millimet & Branch

Cathy J. Green Shaheen & Gordon

Jeffrey J. Zellers Annis & Zellers

Collaborative Law: Family Law

Denise J. Deschenes Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

George W. Roussos Orr & Reno

Camille Holton DiCroce Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Gregory H. Smith McLane Middleton

Christopher M. Dube McLane Middleton

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Appellate Practice

W. John Funk Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com

William L. Chapman Orr & Reno Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Doreen F. Connor Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Michael A. Delaney McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Samantha Elliott Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Bruce W. Felmly McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Wilbur A. Glahn McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Jon Meyer Backus, Meyer & Branch

Manchester / (603) 244-3282 backusmeyer.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Mary Elizabeth Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Arbitration

Charles P. Bauer Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Margaret R. Kerouac Orr & Reno Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

William A. Mulvey Mulvey, Cornell & Mulvey

Portsmouth / (603) 431-1333 mulveymediation.com

56

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY specialty and attorney’s name

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

James F. Raymond Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

David P. Van Der Beken Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law Joseph A. Foster McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

William S. Gannon William S. Gannon

Manchester / (603) 621-0833 wgannon.com

Matthew R. Johnson Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Steven M. Notinger Notinger Law

Nashua / (603) 888-0803 notingerlaw.com

John M. Sullivan Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Bet-the-Company Litigation

Doreen F. Connor Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

James Q. Shirley Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

James C. Wheat Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Business Organizations (including LLCs and Partnerships) Sabrina Beavens Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Nashua / (603) 966-7634 abridgelaw.com Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com Concord / (603) 224-5800 anniszellers.com

Civil Rights Law

Jon Meyer Backus, Meyer & Branch

Manchester / (603) 244-3282 backusmeyer.com

Kirk C. Simoneau Red Sneaker Law

Manchester / (603) 669-5000 redsneakerlaw.com

Lawrence A. Vogelman Shaheen & Gordon Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Closely Held Companies and Family Businesses Law Matthew H. Benson Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Steve Cohen Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Peter Cline Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Tabitha Croscut Devine Millimet & Branch

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

David K. Fries Cleveland, Waters and Bass

David K. Fries Cleveland, Waters and Bass

Dodd S. Griffith Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Colleen Lyons Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Colleen Lyons Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Angela B. Martin Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Nashua / (603) 966-7634 abridgelaw.com Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Tracey Goyette Cote Shaheen & Gordon Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Margaret R. Kerouac Orr & Reno Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Debbie Martin-Demers Rousseau Law and Mediation Pembroke / (603) 715-2824 rousseaulawnh.com

Katherine Morneau Morneau Law

Nashua / (603) 943-5647 morneaulaw.com

Catherine E. Shanelaris Shanelaris & Schirch Nashua / (603) 594-8300 sandslawfirm.com

Kimberly Weibrecht Weibrecht Law Dover / (603) 842-5525 weibrechtlaw.com

Commercial Finance Law

Martin J. Baroff Baroff & Craven

Manchester / (603) 647-4200 bclawnh.com

Timothy E. Britain Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Peter F. Burger Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Peter Cline Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Camille Holton DiCroce Devine Millimet & Branch Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Dodd S. Griffith Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com


• 2022 Margaret E. Probish Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Commercial Litigation

Gary M. Burt Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Peter G. Callaghan Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

“Sometimes you have to be a lion, to be the lamb you really are.” — Dave Chappelle, quoting his mother Yvonne Seon

Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Robert S. Carey Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Peter S. Cowan Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Brian Cullen CullenCollimore

Nashua / (603) 881-5500 cullencollimore.com

Daniel Deane Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Michael A. Delaney McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Daniel M. Deschenes Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Steven J. Dutton McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Samantha Elliott Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Bruce W. Felmly McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Wilbur A. Glahn McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Jamie N. Hage Hage Hodes

Manchester / (603) 668-2222 hagehodes.com

Scott H. Harris McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Donna J. Brown

Wadleigh, Starr and Peters Criminal Defense: General Practice

James P. Harris Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Courtney H. G. Herz Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

“The criminal justice system doesn’t lean toward justice on its own — it must be coaxed in the direction of justice by fierce criminal defense lawyers. I love what I do because I love working with my clients to fight for a just result.” nhmagazine.com | November 2021 57


• 2022

“The courts of this country should not be the places where resolution of disputes begins. They should be the places where the disputes end after alternative methods of resolving disputes have been considered and tried.” — Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

Russell F. Hilliard Upton & Hatfield

Portsmouth / (603) 436-7046 uptonhatfield.com

Ralph F. Holmes McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Ovide M. Lamontagne Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Robert R. Lucic Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Daniel P. Luker Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Kathleen M. Mahan Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Marc W. McDonald Ford, McDonald, McPartlin & Borden Portsmouth / (603) 373-1600 fordassociatespa.com

David W. McGrath Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Robert H. Miller Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Gregory A. Moffett Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

James F. Ogorchock Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Thomas J. Pappas Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Margaret R. Kerouac Orr & Reno Family Law

“For the last 20 years, my niche has been high-asset and complex divorce cases. It’s interesting and intellectually challenging work. I feel extremely fortunate to have such a practice. While I will always cultivate and continue my litigation practice, what I enjoy most is helping clients resolve their cases in a private, cooperative and dignified way whenever reasonably possible, mostly through collaborative law and mediation. I enjoy the nature of those cases, and the clients enjoy the faster, creative, client-driven results and the civility of the process. It is incredibly satisfying to help good people through one of the most difficult times of their lives in a way that minimizes financial, emotional and other forms of damage.” 58

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Jennifer L. Parent McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Michael A. Pignatelli Rath Young Pignatelli Nashua / (603) 889-9952 rathlaw.com

Michael D. Ramsdell Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

David W. Rayment Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com


• 2022 Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Mark C. Rouvalis McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Kierstan Schultz Nixon Peabody

“Cross-examination is the greatest legal engine ever invented for the discovery of truth.” — John H. Wigmore

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Jonathan M. Shirley CullenCollimore Nashua / (603) 881-5500 cullencollimore.com

James Q. Shirley Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Donald Lee Smith Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Frank P. Spinella Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Robert A. Stein The Stein Law Firm

Concord / (603) 228-1109 steinlawpllc.com

Mary Elizabeth Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Jeremy T. Walker McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

James C. Wheat Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Jack S. White Welts, White & Fontaine Nashua / (603) 883-0797 lawyersnh.com

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Commercial Transactions/UCC Law

Timothy E. Britain Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Gary M. Burt

Charles F. Cleary Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Litigation — Insurance

Peter Cline Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

“My specialty is trial work, specifically civil trials. The primary reason I enjoy what I do is the people I meet and represent along the way. I have encountered thousands of clients with different experiences and concerns that provide intriguing issues in need of resolution. The second reason I enjoy what I do is the intellectual challenge involved in problem-solving within the often complex mosaic of the law. My clients typically present multiple issues that need to be critically analyzed as we move forward toward a solution. They often need to present these problems to a jury of their peers, which allows me the opportunity to argue persuasively and imaginatively in a courtroom. There is nothing to compare to the thrill, challenge and, at times, fear of standing before twelve citizens of the state, marshalling evidence and argument, and convincing them of the justice of my client’s case.”

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Camille Holton DiCroce Devine Millimet & Branch Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

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• 2022 Edmond J. Ford Ford, McDonald, McPartlin & Borden

“There is no shortcut to life. To the end of our days, life is a lesson imperfectly learned.” — Harrison Salisbury

Portsmouth / (603) 373-1600 fordassociatespa.com

David K. Fries Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

James D. Kerouac Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Caroline K. Leonard Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Construction Law Kevin Collimore CullenCollimore

Nashua / (603) 881-5500 cullencollimore.com

Daniel M. Deschenes Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Kelly J. Gagliuso Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Richard C. Gagliuso Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Matthew R. Johnson Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Bruce J. Marshall Bruce Marshall Law Bow / (603) 715-8720 marshalllawnh.com

Thomas J. Pappas Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Kenneth E. Rubinstein Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Frank P. Spinella Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Jeremy T. Walker McLane Middleton

Angela B. Martin

Devine Millimet & Branch Closely Held Companies and Family Businesses Law “As co-chair of our firm’s Mergers and Acquisitions Practice Group, I am involved in many of our firm’s M&A deals. I thrive on structuring an M&A transaction that is perhaps the most important financial decision of a client’s lifetime. In doing so, I can appreciate the many sacrifices of long days, missed family time, financial risks and lessons learned while building their business. One of my greatest professional pleasures is to see my clients reap the financial rewards of a lifetime of hard work. The successful closing of a transaction represents not only the end of a very long and eventful chapter in their lives, but also the beginning of a new one.” 60

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Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Consumer Protection Law

Christine M. Craig Shaheen & Gordon

Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Copyright Law

Daniel J. Bourque Bourque & Associates

Manchester / (603) 623-5111 nhpatlaw.com

Michael J. Bujold Davis & Bujold

Concord / (603) 226-7490 nhpat.com


• 2022 James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Mark A. Wright McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Corporate Compliance Law

Michael A. Delaney McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

“The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor.” – Vince Lombardi

Corporate Governance Law

Stephen Gould Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Corporate Law

Erik T. Barstow Integral Business Counsel

Portsmouth / (603) 766-0408 integralcounsel.com

John P. Beals Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Matthew H. Benson Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

John Bentas McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Peter F. Burger Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Steven M. Burke McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Christopher M. Candon Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Patrick C. Closson McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Steve Cohen Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Anthony Delyani McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Joseph A. DiBrigida Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

Christopher Cole

Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Employment Law — Individuals “Among other things, I represent individuals and businesses involved in employment disputes, boards of directors involved in governance disputes, and employers dealing with the sudden and suspicious departures of key employees. And these sorts of honors are nice recognition that, among clients and peers, you are doing a good job explaining and advocating for the client. But the reality — for me, anyway — is that I am surrounded by terrific lawyers committed to responsiveness to the client’s needs and excellence in our written work and arguments to the courts. I am just incredibly grateful I work for a law firm that includes so many — too many to list — skilled trial lawyers and serious thinkers on whom I can rely.” nhmagazine.com | November 2021 61


• 2022 Michael J. Drooff Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Christopher M. Dube McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Joseph A. Foster McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

David K. Fries Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Benjamin F. Gayman Devine Millimet & Branch

“Today is a great day to have a great day.” — Author unknown

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Dodd S. Griffith Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Jamie N. Hage Hage Hodes

Manchester / (603) 668-2222 hagehodes.com

Dennis J. Haley McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Susan B. Hollinger Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Mary Susan Leahy McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Simon C. Leeming Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Daniel P. Luker Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Colleen Lyons Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

J. Daniel Marr Hamblett & Kerrigan

Patrick C. Closson

McLane Middleton Mergers and Acquisitions Law “I enjoy learning about and helping people. As a corporate lawyer, I get to work with business owners and learn about their businesses, their people, their goals and their challenges. I am a curious person and enjoy learning how things work and get done. As a trusted advisor to my clients, I get the opportunity to sit at the table with them and help them achieve their goals and work though their challenges. While no day is the same, every day I get the opportunity to work with great people on challenging issues and, I hope, in some small way, make a difference.” 62

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Nashua / (603) 883-5501 nashualaw.com

Angela B. Martin Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Mark S. McCue Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”


THE BEST LAWYERS – YEAR AFTER YEAR MARK A. ABRAMSON

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs – Personal Injury litigation – Plaintiffs

KEVIN F. DUGAN

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs – Personal Injury litigation – Plaintiffs

JARED R. GREEN

Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs and Product Liability Litigation – Plaintiffs

HOLLY B. HAINES

Medical Malpractice Law – Plaintiffs and Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs

“2022 Lawyer of the Year – Medical Malpractice – Plaintiffs – Manchester, NH” EVA H. BLEICH

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs

NICK ABRAMSON + ELIE MAALOUF

Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs and Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs

“The Ones to Watch”

THE PRACTICE FOR MALPRACTICE. 1819 Elm Street, Manchester, NH (603) 627-1819 Fax: (603) 666-4227 www.arbd.com


• 2022

“Wisdom too often never comes, and so one ought not to reject it merely because it comes late.” — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter

John R. Monson Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Daniel J. Norris McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Lyndsee D. Paskalis Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Robert Previti Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Scott E. Pueschel Pierce Atwood

