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BEYOND PATTERN


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Henna Nadeem Summit 2000


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Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (hot)) (detail) 2009

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Leo Fitzmaurice Andrea Stokes Hampshire Flyer Carpet (DVD 2009 still) 2002


Adam King Ambivalent Apocalypse (detail) 2008-9

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Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram (detail) 2009


Andrea Stokes Module 1 2008

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Pamela So from the series Homeground (detail) 2005-9

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Henna Nadeem B&W Mountains 2001


Angharad Pearce-Jones -I--Beam (Trawst--I-) 2009

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Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009

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Pamela So Boudoir 2007

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Above and right Steve Messam Clad Newtown, Powys 2009


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Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space 2009


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Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space (detail) 2009


Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (cold)) (detail) 2009

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Andrea Stokes Just a Kiss (detail) 2009


Steve Messam Clad Newtown, Powys (detail) 2009

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Michael Brennand-Wood Babel 2008


Michael Brennand-Wood Footloose from the series Vase Attacks 2009

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Catherine Bertola Bluestockings 2009 and From the Palace at Hillstreet 2009 (see plate list)


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Catherine Bertola The Palace at HillStreet 2009 Assembling 94 individual 'fragments' embroidered by volunteers at their homes and in group sessions at Oriel Davies Gallery

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Angharad Pearce-Jones I-Beam (Trawst-I) 2009


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Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram (detail) 2009

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BEYOND PATTERN An exploration into the cultural meanings of pattern, through exhibition, commission, publication and debate


Foreword

Alex Boyd, Curator, Oriel Davies Gallery Whether we are conscious of it or not, pattern is omnipresent. It penetrates all aspects of our lives, finding its way into the home, workplace, street, garden and the landscape. Its existence is not confined by our own manufacture for it forms the foundation of many aspects of the natural world. However, it is the manner in which we utilise pattern in our lives that forms the basis of this project. We often think of pattern as simply adornment or perhaps a form of disguise, but it can also reflect a desire to communicate through a specific visual language. It might be that it represents cohesion and a sense of balance, thereby providing visual stimulation or a space for meditation. It can symbolise status or even be a device to convey ideas, express identity or specific ideologies, as well as presenting political beliefs or maintaining cultural traditions.

Beyond Pattern intertwines conceptual methods and process-focused practices, bringing together an array of media: from metalwork to embroidered textiles and temporary public installation to hand-cut collages. Works by eleven artists take us on a journey to explore these ideas and highlight how pattern can be, or has been, used as a social, cultural and political commentator that reaches beyond ornamentation and decoration. Whether these artists reference the domestic or public space, draw on contemporary or historical situations, comment on or observe aspects of society, subvert the familiar and question perception, they present a diverse reflection on the subject of pattern.

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Oriel Davies is delighted to have commissioned new work by Catherine Bertola and Angharad Pearce-Jones for the exhibition, alongside presenting new and recent work by Michael Brennand-Wood, Nisha Duggal, Leo Fitzmaurice, Doug Jones, Adam King, Henna Nadeem, Pamela So and Andrea Stokes. In addition, the Gallery is proud to have commissioned Clad, an ambitious temporary off-site work which the artist, Steve Messam created in Llanllwchaiarn, Newtown. We would like to offer our huge thanks to all the artists for their support and dedication to the project and Laura Mansfield and Lesley Millar for their insightful contributions to this catalogue. The full ambition of this project would not have been possible without generous support from The Laura Ashley Foundation, Arts Council England and an Arts Council of Wales Beacon Company Award. We also extend great thanks for the continued support from the EsmĂŠe Fairbairn Foundation and the Arts Council of Wales.

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Beyond Pattern: The dust on a butterfly’s wings

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Lesley Millar Professor of Textile Culture, University for the Creative Arts

The concept of ‘pattern’ is both simple and complex: a series of infinite sequences, which are embedded in our personal, cultural and universal narratives. As American mathematician, John Allen Paulos, describes it: ‘searching for patterns is basically what art and science is about. We are little islands of order in this kind of thermodynamic sea of swirling static, and we have to search for whatever patterns are out there to stay alive, and whether we do it through art or through science... we need patterns to survive.’ (In Our Time: 2007) Such a resonant statement at a time when we are strugglng, globally, to acknowledge the consequences of attempting to disregard or unpick these patterns. Patterns are present on the surface and within the surface; and, as Nano technology reveals, every pattern contains another micro-pattern. Patterns might be structural, an additive line or reductive trace (Ingold 2008:43). They may be created by a tool or by the movement of the body; they may be historically, biologically or psychologically determined; imposed or natural. This omnipresence of pattern could be overwhelming and daunting to navigate. However, it is possible to create loose and overarching categories that can be helpful orientation points. A pattern may be an organic or designed arrangement of lines, shapes or colours on, or within, a surface. It could be an exemplar to be copied, or be customary methods of behaviour, or a description of thought processes.

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It is interesting how these simple categories illuminate the different pathways referenced by the works in the exhibition Beyond Pattern, moving our perception away from the location of pattern solely within decoration. In their exploration of the territory beyond pattern, the artists are also forming connections with ancient civilisations, aboriginal peoples, Celtic tribes – so many – who have used pattern to communicate and to find a means of understanding and negotiating our relationship with the underlying patterns of those that govern our lives. A favourite pattern of mine demonstrates the multi-tasking role of ‘pattern’. It is the pattern, as notated on paper, created by the feet of the dancers as they enact the Tango. This is a dance that is a physical response to a particular rhythmic pattern of driving and heady music that fills the room, the head and the body. Inscribed on paper, the precise footprints and the expressive lines of movement are both abstract and concrete. The notation marks stab, swirl and repeat, forming magical patterns of connection and separation; recording and enabling the repetition of that performance. A p a s s i o n a t e ritual, set out as a pattern, ready for imitation. When faced with a multitude of possibilities as to what is a constructed pattern (as opposed to a random assemblage in which we may perceive a patterning), it may be useful to acknowledge that, classically, in terms of ornamentation, we can identify four basic types. There are those patterns made from different motifs combined in a non-repetitive manner, or those using the same motif repeated in a predictable order. There are also patterns comprised of different motifs, changing in size or in other aspects, with a definite organisation. Finally there are patterns that contain a motif that forms a single ‘picture’ (Trilling 2001). Japanese kimono provide wonderful examples of all these approaches,

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which are often combined on one garment. For example, a single motif will sweep across the surface, accompanied by other different motifs – fans, chrysanthemums etc. – in an aesthetic rather than predictive arrangement. Other kimono, using shibori fabrics, may contain both a repeating pattern and different motifs floating over the surface. These overlapping approaches demonstrate that we do not have to break or de-construct a pattern to step outside specific definitions; transformations may also be achieved whilst still acknowledging the conventions that form the context for the work. Patterns in ornamentation are built from threads and traces, from positive and negative spaces, from marks and gestures. They are constructs that have emerged from the society in which we live. Traditionally such patterns have provided a language of place and identity, codified cultural texts. The Old English term writan carried the specific meaning ‘to incise runic letters in stone’ (Howe 1992:61) – a form of reductive pattern making. The Saami peoples of Lapland make a series of cuts in the ears of their animals to create a pattern of different shapes, which serve to identify individual owners. Each pattern is understood as a word and cutting the mark is an act of writing (Ingold 2008). In many societies pattern in cloth is specific to place; every village, every region would have its own particular pattern, which could be identified as being from that precise place. If a pattern from one place were to be discovered in another place, then it would be understood to be carrying a message of displacement. However, whilst the repetition of pattern is proof of continuity through time, it is also true that in the repetition over the years, maybe hundreds or thousands of years, the original context is often lost. For example, it is said that in Afghanistan there are folk patterns that are figurations of the sea. Afghanistan is land-locked; the tribal peoples of Afghanistan have no relationship with the sea. Yet the sea is present in their traditional patterns, telling an ancient story of migration (Becker & Millar 2005). And so we

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become aware of the narrative function of pattern as a ‘visual language’ constantly morphing via trade and migration...The study of patterns reveals much in anthropological terms about our spiritual, cultural and sociological history.’ (Brennand-Wood 2007) The narrative of place, embedded in the surface of everyday cloth, has, throughout time, been understood as a statement of cultural particularity. For the Navaho people, the pattern of their individual blanket was a statement of identity and a record of ancestry. The Hmong peoples of China were forcibly divided by the Han Chinese and their language outlawed, its use punishable by death. To preserve their language, Hmong women hid their alphabet in the intricate designs of pa ndau, the flower-cloth embroidered textiles used for clothes and burial shrouds. Their original alphabet has now long been forgotten, the sounds were written only in pictorial form, handed down as design motifs from one generation to the next. The flower-cloth patterns reinforced their ethnic identity for centuries. Indeed, one of the names Hmong tribes called themselves was ‘embroidery people’. (Fournier 1987) I have written elsewhere (Millar 2007) of examples from the 20th century, where artists living in occupied countries or under repressive regimes used pattern, predominantly in cloth, as a subversive tool of protest, a covert observance of cultural particularity and national identity. In the Soviet occupied Baltic countries abstraction in art was forbidden, whereas pattern, being merely decorative, could slip ‘under the radar’. Also the Japanese use of the highly patterned Jo-mon aesthetic during the American occupation after the second world war, re-establishing the connections of contemporary Japan of the day with is ancient roots. In Chile the Association of the Relatives of the Disappeared took the traditional appliqué technique known as Arpilleras and used it to record those things they could not speak of: what they had seen and experienced, so that others would know. (Bacic 2008)

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Pattern trails, hidden structures: the Navaho Spider Woman weaving the patterns of our relationship with the land; lace threads patterning the air and delineating space – your space, our space, MySpace; the electronic network of the internet echoing the aboriginal Songlines, tracing unseen patterns of connection across continents. If something is so all-pervasive, is it possible to look ‘beyond’ it? Beyond the decoration, beyond the learned behaviour, beyond the patterns of the earth and the universe? For me, when Ernest Hemmingway writes of ‘the dust on a butterfly’s wings’, he is taking us beyond pattern – beyond the predictable sequence, to the unpredictable pattern of chance and its consequences for the pre-ordained.