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Michael D. Ruedig Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Jon B. Sparkman Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken

Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

John M. Sullivan Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Kara N. Sweeney Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Philip B. Taub Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Peter A. Meyer

Sulloway & Hollis Medical Malpractice — Defendants “I have been fortunate to have spent my entire legal career at Sulloway & Hollis. For more than three decades, I have been privileged to represent and defend hospitals, physicians and other healthcare providers all around the state in medical malpractice actions. These actions are emotionally trying for all parties, and physicians are no exception. When we successfully defend a physician at trial, they don’t forget. In November of 1999, I successfully defended a neurosurgeon in Manchester. I had not spoken with this physician since the trial. But on the 20th anniversary of that defense verdict, out of the blue, I received a voice message from the physician, thanking me for the help and support that I had given him years before. That’s why I love what I do.” 64

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Michael B. Tule McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

David P. Van Der Beken Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Kenneth A. Viscarello Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”



• 2022

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” — Plato

Criminal Defense: General Practice

Donna J. Brown Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Robert S. Carey Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Alan J. Cronheim Sisti Law Offices

Portsmouth / (603) 433-7117 sistilawoffices.com

Cathy J. Green Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Timothy M. Harrington Shaheen & Gordon Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Michael J. Iacopino Brennan Lenehan Iacopino & Hickey

Manchester / (603) 734-5461 brennanlenehan.com

Jaye L. Rancourt Brennan Lenehan Iacopino & Hickey

Manchester / (603) 734-5461 brennanlenehan.com

James D. Rosenberg Shaheen & Gordon Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Anthony Sculimbrene Gill and Sculimbrene Nashua /m(855) 645-2971 nhlaws.com

Mark L. Sisti Sisti Law Offices

Chichester / (603) 224-4220 sistilawoffices.com

Criminal Defense: White-Collar

Peter D. Anderson McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Donna J. Brown Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Robert S. Carey Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Mark S. McCue Hinkley Allen Health Care Law

“I was drawn to the legal profession because I enjoy helping others navigate challenges and achieve desired outcomes. For many years, my corporate practice has focused on health care and senior living. These two dynamic and intersecting industries allow me to help clients develop innovative new strategies, relationships and models for services. I am humbled by the opportunity to assist my clients in providing quality health care and making the lives of seniors more meaningful and enriching. In addition to being part of their team, I especially value the personal relationships I have developed throughout my career.” 66

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Alan J. Cronheim Sisti Law Offices

Portsmouth / (603) 433-7117 sistilawoffices.com

Steven M. Gordon Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Cathy J. Green Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”


57 MCLANE MIDDLETON ATTORNEYS WERE INCLUDED IN THE BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA© FOR 2022

PETER ANDERSON

JOHN BENTAS

ANDREW BOTTI

STEVEN BURKE

PATRICK CLOSSON

GEORGE CUSHING

MICHAEL DELANEY

ANTHONY DELYANI

DAVID DEPUY

DENIS DILLON

CHRIS DUBE

STEVEN DUTTON

BRUCE FELMLY

JOSEPH FOSTER

THOMAS GETZ

WILBUR GLAHN

ROLF GOODWIN

DENNIS HALEY

SCOTT HARRIS

THOMAS HILDRETH

RALPH HOLMES

JOHN HUGHES

LINDA JOHNSON

MARY SUSAN LEAHY

JACK MIDDLETON

DAVID MOYNIHAN

BARRY NEEDLEMAN

DANIEL NORRIS

PEG O’BRIEN

JENNIFER PARENT

CHRIS PAUL

MICHAEL QUINN

JOHN RICH

MARK ROUVALIS

RICHARD SAMUELS

SUSAN SCHORR

CAMERON SHILLING

GREGORY SMITH

JON STEFFENSEN

CHARLA STEVENS

MICHAEL TULE

JEREMY WALKER

ROBERT WELLS

DAVID WOLOWITZ

MARK WRIGHT

WILLIAM ZORN

THE BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA© ONES TO WATCH

JESSE ANGELEY

ALEXANDRA COTE

AMY DRAKE

ADAM DUMVILLE

VIGGO FISH

MANCHESTER, NH / CONCORD, NH / PORTSMOUTH, NH WOBURN, MA / BOSTON, MA

JACQUELINE LEARY

AMANDA QUINLAN

ANDREA SCHWEITZER

RAMEY SYLVESTER

REBECCA WALKLEY

CATHERINE YAO

MCLANE.COM


• 2022 Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Brian M. Quirk Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

James D. Rosenberg Shaheen & Gordon Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Anthony Sculimbrene Gill and Sculimbrene Nashua / (855) 645-2971 nhlaws.com

Mark L. Sisti Sisti Law Offices

Chichester / (603) 224-4220 sistilawoffices.com

Phil Waystack Waystack Frizzell

Colebrook / (603) 237-8322 waystackfrizzell.com

DUI/DWI Defense

George T. Campbell George Campbell, Attorney at Law

Manchester / (603) 787-5364 georgetcampbell.com

Theodore Lothstein Lothstein Guerriero Concord / (603) 513-1919 nhdefender.com

James D. Rosenberg Shaheen & Gordon Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Education Law

Michael A. Delaney McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Dean B. Eggert Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Linda S. Johnson McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Kathleen C. Peahl Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Gerald M. Zelin Drummond Woodsum

Portsmouth / (603) 433-3317 dwmlaw.com

Elder Law

Christine S. Anderson Ansell & Anderson Bedford / (603) 644-8211 ansellpa.com

Tina L. Annis Annis & Zellers

Virginia Symmes Sheehan Flood, Sheehan & Tobin

Edward M. Kaplan Sulloway & Hollis

Judith L. Bomster Butenhof & Bomster

Laura Tetrault Barradale, O’Connell, Newkirk & Dwyer

C. Kevin Leonard Douglas, Leonard & Garvey

Concord / (603) 224-5800 anniszellers.com Manchester / (603) 296-0428 butenhofbomster.com

Ann N. Butenhof Butenhof & Bomster

Manchester / (603) 296-0428 butenhofbomster.com

David R. Craig David R. Craig & Associates

New Boston / (603) 487-3915 craiglawoffice.com

Ann Meissner Flood Flood, Sheehan & Tobin

Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

Jan P. Myskowski Myskowski & Matthews

Concord / (603) 227-6342 mmlawnh.com

Kathleen M. Robinson Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly

Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

Andrea L. Sennott Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly

Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Concord / (603) 224-1988 nhlawoffice.com

Bedford / (603) 644-0275 bondpa.com

David W. McGrath Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

John E. Rich McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Employment Law — Individuals

Jon Meyer Backus, Meyer & Branch

Manchester / (603) 244-3282 backusmeyer.com

Richard E. Molan Molan Law Office

Heather M. Burns Upton & Hatfield

Manchester / (603) 206-5470 molanlaw.com

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Francis G. Murphy Shaheen & Gordon

Kathleen A Davidson Pastori Krans

Terri Pastori Pastori Krans

Lauren S. Irwin Upton & Hatfield

Christopher J. Pyles Sulloway & Hollis

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 635-4099 shaheengordon.com

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

The best lawyer is the one who fights tirelessly on your behalf. Congratulations to our attorneys recognized this year by Best Lawyers® in America!

Steven M. Gordon

James D. Rosenberg Lawyer of the Year

Benjamin Siracusa Hillman

Christine M. Craig

Timothy M. Harrington

D. Michael Noonan

William H. Shaheen

Francis G. Murphy

Peter W. Schroeter Lawyer of the Year

Randall E. Smith

Brian M. Quirk Lawyer of the Year

Concord • Dover • Manchester • Nashua • Portland

68

Tracey Goyette Cote

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Cathy J. Green

Lucy J. Karl

It’s different here

Lawrence A. Vogelman

Anthony Carr Ones to Watch

shaheengordon.com


• 2022

Employment Law — Management

Elizabeth A. Bailey Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Mark T. Broth Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Andrea G. Chatfield Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Thomas M. Closson Jackson Lewis

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Anna B. Cole Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Beth A. Deragon Pastori Krans

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

Debra Weiss Ford Jackson Lewis

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Lauren S. Irwin Upton & Hatfield

Kathleen C. Peahl Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Linda S. Johnson McLane Middleton

Christopher J. Pyles Sulloway & Hollis

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Edward M. Kaplan Sulloway & Hollis

Elizabeth K. Rattigan Downs Rachlin Martin

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

David W. McGrath Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Jennifer Shea Moeckel Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Lebanon / (603) 448-2211 drm.com

James P. Reidy Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Donald Lee Smith Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Margaret A. O’Brien McLane Middleton

Charla Bizios Stevens McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

James A. O’Shaughnessy Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Jennifer L. Parent McLane Middleton

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Terri Pastori Pastori Krans

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

Martha Van Oot Jackson Lewis

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Energy Law

Robert P. Cheney Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Concord / (603) 223-2020 sheehan.com

Mark W. Dean Mark Dean

Concord / (603) 230-9955 mdeanlaw.net

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

M. Curtis Whittaker Rath Young Pignatelli

Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Energy Regulatory Law

Susan S. Geiger Orr & Reno

Thomas B. Getz McLane Middleton

Thomas B. Getz McLane Middleton

M. Curtis Whittaker Rath Young Pignatelli

Barry Needleman McLane Middleton

Environmental Law

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com

Margaret H. Nelson Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Douglas L. Patch Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Mark E. Beliveau Pierce Atwood

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Robert P. Cheney Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Concord / (603) 223-2020 sheehan.com

Barry Needleman McLane Middleton

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

Morneau Law

M

orneau Law is a boutique law firm in southern New Hampshire helping individuals with estate planning, probate and family law. We are celebrating Morneau Law’s selection as Best Lawyers 2022. The Morneau Law team handles a variety of matters, including, divorces, estate planning, adoptions, stepparent and grandparent rights, Medicaid applications, estate

administration and trust administration. Your privacy and integrity will be protected from the first moment you contact the firm. Your case will be handled professionally and in the most efficient manner possible. Come experience the Morneau Law difference, where you get the attention of a small firm, but the support of having a large experienced legal team.

We are located in beautiful downtown Nashua representing individuals in southern New Hampshire and estate planning clients in both New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 30 Temple St., Suite 503, Nashua (603) 943-5647 www.morneaulaw.com

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 69


• 2022 Michael J. Quinn McLane Middleton

R. David Depuy McLane Middleton

Stephen H. Roberts Hoefle, Phoenix, Gormley & Roberts

Judith A. Fairclough Orr & Reno

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com Portsmouth / (603) 436-0666 hpgrlaw.com

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Gregory H. Smith McLane Middleton

James V. Ferro Ferro Law & Mediation Group

Sherilyn Burnett Young Rath Young Pignatelli

Carolyn S. Garvey Douglas, Leonard & Garvey

Ethics and Professional Responsibility Law

Jaime I. Gillis Integral Business Counsel

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

William F. Gramer Devine Millimet & Branch

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Mitchell M. Simon Devine Millimet & Branch

Family Law

Manchester / (603) 836-5400 ferrolawgroup.com Concord / (603) 224-1988 nhlawoffice.com

Portsmouth / (603) 766-0408 integralcounsel.com Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Debbie Martin-Demers Rousseau Law and Mediation Pembroke / (603) 715-2824 rousseaulawnh.com

Katherine Morneau Morneau Law

Nashua / (603) 943-5647 morneaulaw.com

James F. Ogorchock Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Pamela A. Peterson Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

William J. Quinn Brennan Lenehan Iacopino & Hickey Manchester / (603) 734-5461 brennanlenehan.com

Ronald J. Caron Devine Millimet & Branch

Kathleen A. Hickey Brennan Lenehan Iacopino & Hickey

Kevin Rauseo Hamblett & Kerrigan

Tracey Goyette Cote Shaheen & Gordon

Margaret R. Kerouac Orr & Reno

L. Jonathan Ross Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer

Sara B. Crisp The Crisp Law Firm

Heather E. Krans Pastori Krans

Catherine E. Shanelaris Shanelaris & Schirch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Concord / (603) 225-5252 crisplaw.com

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Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Crystal M. Maldonado Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 734-5461 brennanlenehan.com Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Nashua / (603) 883-5501 nashualaw.com Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com Nashua / (603) 594-8300 sandslawfirm.com