Hemingway, E. (1964), A Moveable Feast, ch. 17: “His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly's wings”. 2 Dr Frances Geesin in conversation with the author 29/11/09. 1

Bibliography Bacic, R. (2008) Catalogue of Chilean Arpilleras. The Art of Survival: International and Irish Quilts. Harbour Museum, Derry, N. Ireland. Becker, L. (Director), Millar, L (Author). (2005) What is Cloth to Me? Video. Brennand-Wood, M. Web statement www.clothandculturenow.com. Visited 14/11/09. Fournier, M. Hmong stories and Story Cloth in The World and I Online. Article 13437. www.worldandihomeschool.com/public_articles/1987/september/wis13437.asp visited 24/09/08 Howe, N. (1992). ‘The Cultural Construction of Reading in Anglo-Saxon England’ in Boyarin (ed.) The Ethnography of Reading. Berkeley, CA. University of California Press. Ingold, T. (2008). Lines: a brief history. London. Routledge. In Our Time’ John Allen Paulos in conversation with Marina Warner and Melvyn Bragg. BBC Radio 4, 25/11/07. Millar, L. (2007). Cloth & Culture Now. Farnham. University for the Creative Arts. Trilling, J. (2001). The Language of Ornament. London. Thames & Hudson.

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Lesley Millar has worked as a curator specialising in textiles since 1994 and has been project director for 6 major international touring exhibitions featuring textile artists, with particular focus on contemporary textile practice in the UK and Japan. In 2005, as an outcome of an AHRC Fellowship, she established the Anglo Japanese Textile Research Centre at the University for the Creative Arts. Her project Cloth & Culture Now (2008) explored the transition from traditional to contemporary textile practice in countries where textile has played an important role in the expression of cultural identity. She is currently leading a collaborative research project (outcome 2011) between the University for the Creative Arts and Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, in which she is investigating the relationship between lace and the built environment. She writes regularly about textile practice in Britain and Japan, including a monograph on Chiyoko Tanaka. In 2007 she was appointed Professor of Textile Culture at the University for the Creative Arts and in 2008 received the Japan Society Award for significant contribution to Anglo-Japanese relations. www.transitionandinfluence.com

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Working through pattern: The weaving of traditional and contemporary practice Laura Mansfield

Beyond Pattern brings together a range of different artists’ works that share a use of pattern, whether through decorative motifs, repeated rhythmical forms or familiar fragments of everyday imagery subsumed into rich visual designs. Traditionally, the term ‘pattern’ is rooted to notions of decorative and craft based practices rather than the realms of high art. However, throughout art history, artists and designers have used pattern as a means of cultural reference. With its emphasis on narrative and communication the use of pattern in this exhibition often uncovers and recalls past practices, from traditional weaving and lace work to nineteenth century indust r i a l production and their corresponding cultural discourses. A reference to historical formations is most pertinent in Catherine Bertola’s commission From the Palace at HillStreet. The work involves the recreation of an original carpet design by Robert Adam, commissioned for the dressing room of Elizabeth Montagu circa 1766. Montagu was a founding member of the Georgian Bluestocking Circle, a group of progressive ladies who promoted education for women beyond that of domesticity and needlework. Elizabeth Montagu’s dressing room became the meeting point for the group where contemporary topics were debated: expanding women’s viewpoints and opinions and learning through discussion. For Beyond Pattern Bertola has recreated segments of the original carpet design. Sections of the design were distributed to a network of participants who embroidered the individual pieces over the months leading up to the exhibition. Working at home 51


and in social sewing groups organised by the Gallery, the individual participants both mirrored the limited domestic education of needlework and home-making criticised by the Bluestockings, and evoked their ethos of collective learning and development. The use of collective action as a means of communication and a suggestion of narrative is further present in an unusual installation by Doug Jones. A series of child-size figures form a procession across the gallery space overseen by a hooded adult. The figures wear priest-like vestments in a variety of patterns, their faces obscured by the clothing design. The grouping immediately brings forth narrative references whereas the array of patterned fabrics allude to different hierarchical orders, social groups or cultural identities - our familiarity with the relationship of patterned designs and religious iconography producing a plethora of associations. Traces of narrative also proliferate throughout the sculptural installation by Adam King. King’s fusion of objects, threads and throwaway regalia sprawl organically across the gallery space. The stretch of seemingly disparate objects is held together by a network of tentative threads that suggest varying lines of communication between each component part. The fragments of narrative strands create a tension between the complete image and the fragility of its physical materials, which teeter on the edge of collapse. Similarly, in Leo Fitzmaurice’s rich floor patterns comprised of layered flyers and advertising imagery, the patterned formation could easily slide apart, the rhythmical image disappearing just as a loose thread of cotton or lace might be pulled accidentally and the pattern unravelled. Fitzmaurice uses the mass of visual imagery we encounter in our everyday environment and transforms it into a swirl of colour and form punctuating the gallery floor. The banal is subsumed into the decorative and the public arena is appropriated into intimate private designs. Allusions to the patterned threads of lacework and embroidery are woven throughout the exhibition. Accompanying her work From the Palace at HillStreet, Bertola exhibits four drawings of laced tights, each pair named after a member of the Bluestocking Circle. The tights are part of a series of 52


twelve works commemorating the core members of the Georgian discussion group and simultaneously referencing the history of lace, whose early manufacture was through female labour in a domestic environment. The making of lace cloth involved ‘stitching the air with threads’: the descriptive phrase, a contradiction between the lightness of the thread and the repetitive hours of labour required to produce a single pattern. The intellectual endeavour and ambition for learning inherent in the Bluestocking Circle contradicts with the traditional social conventions of women’s domestic roles embodied by Bertola’s lace tights. Throughout the exhibition relationships between the domestic production of needlework and the formation of a gendered identity critically reflects both historical and contemporary roles of women in society. Pamela So’s photographic series Homeground investigates and discovers the paraphernalia, ornaments and trinkets of her mother’s house. The placement and collection of these objects are infused with a series of histories and narratives that draw upon her shared Chinese and English heritage. So uses the appearance of English decorative pattern, the floral garden motifs of curtains and wallpaper, alongside traditional Chinese designs with specific symbolic references (such as the chrysanthemum flower connoting long life), to reflect upon her mother’s and her own formation of identity. In Boudoir, So reconstructs her mother’s dressing table, a very private and personal space specific to her daily routine; the ritual of make-up and jewellery, a space infused with her identity. Upon the tabletop So re-creates the patterned lace cloth used to decorate the surface in dusted talcum powder. The sweet perfume of the powder and the delicacy of the lace pattern creating a distinctly feminine installation conveying something of both her mother’s identity and broader associations of femininity held in decorative designs. Pattern’s ability to connote a specific personal, gendered or cultural identity can be further seen in Henna Nadeem’s collages, where found images of landscapes are interwoven with patterns and motifs from a range of different cultures, creating rich sites of association and critique. Summit depicts fragments of a mountain merged with a pattern of natural forms. The 53


interlaced imagery suggests an exoticisation of both the mountain image and the culture from which the pattern derived, with both being reduced to surface forms of aesthetic value. Whereas some of the works refer to pattern from non-English cultural heritage, (such as Pamela So and Henna Nadeem’s pieces), a use of flora and fauna motifs throughout the exhibition implies a certain Englishness, and plays with the idea of an English identity. Andrea Stokes’ video installation Hampshire seems to explore this most directly. Using net curtains common to many British homes, Stokes cuts into the floral patterns of the fabric stretched taut in front of the camera. In cutting away the banal representations of nature, a garden is slowly revealed. The removal of the floral motifs emphasises both the privacy of the curtains and the aspiration they seem to suggest for an idyllic English country garden: the title Hampshire suggesting the wealth and rural topiary of the Home Counties. Cutting as an action is both a means to create and destroy an image. In Hampshire the scissors’ ‘cut’ reveals the ideological aspirations held within the cheap net fabric whose floral motifs mimic the garden beyond. Angharad Pearce-Jones’ use of cutting is a similar process of layering and association. Pearce-Jones has installed a steel girder jutting across the gallery space, its heavy metal surface punctuated with hand-cut, welded motifs. Yet the motifs are derived from construction company logos, synonymous with new-builds, the transformation of landscape and public space, and the desire for wealth associated with the construction industry. In the gallery the girder’s associations with industry and development are reconfigured to allude to the seemingly contrasting and private realm of ornate pattern, intricate detail, and skilled finesse. A merging of contemporary industrial practices with the intricacies of pattern is further visible in the work of Michael Brennand-Wood. The artist combines pre-programmed sewing machine patterns with three-dimensional objects which, once viewed in unison, echo the traditional patterns of early stitched and woven textiles. The juxtaposition of technical formation and traditional aesthetics constitutes a play on contemporary and historical means of pattern production, from the private and domestic to the machine 54


orientated and industrial. Indeed, there is a dialogue between many of these works that questions and reconfigures traditional modes of production: the drawings and depictions of lace, created by a physical act of intensive reproduction, involve a near-mechanical process which reflects the industry involved in the production of delicately patterned fabrics; the hand-crafted structure by Angharad Pearce-Jones reveals, through repeated patterns of developers’ logos, a transformation of weight, industrial purpose and manufacture; Nisha Duggal’s drawings, further combine contemporary technology with the labour intensive forms of traditional production methods. Using squares of colour-coded symbols akin to those used in needlework, she maps out the entire image for replication. This is then robustly reproduced with the physical act of drawing, countering the minimal movement used for computer programming and mirroring traditional labour required in the cutting, weaving and stitching of fabric. Outside the gallery space, Clad, a commission by Steve Messam, highlights traditional means of production and pattern’s association with a specific identity or cultural affiliation. Cladding a timber-framed building with locally produced fleece, Messam creates a coat around the structure that draws upon its existing identity, the pattern of the wooden beams mirrored in his use of black and white fleece. The black and white pattern references both the distinctive markings of a local breed of sheep and the colour and design of vernacular architecture, igniting a series of associations on the role and identity of the locale and its formation through agriculture, architecture and aesthetics. Pattern here becomes a signifier of a host of cultural and social associations that both draws on the traditional and reconfigures established means of production and expected designs of imagery.

Beyond Pattern presents a shared interest and experimentation with patterned forms. Individual works reference a diversity of sources that proves pattern as an aesthetic clearly pertinent to the contemporary domain; a visual formation that refers both to public and private, contemporary and historical means of labour, leisure and luxury. 55


Laura Mansfield is a writer and researcher living in Manchester. She has written on a variety of artists work for AN Magazine, Situations Papers, Spike Island Gallery, Arty and Circa Magazine. In 2006 she produced and edited the publication Spike Island Journal 2 Currency and Exchange, an international exchange of texts exploring notions of local and global identity. Over the last two years she has worked closely with the artist Daphne Wright writing regularly on Wright’s practise and delivering papers on her work at the International Conference of Death, Dying and Disposal (University of Bath 2007) and The National Gallery of Ireland (2008). Laura has also worked on a number of public art projects including Intervention Decoration in Frome Somerset (May 2008) and Spectacular Vernacular Folkestone, Kent (2008). Since completing an MA in Cultural and Critical Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London, in October 2008 she has been a central member of the Corridor 8 editorial team, a new visual arts magazine based in the North West. For the first edition she compiled a visual map of participatory art projects across the northwest and devised an audio guide for Manchester, based on a walk performed by the writer Iain Sinclair. A narrative of Sinclair’s walk was available as a pod cast to download and use across the city. In September 2009 she completed a commission for the Great North Run cultural program in collaboration with the artist Amy Feneck. Together, they worked closely with a Newcastle running group devising a billboard image and series of texts to be printed in the local paper, producing an alternative map of the city comprised of physical journeys and abstracted text. Laura is currently working for the Contemporary Art Society developing a guide book to public collections of contemporary art throughout the UK (outcome 2010).

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BEYOND PATTERN Archwiliad o ystyron diwylliannol patrwm, drwy arddangos, comisiynu, cyhoeddi a thrafod


Rhagair Alex Boyd, Curadur, Oriel Davies Gallery Mae patrwm o’n hamgylch drwy’r adeg, p’un ai a ydym yn ymwybodol ohono neu beidio. Mae’n ymdreiddio i mewn i bob agwedd o’n bywydau, a gellir dod o hyd iddo yn y cartref, yn y gweithle, yn y stryd, yn yr ardd neu yn y tirwedd. Nid trwy gynhyrchiant yn unig y mae bodolaeth patrwm yn cael ei ddiffinio - mae’n bodoli hefyd trwy sawl agwedd o’r byd naturiol. Fodd bynnag, y ffordd rydyn ni’n defnyddio patrwm yn ein bywydau sy’n ffurfio sylfaen y prosiect hwn. Yn aml, rydym yn meddwl am batrwm yn syml fel addurniad, neu efallai, fel rhyw fath o guddwisg hyd yn oed, ond hefyd, mae’n gallu adlewyrchu awydd ynom i gyfathrebu drwy iaith weledol benodol. Mae posibiliad ei fod yn cynrychioli cydlyniad a synnwyr o gydbwysedd, ac o’r herwydd, yn darparu ysgogiad gweledol neu le i synfyfyrio. Gallai symboleiddio statws neu fod yn ddyfais hyd yn oed i gyfleu syniadau, i fynegi hunaniaeth neu athroniaethau penodol a hefyd, i gyflwyno credau gwleidyddol neu i gynnal traddodiadau diwylliannol. Mae Beyond Pattern yn cyfuno dulliau cysyniadol ac ymarferion sy’n canolbwyntio ar broses, a’n dod â chyflwyniad eang o gyfryngau at ei gilydd: o waith metel i decstilau wedi’u brodio, ac o osodiad cyhoeddus dros dro i ludwaith sydd wedi’u torri â llaw. Mae gwaith gan un ar ddeg artist yn mynd â ni ar daith sy’n archwilio’r syniadau hyn, ac sy’n amlygu sut gallai, neu sut mae patrwm wedi bod yn cael ei ddefnyddio fel sylwebydd cymdeithasol, diwylliannol a gwleidyddol sy’n ymestyn tu hwnt i ddibenion addurno. P’un ai a yw’r artistiaid hyn yn cyfeirio at y man domestig neu gyhoeddus, yn tynnu ar sefyllfaoedd cyfoes neu hanesyddol, yn sylwebu neu’n arsylwi ar agweddau o gymdeithas, neu’n gwyrdroi’r cyfarwydd a’n cwestiynu canfyddiad, maen nhw’n cyflwyno adlewyrchiad gwahanol ar y pwnc patrwm. 60


Mae’n bleser gan Oriel Davies fod wedi comisiynu gwaith newydd gan Catherine Bertola ag Angharad Pearce-Jones ar gyfer yr arddangosfa, ochr yn ochr â gwaith newydd a diweddar gan Michael Brennand-Wood, Nisha Duggal, Leo Fitzmaurice, Doug Jones, Adam King, Henna Nadeem, Pamela So ag Andrea Stokes. Yn ogystal, mae’n bleser gan yr Oriel fod wedi comisiynu Clad, gwaith uchelgeisiol oddi-ar safle y mae’r artist Steve Messam wedi’i greu yn Llanllwchaiarn, Y Drenewydd. Hoffem ddiolch yn fawr iawn i’n holl artistiaid am eu cymorth a’u hymrwymiad i’r prosiect, ac i Laura Mansfield a Lesley Millar am eu cyfraniadau mewnweledol i’r catalog hwn. Ni fyddai uchelgais llawn y prosiect yma wedi bod yn bosib heb gymorth hael Sefydliad Laura Ashley, Cyngor Celfyddydau Lloegr a Gwobr Cwmni Beacon Cyngor Celfyddydau Cymru. Hoffem ddiolch hefyd i Sefydliad Esmée Fairbairn a Chyngor Celfyddydau Cymru am eu cefnogaeth barhaus.

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Tu Hwnt i Batrwm: Y llwch ar adenydd y glöyn byw

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Lesley Millar Athro Diwylliant Tecstilau, Prifysgol y Celfyddydau Creadigol Mae’r cysyniad o ‘batrwm’ yn syml a chymhleth ar yr un pryd: cyfres o ddilyniannau diddiwedd, sydd wedi eu sefydlu yn ein naratif personol, diwylliannol a chyffredinol. Fel mae’r mathemategydd Americanaidd, John Allen Paulos, yn ei ddisgrifio: ‘chwilio am batrymau yw’r hyn mae celf a gwyddoniaeth yn ei olygu. Rydyn ni’n ynysoedd bychain yn y môr thermodynamig yma o statig sy’n chwyrlïog, ac mae'n rhaid i ni chwilio am ba bynnag batrymau sydd allan yna er mwyn cadw’n fyw, a p’run ai’n bod ni’n gwneud hynny trwy gelf neu wyddoniaeth... rydyn ni angen patrymau i oroesi.’ (In Our Time: 2007) Datganiad mor gysain ar adeg pan rydyn ni’n ymdrechu’n fyd-eang i gydnabod canlyniadau ceisio diystyru neu ddatod y patrymau hyn. Mae patrymau’n bresennol ar y wyneb ac oddi fewn i’r wyneb; ac fel mae technoleg Nano wedi ei ddatgelu, mae pob patrwm yn cynnwys patrwm micro arall. Gallai patrymau fod yn strwythurol, yn llinell o ychwanegion neu’n ôl-ostyngol (Ingold 2008:43). Fe allan nhw gael eu creu gan declyn neu gan symudiad y corff; fe allan nhw gael eu pennu’n hanesyddol, yn fiolegol neu’n seicolegol; wedi eu gorfodi neu’n naturiol. Gall yr hollbresenoldeb hwn o batrwm fod yn llethol ac yn anodd ei lywio. Er hynny, mae’n bosib creu categorïau bras a chyffredinol a allai fod yn bwyntiau

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cyfeirio defnyddiol. Gallai patrwm fod yn organig neu’n drefniant trefnedig o linellau, siapiau neu liwiau ar, neu oddi fewn i arwyneb. Gallai fod yn enghraifft batrymol i’w gopïo, neu’n ddulliau ymddygiad arferol, neu’n ddisgrifiad o brosesau meddwl. Mae’n ddiddorol sut mae’r categorïau syml yma’n egluro’r gwahanol lwybrau a gyfeirir atyn nhw gan y gweithiau yn yr arddangosfa Beyond Pattern, a’n symud ein canfyddiad i ffwrdd oddi wrth leoliad y patrwm oddi fewn i addurn. Yn eu harchwiliad o’r gofod y tu hwnt i batrwm, mae’r artistiaid hefyd yn ffurfio cysylltiadau gyda gwareiddiadau hynafol, cynfrodorion, llwythau Celtaidd - cynifer ohonyn nhw - sydd wedi defnyddio patrwm i gyfathrebu ac i ddod o hyd i ffyrdd o ddeall a datrys ein perthynas gyda phatrymau gwaelodol y rhai sy’n llywodraethu’n bywydau. Mae un o fy hoff batrymau i yn dangos rôl amlorchwyl ‘patrwm’. Dyma’r patrwm, fel y’i hanodir ar bapur, a grëir gan draed y dawnswyr wrth iddyn nhw wneud y Tango. Mae hon yn ddawns sy’n ymateb corfforol i batrwm rhythmig penodol o gerddoriaeth yriadol a rhythmig sy’n llenwi’r ystafell, y pen a’r corff. Wedi eu hanodi ar bapur, mae’r olion traed manwl a’r llinellau mynegiannol o symudiad yn haniaethol a’n goncrid ar yr un pryd. Mae’r marciau anodi’n gwanu, yn chwyrlio a’n ailadrodd, gan ffurfio patrymau hudol o gysylltu a gwahanu; a’n cofnodi a’n galluogi i ailadrodd y perfformiad hwnnw. Defod angerddol, wedi ei nodi fel patrwm, yn barod i gael ei dynwared. Pan gawn ein hwynebu gan nifer o bosibiliadau yngly^ n â’r hyn yw patrwm wedi’i lunio (yn hytrach na chasgliad ar hap y gallwn efallai nodi patrwm ynddo), gallai fod yn ddefnyddiol cydnabod, yn glasurol, yn nhermau addurniad, y gallwn nodi pedwar math sylfaenol. Mae’r patrymau hynny a grëir o wahanol fotiffau wedi eu cyfuno mewn dull sydd ddim yn ailadroddus, neu’r rhai hynny sy’n defnyddio’r un motiff wedi ei ailadrodd mewn trefn y