Patrick J. Sheehan Sheehan Law Office

James V. Ferro Ferro Law & Mediation Group

Robert A. Stein The Stein Law Firm

Margaret R. Kerouac Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 715-2560 pjsheehan.com Concord / (603) 228-1109 steinlawpllc.com

James J. Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Mary Elizabeth Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Kimberly Weibrecht Weibrecht Law Dover / (603) 842-5525 weibrechtlaw.com

Anna Goulet Zimmerman Law Office of Manning & Zimmerman Manchester / (603) 624-7200 manningzimmermanlaw.com

Family Law Arbitration

James V. Ferro Ferro Law & Mediation Group Manchester / (603) 836-5400 ferrolawgroup.com

Family Law Mediation R. David Depuy McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 836-5400 ferrolawgroup.com Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

James J. Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Financial Services Regulation Law

Denise J. Deschenes Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Littleton / (603) 444-4008 primmer.com

W. John Funk Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com


• 2022 David P. Van Der Beken Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

First Amendment Law William L. Chapman Orr & Reno Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Jon Meyer Backus, Meyer & Branch

Manchester / (603) 244-3282 backusmeyer.com

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Thomas D. Rath Rath Young Pignatelli

Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

George W. Roussos Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Daniel Deane Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Government Relations Practice Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Jonathan A. Lax Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Mark S. McCue Hinckley Allen

Gregory H. Smith McLane Middleton

Lisa Snow Wade Orr & Reno

Health Care Law

Immigration Law

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 226-0400 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Susan T. Goff GoffWilson

Manchester / (603) 228-1277 goffwilson.com

Insurance Law

Mark T. Broth Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Gary M. Burt Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Doreen F. Connor Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Brian Cullen CullenCollimore

Nashua / (603) 881-5500 cullencollimore.com

Robert C. Dewhirst Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Patrick C. Closson McLane Middleton

Thomas W. Hildreth McLane Middleton

Gregory Eaton Hess Gehris Solutions

Jason D. Gregoire Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Mona T. Movafaghi Drummond Woodsum

Charles W. Grau Upton & Hatfield

Katherine M. Hanna Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

John R. Wilson GoffWilson

James V. Hatem Nixon Peabody

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

James V. Hatem Nixon Peabody

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Mark C. Rouvalis McLane Middleton

Beth G. Catenza Sulloway & Hollis

Franchise Law

Lucy J. Karl Shaheen & Gordon

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 228-1277 goffwilson.com

Concord / (603) 225-0477 hessgehris.com

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Russell F. Hilliard Upton & Hatfield

Portsmouth / (603) 436-7046 uptonhatfield.com

Steven J. Lauwers Rath Young Pignatelli

Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Adam R. Mordecai Morrison Mahoney

Manchester / (603) 622-3400 morrisonmahoney.com

Sarah S. Murdough Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Margaret H. Nelson Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Donald J. Pfundstein Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Concord / (603) 228-1181 / gcglaw.com

Stephen H. Roberts Hoefle, Phoenix, Gormley & Roberts Portsmouth / (603) 436-0666 hpgrlaw.com

George W. Roussos Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

is pleased to congratulate William C. Tucker, James C. Wheat, Ronald J. Lajoie, Marc R. Scheer, Gregory G. Peters, Frank P. Spinella, Jr., Dean B. Eggert, Kathleen C. Peahl, Charles F. Cleary, Todd J. Hathaway, and Donna J. Brown

for their continued recognized excellence and inclusion in

The Best Lawyers in America© 2022*

We also congratulate those who were named “Lawyer of the Year” James C. Wheat – Litigation – Construction Gregory C. Peters – Medical Malpractice Law – Defendants Donna J. Brown – Criminal Defense – General Practice 95 Market Street Manchester, NH 03101

(603) 669-4140 www.wadleighlaw.com

The �irm offers a full range of legal services

* Best Lawyers (Copyright 2021 by Woodward/White, Inc), the oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession, is based on an exhaustive annual peer-review survey and because lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor.

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 71


• 2022

Labor Law — Management Mark T. Broth Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Debra Weiss Ford Jackson Lewis

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Edward M. Kaplan Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

David W. McGrath Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

James A. O’Shaughnessy Drummond Woodsum Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Jennifer L. Parent McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Kathleen C. Peahl Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

James P. Reidy Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Cameron G. Shilling McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Charla Bizios Stevens McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Martha Van Oot Jackson Lewis

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Labor Law — Union Richard E. Molan Molan Law Office

Manchester / (603) 206-5470 molanlaw.com

Raymond P. D’Amante D’Amante Couser Pellerin & Associates

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Concord / (603) 224-6777 damantelaw.com

Roy W. Tilsley Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson

Philip M. Hastings Cleveland, Waters and Bass

Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

William C. Tucker Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Thomas W. Hildreth McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Legal Malpractice Law — Defendants

Morgan Hollis Gottesman & Hollis

William C. Saturley Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Concord / (603) 410-1500 / preti.com

Land Use and Zoning Law

Peter J. Loughlin Law Office of Peter J. Loughlin

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Gregory Michael Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson

Andrew Bauer Gottesman & Hollis

Mark E. Beliveau Pierce Atwood

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Timothy E. Britain Cleveland, Waters and Bass

Concord / (603) 224-7761 / cwbpa.com

Suzanne Brunelle Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Portsmouth / (603) 431-6466 pjllaw.com

Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Ari B. Pollack Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

John H. Sokul Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

very best.

The Best Lawyers in America®

Sabrina Beavens Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

William S. Gannon William S. Gannon

Manchester / (603) 621-0833 wgannon.com

Marc W. McDonald Ford, McDonald, McPartlin & Borden Portsmouth / (603) 373-1600 fordassociatespa.com

Steven M. Notinger Notinger Law

Nashua / (603) 888-0803 notingerlaw.com

James C. Wheat Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Thomas J. Pappas Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer

Litigation — Banking and Finance

Litigation — Construction

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Jeremy T. Walker McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Mark T. Broth

Drummond Woodsum is proud to congratulate our outstanding attorneys for truly being among New Hampshire’s

Litigation — Bankruptcy

Employment & Labor Law Insurance Law Insurance Litigation

Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Ronald D. Ciotti Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Daniel M. Deschenes Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Kelly J. Gagliuso Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

James A. O’Shaughnessy

Employment & Labor Law

Anna B. Cole

Matthew R. Serge

Employment Law

Municipal Litigation

Erin R. Feltes

Gerald M. Zelin

Insurance Litigation

Education Law

Mona T. Movafaghi Immigration Law

dwmlaw.com | 800.727.1941 | Manchester & Lebanon, NH

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• 2022 Richard C. Gagliuso Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Portsmouth / (603) 766-1686 dtclawyers.com

Ovide M. Lamontagne Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson

Frank P. Spinella Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Jeremy T. Walker McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

James C. Wheat Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Litigation — Insurance

Sherilyn Burnett Young Rath Young Pignatelli

Litigation — First Amendment

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Bow / (603) 715-8720 marshalllawnh.com

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Matthew R. Johnson Devine Millimet & Branch

Bruce J. Marshall Bruce Marshall Law

Lisa Snow Wade Orr & Reno

Michael J. Quinn McLane Middleton

Christopher D. Hawkins Donahue, Tucker & Ciandella

Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Litigation — Environmental

William L. Chapman Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 / orr-reno.com

Richard C. Gagliuso Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Steven M. Gordon Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Mark T. Broth Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Gary M. Burt Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Megan C. Carrier Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Doreen F. Connor Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Erin R. Feltes Drummond Woodsum

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Michael J. Bujold Davis & Bujold

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Concord / (603) 226-7490 nhpat.com

Melissa M. Hanlon Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Russell F. Hilliard Upton & Hatfield

Portsmouth / (603) 436-7046 uptonhatfield.com

Derek D. Lick Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Adam R. Mordecai Morrison Mahoney

Litigation — Health Care

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Manchester / (603) 622-3400 morrisonmahoney.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Gregory Eaton Hess Gehris Solutions

Adam B. Pignatelli Rath Young Pignatelli

Jonathan M. Eck Orr & Reno

Donald Lee Smith Devine Millimet & Branch

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Concord / (603) 225-0477 hessgehris.com

Adam B. Pignatelli Rath Young Pignatelli

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Deb Deb Ford Ford Deb Ford Deb Ford

Marty Marty Van Van Oot Oot Marty Van Oot Marty Van Oot

Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Tom Tom Closson Closson Tom Closson Tom Closson

Daniel J. Bourque Bourque & Associates

Manchester / (603) 623-5111 nhpatlaw.com

Charles W. Grau Upton & Hatfield

Robert C. Dewhirst Devine Millimet & Branch

Mark D. Attori Devine Millimet & Branch

Litigation — Intellectual Property

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Jamie N. Hage Hage Hodes

Manchester / (603) 668-2222 hagehodes.com

Kathleen M. Mahan Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Jonathan M. Shirley CullenCollimore Nashua / (603) 881-5500 cullencollimore.com

Jeremy T. Walker McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Kevin Kevin Sibbernsen Sibbernsen Kevin Sibbernsen Kevin Sibbernsen

Nancy Nancy Oliver Oliver Nancy Oliver Nancy Oliver

Kim Kim Sullivan Sullivan Josh Josh Scott Scott Sam Sam Martin Martin Kim Sullivan Josh Scott Sam Martin Kim Sullivan Josh Scott Sam Martin Jackson JacksonLewis Lewisis isdedicated dedicatedtotorepresenting representingmanagement managementexclusively exclusivelyin inworkplace workplacelaw. law.The Thefirm’s firm’srange rangeofof

Jackson Lewis is dedicated to representing management exclusively in workplace law. The firm’s range of Jackson Lewis is of dedicated to representing management exclusively inofworkplace law. The firm’s range of specialized specialized areas areas of practice practice provides provides the the resources resources toto to address address every every aspect aspect of the the employer/employee employer/employee relationship. relationship. specialized areas of practice provides the resources address every aspect of the employer/employee relationship. specialized areas of practice provides the resources to address every aspect of the employer/employee relationship. DD eDb rb arraW aW W eieseississFso ro drrd , d,M ,M M araatrhrtth ahaV aV aVn OO oOo to ,tt,T,T hTh oho m om m asaasM sM M . .C.C lC olo slosso ssso non , n,N ,N aNn cnyccyE y.EE.O.O lO iv rand KK .KJ. .oJJo sohssh uhu auaSaS cSo to ttttwere t were and were recognized recognized inin in eeb FFo aann aan lile vivreerand cco recognized Dthe ethe br2021 a 2021 WeEdition issEdition Fordof ,M aChambers r tha Van USA. OUSA. ot, TDheD obe m arsW M .sesC lsooFsrso ord n,was Na nalso cynamed E.named OliveLawyer r Lawyer . Jof osthe huYear aYear Scby otby tBest and Kof were recognized in r b a a W e i i s F d of Chambers was also the Best Lawyers. Lawyers. the 2021 Edition of Chambers USA. Debra Weiss Ford was also named Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers. the 2021 Edition of Chambers USA. Debra Weiss Ford was also named Lawyer of the Year by Best Lawyers.