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gellid ei rhagweld. Mae yna hefyd batrymau wedi eu creu o wahanol fotiffau, sy’n newid mewn maint neu agweddau eraill, gyda threfn bendant. Yn olaf, mae yna batrymau sy’n cynnwys motiff sy’n ffurfio ‘llun’ sengl (Trilling 2001). Mae’r cimono o Japan yn cynnig enghreifftiau gwych o’r holl agweddau yma, sy’n cael eu cyfuno yn aml, ar un dilledyn. Er enghraifft, bydd motiff sengl yn llifo ar draws y wyneb, ynghyd â nifer o fotiffau eraill – ffannau, eurflodau ac ati – mewn trefniant esthetig yn hytrach nag un y gellid ei ragfynegi. Gallai cimono eraill, yn defnyddio ffabrigau ‘shibori’, gynnwys patrwm sy’n cael ei ailadrodd a motiffau gwahanol sy’n arnofio ar draws y wyneb. Mae’r dulliau yma sy’n gorgyffwrdd yn arddangos nad oes rhaid i ni dorri neu ddadwneud patrwm er mwyn camu tu allan i ddiffiniadau penodol; gellir cyflawni trawsffurfiannau hefyd, tra’n dal i gydnabod y confensiynau sy’n ffurfio cyd-destun y gwaith. Mae patrymau mewn addurn wedi eu llunio o edafedd ac olinau, o fannau positif a negatif, o farciau ac ystumiau. Maen nhw’n lluniadau sydd wedi ymddangos o’r gymdeithas rydyn ni’n byw ynddi. Yn draddodiadol, mae patrymau fel hyn wedi darparu iaith lle a hunaniaeth, a thestunau diwylliannol wedi eu cyfundrefnu. Roedd y term Hen Saesneg writan yn golygu’r ystyr penodol ‘i endorri llythrennau rwnig mewn carreg’ (Howe 1992:61) - math o wneud patrymau gostyngol. Mae pobloedd Saami o’r Lapdir yn gwneud cyfres o doriadau yng nghlustiau eu hanifeiliaid i greu patrymau o wahanol siapiau, sy’n helpu i nodi perchnogion unigol. Mae pob patrwm yn cael ei ddeall fel gair, ac mae torri’r marc yn weithred o ysgrifennu (Ingold 2008). Mewn nifer o gymdeithasau, mae patrwm mewn defnyddiau’n benodol i le; byddai pob pentref, pob rhanbarth â’i batrwm arbennig ei hun a allai gael ei adnabod fel dod o’r lle arbennig hwnnw. Petai patrwm o un lle’n cael ei ddarganfod mewn lle arall, yna byddai’n cael ei ddeall ei fod yn cario neges o ddadleoliad.

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Er hynny, er bod ailadrodd patrwm yn brawf o ddilyniant trwy amser, mae hefyd yn wir, yn y broses o ailadrodd dros y blynyddoedd, efallai cannoedd neu filoedd o flynyddoedd, bod y cyd-destun gwreiddiol yn aml yn cael ei golli. Er enghraifft, dywedir yn Afghanistan bod yna batrymau gwerin sy’n cynrychioli’r môr. Mae Afghanistan yng nghanol tir; does gan bobloedd lwythol Afghanistan ddim cysylltiad â’r môr. Eto mae’r môr yn bresennol yn eu patrymau traddodiadol, a’n adrodd hen hanes o ymfudiad (Becker & Millar 2005). Ac felly rydyn ni’n dod yn ymwybodol o swyddogaeth naratif fel ‘iaith weledol’ sy’n newid trwy’r amser trwy gyfrwng masnach ac ymfudo... Mae’r astudiaeth o batrymau’n dangos llawer mewn termau anthropolegol am ein hanes ysbrydol, diwylliannol a chymdeithasegol.’ (Brennand-Wood 2007) Mae naratif o le, sydd wedi’i gynnwys yn arwynebedd defnyddiau bob dydd, wedi cael ei ddeall fel datganiad o hynodrwydd diwylliannol trwy gydol amser. Yn achos y bobl Navaho, roedd patrwm eu blancedi unigol yn ddatganiad o hunaniaeth ac yn gofnod o’u llinach. Cafodd pobloedd Hmong o Tsieina eu rhannu trwy orfodaeth gan y Tsieineaid Han a chafodd eu hiaith ei gwahardd, a chanlyniad ei defnyddio oedd cosb marwolaeth. I gadw’u hiaith, roedd gwragedd Hmong yn cuddio’u Wyddor yng nghynlluniau cywrain y pa ndau, y tecstilau wedi’u pwytho â blodau a ddefnyddiwyd ar gyfer dillad ac amdoeau. Mae eu gwyddor wreiddiol wedi ei hen anghofio erbyn hyn, gan mai dim ond ar ffurf ddarluniadol yr ysgrifennwyd y synau, a’u trosglwyddo fel motiffau cynlluniau o un genhedlaeth i’r nesaf. Fe wnaeth patrymau’r tecstilau blodau atgyfnerthu eu hunaniaeth ethnig am ganrifoedd. Yn wir, un o’r enwau yr oedd llwythau Hmong yn galw’u hunain oedd y ‘bobl brodwaith’. (Fournier 1987) Rydw i wedi ysgrifennu mewn man arall (Millar 2007) am enghreifftiau o’r 20fed ganrif, lle’r oedd artistiaid oedd yn byw mewn gwledydd wedi eu meddiannu neu dan gyfundrefnau gormesol yn defnyddio patrwm, mewn

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defnyddiau’n bennaf, fel offer tanseiliol o brotest, mesur cudd o hynodwedd ddiwylliannol a hunaniaeth genedlaethol. Yn y gwledydd Baltig oedd ym meddiant Sofietaidd, roedd haniaeth mewn celf wedi ei wahardd, ond gallai patrwm, gan ei fod yn addurn yn unig, gael ei ganiatáu. Hefyd y defnydd Japaneaidd o’r esthetig Jo-mon hynod batrymog yn ystod y meddiant Americanaidd ar ôl yr ail ryfel byd, yn ailsefydlu cysylltiadau Japan gyfoes yr adeg honno gyda’i gwreiddiau hynafol. Yn Chile, cymrodd yr ‘Association of the Relatives of the Disappeared’ y dechneg appliqué draddodiadol a elwid yn Arpilleras, a’i defnyddio i gofnodi’r hyn na allen nhw siarad amdanyn nhw: beth roedden nhw wedi ei weld a’i brofi, fel y byddai eraill yn gwybod. (Bacic 2008) Llwybrau patrymau, strwythurau cudd: ‘Spider Woman’ y Navaho yn gwau patrymau’n perthynas â’r tir; edafedd les yn creu patrymau yn yr awyr ac yn darlunio’r gofod – eich gofod, ein gofod, MySpace; rhwydwaith electronig y rhyngrwyd yn adleisio caneuon y cynfrodorion, yn olrhain patrymau cyswllt nas gellir eu gweld ar draws y cyfandiroedd. Os yw rhywbeth mor holl dreiddiol, a yw hi’n bosibl edrych ‘y tu hwnt’ iddo? Y tu hwnt i’r addurn, y tu hwnt i’r ymddygiad y dysgwyd, y tu hwnt i batrymau’r ddaear a’r bydysawd? I mi. Pan fo Ernest Hemmingway’n ysgrifennu am ‘y llwch ar adenydd y glöyn byw’, mae’n mynd â ni y tu hwnt i batrwm – y tu hwnt i’r dilyniant y gellir ei ragfynegi, i batrwm nas gellir ei ddarogan sy’n eiddo i siawns a’i oblygiadau i’r rhagordeiniedig.

Hemingway, E. (1964), A Moveable Feast, ch. 17: “His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly's wings”. 2 Dr Frances Geesin in conversation with the author 29/11/09. 1

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Llyfryddiaeth Bacic, R. (2008) Catalogue of Chilean Arpilleras. The Art of Survival: International and Irish Quilts. Harbour Museum, Derry, N. Ireland. Becker, L. (Director), Millar, L (Author). (2005) What is Cloth to Me? Video. Brennand-Wood, M. Web statement www.clothandculturenow.com. Visited 14/11/09. Fournier, M. Hmong stories and Story Cloth in The World and I Online. Article 13437. www.worldandihomeschool.com/public_articles/1987/september/wis13437.asp visited 24/09/08 Howe, N. (1992). ‘The Cultural Construction of Reading in Anglo-Saxon England’ in Boyarin (ed.) The Ethnography of Reading. Berkeley, CA. University of California Press. Ingold, T. (2008). Lines: a brief history. London. Routledge. In Our Time’ John Allen Paulos in conversation with Marina Warner and Melvyn Bragg. BBC Radio 4, 25/11/07. Millar, L. (2007). Cloth & Culture Now. Farnham. University for the Creative Arts. Trilling, J. (2001). The Language of Ornament. London. Thames & Hudson.

Mae Lesley Millar wedi gweithio fel curadur sy’n arbenigo mewn tecstilau ers 1994, ac mae hi wedi bod yn gweithio fel cyfarwyddwr prosiect ar gyfer 6 arddangosfa teithiol rhyngwladol sy’n cynnwys artistiaid tecstil, gan ganolbwyntio’n arbennig ar arferion tecstilau cyfoes yn y DU ac yn Japan. Yn 2005, ar ôl ennill Cymrodoriaeth yr AHRC, fe sefydlodd y Ganolfan Ymchwil Tecstilau Eingl-Japaneaidd ym Mhrifysgol y Celfyddydau Creadigol. Fe wnaeth ei phrosiect Cloth & Culture Now (2008) archwilio’r newid o arferion tecstilau traddodiadol i arferion tecstilau cyfoes mewn gwledydd lle mae tecstilau wedi chwarae rôl bwysig mewn mynegi hunaniaeth ddiwylliannol. Ar hyn o bryd, mae hi’n arwain prosiect ymchwil ar y cyd (canlyniad yn 2011) rhwng Prifysgol y Celfyddydau Creadigol ac Amgueddfa ac Oriel Gelf Birmingham, lle mae hi’n archwilio’r berthynas rhwng les a’r amgylchedd adeiledig. Mae hi’n ysgrifennu’n rheolaidd ynghylch arferion tecstilau ym Mhrydain a Japan, ac mae hi wedi ysgrifennu monograff ar Chiyoko Tanak. Yn 2007, fe’i hapwyntiwyd yn Athro Diwylliant Tecstilau ym Mhrifysgol y Celfyddydau Creadigol ac yn 2008, fe dderbyniodd hi Wobr Cymdeithas Japan am ei chyfraniad sylweddol i gysylltiadau Eingl-Japaneaidd. www.transitionandinfluence.com