Jackson Jackson Lewis Lewis P.C. P.C.● ●●100 100 International International Drive Drive● ●●Portsmouth, Portsmouth, NH NH● ●●603-559-2700 603-559-2700● ●●www.jacksonlewis.com www.jacksonlewis.com Jackson Lewis P.C. 100 International Drive Portsmouth, NH 603-559-2700 www.jacksonlewis.com Jackson Lewis P.C. ● 100 International Drive ● Portsmouth, NH ● 603-559-2700 ● www.jacksonlewis.com nhmagazine.com | November 2021 73


• 2022 Mark A. Wright McLane Middleton

James F. Laboe Orr & Reno

Charla Bizios Stevens McLane Middleton

Robert H. Miller Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Matthew R. Serge Drummond Woodsum

Litigation — Labor and Employment

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

Martha Van Oot Jackson Lewis

Jennifer L. Parent McLane Middleton

Litigation — Patent

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Adam R. Mordecai Morrison Mahoney

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Ari B. Pollack Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Thomas J. Pappas Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer

Litigation — Land Use and Zoning

Thomas Quarles Devine Millimet & Branch

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

John H. Sokul Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Elizabeth A. Bailey Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Manchester / (603) 622-3400 morrisonmahoney.com

Heather M. Burns Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Thomas M. Closson Jackson Lewis

Terri Pastori Pastori Krans

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Concord / (603) 369-4769 pastorikrans.com

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Christopher J. Pyles Sulloway & Hollis

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Debra Weiss Ford Jackson Lewis

Elizabeth K. Rattigan Downs Rachlin Martin

Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com

Lebanon / (603) 448-2211 drm.com

Charles W. Grau Upton & Hatfield

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Lauren S. Irwin Upton & Hatfield

Cameron G. Shilling McLane Middleton

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com Portsmouth / (603) 559-2700 jacksonlewis.com Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Robert S. Carey Orr & Reno

Christopher Cole Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Morgan Hollis Gottesman & Hollis

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Gregory Michael Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Litigation — Municipal Barton L. Mayer Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Manchester / (603) 716-2895 dwmlaw.com

Daniel J. Bourque Bourque & Associates

Manchester / (603) 623-5111 nhpatlaw.com

Jamie N. Hage Hage Hodes

Manchester / (603) 668-2222 hagehodes.com

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Litigation — Real Estate Timothy E. Britain Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Gregory Michael Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

James E. Morris Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Thomas Quarles Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Excellence recognized by our peers Peter F. Burger

Robert S. Carey

William L. Chapman

Jonathan M. Eck

Judith A. Fairclough

Susan S. Geiger

Margaret R. Kerouac

James F. Laboe

James E. Morris

Julie R. Morse

Douglas L. Patch

George W. Roussos

Lisa Snow Wade

Congratulations to our thirteen colleagues for being listed among The Best Lawyers in America®. Additionally we would like to congratulate Peter F. Burger, Robert S. Carey and Margaret R. Kerouac for being selected a “Lawyer of the Year”. 603.224.2381 | www.orr-reno.com | Concord, NH

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Sustained Excellence Since 1946


• 2022 Roy W. Tilsley Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson

Elise H. Salek Sulloway & Hollis

Kathryn H. Michaelis Rath Young Pignatelli

Dennis T. Ducharme Ducharme Resolutions

Todd J. Hathaway Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Litigation — Securities

Benjamin Siracusa Hillman Shaheen & Gordon

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

James V. Ferro Ferro Law & Mediation Group

wadleighlaw.com Ronald J. Lajoie Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Robert A. Stein The Stein Law Firm

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions — Defendants

Melinda Gehris Hess Gehris Solutions

Peter A. Meyer Sulloway & Hollis

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Russell F. Hilliard Upton & Hatfield

Pete W. Mosseau Devine Millimet & Branch

William A. Mulvey Mulvey, Cornell & Mulvey

Gregory G. Peters Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Medical Malpractice Law — Defendants

Michael A. Pignatelli Rath Young Pignatelli

D. Michael Noonan Shaheen & Gordon

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

William N. Smart Morrison Mahoney

Mediation

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Arnold Rosenblatt Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Litigation — Trusts and Estates Thomas C. Csatari Downs Rachlin Martin

Lebanon / (603) 448-2211 / drm.com

Andrea L. Daly Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

David P. Eby Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Ralph F. Holmes McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Pamela J. Newkirk Barradale, O’Connell, Newkirk & Dwyer

Bedford / (603) 644-0275 bondpa.com

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com Concord / (603) 819-4231 shaheengordon.com Concord / (603) 228-1109 steinlawpllc.com

R. James Steiner Steiner Law

Concord / (603) 345-6440 jimsteinerlaw.com

David Wolowitz McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Litigation and Controversy — Tax

William F. J. Ardinger Rath Young Pignatelli Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Peter T. Beach Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

David F. Conley David F. Conley

Concord / (603) 224-4324 dfconley.com

Congratulations to our eight colleagues who were selected by their peers for inclusion in the 2022 edition of The Best Lawyers in America®.

Concord | Nashua | Boston | Montpelier

Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 935-7292 ducharmeresolutions.com Manchester / (603) 836-5400 ferrolawgroup.com

Pete W. Mosseau Devine Millimet & Branch

Concord / (603) 225-0477 hessgehris.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Portsmouth / (603) 436-7046 uptonhatfield.com

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions — Plaintiffs

Portsmouth / (603) 431-1333 mulveymediation.com

Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Mark D. Attori Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Christine M. Craig Shaheen & Gordon

Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Charles P. Bauer Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Beth G. Catenza Sulloway & Hollis

Melissa M. Hanlon Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Thomas D. Rath

Manchester / (603) 669-4140

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com Nashua / (603) 889-9952 rathlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 622-3400 morrisonmahoney.com

Lisa Snow Wade Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

Sherilyn Burnett Young

Michael A. Pignatelli

William F.J. Ardinger

M. Curtis Whittaker

Steven J. Lauwers

Kathryn H. Michaelis

Adam B. Pignatelli

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 75


• 2022

Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs

Holly B. Haines Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Tabitha Croscut Devine Millimet & Branch

Scott E. Pueschel Pierce Atwood

Barton L. Mayer Upton & Hatfield

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Ralph F. Holmes McLane Middleton

Michael J. Drooff Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Mark H. Puffer Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Kara N. Sweeney Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Nonprofit/ Charities Law

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Mark A. Abramson Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Eva H. Bleich Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Maureen Raiche Manning Law Office of Manning & Zimmerman

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Thomas W. Braun Moquin & Daley

Manchester / (603) 624-7200 manningzimmermanlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 669-9400 moquindaley.com

Michael P. Rainboth Coughlin, Rainboth, Murphy & Lown

Heather M. Burns Upton & Hatfield

Portsmouth / (603) 431-1993 nhtrialattorneys.com

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Peter T. Beach Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Kevin F. Dugan Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Susan B. Hollinger Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell

Angela B. Martin Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Names highlighted in red were selected by Woodward/White as “Lawyers of the Year.”

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Steve Cohen Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 623-1234 beliveau-fradette.com

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Colleen Lyons Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Richard E. Fradette Beliveau, Fradette & Gallant

Stephen Gould Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Patrick C. Closson McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Dennis J. Haley McLane Middleton

Mergers and Acquisitions Law

R. David Depuy McLane Middleton

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Daniel J. Norris McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Philip B. Taub Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Michael B. Tule McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

David P. Van Der Beken Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Municipal Law

Dean B. Eggert Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Peter J. Loughlin Law Office of Peter J. Loughlin Portsmouth / (603) 431-6466 pjllaw.com

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Bradford E. Cook Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Benjamin F. Gayman Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Rolf E. Goodwin McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Jon B. Sparkman Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Robert A. Wells McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Patent Law

Daniel J. Bourque Bourque & Associates

Manchester / (603) 623-5111 nhpatlaw.com

S E V E N U P TO N & H AT F I E L D AT TO R N E YS L I S T E D A M O N G

B E S T L AW Y E R S I N A M E R I C A

LAWYER OF THE YEAR

LAWYER OF THE YEAR Employment Law — Management

Employment Law — Individuals

HEATHER M. BURNS

Employment Law, Litigation and Medical Malpractice Law

CHARLES W. GRAU

Insurance Law and Litigation

LAWYER OF THE YEAR

Personal Injury Litigation — Plaintiffs

BARTON L. MAYER

Litigation and Municipal Law

uptonhatfield.com law@uptonhatfield.com

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MICHAEL S. MCGRATH Personal Injury Litigation

Concord 603-224-7791

LAUREN S. IRWIN

Employment Law and Litigation

LAWYER OF THE YEAR Banking & Finance Law

JAMES F. RAYMOND

Banking and Finance Law, Business Organizations and Real Estate Law

Hillsborough 603-464-5578

RUSSEL F. HILLIARD

Commercial Litigation, Insurance Law and Litigation Mediation

Peterborough 603-924-3864

Portsmouth 603-436-7046


• 2022 Michael J. Bujold Davis & Bujold

John Edward Durkin Burns, Bryant, Cox, Rockefeller & Durkin

Concord / (603) 226-7490 nhpat.com

Dover / (603) 742-2332 burnsbryant.com

Stephen R. Finch Finch & Maloney

Gregory Eaton Hess Gehris Solutions

Manchester / (603) 622-8456 finchmaloney.com

Peter A. Nieves Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Personal Injury Litigation — Defendants

Gary M. Burt Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Todd J. Hathaway Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

David W. Johnston Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Ronald J. Lajoie Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Robert S. Carey Orr & Reno

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Derek D. Lick Sulloway & Hollis

Robert C. Dewhirst Devine Millimet & Branch

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Adam R. Mordecai Morrison Mahoney

Dennis T. Ducharme Ducharme Resolutions

Manchester / (603) 622-3400 morrisonmahoney.com

Manchester / (603) 935-7292 ducharmeresolutions.com

Daniel Duckett The Law Office of Daniel Duckett Manchester / (603) 836-5800 dduckettlaw.com

Concord / (603) 225-0477 hessgehris.com

Pete W. Mosseau Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Michael A. Pignatelli Rath Young Pignatelli

R. David Depuy McLane Middleton

Benjamin R. Hiller Moquin & Daley

Marc R. Scheer Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Charles G. Douglas Douglas, Leonard & Garvey

Ralph F. Holmes McLane Middleton

Lisa Snow Wade Orr & Reno

Kevin F. Dugan Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Michael J. Iacopino Brennan Lenehan Iacopino & Hickey

Nashua / (603) 889-9952 rathlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com Concord / (603) 224-1988 nhlawoffice.com

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Personal Injury Litigation — Plaintiffs

Bruce W. Felmly McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Richard E. Fradette Beliveau, Fradette & Gallant

Mark A. Abramson Abramson, Brown & Dugan Thomas W. Braun Moquin & Daley

Manchester / (603) 669-9400 moquindaley.com

Matthew B. Cox Burns, Bryant, Cox, Rockefeller & Durkin

Dover / (603) 742-2332 burnsbryant.com

Christine M. Craig Shaheen & Gordon

Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Paul M. DeCarolis Gottesman & Hollis

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com Manchester / (603) 623-1234 beliveau-fradette.com

David M. Gottesman Gottesman & Hollis Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Jared R. Green Abramson, Brown & Dugan Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Holly B. Haines Abramson, Brown & Dugan Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com

Scott H. Harris McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 669-9400 moquindaley.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Manchester / (603) 734-5461 brennanlenehan.com

Edward M. Kaplan Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Maureen Raiche Manning Law Office of Manning & Zimmerman Manchester / (603) 624-7200 manningzimmermanlaw.com

Joseph F. McDowell McDowell & Morrissette

Manchester / (603) 623-9300 mcdowell-morrissette.com

Michael S. McGrath Upton & Hatfield

Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Jack B. Middleton McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

New England’s Trusted Mediation and Workplace Conflict Resolution Firm New England’s Trusted Mediation and Workplace Conflict Resolution Firm

New England’s Trusted Mediation and Workplace Conflict Resolution Firm

L – R: Frank Kenison, Dan Feltes, Lauren Girard Adams, Melinda Gehris, Greg Eaton HessGehris Solutions/PRISM Conflict Solutions is a leading provider conflictMelinda management solutions in New England. L – R: Frank Kenison, Dan Feltes, Lauren Girardofprovider Adams, Gehris, Greg Eaton HessGehris Solutions/PRISM Conflict Solutions is a and leading of conflict management solutions in We support clients through mediation, facilitation, training individualized conflict coaching for executives, managers New England. We support clients through mediation, facilitation, training and individualized conflict and front-line contributors. Our goal is Conflict to help you move through conflict efficiently and effectively, so yousolutions can focus on HessGehris Solutions/PRISM Solutions is a leading provider of conflict management in productivity and achieving your strategic goals. coaching for executives, managers and front-line contributors. Our goal is to help you move through New England. We support clients through mediation, facilitation, training and individualized conflict We are all proud to work with Melinda Gehris and Greg Eaton, two of our mediators who haveyour beenstrategic recognized by their conflict efficiently and effectively, so you focus oncontributors. productivity andgoal achieving goals. coaching for executives, managers andcan front-line Our is to help you move through peers for the work they do. You can schedule a mediation or coaching session with them or any of our mediators by conflict efficiently and effectively, so you focus on productivity and achieving your strategic goals. contacting us through our website by calling us. canand We are all proud to work withorMelinda Gehris Greg Eaton, two of our mediators who have been