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Gweithio drwy batrwm: Uno arfer traddodiadol a chyfoes Laura Mansfield Mae Beyond Pattern yn dod ag ystod o waith gan wahanol artistiaid at ei gilydd sy’n rhannu defnydd o batrwm, p’un ai drwy fotiffau addurniadol, ffurfiau rhythmig sy’n cael eu hailadrodd, neu ddarnau cyfarwydd o bethau pob dydd sy’n cael eu trosglwyddo i ddyluniadau gweledol cyfoeth. Yn draddodiadol, mae’r term ‘patrwm’ yn cael ei gysylltu gyda syniadau o arferion addurniadol a rhai sy’n seiliedig ar grefft yn hytrach na meysydd uchel gelf. Fodd bynnag, drwy gydol hanes celf, mae artistiaid a dylunwyr wedi defnyddio patrwm fel dull o gyfeiriad diwylliannol. Gyda'i bwyslais ar naratif a chyfathrebu, mae’r defnydd o batrwm yn yr arddangosfa hon yn aml yn datgelu ac yn cofio arferion y gorffennol, o'r hen arfer traddodiadol o wehyddu a chynhyrchu les, i gynhyrchiant diwydiannol yn y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg a’u sgyrsiau diwylliedig cyfatebol. Mae cyfeiriad at ffurfiau hanesyddol fwyaf amlwg yng nghomisiwn Catherine Bertola From the Palace at HillStreet. Mae’r gwaith yn cynnwys ail-greu dyluniad carped gwreiddiol gan Robert Adam, a gomisiynwyd ar gyfer ystafell ymbincio Elizabeth Montagu tua 1766. Montagu oedd sefydlydd y ^ p o ferched arloesol a wnaeth hyrwyddo Cylch Bluestocking Sioraidd, grw 71


addysg i ferched tu hwnt i redeg cartref a gwaith gwnïo. Daeth ystafell ^ ymbincio Elizabeth Montagu yn fan ymgynnull i’r grw p, lle'r oedd pynciau cyfoes yn cael eu trafod; gan ymestyn safbwyntiau a barnau menywod a dysgu drwy drafodaeth. Yn Beyond Pattern, mae Bertola wedi ail-greu darnau o’r dyluniad carped gwreiddiol. Fe ddosbarthwyd darnau o’r dyluniad i rwydwaith o bobl a gymrodd ran, a wnaeth frodio’r darnau unigol dros y misoedd yn dynesu at yr arddangosfa. Gan weithio gartref ac mewn grwpiau gwnïo cymdeithasol a drefnwyd gan yr Oriel, fe wnaeth y cyfranogwyr unigol adlewyrchu addysg gyfyngedig gwaith gwnïo a rhedeg cartref a feirniadwyd gan y Bluestockings, yn ogystal ag amlygu eu hethos o ddysgu a datblygu ar y cyd. Mae gweithredu ar y cyd a chynnig naratif yn bresennol eto mewn gosodiad anarferol gan Doug Jones. Mae cyfres o gymeriadau o faint plant yn ffurfio gorymdaith ar draws gwagle’r oriel, sy’n cael ei wylio gan oedolyn mewn cwfl. Mae’r cymeriadau’n gwisgo gwisgoedd sy’n debyg i rai gweinidogion mewn amryw o batrymau, ac mae eu hwynebau’n cael eu cuddio gan ^ ddyluniad y dillad. Mae’r grw p tanio cyfeiriadau naratif, tra bod yr amrywiaeth o ffabrigau patrymog yn cyfeirio at orchmynion hierarchaidd gwahanol grwpiau cymdeithasol neu hunaniaethau diwylliannol - ein hagosatrwydd gyda’r berthynas rhwng cynlluniau patrymog ac eiconograffi crefyddol yn cynhyrchu llu o gysylltiadau. Mae olion o naratif hefyd yn cael eu gweld drwy gydol y gosodiad cerfluniol gan Adam King. Mae cymysgedd King o wrthrychau, edafedd a regalia di-angen yn cael eu gwasgaru’n organig ar draws gwagle’r oriel. Caiff y gwrthrychau sy’n ymddangos yn eithaf amrywiol eu dal gyda’i gilydd gan rwydwaith o edafedd bregus sy'n awgrymu llinellau cyfathrebu amrywiol rhwng pob rhan. Mae'r naratif darniog yn creu tensiwn rhwng y ddelwedd gyfan a bregusrwydd ei deunyddiau ffisegol, sydd bron â disgyn yn ddarnau. Yn debyg, ym mhatrymau llawr cyfoeth Leo Fitzmaurice, sy’n cynnwys

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taflenni haenog a deunyddiau cyhoeddusrwydd, gallai ffurf y patrwm fynd i ddarnau’n rhwydd, a gallai’r ddelwedd rythmig ddiflannu ar yr union adeg y bydd edafedd rhydd o gotwm neu les o bosib yn cael ei dynnu ar ddamwain ac yn malu’r patrwm. Mae Fitzmaurice yn defnyddio’r doreth o ddelweddau gweledol rydym yn dod ar eu traws yn ein hamgylchedd pob dydd, a’n eu newid nhw i lu o liw a ffurf ar draws llawr yr oriel. Cynhwysir y cyffredin yn yr addurnol, ac mae’r arena gyhoeddus yn aeddfedu’n ddyluniadau preifat, cartrefol. Mae cyfeiriadau at edafedd patrymog gwaith les a brodwaith yn cael eu plethu drwy gydol yr arddangosfa. I gyd-fynd â’i gwaith From the Palace at HillStreet, mae Bertola yn arddangos pedwar llun o sanau les, ac mae pob pâr wedi’u henwi ar ôl aelod o’r Cylch Bluestocking. Mae’r sanau’n rhan o ^ gyfres o ddeuddeg darn o waith sy’n coffáu aelodau gwreiddiol y grw p trafodaeth Sioraidd ac sydd felly’n cyfeirio at hanes les, y cynhyrchwyd yn y dyddiau cynnar gan ferched mewn amgylchedd domestig. I greu ‘clwtyn les’ roedd rhaid ‘pwytho’r aer gydag edafedd’: y frawddeg ddisgrifiadol, sef cyferbyniad rhwng ysgafnder yr edafedd a’r oriau ac oriau o waith oedd ei angen i greu patrwm sengl. Mae'r ymdrech deallusol a’r uchelgais i ddysgu sy’n amlwg yn y Cylch Bluestocking, yn mynd yn groes â chonfensiynau cymdeithasol traddodiadol rolau domestig menywod sy’n cael eu cyflwyno gan sanau les Bertola. Trwy gydol yr arddangosfa, mae’r perthnasau rhwng y dull domestig o gynhyrchu gwaith gwnïo a ffurfio hunaniaeth rywiol yn adlewyrchu’n feirniadol rolau hanesyddol a chyfoes menywod mewn cymdeithas. Mae cyfres Pamela So, Homeground, yn archwilio a’n darganfod y paraffernalia, yr ornamentau a’r addurniadau o dy^ ei mam. Mae gosod a chasglu’r gwrthrychau hyn yn cael eu huno gyda chyfres o hanesion a naratif sy’n deillio o’’i threftadaeth Tsieinëeg a Saesneg. Mae So yn defnyddio ymddangosiad patrwm addurniadol Saesneg, sef motiffau gardd flodeuog

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llenni a phapur wal, ochr yn ochr â dyluniadau Tsieinëeg traddodiadol sydd â chyfeiriadau symbolaidd penodol (fel yr eurflodyn sy’n symboleiddio bywyd hir), i adlewyrchu ar ffurf hunaniaeth ei mam a hi ei hun. Yn Boudoir, mae So yn ail-greu bwrdd ymbincio ei mam, man preifat a personol iawn sy’n bwysig i’w harfer pob dydd; yr arfer o ymbincio a rhoi gemwaith ymlaen, lle sy’n llawn o’i hunaniaeth. Ar ben y bwrdd, mae So yn ail-greu'r clwtyn les patrymog sy’n cael ei ddefnyddio i addurno’r arwyneb mewn powdr talcwm. Mae arogl melys y powdr a bregusrwydd y patrwm les yn creu gosodiad benywaidd iawn, sy’n dangos rhywfaint o hunaniaeth ei mam a chysylltiadau mwy eang sy’n ymwneud â benyweidd-dra sy’n cael eu cynnwys mewn darluniadau addurniadol. Mae gallu patrymau i symboleiddio hunaniaeth bersonol, rywiol neu ddiwylliannol benodol yn cael ei weld ymhellach yng ngludwaith Henna Nadeem, lle mae delweddau o dirweddau a ddarganfuwyd yn cydblethu â phatrymau a motiffau o amrywiaeth o ddiwylliannau gwahanol, gan greu safleoedd cyfoethog o gydgysylltiad a beirniadaeth. Mae Summit yn dangos darnau o fynydd sydd wedi cyfuno gyda phatrwm o ffurfiau naturiol. Mae’r ddelweddaeth ryngweol yn awgrymu ecsotigeiddio delwedd y mynydd a’r diwylliant o ble mae’r patrwm yn tarddu, gyda’r ddau’n cael eu lleihau i ffurfiau arwynebol o werth esthetig. Er bod rhywfaint o’r gwaith yn cyfeirio at batrwm o dreftadaeth ddiwylliannol sydd ddim yn Saesneg (fel darnau Pamela So a Henna Nadeem), mae defnyddio motiffau fflora a ffawna drwy gydol yr arddangosfa yn awgrymu rhywfaint o Seisnigrwydd, a’n chwarae gyda’r syniad o hunaniaeth Saesneg. Gosodiad fideo Andrea Stokes Hampshire sy’n ymddangos i archwilio hyn fwyaf. Gan ddefnyddio llenni net sy’n gyffredin mewn llawer o gartrefi ym Mhrydain, mae Stokes yn torri patrymau blodeuog y ffabrig o flaen y camera. Wrth dorri cynrychiolaethau cyffredin natur, yn araf, mae gardd yn cael ei datgelu. Mae cael gwared ar fotiffau’r blodau yn pwysleisio preifatrwydd

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y llenni, a'r dyhead y maen nhw’n ymddangos i’w awgrymu ar gyfer gardd wledig, Saesnig, ddelfrydol: mae’r teitl Hampshire yn awgrymu cyfoeth a thocwaith gwledig y Siroedd Cartref. Mae torri fel gweithred yn ffordd o greu yn ogystal â dinistrio delwedd. Yn Hampshire mae ‘tor’ y siswrn yn datgelu dyheadau ideolegol sydd tu mewn i’r ffabrig net rhad y mae ei fotiffau blodeuog yn efelychu’r ardd tu hwnt. Mae defnydd Angharad Pearce-Jones o dorri yn broses debyg o haenu a chysylltu. Mae Pearce-Jones wedi gosod hytrawst dur sy’n ymwthio ar draws gofod yr oriel, a motiffau wedi’u torri â llaw wedi’u gosod bob yn hyn a hyn ar ei wyneb metal trwm. Eto, mae’r motiffau’n deillio o logos cwmni adeiladu, sy’n gyfystyr ag adeiladau newydd, trawsnewid y tirwedd a’r man cyhoeddus, a’r awydd am gyfoeth sy’n gysylltiedig â’r diwydiant adeiladu. Yn yr oriel, mae cysylltiadau’r trawst gyda diwydiant a datblygiad yn cael eu hailffurfio i gyfeirio at y deyrnas breifat ac ymddangosol gyferbyniol o batrwm addurnedig, manylion cymhleth a gallu sgilgar. Mae uno arferion diwydiannol cyfoes gyda chymhlethdod patrwm yn cael ei weld ymhellach yng ngwaith Michael Brennand-Wood. Mae’r artist yn cyfuno patrymau peiriant gwnïo sydd wedi’u rhaglennu o flaenllaw gyda gwrthrychau tri dimensiwn sydd, unwaith maen nhw wedi cael eu gweld gyda’i gilydd, yn atsain patrymau traddodiadol tecstilau sydd wedi’u pwytho a’u gwehyddu. Mae cyfosod ffurfiad technegol ac esthetau traddodiadol yn chwarae ar ddulliau cyfoes a hanesyddol o gynhyrchu patrwm, o’r preifat a domestig i gyfeiriad y peiriant a’r diwydiannol. Yn wir, mae deialog rhwng llawer o’r gweithiau hyn sy’n cwestiynu a’n ailffurfio dulliau cynhyrchu traddodiadol: mae’r darluniau a’r disgrifiadau o les, sydd wedi’u creu gan y weithred ffisegol o atgynhyrchiad dwys, yn cynnwys prosesau bron yn fecanyddol sy’n adlewyrchu’r diwydiant sydd â rhan mewn cynhyrchu defnyddiau gyda phatrymau cynnil; mae’r strwythur a grefftwyd â llaw gan Angharad Pearce-Jones yn dangos, drwy ailadrodd

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patrymau o logos datblygwyr, trawsnewid pwysau, diben diwydiannol a gweithgynhyrchu; mae darluniadau Nisha Duggal, yn cyfuno technoleg gyfoes ymhellach gyda ffurfiau dwys o ddulliau cynhyrchu traddodiadol. Gan ddefnyddio sgwariau o symbolau gyda chodau lliw yn debyg i’r rhai a ddefnyddir mewn gwaith gwnïo, mae hi’n mapio allan y ddelwedd gyfan ar gyfer ei dyblygu. Yna, mae hyn yn cael ei ailgynhyrchu’n gadarn gyda’r weithred gorfforol o ddarlunio, yn wahanol iawn i symudiadau prin rhaglennu cyfrifiadur ac yn efelychu llafur traddodiadol torri, gwehyddu a phwytho’r ffabrig. Tu allan i wagle’r oriel, mae Clad, a gomisiynwyd gan Steve Messam, yn amlygu ffyrdd cynhyrchu traddodiadol, a chysylltiad patrwm gyda hunaniaeth benodol neu gysylltiad diwylliannol. Wrth orchuddio adeilad o ffrâm pren gyda chnu a gynhyrchwyd yn lleol, mae Messam yn creu côt o amgylch y strwythur sy’n tynnu ar ei hunaniaeth gyfredol, ac mae patrwm y trawstiau pren yn cael ei efelychu yn ei ddefnydd o gnu du a gwyn. Mae’r patrwm du a gwyn yn cyfeirio at farciau unigryw brid o ddefaid lleol ac at liw a dyluniad pensaernïaeth gynhenid, gan arwain at gyfres o gysylltiadau ynghylch rôl a hunaniaeth y bobl leol a’i ffurfiad drwy amaethyddiaeth, pensaenriaeth ac estheteg. Mae’r patrwm yma’n dod yn arwyddwr o lu o gymdeithasau diwylliannol a chymdeithasol sy’n tynnu ar y traddodiadol ac yn ailffurfio'r dulliau traddodiadol o gynhyrchu ac o ddylunio’r dyluniadau a ddisgwylir. Mae Beyond Pattern yn cyflwyno diddordeb cyffredin a dull o arbrofi gyda ffurfiau patrymog. Mae gwaith unigol yn dangos amrywiaeth o ffynonellau sy’n profi patrwm fel esthetig sy'n amlwg yn berthnasol i'r parth cyfoes; ffurfiad gweledol sy'n cyfeirio at y cyhoeddus a'r preifat, dulliau cyfoes a hanesyddol o lafur, hamdden a moethusrwydd

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Ysgrifennydd ac ymchwilydd yw Laura Mansfield sy’n byw ym Manceinion. Mae hi wedi ysgrifennu ar waith sawl artist ar gyfer AN Magazine, Situations Papers, Spike Island Gallery, Arty a Circa Magazine. Yn 2006, fe wnaeth hi gynhyrchu a golygu’r cyhoeddiad Spike Island Journal 2 Currency and Exchange, cyhoeddiad sy’n cyfnewid testunau rhyngwladol sy’n archwilio syniadau am hunaniaeth leol a byd-eang. Dros y ddwy flynedd ddiwethaf, mae hi wedi gweithio’n agos gyda’r artist Daphne Wright, gan ysgrifennu’n rheolaidd ar arferion Wright a chyflwyno papurau ar ei gwaith mewn mannau fel: International Conference of Death, Dying and Disposal (University of Bath 2007) a The National Gallery of Ireland (2008). Mae Laura wedi gweithio hefyd ar sawl prosiect celf gyhoeddus, gan gynnwys Intervention Decoration yn Frome, Gwlad yr Haf (Mai 2008), a Spectacular Vernacular yn Folkestone, Kent (2008). Ers ennill MA mewn Astudiaethau Diwylliannol a Beirniadol yng Ngholeg Birkbeck, Prifysgol Llundain ym mis Hydref 2008, mae hi wedi bod yn aelod blaenllaw o dîm golygyddol Corridor 8, cylchgrawn celfyddydau gweledol newydd sydd wedi’i leoli yn y Gogledd Orllewin. Ar gyfer y rhifyn cyntaf, fe greodd fap gweledol o brosiectau celf cyfranogol ar draws y gogledd orllewin, ac fe ddyluniodd dywysydd sain ar gyfer Manceinion yn seiliedig ar daith gerdded a berfformiwyd gan yr ysgrifennydd Iain Sinclair. Bu hanes taith gerdded Sinclair ar gael fel podlediad i’w lawrlwytho a’i ddefnyddio ar draws y ddinas. Ym mis Medi eleni, cwblhaodd Laura gomisiwn ar gyfer rhaglen ddiwylliannol y Great North Run ar y cyd gyda’r artist Amy Fe^ neck. Gyda'i gilydd, fe weithion nhw’n agos gyda grw p rhedeg yn Newcastle, gan baratoi delwedd ar gyfer hysbysfwrdd mawr a chyfres o destunau i'w hargraffu yn y papur lleol, a chynhyrchu map amgen o'r ddinas oedd yn cynnwys teithiau ffisegol a thestun haniaethol. Ar hyn o bryd, mae Laura’n gweithio i’r Gymdeithas Celfyddyd Gyfoes, ac mae hi’n datblygu arweinlyfr ar gasgliadau cyhoeddus o gelfyddyd gyfoes drwy gydol u DU (canlyniad yn 2010).

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Catherine Bertola Michael Brennand-Wood Nisha Duggal Leo Fitzmaurice Doug Jones Adam King Steve Messam Henna Nadeem Angharad Pearce-Jones Pamela So Andrea Stokes


Catherine Bertola Catherine Bertola graduated from the University of Newcastle in 1999. She lives and works in Gateshead. She has exhibited widely across the UK including The Drawing Room, Jerwood Space; Baltic; Cornerhouse and has had solo shows at International 3, Manchester; Fabrica, Brighton and Firstsite, Colchester. International exhibitions include CAC and Kaunas Picture Gallery in Lithuania, and Artium in Vitoria Gastiez. Catherine has been commissioned by: Locus+, Newcastle upon Tyne; Beacon, Lincolnshire; Further Up in the Air, Liverpool; the Government Art Collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Millennium Gallery, Sheffield; Amgueddfa CymruNational Museum Wales, Cardiff and Tattershall Castle, Lincolnshire. She has work in several private collections and is represented by Workplace Gallery, Gateshead and M+R Fricke, Berlin. Fe raddiodd Catherine Bertola o Brifysgol Newcastle ym 1999. Mae hi’n byw a’n gweithio yn Gateshead. Mae hi wedi arddangos yn eang ar draws y DU, gan gynnwys: The Drawing Room, Jerwood Space; Baltic; Cornerhouse ac mae hi hefyd wedi cynnal tair sioe unigol yn International 3, Manceinion; yn Fabrica, Brighton ac yn Firstsite, Colchester. Mae ei harddangosfeydd rhyngwladol yn cynnwys CAC a Kaunas Picture Gallery yn Lithwania ac Artium yn Vitoria Gastiez. Mae Catherine wedi cael ei chomisiynu gan: Locus+, Newcastle upon Tyne; Beacon, Swydd Lincoln; Further Up in the Air, Lerpwl; Casgliad Celf y Llywodraeth ac Amgueddfa Fictoria ac Albert, Llundain; Millennium Gallery, Sheffield; Amgueddfa Cymru-National Museum Wales, Caerdydd a Tattershall Castle, Swydd Lincoln. Mae ganddi waith mewn sawl casgliad preifat, ac mae hi’n cael ei chynrychioli gan Workplace Gallery, Gateshead a M+R Fricke, Berlin. www.workplacegallery.co.uk 80