State Street | Suite | Concord, NH 03301 We areby alltheir proudpeers to work with Melinda Gehris and Greg Eaton, two of our mediators who have beenwith recognized for 95 theNorth work they do. You can3schedule a mediation or coaching session (603) 225-0477 | HessGehris.com | PRISMConflictSolutions.com by their peers for work they You can mediation orus. coaching session with themrecognized or any of our mediators by the contacting usdo. through ourschedule websiteaor by calling

them or any of our mediators by contacting us through our website or by calling us. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 77

95 North State Street | Suite 3 | Concord, NH 03301 95 North State Street | Suite 3 | Concord, NH 03301 (603) 225-0477 | HessGehris.com | PRISMConflictSolutions.com


• 2022 Mark D. Morrissette McDowell & Morrissette

Manchester / (603) 623-9300 mcdowell-morrissette.com

Neil Nicholson Nicholson Law Firm

Concord / (603) 856-8441 nicholson-lawfirm.com

D. Michael Noonan Shaheen & Gordon Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Legal Complexity Requires Legal Teamwork The more complex the legal challenge, the larger and more coordinated a team required to solve it: more minds working in concert; more expertise brought to the table; more disciplines thoughtfully intertwined. We Are Wherever You Are Our attorneys work with clients throughout the country and the globe. Long before the pandemic forced many to work from home, we equipped our attorneys and staff with remote office capabilities to ensure that our client service is never neglected, no matter where we are. 603.626.3300 | primmer.com

Jennifer L. Parent McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Michael P. Rainboth Coughlin, Rainboth, Murphy & Lown

Portsmouth / (603) 431-1993 nhtrialattorneys.com

Christine M. Rockefeller Burns, Bryant, Cox, Rockefeller & Durkin Dover / (603) 742-2332 burnsbryant.com

William H. Shaheen Shaheen & Gordon Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com

Private Funds / Hedge Funds Law John P. Beals Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Product Liability Litigation — Defendants Gregory Eaton Hess Gehris Solutions Concord / (603) 225-0477 hessgehris.com Derek D. Lick Sulloway & Hollis Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Scott O’Connell Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Product Liability Litigation — Plaintiffs

Donald Lee Smith Devine Millimet & Branch

Jared R. Green Abramson, Brown & Dugan

Robert A. Stein The Stein Law Firm

Robert A. Stein The Stein Law Firm

James J. Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Professional Malpractice Law — Defendants

John J. Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Portsmouth / (603) 766-1686 dtclawyers.com

Portsmouth / (603) 570-4837 johnshermanlaw.com

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Mary Elizabeth Tenn Tenn And Tenn

Manchester / (603) 624-3700 tennandtenn.com

Phil Waystack Waystack Frizzell

Colebrook / (603) 237-8322 waystackfrizzell.com

Peter G. Webb Winer and Bennett

Nashua / (603) 882-5157 winerbennett.com

Jack S. White Welts, White & Fontaine Nashua / (603) 883-0797 lawyersnh.com

Nicholas Wright Bouchard, Kleinman & Wright Manchester / (603) 623-7222 bkwlawyers.com

Anna Goulet Zimmerman Law Office of Manning & Zimmerman Manchester / (603) 624-7200 manningzimmermanlaw.com nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Christine M. Craig Shaheen & Gordon

Concord / (603) 228-1109 steinlawpllc.com

78

Cameron G. Shilling McLane Middleton

John P. Sherman Sherman Law

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Clients statewide come to Ford, McDonald, McPartlin & Borden for all kinds of debtor-creditor, bankruptcy, and commercial litigation.

Privacy and Data Security Law

Dover / (603) 871-4144 shaheengordon.com Manchester / (603) 627-1819 arbd.com Concord / (603) 228-1109 steinlawpllc.com

Christopher D. Hawkins Donahue, Tucker & Ciandella Gregory A. Moffett Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios

Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Pete W. Mosseau Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Real Estate Law

R. Carl Anderson Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Martin J. Baroff Baroff & Craven

Manchester / (603) 647-4200 bclawnh.com

Andrew Bauer Gottesman & Hollis

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Timothy E. Britain Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com


• 2022 Suzanne Brunelle Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Peter F. Burger Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Ari B. Pollack Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

Denise A. Poulos Donahue, Tucker & Ciandella Portsmouth / (603) 766-1686 dtclawyers.com

Steve Cohen Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Tina L. Annis Annis & Zellers

Concord / (603) 224-5800 anniszellers.com

Scott W. Ellison Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Michelle M. Arruda Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Concord / (603) 226-1000 devinemillimet.com

Charles F. Cleary Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Margaret E. Probish Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green

Amy K. Kanyuk McDonald & Kanyuk

William S. Boesch Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly

Raymond P. D’Amante D’Amante Couser Pellerin & Associates

James F. Raymond Upton & Hatfield

Kathryn H. Michaelis Rath Young Pignatelli

Judith L. Bomster Butenhof & Bomster

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Concord / (603) 224-6777 damantelaw.com

Beth H. Davis Hamblett & Kerrigan

Nashua / (603) 883-5501 nashualaw.com

Benjamin F. Gayman Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Rolf E. Goodwin McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

John F. Griffin Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer Manchester / (603) 626-3300 primmer.com

Philip M. Hastings Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Morgan Hollis Gottesman & Hollis

Nashua / (603) 889-5959 nh-lawyers.com

Peter F. Imse Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

James D. Kerouac Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

Simon C. Leeming Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios Concord / (603) 410-1500 preti.com

Susan A. Manchester Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Gregory Michael Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer & Nelson Manchester / (603) 623-8700 bernsteinshur.com

James E. Morris Orr & Reno

Concord / (603) 224-2381 orr-reno.com

Lyndsee D. Paskalis Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

Bryan L. Pellerin D’Amante Couser Pellerin & Assoc. Concord / (603) 224-6777 damantelaw.com

Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com Concord / (603) 716-9777 uptonhatfield.com

Denis O. Robinson Pierce Atwood

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Michael D. Ruedig Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell Concord / (603) 228-1181 gcglaw.com

John H. Sokul Hinckley Allen

Manchester / (603) 225-4334 hinckleyallen.com

Henry B. Stebbins Stebbins, Lazos & Van Der Beken Manchester / (603) 627-3700 slvlaw.com

William C. Tucker Wadleigh, Starr and Peters

Manchester / (603) 669-4140 wadleighlaw.com

Kenneth A. Viscarello Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

J. Bradford Westgate Winer and Bennett Nashua / (603) 882-5157 winerbennett.com

Securities/Capital Markets Law

Concord / (603) 228-9900 mckan.com Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Margaret H. Nelson Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Christopher R. Paul McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Elise H. Salek Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Jon B. Sparkman Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Jeffrey J. Zellers Annis & Zellers

Concord / (603) 224-5800 anniszellers.com

William V.A. Zorn McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Technology Law

Matthew H. Benson Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

Manchester / (603) 296-0428 butenhofbomster.com

Timothy W. Caldwell Caldwell Law

Lebanon / (603) 643-7577 estateandelderlawgroup.com

Steve Cohen Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Bradford E. Cook Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Thomas C. Csatari Downs Rachlin Martin

Lebanon / (603) 448-2211 drm.com

Denis P. Dillon McLane Middleton

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com

Ann Meissner Flood Flood, Sheehan & Tobin

Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

John E. Hughes McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Amy K. Kanyuk McDonald & Kanyuk

Concord / (603) 228-9900 mckan.com

Scott E. Pueschel Pierce Atwood

James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Trademark Law

Concord / (603) 226-1000 devinemillimet.com

Manchester / (603) 623-5111 nhpatlaw.com

Concord / (603) 228-9900 mckan.com

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

John S. Kitchen Devine Millimet & Branch

Daniel J. Bourque Bourque & Associates

Megan C. Knox McDonald & Kanyuk

Richard A. Samuels McLane Middleton

Michael J. Bujold Davis & Bujold

Mary Susan Leahy McLane Middleton

Tax Law

James G. Cook Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson

Elizabeth M. Lorsbach Morneau Law

Mark A. Wright McLane Middleton

Thomas N. Masland Ransmeier & Spellman

Trusts and Estates

Joseph F. McDonald McDonald & Kanyuk

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Securities Regulation Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

William F. J. Ardinger Rath Young Pignatelli Concord / (603) 226-2600 rathlaw.com

Peter T. Beach Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Steven M. Burke McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Concord / (603) 226-7490 nhpat.com Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Christine S. Anderson Ansell & Anderson Bedford / (603) 644-8211 ansellpa.com

Newington / (603) 436-2818 mclane.com Nashua / (603) 943-5647 morneaulaw.com

Concord / (603) 290-5104 ranspell.com Concord / (603) 228-9900 mckan.com

Willemien Dingemans Miller Downs Rachlin Martin Lebanon / (603) 448-2211 / drm.com

Marcia Hennelly Moran Flood, Sheehan & Tobin Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

David Mulhern Mulhern & Scott

Portsmouth / (603) 436-1211 mulhernlaw.com

Sally Mulhern Mulhern & Scott

Portsmouth / (603) 436-1211 mulhernlaw.com

Anu R. Mullikin Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Jan P. Myskowski Myskowski & Matthews

Concord / (603) 227-6342 mmlawnh.com

Colleen D. O’Connell Barradale, O’Connell, Newkirk & Dwyer Bedford / (603) 644-0275 bondpa.com

Michael P. Panebianco Sheehan Phinney Bass & Green Manchester / (603) 668-0300 sheehan.com

Christopher R. Paul McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

John C. Ransmeier Ransmeier & Spellman

Concord / (603) 290-5104 ranspell.com

Nelson A. Raust Ransmeier & Spellman

Concord / (603) 290-5104 ranspell.com

Jennifer R. Rivett Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Kathleen M. Robinson Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

Elise H. Salek Sulloway & Hollis

Concord / (603) 223-2800 sulloway.com

Andrea L. Sennott Robinson, Boesch, Sennott & Daly Portsmouth / (603) 427-5380 nhprobatelaw.com

Virginia Symmes Sheehan Flood, Sheehan & Tobin Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

Laura Tetrault Barradale, O’Connell, Newkirk & Dwyer

Bedford / (603) 644-0275 bondpa.com

Laura E. Tobin Flood, Sheehan & Tobin

Concord / (603) 415-4200 fstlaw.com

Robert A. Wells McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 79


• 2022 Cynthia L. Worthen Pierce Atwood

Portsmouth / (603) 433-6300 pierceatwood.com

Jeffrey J. Zellers Annis & Zellers

Concord / (603) 224-5800 anniszellers.com

William V.A. Zorn McLane Middleton

Manchester / (603) 625-6464 mclane.com

Venture Capital Law

Matthew H. Benson Cook, Little, Rosenblatt & Manson Manchester / (603) 621-7100 clrm.com

Philip B. Taub Nixon Peabody

Manchester / (603) 628-4000 nixonpeabody.com

Workers’ Compensation Law — Claimants Timothy Beaupre Beaupre Law

Dover / (877) 734-0777 beauprelaw.com

Terrence J. Daley Moquin & Daley

Manchester / (603) 669-9400 moquindaley.com

Benjamin T. King Douglas, Leonard & Garvey Concord / (603) 224-1988 nhlawoffice.com

Maureen Raiche Manning Law Office of Manning & Zimmerman Manchester / (603) 624-7200 manningzimmermanlaw.com

Francis G. Murphy Shaheen & Gordon

Manchester / (603) 635-4099 shaheengordon.com

A. Gerard O’Neil Normandin, Cheney & O’Neil Laconia / (603) 524-4380 ncolaw.com

Mark D. Wiseman Cleveland, Waters and Bass Concord / (603) 224-7761 cwbpa.com

Workers’ Compensation Law — Employers Eric G. Falkenham Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Charles T. Giacopelli Devine Millimet & Branch

Manchester / (603) 669-1000 devinemillimet.com

Paul R. Kfoury Trombley Kfoury

Bedford / (603) 935-7566 trombleykfoury.com

Paul L. Salafia Devine Millimet & Branch Concord / (603) 226-1000 devinemillimet.com

80

About the list METHODOLOGY FOR BEST LAWYERS AND “ONES TO WATCH” This list is excerpted from the 2022 edition of “The Best Lawyers in America,” the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, “Best Lawyers” lists attorneys in 148 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey, in which thousands of the nation’s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2021 Edition of “Best Lawyers” is based on over 13 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile “Best Lawyers” remains unchanged since the first edition was compiled almost 40 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, “Best Lawyers” remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2021 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of “Best Lawyers,” lawyers who were nominated since the previous survey and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the

voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among the best: “If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?” All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality — a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best Lawyers’ surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting, and to evaluate nominees based only on their individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyer’s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents and the sophistication of the polling-methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, “Best Lawyers” lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the best lawyers in the United States available anywhere.