Michael Brennand-Wood Michael Brennand-Wood is a visual artist, curator, lecturer and arts consultant. Since 1979 he has occupied a central position in the research, origination and advocacy of contemporary international art textiles. He has exhibited in major galleries and museums all over the world and has work in private, public and corporate collections worldwide. Michael has taught extensively in colleges and universities in the UK and overseas, and has undertaken residencies in Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Belgium. From 2001-08 he was awarded an Arts and Humanities Research Board Fellowship in the Creative and Performing Arts in conjunction with the University of Ulster. Artist gweledol, curadur, darlithydd ac ymgynghorydd ar y celfyddydau yw Michael Brennand-Wood. Mae wedi chwarae rôl bwysig ers 1979 mewn ymchwilio, creu ac eirioli tecstilau celf rhyngwladol cyfoes. Mae wedi arddangos mewn orielau ac amgueddfeydd pwysig ar draws y byd, ac mae ganddo waith mewn casgliadau preifat, cyhoeddus a chorfforaethol ar draws y byd. Mae Michael wedi dysgu’n eang mewn colegau a phrifysgolion yn y DU a thramor, ac mae wedi mynychu cyfnodau preswyl yn Japan, Awstralia, Seland Newydd, Canada a Gwlad Belg. O 2001-08, fe ddyfarnwyd Cymrodoriaeth Bwrdd Ymchwil y Celfyddydau a’r Dyniaethau iddo, ar y cyd gyda Phrifysgol Ulster. www.brennand-wood.com

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Nisha Duggal Nisha Duggal completed her MA in Fine Art at The Slade in 2009 where her work, Objective Drawing was bought by Charles Saatchi for his private collection. In 2008 her video, Machine was shortlisted for the Jerwood Moving Image Awards. Recent solo projects include a show at Art Connexion, Lille and commissions for Site Gallery, Sheffield and Airspace Gallery, Stoke on Trent. Nisha is currently based in London where she is undertaking a twelve month studio residency at The Florence Trust. Fe gwblhaodd Nisha Duggal ei MA mewn Celfyddyd Gain yn Ysgol Gelf Slade yn 2009, lle prynwyd ei gwaith, Objective Drawing gan Charles Saatchi ar gyfer ei gasgliad preifat. Yn 2008, fe roddwyd ei fideo, Machine ar y rhestr fer ar gyfer Gwobrau Moving Image Jerwood. Mae prosiectau unigol diweddar yn cynnwys sioe yn Art Connexion, Lille a chomisiynau ar gyfer Site Gallery, Sheffield ac Airspace Gallery, Stoke on Trent. Ar hyn o bryd, mae Nisha’n byw yn Llundain, lle mae hi’n ymgymryd â chyfnod preswyl am ddeuddeg mis mewn stiwdio o dan oruchwyliaeth The Florence Trust. www.nishaduggal.co.uk

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Leo Fitzmaurice Leo Fitzmaurice was born in Shropshire and now lives and works in Liverpool. He graduated from Liverpool Polytechnic 1992 and completed his MA at Manchester Metropolitan University in 1994. He has exhibited widely across the UK and internationally and has recently been shown at De Beurs Van Berlag, Amsterdam; Drawing Room, London; Deptford X, London; Yorkshire Sculpture Park; Art Rotterdam; and the Collective Gallery, Edinburgh. He has also just published a book, Post Match, with Locus+, Newcastle upon Tyne. Leo has work in the Arts Council Collection, Manchester City Art Gallery, Harewood House, Locus+ Archive and in numerous private collections. Fe aned Leo Fitzmaurice yn Swydd Amwythig ac erbyn hyn, mae’n byw a’n gweithio yn Lerpwl. Fe raddiodd o Bolytechnig Lerpwl ym 1992 ac fe gwblhaodd ei MA ym Mhrifysgol Fetropolitan Manceinion ym 1994. Mae wedi arddangos yn eang ar draws y DU a’n rhyngwladol, ac yn ddiweddar, mae wedi arddangos yn De Beurs Van Berlag, Amsterdam; yn The Drawing Room, Llundain; yn Deptford X, Llundain; yn Yorkshire Sculpture Park; Art Rotterdam; ac yn the Collective Gallery, Caeredin. Yn ogystal, mae newydd gyhoeddi llyfr, Post Match, gyda Locus+, Newcastle upon Tyne. Mae gan Leo waith yng Nghasgliad Cyngor y Celfyddydau, yn Oriel Gelf Dinas Manceinion, yn Harewood House, yn Archif Locus+ ac mewn sawl casgliad preifat.

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Doug Jones Doug Jones lives and works in London. He graduated from Bucks Chiltern University College in 2006 and completed his MA at Falmouth University College in 2007. He has exhibited recently at Exeter Phoenix Gallery; Ceri Hand Gallery, Liverpool; Diamonds and Oranges Gallery, New York; The Rhythm Factory, London; Project Space Leeds and Transition Gallery, London. Doug is represented by Ceri Hand Gallery, Liverpool. Mae Doug Jones yn byw a’n gweithio yn Llundain. Fe raddiodd o Goleg Prifysgol Bucks Chiltern yn 2006, ac fe gwblhaodd ei MA yng Ngholeg Prifysgol Falmouth yn 2007. Yn ddiweddar, mae wedi arddangos yn Exeter Phoenix Gallery; yn Ceri Hand Gallery, Lerpwl; yn Diamonds and Oranges Gallery, Efrog Newydd; yn The Rhythm Factory, Llundain; yn Project Space Leeds ac yn Transition Gallery, Llundain. Caiff Doug ei gynrychioli gan Ceri Hand Gallery, Lerpwl. www.cerihand.co.uk

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Adam King Adam King was born in Norfolk and now lives and works in London. He graduated from Brighton University in 1994 and completed his MA in Drawing at Wimbledon School of Art in 2002. Recent shows and commissions include an installation in Selfridges for the WWFund, The Solo Project, Basel and Pulse Art Fair, New York (Monika Bobinska Gallery); Dundee Contemporary Arts; The Culture House and Adventure Ecology Gallery, London. He has works in V22 and Charles Saatchi Collection. Adam King is represented by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London. Fe aned Adam King yn Norfolk ac erbyn hyn, mae’n byw a’n gweithio yn Llundain. Fe raddiodd o Brifysgol Brighton ym 1994, ac fe gwblhaodd ei MA mewn Dylunio yn Ysgol Gelf Wimbledon yn 2002. Mae sioeau a chomisiynau diweddar yn cynnwys gosodiad yn Selfridges ar gyfer y WWFund, The Solo Project, Basel a Pulse Art Fair, New York (Monika Bobinska Gallery); Celfyddydau Cyfoes Dundee; The Culture House and Adventure Ecology Gallery, Llundain. Mae ganddo waith yn V22 ac yng Nghasgliad Charles Saatchi. Caiff Adam King ei gynrychioli gan Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, Llundain. www.houldsworth.co.uk

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Steve Messam Steve Messam is an environmental artist based in the north of England and produces sitespecific installations, in rural or urban settings. Steve has worked around the world, but is best known for his pieces in Cumbria and for founding FRED - Europe’s largest annual site-specific art festival (2004 - 2008). Works have included: filling a beach with thousands of sandcastles and paper flags (Beached, 2007); throwing a bubble over a redundant building in the North Pennines (Landscape Bubble, 2006); and a line of giant balls made from hundreds of red umbrellas in the heart of Shanghai (Souvenir, 2006). Artist amgylcheddol yw Steve Messam sydd wedi’i leoli yng ngogledd Lloegr ac sy’n cynhyrchu gosodiadau safle-benodol mewn sefyllfaoedd cefn gwlad neu drefol. Mae Steve wedi gweithio o amgylch y byd, ond mae’n fwyaf ^ yl gelf adnabyddus am ei ddarnau yng Nghymbria ac am sefydlu FRED - gw safle-benodol flynyddol fwyaf Ewrop (2004 - 2008). Mae ei weithiau wedi cynnwys llenwi traeth gyda miloedd o gestyll tywod a baneri papur (Beached, 2007), taflu swigen dros adeilad gwag yng Ngogledd y Penwynion (Landscape Bubble, 2006) a llinell o beli anferth sydd wedi cael eu creu o gannoedd o ymbarelau coch yng nghanol Shanghai (Souvenir, 2006). www.stevemessam.co.uk

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Henna Nadeem Henna Nadeem was born in Leeds and now lives and works in London. She graduated with an MA from the Royal College of Art, London in 1993. Recent solo exhibitions include Charleston Farmhouse, as part of Brighton Photo Biennial, and Newlyn Art Gallery, Penzance. Other solo projects include commissions for the DCMS, Heaven 'n Earth; Spectra, the London School of Economics; Henna Nadeem: A Picture Book of Britain, Photoworks, and trees water rocks for Piccadilly Circus Underground Station, London. She has exhibited widely in group exhibitions across the UK including Superabundant: A Celebration of Pattern, Turner Contemporary, Margate and Being British, Stephen Lawrence Gallery. Fe aned Henna Nadeem yn Leeds ac erbyn hyn, mae hi’n byw a’n gweithio yn Llundain. Fe raddiodd gydag MA o Goleg Celf Frenhinol Llundain ym 1993. Mae rhai o’i gwaith unigol diweddar yn cynnwys Charleston Farmhouse, fel rhan o Brighton Photo Biennial,a Newlyn Art Gallery, Penzance. Mae prosiectau unigol eraill yn cynnwys comisiynau ar gyfer y DCMS, Heaven 'n Earth; Spectra, Ysgol Economeg Llundain; Henna Nadeem: A Picture Book of Britain, Photoworks, a trees water rocks ar gyfer Gorsaf Danddaearol Piccadilly Circus, Llundain. Mae hi wedi arddangos ^ yn eang mewn arddangosfeydd grw p ar draws y DU gan gynnwys Superabundant: A Celebration of Pattern, Turner Contemporary, Margate a Being British, Stephen Lawrence Gallery. www.axisweb.org

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Angharad Pearce-Jones Angharad Pearce-Jones lives and works in Garnant, Carmarthenshire.She graduated from Brighton University in 1991 and completed her MA at University of Wales, Cardiff in 1999. Recent exhibitions, commissions and residencies include Smithsonian Festival, Washington; Cywain Centre, Bala; The National History Museum, Cardiff; National Moravian Gallery, Brno; National Eisteddfodd, Eryri; Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff. Angharad is Co-Director of Haearn Designer Blacksmiths Ltd established 1992, producing wrought iron and steel metal fabricated artefacts and public sculpture.