“The Best Lawyers in America”© is published by BL Rankings, LLC, Augusta, GA., and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call (803) 648-0300; write 801 Broad St., Suite 950, Augusta, GA 30901; email info@bestlawyers.com or visit bestlawyers.com. An online subscription to Best Lawyers® is available at bestlawyers.com. Disclaimer and Copyright BL Rankings, LLC has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2021, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar association for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney. Copyright 2020 by BL Rankings, LLC, Augusta, GA. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of BL Rankings, LLC. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of BL Rankings, LLC.

nhmagazine.com | November 2021


Attorney Ryan L. Russman

Driven in Defense of Those Who Drive

A

s Senior Counsel at Russman Law Offices, Ryan Russman has been fighting for his clients’ rights and winning cases in New Hampshire since his practice opened in 1999. A specialist in DWI law, Attorney Russman is board certified by the National College of DUI Defense (NCDD), the only ABA-accredited organization to boardcertify DUI attorneys. Attorney Russman is also an NCDD Sustaining Member as well as a member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the National Trial Lawyers Association. Russman is one of the best-trained DWI Attorneys in

the state. For example, he is certified in practical gas chromatography, and is a field sobriety test instructor and practitioner, as well as an evidentiary breath alcohol technician, to name a few training highlights. A specialist in the field of NH DWI defense, he has authored two books on the topic, published informational videos and been featured in many news media programs. His training and experience explain why he was once again listed in “The Best Lawyers in America”© as well as SuperLawyers, and has earned the highest (Preeminent) rating level from LexisNexis and the highest (“Superb” 10.0) rating from AVVO.

Russman Law 155 Fleet Street, Portsmouth • (603) 373-1664 | 14 Center Street, Exeter • (603) 772-3433 36 Salmon Street, Manchester • (603) 373-1664 | 104 Washington Street, Dover • (603) 772-3433 www.russmanlaw.com


• 2022

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nhmagazine.com | November 2021


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• Senior Nursing Leader

As the ongoing Covid-19 crisis continues to underscore the incredible contributions of nurses, they deserve to be recognized for all the work they do on the front lines of our communities throughout the state. In partnership with the New Hampshire Nurses Association, New Hampshire Magazine needs your help to honor these healthcare professionals who deserve recognition for their efforts in fighting Covid-19. We also want to celebrate the very best in nursing – those who go above and beyond to comfort, heal and educate – and to bring to light how critical nursing is to achieving comprehensive health care. If you know a nurse, please consider nominating them in one of the award categories. Recognition is especially meaningful during these times, so say “thank you” to these healthcare heroes by submitting a nomination today. To nominate, visit: NHMagazine.com/NursingAwards

Deadline for nominations is January 7, 2022. Recipients will be featured in the June 2022 issue of New Hampshire Magazine. For event sponsorship information, contact Kimberly Lencki at (603) 413-5154 or klencki@mcleancommunications.com.


603 Living “I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” — Groucho Marx

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PHOTO BY DAN SZCZESNY


Calendar 88 Local Dish 92 Health 94 Ayuh 96

Local Authors Rock It With New Reads Winter is coming! Prepare with books.

BY RICK BROUSSARD

T

he “winter” predicted in the popular “Game of Thrones” series was almost certainly worse than whatever is in store for us here in New England this year, but when the days grow short and the nights grow cold, it’s always smart to have a good book (or two, or a dozen) around. To that end, we’ve asked three of the state’s most prominent local booksellers to offer some choices from local authors. It’s getting hard to pick just a few, since the Granite State seems to attract great writers like novelist Dan Brown attracts movie deals, but these people know their stuff. So, here are their picks, spanning mystery, history, exploration, family drama, tragedy and poetry. Each would make an excellent gift with ample local bona fides to impress a friend or loved one. And if you don’t find one you like, try asking the owner of the nearest independent book seller, and they will guide you to a local author who knows what it takes for avid readers to stock up on plenty of warm, bright words for the frigid, dark months ahead. Rec omm

e n d e d re a d s

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“If there’s anything more charming than To st m ok Dan Szczesny H ol b ro o k , e r R u n B o Riv and his six-year-old daughter, Uma, rambling around New Hampshire climbing on big rocks, well, I don’t know what it is. With this little book in hand, you can visit 25 different notable rocks in the Granite state and szceck them off your list!” m

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NH Rocks That Rock

From Hobblebush Books

Dan Szczesny and Uma during one of their many explorations of the state’s big rocks. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 85


603 LIVING / RECOMMENDED READS

Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers

“Yes, we probably all have our visions of Eden, some of us simply dream about it, but Hancock writer Howard Mansfield has pursued some active chasers and written a fascinating account of individuals and groups that made attempts to create an Edenic life here on Earth. They range from the Shaker Community in Canterbury to an early 20th-century Black doctor in Keene who crossed over and back between races. And not to be missed is the powerful chapter on the 40 thousand former slaves offered ‘40 acres and a mule’ right after the Civil War. An Eden promised but not delivered.” From Bauhan Press

nhmagazine.com | November 2021

Whirlybird Island

sh o p

“One of our favorite authors, Westmoreland writer Ernie Hebert, captured the life of the working people of western New Hampshire in his Darby Chronicles (all reissued in August by Wesleyan). We have not yet read his forthcoming novel ‘Whirlybird Island’ now scheduled for publication later this fall but anticipate it greatly. Partially set in Darby, it takes on the traumatic effects of war on a Korean vet and his family.” From Plaidswede Publishing

New England’s Roadside Ecology

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From Roaring Brook Press

“Tom Wessels’ book ‘Reading The Forested Landscape’ has been a favorite of any who are curious about the history and uses our New England countryside has experienced and we have all been waiting for a new one from him. And it’s his eye for close observation that makes ‘New England’s Roadside Ecology’ such a unique and fascinating guide to 30 places you will want to explore in detail.” From Timber Press

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From Peter Randall Publisher

“Petersf t ro m borough ds W ill a To a , s m r d W i lli a artist and author Lita Judge has produced many picture books for kids, often with a touch of natural history inspired by her own childhood fascination. Her latest is a beautifully illustrated appreciation of trees and the community they create.” re a

“We haven’t seen this yet. It is due out in mid-October and is one of the books we are most excited about. Franklin Pierce professor Robert Goodby has done extensive archaeological work on the Abenaki tribes that inhabited this area. His digs have revealed their presence going back to the end of the ice age and include sites in Keene, Hinsdale and Peterborough.”

Wisdom of Trees

R e co m m e n d e d

A Deep Presence: 13,000 Years of Native American History


t o re

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R e c o m m e n d e d re

The Children’s Secret

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“I r think o m Mi so n c ha e Gib , n n l H err m a my lead title for this list will be ‘The Children’s Secret’ by ‘Nina Monroe’ — actually a pseudonym for Concord author Virginia MacGregor. She grew up in Europe and was educated at Oxford, and finally settled in Concord with her husband and young children a few years ago. A persistent theme in her novels is what we are willing to do to keep our children safe. This one hits that theme hard: Set in the fictional New Hampshire town of Middlebrook, it’s about what happens when children are left unsupervised at a barn party and a child is shot. So here we have a newcomer to America writing fiction about one of the most intractable controversies — guns. As always with MacGregor novels, it’s family relationships, not politics, that take center stage. Full of suspense and very emotional for anyone who has been, or wants to be, a parent. This novel is published by Crooked Lane Books, distributed by Penguin Random House. ‘... the best kind of suspense story, one that makes the reader think as well as feel.’” From Crooked Lane Books

R

“I will second Willard’s nomination of Howard Mansfield’s new book, ‘Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers.’ Millenarian dreamers are as American as apple pie, and form a fertile subject for Howard Mansfield as he once again grapples with our history and makes it feel contemporary. Mansfield is one of the few writers working today who could be called a public intellectual — like Edmund Wilson in years gone by, or Ta-Nehisi Coates and Masha Gessen today, these are thinkers who are not affiliated with universities whose interests are wide-ranging, covering broad swathes of our cultural and literary landscape. As always, Mansfield’s fertile mind entertains as much as it educates in this fantastic new book.”

More recommended reads from Tom Holbrook of RiverRun Bookstore

Dead on Deadline

“Do you love a cozy mystery? That’s what we call a book with murder and intrigue, but not a lot of blood and gore. Another good hallmark of a good cozy mystery is that it usually takes place in a small town with an interesting cast of characters. If this sounds like your kind of book, think how much better it would be if that small town was one that you knew? This fall, grab a copy of ‘Dead on Deadline’ by Lara Bricker, the first book in the Piper Greene Exeter Mystery Series. From the description: ‘Piper Greene is a journalist who returns to her tiny New England hometown to care for her aunt. She works at the Exeter Independent, covering small-town news. At the American Independence Festival, honoring her town’s role in the Revolutionary War, a dead body dressed in a Red Coat soldier jacket is found. The victim is her news editor, Charlotte Campbell, and there is no shortage of people who would be glad to see her dead. Suspicion quickly lands on the paper’s photographer, who was fired the day before, but Piper cannot believe he is capable of murder. With the help of her high school crush, now a detective, her best friend at the bakery and the town historian, Piper sets out to prove her friend’s innocence.’”

Count the Ways

“Joyce Maynard has been at this writing game a long time, but with each book she seems to always find a way to push a little further into the psychology of our lives and families. ‘Count the Ways’ is no exception, as this novel follows the life of a young woman orphaned in her teens, and how that affects the life she builds as an adult.”

Old Poets

“Donald Hall’s classic study of mid-century poetry, ‘Remembering Poets,’ was first published in 1978. It was then republished in 1992 as ‘Their Ancient Glittering Eyes,’ and included more poets. It’s now being brought back by David R. Godine, Publisher as ‘Old Poets,’ with the same material, plus a new introduction by Wes McNair. These essays on poets — such as Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Dylan Thomas, Ezra Pound and others — grew out of interviews and other encounters (some just on the page, as with Pound) the young Hall had with them as the new editor of the Paris Review. A fascinating window into the careers of many giants in the world of poetry, and into the mind of a giant of New Hampshire letters.” From David R. Godine, Publisher

From William Morrow Publishing

Support Your Local Bookseller RiverRun Bookstore

32 Daniel St., Portsmouth / (603) 431-2100 riverrunbookstore.com

Gibson’s Bookstore

45 South Main St., Concord / (603) 224-0562 gibsonsbookstore.com

Toadstool Bookshop

375 Amherst St., Nashua / (603) 673-1734 12 Emerald St., Keene / (603) 352-8815 12 Depot Square, Peterborough / (603)-924-3543 / toadbooks.com And see this story at nhmagazine.com for more great bookstores. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 87


603 603 LIVING LIVING / CALENDAR / CALENDAR

Calendar Ed ito r’ s

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Editor’s note: As of press time in late September, the following events were still going forward as planned. However, due to evolving information about Covid-19, it’s possible some were canceled or postponed after this issue was published. Please confirm events are happening before heading out.

The Distiller’s Showcase of Premium Spirits > This annual event and benefit for the New Hampshire Food Bank offers the chance to taste hundreds of spirits. In addition to more than 130 tables of premium and ultra-premium spirits available for sampling, you’ll also have the opportunity to meet distillers from around the world while enjoying bites from the state’s top restaurants. The showcase is the culmination of Distiller’s Week, which is filled with seminars, tastings, celebrity panels and more. Distiller’s Week details will be posted at distillersshowcase.com, so check back often for new and exciting events. The Distiller’s Showcase of Premium Spirits is from 6-8:30 p.m. Tickets are $60. DoubleTree by Hilton Manchester Downtown, 700 Elm St., Manchester. Visit distillersshowcase.com for tickets and more information. 88

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PHOTO BY SUSAN LAUGHLIN

November 4


Miscellaneous November 6-7

Manchester City Marathon > Start hoping now for a snowstorm-less November. The Queen City’s annual Boston Marathon qualifying 26.2 takes runners through the Millyard and across the river into Goffstown. Don’t have the energy for a full marathon? Try the half or, on the day before, the new Penmen for Patriots 5K. Prices vary. 9 a.m., SNHU Arena, 555 Elm St., Manchester. (603) 488-1186; millenniumrunning.com November 6-7

Ed ito r’ s

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Silver Bells Craft Fair > Celebrate the start of holiday shopping season by attending this crafty event. Tilton will come alive with color, flavor and music as over 75 artisans from around New England will display and sell their handmade arts and crafts. Free. 10 a.m., Tanger Outlets, 120 Laconia Rd., Route 3, Tilton. joycescraftshows.com

610 THE NEW INDEPENDENT VOICE OF THE GRANITE STATE LISTEN WEEKDAYS 6AM-9AM

COURTESY PHOTO

November 6-14

Christmas at The Fells Decorator Showcase > In need of holiday décor inspiration? Tour the main house at The Fells to see how professional interior designers, floral artists, decorators and talented volunteers use their personal sense of style and interpretation of Christmas cheer to transform the gorgeous historic home. Also open is the holiday gift boutique, where you can find items created by regional artisans. The showhouse begins with the Preview Gala on November 5 from 5-7 p.m., which includes music, appetizers and a chance to meet the designers. Tickets are $100 and reservations are required. Admission is $25 for adults, $8 for children and free for children under 5. John Hay Estate at The Fells, 456 Route 103A, Newbury. (603) 763-4789; thefells.org

BREWERY & TAPROOM 126B HALL ST., CONCORD, NH

WED-FRI 4-8 P.M. SAT 12-8 P.M. SUN 12-6 P.M. Now with an expanded taproom! lithermans.beer (603) 219-0784 nhmagazine.com | November 2021 89


Holiday Open House and Kitty Angels Weekend > Now celebrating 31 years, this pet- and kid-friendly event offers special sales of vintage Christmas and holiday décor, plus a number of activities and entertainment. The two-day event includes raffles, music, horse and pony rides, demonstrations by artists, food vendors, petting zoo and more. Kitty Angels will be offering information on the organization, adoptions and donations. Representatives from the Amherst Animal Hospital, who have worked alongside Kitty Angels for decades, will also be on hand. 10 a.m.4 p.m. 106 Ponemah Rd., Amherst. (603) 672-2535; treasuresnh.com

Ed ito r’ s

November 6-7

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603 LIVING / CALENDAR

November 8

November 11

Fall Family Farm Day > Get up bright and early to spend a morning milking a cow (or goat) with your kids. Then your little ones can take a pony ride, and maybe even hop on the wagon or enjoy making arts and crafts. The Best of NH award-winning Inn at East Hill Farm is a picturesque spot to learn about farming while having a great family time. $25-$25. 9 a.m., The Inn at East Hill Farm, 460 Monadnock St., Troy. east-hill-farm.com November 18-20

Warren Miller’s 72nd Annual Film “Winter Starts Now” > Kick off the season with Warren Miller’s “Winter Starts Now,” featuring the best snowriding happening in your own backyard — from the mom-and-pop ski hill down the street to the highest peak on the horizon. Grab your family and friends for a road trip through the Rocky Mountains, experience classic New England skiing, and hitch a ride up the coast of Alaska. Along the way, you’ll be joined by old friends Marcus Caston, Amie Engerbretson and Jim Ryan. For years, The Music Hall has kicked off winter in true Warren Miller fashion, and they’re back for another round. $28-$34. Times vary, The Historic Theater, 28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth. (603) 436-2400; themusichall.org November 19-20

Stonewall Farm’s Farm Fare > Make Thanksgiving prep fun (and local) with the annual Farm Fare. Your table (and tummies) will be delighted with items like meat, produce, breads, wine and beer, and other goodies from local farms. Vendors will also sell handmade crafts and gifts, a great opportunity to get a jump on your holiday shopping list. Stonewall Farm, 242 Chesterfield Rd., Keene. (603) 357-7278; stonewallfarm.org November 20-21, 26-28

Christmas at the Castle > Tour the Lucknow mansion at the Castle in the Clouds, festively dressed for the holidays by creative businesses and designers to reflect their take on holiday carols. Browse the artisan fair, and have fun making crafts at this most-loved holiday event. Tickets and times vary. Castle in the Clouds, Route 171, 455 Old Mountain Rd., Moultonborough. (603) 476-5900; castleintheclouds.org

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COURTESY PHOTO

Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale > Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, New Hampshire, native, tells the story of her 30-year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times. Free. 7 p.m., Virtual. nhhumanities.org Weekends November 20-December 19

Jingle Bell Chocolate Tour > Find enchantment on a magical sleigh ride through the snowy mountains with delicious chocolate treats from local chocolatiers. The Austrian horsedrawn sleigh winds its way to Jackson Village, halting at various stops for tastes of homemade chocolates. $32. Times and locations vary. jacksonnh.com November 20-21

Portsmouth Holiday Arts Tour > Fair warning: It might be tough to pass up the many lovely items you’ll discover on this self-guided tour. Each year on the weekend before Thanksgiving, a number of artists open their homes and studios to the public in a celebration of art, community and the holidays. Free. Portsmouth. portsmouthartstour.com November 25

15th Annual Lake Sunapee Turkey Trot > Work off some of the post-Thanksgiving calories with this Lake Sunapee tradition. Grab your family and friends, throw on a costume (optional) and make this event part of your Thanksgiving escapades. Kids are also invited to run a 1K Chicken Run down Lake Avenue and every participant will receive a medal. Events start at 8:15 a.m., Ben Mere Gazebo, Sunapee Harbor, Lake Sunapee. sunapeeturkeytrot.com November 25

Dover Turkey Trot > This 5K race is designed for walkers and runners of all ages and abilities. This fun-filled community event benefits Garrison School PTA and is the final race of the Dover Race Series. $10-$25. 8:30 a.m., Shaw’s Lane, Dover. doverturkeytrot.com November 25

Fisher Cats Thanksgiving 5K > The Fisher Cats are sponsors of this fun event, and your registration includes one free ticket to the Fisher Cats opening game, personalized bib, free race photos and finish line video. The first 1,500 registrants will also receive a free race T-shirt. $10-$35. 9 a.m., Northeast Delta Dental Stadium, 1 Line Dr., Manchester. millenniumrunning.com

November 27

9th Annual Cold Turkey Plunge > Skip your own wallet and capitalize on the holiday goodwill of your friends and family to meet the fundraising minimum for this charity celebration. In the tradition of the classic polar bear plunge, the brave or crazy participants in this event will run into the wintry waters of Waterville Valley’s Corcoran Pond to raise money for the disability services of Waterville Valley Adaptive Sports Programs. Costumes are welcome, Santa Claus will make an appearance, and, to top it off, the day will end with fireworks. Waterville Valley Adaptive Sports, 1 Ski Area Rd., Waterville Valley. watervilleadaptive.com

Music & Arts October 30-December 4

13th Annual “It’s Pastel!” Juried Show > This national juried show features the newfound excitement of a traditional medium. More than 30 pastel paintings from award-winning, critically acclaimed artists across the country will be on view. Free. This year’s exhibit will be virtual only. (603) 436-8433; pastelsocietynh.com November 5-6

Bob Marley > Bob loves being a comedian and he’s wicked good at it! He’s featured regularly on Sirius XM radio and he even won their Superbowl of Comedy. He has put out over 20 comedy CDs and DVDs, and he was even inducted into “The Guinness Book of World Records” for “the longest stand up comedy show by an individual” at 40 hours of straight standup. He’s also been on over 100 television shows, including “Jimmy Fallon” and “Letterman.” $37.50. Shows at 6 and 8:30 p.m., Capitol Center for the Arts, 44 South Main St., Concord. ccanh.com


November 12-21

“9/12” > On the day after the World Trade Center attacks, a conflicted Boston couple proceed with their plan to host a birthday party for their 2-yearold daughter, but the fragile veneer of normalcy is shattered as the enormity of the tragedy awakens the guests to their own helplessness, anger, internal resentments and shocking beliefs. $16-$22. Times vary, Hatbox Theatre, 270 Loudon Rd., Concord. (603) 715-2315; hatboxnh.com November 18-December 23

“Peter Pan” > The classic tale of the power of imagination, childhood fantasy, and a boy who can fly comes to Seacoast Rep with a new treatment to modernize this magical piece of the Broadway canon. It’s a perfect show for the family. $32-$50. Times vary, The Seacoast Reperatory Theatre, 125 Bow St., Portsmouth. (603) 433-4472; seacoastrep.org

Lend your voice.

November 19

HELP AN ABUSED OR NEGLECTED CHILD SUCCEED. VOLUNTEER.

Roomful of Blues > Even though Roomful of Blues’ lineup has changed over the years, the band has always been one of the tightest, most joyful blues ensembles in the world. Currently an eight-piece unit led by guitarist Chris Vachon, the band has never sounded fresher or stronger. Singer Phil Pemberton brings his sweet and soulful vocals and adds another bright new dimension to the jazzy, jump-blues musical roots. Their winning combination of jump, swing, blues, R&B and soul remains their calling card, as does their ability to fill the dance floor. $30. 8 p.m., The Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry. (603) 437-5100; tupelomusichall.com

There are children waiting for someone like you to speak up for their best interests. With a CASA volunteer, children are more likely to adjust to change and to find a safe, permanent home. Get involved, and change a child’s story. Learn more at a virtual info session. Sign up today!

CASANH.org/info | (603) 626-4600

November 19-21

“The Nutcracker” > It’s Christmas, the best time of year for toys and stories. But all over the world, the magic of make-believe is fading. Only the toys know the truth: The Queen and King of mouses have stolen the Christmas Star and used its magic to turn the Prince of Make Believe into a wooden Nutcracker. Can Clara and her brother Fritz bring the Nutcracker back to life, help him defeat the House of Mouse, and restore him to the throne? First, they must believe. $25-$46. Times vary, The Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester. (603) 668-5588; palacetheatre.org November 26

Trans-Siberian Orchestra >The TSO’s highly anticipated Winter Tour will be returning to the Queen City for a multisensory extravaganza. This year’s tour will feature founder/composer/lyricist Paul O’Neill’s timeless story of a runaway who finds her way into a mysterious abandoned theater. This event will sell out quickly, so get tickets while you can. Tickets vary. Shows at 3:30 and 8 p.m., SNHU Arena, 555 Elm St., Manchester. (603) 644-5000; snhuarena.com November 27

Comedian Juston McKinney > New Hampshire’s own police-officer-turned-comedian Juston McKinney is no longer just a local favorite — he’s appeared on national shows such as the “Tonight Show” and “Conan O’Brien.” Still, expect this Best of NH award-winner to touch on familiar New Hampshire icons, plus New England life in general in a socially distanced show that you won’t want to miss. Tickets start at $29.50. 7:30 p.m., The Flying Monkey, 39 S. Main St., Plymouth. flyingmonkeynh.com Find additional events at nhmagazine.com/calendar. Submit events eight weeks in advance to Emily Heidt at eheidt@ nhmagazine.com or enter your own at nhmagazine.com/calendar. Not all events are guaranteed to be published either online or in the print calendar. Event submissions will be reviewed and, if deemed appropriate, approved by a New Hampshire Magazine editor.

Statement of Ownership Management and Circulation 1. 2. 3. 4.

Title: NEW HAMPSHIRE MAGAZINE Date of Filing: October 1, 2021 Frequency of Issue: Monthly except Jan/Feb and April/May – 10 Issues Location of known office of publication: 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101 5. Location of the headquarters or general business offices of the publishers: McLean Communications, LLC., 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101 6. Names and addresses of Publisher and Editor: Publisher – Ernesto Burden, 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101; Editor – Rick Broussard, 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101; Managing Editor – Erica Thoits, 150 Dow Street, Manchester, NH 03101 7. Owner: Yankee Publishing Inc., PO Box 520, Dublin, NH 03444 8. Known bondholders, mortgages, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None 9. For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at special rates: N/A Average No. 10. Extent and nature of circulation: No. Copies of Copies Each Single Issue Issue During Nearest to Preceding 12 Filing Date months a. Total Number of Copies (Net Press Run)

22,082

22,963

16,290

15,727

— 754

— 930

b. Paid and/or Requested Circulation 1. Paid/Requested Outside County Mail Subscriptions Stated on Form 3541. 2. Paid In-County Subscriptions 3. Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Non-USPS Paid Distribution 4. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation (Sum b1, b2, b3, and b4)

17,044

16,657

1,925

3,326

d. Free Distribution by Mail 1. Outside-County as Stated on Form 3541 2. In-County as Stated on Form 3541 3. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS 4. Free Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

— —

— —

789

810

e. Total Free Distribution (sum of d1 thru 4)

2,714

4,136

f. Total Distribution (sum of c and e)

19,758

20,793

g. Copies not Distributed

2,324

2,170

h. Total (Sum of f and g)

22,082

22,963

i. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (c divided by f times 100)

86.3%

80.1%

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Ernesto Burden, Publisher

THE GRANITE YMCA The Y is the leading nonprofit committed to strengthening community by empowering young people, improving the health and wellbeing of people of all ages, and inspiring action in and across communities. Join today for more than a workout. Join for a better us.

YMCA of Downtown Manchester YMCA Allard Center of Goffstown YMCA of Concord YMCA of Strafford County YMCA of the Seacoast YMCA of Greater Londonderry

www.graniteymca.org

nhmagazine.com | November 2021 91


603 LIVING / LOCAL DISH

Baked Apple Custard Pie

With Rosewater Meringue Serves 8 For the pastry crust 2 sticks cold unsalted butter 21/4 cups flour 1 egg yolk 1/2 cup very cold buttermilk Makes enough for one single-crust pie. It can be made ahead, and it will keep in the refrigerator for three days. In a mixing bowl, blend the butter and flour to a mealy consistency. Slowly add the egg yolk and buttermilk, mixing only until the mixture comes together to form a ball. (Or use a food processor, the Shakers would approve!) Roll the dough out to a thickness of 1/4 inch with a rolling pin, starting from the center and rotating the crust until it is a perfect-ish circle. (Using a silicone mat makes it easier.) If the dough is difficult to work with, pop it in the freezer for 15 minutes. Line a pie tin with the dough. Put in the freezer while you prepare the other ingredients.

For the custard 4 eggs 2 egg yolks 1 cup granulated sugar 1 stick unsalted butter, melted Cinnamon to taste Combine all ingredients in a blender, and mix for 30 seconds. Set aside.

For the rosewater meringue 3 egg whites 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 teaspoon rose water (Available at Whole Foods in the baking aisle, in Indian grocery stores and online.)

Pie preparation 3 medium apples (Granny Smith apples were a latter-day Shaker favorite for pie.)

TEXT AND PHOTO BY SUSAN LAUGHLIN RECIPE BY CHEF JAMES HALLER 92

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Wash, core and slice the apples. Shingle the apple slices in the dough-lined pie tin. Pour the custard over the apples. Set the pie tin on a small cookie sheet or foil to catch any drippings. Bake in a 425-degree oven for 10 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees, and continue to bake for 20 minutes. Reduce oven to 300 degrees and cook until the custard is set, about another 30 minutes. After the custard is firm, top with meringue, and return pie to 450-degree oven for a few minutes to brown the meringue. Chill at least three hours before slicing.


C

hef James Haller, among many other roles, once shared chef duties with Jeffrey Paige at the long-gone Creamery restaurant at Shaker Village in Canterbury. While there, he came to know the few last remaining Shaker Sisters and came to understand the beauty of Shaker cooking with its simplicity of ingredients and preparation. To the left is one of his favorite recipes from Paige and Haller’s collaborative cookbook, “Cooking in the Shaker Spirit,” published in 2006. This pie can be baked a day ahead and served chilled the next day. What is Chef Haller up to these days? Pioneering a new era for American cuisine via the Blue Strawbery restaurant (19701986) in Portsmouth was just the first act for Haller. Afterward, he was chef at Canterbury Shaker Village, taught cooking classes, appeared as a guest chef at the Wellington Room and on TV, worked and volunteered for the Seacoast Hospice, wrote several cookbooks and nonfiction books, including a memoir, “Salt & Pepper Cooking,” that also became performance art at the West End Studio Theatre. With his creative mind and love of humor, he continues to cook and write. His latest book, “At the End of Ceres Street,” offers a delightful serving of life in Portsmouth. Here, Haller looks back on the long shadow he cast in Portsmouth and reminisces about the people he met and the lives that touched his — the many folks who made Portsmouth what it was and what is has become. The short vignettes are all endearing and reveal the rewards of a life well lived and the importance of friendship. If only we could all write such a book!

Your Stories Are Our Story

News from New Hampshire and

NHPR.ORG

“At the End of Ceres Street: A Chef’s Salute to Portsmouth, New Hampshire” by Chef James Haller will be released on November 23, 2021. Learn more at greatlifepress.com. nhmagazine.com | November 2021 93


603 LIVING / HEALTH at St. Joseph Hospital in Nashua, who notes that she’s seen the effects of caffeine overload in her teenaged patients who are fond of energy drinks. In addition to elevating heart rate and blood pressure, caffeine can induce jitters, exacerbate anxiety disorders and cause insomnia. To avoid feeling fatigued in the first place and needing to reach for coffee, “first and foremost, get enough sleep,” says Gabrielle Phaneuf, D.O, a primary care physician at Core Physicians Primary Care in Epping. The average adult needs seven to nine hours, but when it comes to sleep, quality, not just quantity, counts, so practice what’s known as good sleep hygiene: Limit caffeine, especially late in the day. Don’t eat for two hours before going to bed and follow an established pre-bed routine that includes reading a chapter of a book, meditating, or doing something else that you find relaxing that signals “bedtime” to your brain.

To avoid feeling fatigued in the first place and needing to reach for coffee, “first and foremost, get enough sleep.”

What’s the Buzz?

The latest on whether caffeine is good for you, and how to boost energy without it BY KAREN A. JAMROG / ILLUSTRATION BY MADELINE McMAHON

A

re the grandest of grandes not enough for you? Whether you rely on caffeine to get through the day or just enjoy a little lift from one cup of morning joe, it’s good to know how your coffee habit affects your health. Coffee has gotten a bad rap in the past, but recent research has linked coffee consumption with health benefits such as a lower likelihood of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. 94

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But too much of a good thing — well, you know how that usually goes. People’s sensitivity to caffeine varies widely, as does the amount of caffeine in different types of coffee, tea, energy drinks, soda and food (such as chocolate), but for most healthy adults, consuming up to 400 milligrams per day, or generally about four cups of coffee, appears to be safe. Taking in excessive caffeine can cause blood pressure to go “through the roof,” says Sara Shipley, A.P.R.N., a nurse practitioner

— Gabrielle Phaneuf, D.O.

Note that while television might help you unwind, it’s best to steer clear of electronic screens — including televisions, phones, and computers — for an hour or two before you turn in. Looking at screens stimulates the brain, Phaneuf says, making it difficult to fall asleep soon afterward. Also avoid alcohol as bedtime approaches. Although a nightcap might relax you and help you to drift off to sleep, it can interfere with later stages of sleep, making sleep less restful overall. Keep your bedroom off limits for activities other than sleep. During the pandemic, many people created makeshift offices wherever they could find space in their homes, and for some, that meant setting up shop in their bedroom. Ideally, though, “keep your bedroom just for sleep,” Phaneuf says,


Caffeine: a mixed brew Although moderate consumption of caffeine can provide some health benefits, people’s sensitivity to it varies, and for some, a little goes a long way. “Caffeine is a stimulant,” says Gabrielle Phaneuf, D.O., a primary care physician at Core Physicians Primary Care in Epping. It can increase energy, athletic performance, and brain function, but because it’s a stimulant, it makes everything go faster, she says — including your heart rate. While one cup of coffee shouldn’t pose a problem in most healthy adults, too much caffeine can trigger abnormal heart rhythms in people who are prone to them and can cause side effects such as anxiety and unpleasant jitters in anyone. Indeed, “moderation is crucial,” Phaneuf says. “Too much caffeine is not a good thing, so don’t exceed the [recommended] 400-milligram limit if you can avoid it.” To be your most energetic and healthy self, Phaneuf advises, limit your caffeine intake, eat a nutritious diet, stay active, and make restful sleep a priority. “not for work or a hobby, so that your brain recognizes that as a sleep area.” And don’t overlook your diet, which can affect how energetic you feel. Sugary foods can provide a brief burst of energy that soon crashes. In contrast, complex carbohydrates

like fruits and vegetables take longer to digest and help sustain energy. Lean proteins such as fish, chicken, beans and lentils also “provide longer-lasting energy,” Phaneuf says, so ditch the donuts, give Cap’n Crunch the heave-ho, and begin each

day with a breakfast that includes healthful protein, followed by energy-enhancing foods for lunch, snacks and dinner. Also stay hydrated to get a leg up on energy, Shipley says. “Adequate water intake can definitely affect your cognitive function and your physical function, and how you feel in general,” she says. Aim for 1/2-1 ounce of water per pound of body weight. Someone who weighs 150 pounds, for example, should consume 75-150 ounces of water per day. Lastly, stay active, which improves energy and aids restorative sleep. “Staying active is very good for energy,” Phaneuf says. “The more active you are, the more exercise you get on a regular basis, the better you’ll sleep and the more energy you’re going to have during the day.” Don’t work out too close to bedtime though. A relaxing walk or light bike ride after dinner is fine, Phaneuf says, but the boost in vigor that strenuous activity provides, if it comes late in the day, can make it difficult to fall asleep. NH

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603 LIVING

Egg. It’s What’s for Breakfast. Something peckish this way comes

I

don’t cook. However, I am a fan of the prepared beefs and such, so since diners everywhere were either closed or restricted during the pandemic, I did have to learn to make something, lest I waste away. So, I did. For more than a year, I had the exact same thing for breakfast — every day. I got pretty good at whipping up something I like to call “egg,” which is good because if you live in New Hampshire, you have to own chickens or know someone who does. Chicken adjacent, as it were.

Egg Recipe courtesy of a chicken. Probably. Hopefully. Ingredients: Egg Directions: Cook the egg. Eat the egg. There’s actually a little more to it than that. Here are the detailed steps to preparing this delight so that you, too, can break your fast in a way that will make onlookers question your sanity/be impressed by your strange commitment to unerring routine:

1. For best results, put on good music first. Tom Petty usually results in good egg. Sometimes Gov’t Mule. Not Motorhead — it’s too early for Lemmy and if I wake anyone, they’ll want their own egg and it becomes this whole thing. 2. Cook and eat the egg. I guess there wasn’t too much more to it. The only thing I’ve done more often than make this breakfast is not wear pants. Data suggests I’ve made this recipe 412 times in the past 18 months, and I’ve only worn pants once, assuming chaps don’t count as pants. That’s a lot of eggs, and for this, I simultaneously tip my hat and apologize to the chickens of New Hampshire. Luckily, I can keep this egg stuff going. Our neighbors have ducks, which is kind of the same thing, so it gets them out of the chicken requirement, but it also seems about as random as having capybaras. One day recently, they kindly sent over a dozen duck eggs. (Note to self: Capybaras don’t lay eggs, I think.) If you’ve never

seen duck eggs, I’ll describe them: same as non-massive eggs except for they are Flintstone-size prehistorically enormous. I appreciated the neighborliness of the offer, but as someone dedicated to my entrenched routine, I couldn’t do it. These are not grocery-cleansed and sorted eggs, and I refuse to launch an investigation to learn where the smudges on the shells came from. Also, they came out of an animal — a warm animal — that I came to learn was named Biscuit. The whole thing kind of freaked me out. Are we cavefolk? We are not. So we did not eat them. And by “we,” I mean “me.” Because my wife immediately dug out our most colossal pot, boiled a few, made football-size deviled eggs and swore to Donald that they tasted just like chicken eggs. Thank you, neighbors, and thank you, Biscuit, the person I live with is a big fan of your work. But then, she still eats Vienna sausages on purpose, so she is not to be trusted. NH

BY BILL BURKE / ILLUSTRATION BY BRAD FITZPATRICK 96

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