Mae Angharad Pearce-Jones yn byw a’n gweithio yn Garnant, Sir Gaerfyrddin. Fe raddiodd o Brifysgol Brighton ym 1991 ac fe gwblhaodd ei MA ym Mhrifysgol Cymru, Caerdydd ym 1999. Mae arddangosfeydd, comisiynau a ^ yl Smithsonian, Washington; chyfnodau preswyl diweddar yn cynnwys Gw Canolfan Cywain, Bala; Amgueddfa Werin Cymru, Caerdydd; National Moravian Gallery, Brno; Eisteddfodd Genedlaethol, Eryri; Canolfan Gelfyddydau Chapter, Caerdydd. Mae Angharad yn Gyd-Gyfarwyddwr Haearn Designer Blacksmiths Ltd a sefydlwyd ym 1992, sy’n cynhyrchu arteffactau sydd wedi’u cynhyrchu o haearn bwrw a metel haearn, a cherflunwaith cyhoeddus. www.angharadpearcejones.com

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Pamela So Pamela So was born in Glasgow, Scotland. She graduated from Glasgow University and afterwards from the Environmental Art Department at Glasgow School of Art in 1998. Since then, Pamela has worked as a freelance artist based in Glasgow and North Ayrshire. She has undertaken many public art commissions and socially engaged art projects using her own work as a reference point. Recently she has been working on Following the diaspora: Chinese lives in Scotland, www.eif.co.uk/diasporaproject - a web project for the 2009 Edinburgh international Festival. Fe aned Pamela So yn Glasgow, Yr Alban. Fe raddiodd o Brifysgol Glasgow a’n ddiweddarach, o Adran Gelf Amgylcheddol Ysgol Gelf Glasgow ym 1998. Ers hynny, mae Pamela wedi bod yn gweithio fel artist ar ei liwt ei hun, sydd wedi’i lleoli yn Glasgow ac yng Ngogledd Ayrshire. Mae hi wedi ymgymryd â sawl comisiwn celf gyhoeddus a phrosiectau celf cymdeithasol, gan ddefnyddio gwaith ei hun fel pwynt cyfeirio. Yn ddiweddar, mae hi wedi bod yn gweithio ar Following the diaspora: Chinese lives in Scotland, www.eif.co.uk/diasporaproject - prosiect ar gyfer y we ar gyfer ^ Gw yl Ryngwladol Caeredin 2009. www.pamelaso.co.uk

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Andrea Stokes Andrea Stokes lives and works in Hampshire. She graduated from Liverpool Polytechnic in 1983 and went on to study Experimental Media at the Slade School of Art, London. She has recently had exhibitions and residencies at: SPACE, University of Portsmouth; Aspex, Portsmouth; University of Abertay, Dundee; Fleming Trust Residency at Hospitalfield House, Arbroath; Portsmouth Cathedral; Bury St Edmunds Art Gallery; Jerwood Gallery, London; Spacex, Exeter. Andrea teaches BA Fine Art at Kingston University and is a trustee and member of the artists studio group Art Space Portsmouth. Mae Andrea Stokes yn byw a’n gweithio yn Hampshire. Fe raddiodd o Bolytechnig Lerpwl ym 1983, ac fe aeth ymlaen i astudio Cyfryngau Arbrofol yn Ysgol Gelf Slade, Llundain. Yn ddiweddar, mae hi wedi cynnal arddangosfeydd ac ymgymryd â chyfnodau preswyl yn: SPACE, Prifysgol Portsmouth; Aspex, Portsmouth; Prifysgol Abertay, Dundee; Cyfnod Preswyl dan oruchwyliaeth y Fleming Trust yn Hospitalfield House, Arbroath; Eglwys Gadeiriol Portsmouth; Bury St Edmunds Art Gallery; Jerwood Gallery, Llundain; Spacex, Exeter. Mae Andrea yn dysgu BA Celfyddyd Gain ym Mhrifysgol Kingston, ac mae hi’n ymddiriedolwr a’n aelod o Art Space Portsmouth. www.andreastokes.com

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Plate List Page 3

Page 12

Henna Nadeem Summit 2000 Framed photocollage

Henna Nadeem B&W Mountains 2001 Framed photocollage

Page 4-5

Page 13

Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (hot)) 2009 Event flyers

Angharad Pearce-Jones I-Beam (Trawst-I) 2009 Mild steel with Yellow Pass zinc finish

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Page 6

Page 14-15

Andrea Stokes Hampshire 2002 DVD duration15 minutes

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Mixed media Photography by Stuart Whipps

Page 7

Adam King Ambivalent Apocalypse 2008-9 Mixed media Photography by Stuart Whipps

Page 16-17

Pamela So Boudoir 2007 Found mirror, hand cut stencil, talcum powder and reflection

Page 8

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Mixed media

Page 18-19

Page 9

Andrea Stokes Module 1 2008 Framed pencil drawing

Steve Messam Clad 2009 Temporary site-specific artwork using Kerry Hill and Black Welsh Mountain sheep fleeces, Newtown, Powys Photography by Matthew Richardson (p.18) Photography by Steve Messam (p.19)

Page 10-11

Pamela So From the series Homeground 2005-9 Duratran photographic print on light box

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Page 20-21

Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space 2009 Two drawings: pigment ink on paper


Page 22

Page 28-29

Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space 2009 Pigment ink on paper

Catherine Bertola Bluestockings (Hester Chapone) 2009 Bluestockings (Elizabeth Carter) 2009 Bluestockings (Fanny Burney) 2009 Bluestockings (Elizabeth Vesey) 2009 Pen on paper From The Palace at HillStreet 2009 Canvas and wool

Page 23

Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (cold)) 2009 Event flyers

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Photography by Stuart Whipps Page 30-31 Page 24

Andrea Stokes Just a Kiss 2009 Framed pencil drawing Page 25

Steve Messam Clad 2009 Temporary site-specific artwork using Kerry Hill and Black Welsh Mountain sheep fleeces, Newtown, Powys Page 26

Michael Brennand-Wood Babel 2008 Embroidered flowers, acrylic paint, wire, toy soldiers, sand, resin, ceramic, text on wood base

Catherine Bertola From The Palace at HillStreet 2009 Assembling 94 individual 'fragments' embroidered by volunteers at their homes and in group sessions at Oriel Davies Gallery Canvas and wool Photography by Matthew Richardson

Page 32-33

Angharad Pearce-Jones I-Beam (Trawst-I) 2009 Mild steel with Yellow Pass zinc finish Photography by Stuart Whipps Page 34

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Mixed media

Page 27

Photography by Stuart Whipps

Michael Brennand-Wood Footloose from the series Vase Attacks 2009 Work varies in size and content Photography by Gene Lee

93


Rhestr Blât Tudalen 3

Tudalen 12

Henna Nadeem Summit 2000 Gludwaith ffotograffau wedi’i fframio

Henna Nadeem B&W Mountains 2001 Gludwaith ffotograffau wedi’i fframio

Tudalen 4-5

Tudalen 13

Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (hot)) 2009 Taflenni digwyddiadau

Angharad Pearce-Jones I-Beam (Trawst-I) 2009 Dur meddal gyda gorffeniad sinc melyn

Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Tudalen 6

Tudalen 14-15

Andrea Stokes Hampshire 2002 15 munud yw hyd y DVD

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Cyfrwng cymysg Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Tudalen 7

Adam King Ambivalent Apocalypse 2008-9 Cyfrwng cymysg Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps Tudalen 8

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Cyfrwng cymysg Tudalen 9

Andrea Stokes Module 1 2008 Llun pensil wedi’i fframio Tudalen 10-11

Pamela So O’r gyfres Homeground 2005-9 Lluniau ffotograffig Duratran ar focs ysgafn

94

Tudalen 16-17

Pamela So Boudoir 2007 Drych a ddarganfuwyd, stensil wedi’i dorri â llaw, powdr talcwm ac adlewyrchiad Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps Tudalen 18-19

Steve Messam Clad 2009 Gwaith celf dros dro ar-safle yn defnyddio cnu defaid Kerry Hill a defaid Mynydd Du Cymreig, Y Drenewydd, Powys Ffotograffiaeth gan Matthew Richardson (t.18) Ffotograffiaeth gan Steve Messam (t.19) Tudalen 20-21

Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space 2009 Dau lun: inc lliw ar bapur


Tudalen 22

Tudalen 28-29

Nisha Duggal Wherever you are in the world you take up the same volume of space 2009 Inc lliw ar bapur

Catherine Bertola Bluestockings (Hester Chapone) 2009 Bluestockings (Elizabeth Carter) 2009 Bluestockings (Fanny Burney) 2009 Bluestockings (Elizabeth Vesey) 2009 Ysgrifbin ar bapur From The Palace at HillStreet 2009 Canfas a gwlân

Tudalen 23

Leo Fitzmaurice You don’t say (short circuit (cold)) 2009 Taflenni digwyddiadau

Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps Tudalen 30-31 Tudalen 24

Andrea Stokes Just a Kiss 2009 Llun pensil wedi’i fframio Tudalen 25

Steve Messam Clad 2009 Gwaith celf dros dro ar-safle yn defnyddio cnu defaid Kerry Hill a defaid Mynydd Du Cymreig, Y Drenewydd, Powys Tudalen 26

Michael Brennand-Wood Babel 2008 Blodau wedi’u brodio, paent acrylig, weiar, milwyr pren, tywod, resin, ceramig, testun ar waelod pren Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Catherine Bertola From The Palace at HillStreet 2009 Rhoi 94 ‘darn’ unigol, a gafodd eu brodio gan wirfoddolwyr, at ei gilydd ^ yn eu cartrefi ac mewn sesiynau grw p yn Oriel Davies Gallery Ffotograffiaeth gan Matthew Richardson

Tudalen 32-33

Angharad Pearce-Jones I-Beam (Trawst-I) 2009 Dur meddal gyda gorffeniad sinc melyn Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps Tudalen 34

Doug Jones Non Sum Qualis Eram 2009 Cyfrwng cymysg Ffotograffiaeth gan Stuart Whipps

Tudalen 27

Michael Brennand-Wood Footloose o’r gyfres Vase Attacks 2009 Mae’r gwaith yn amrywio o ran maint a chynnwys Ffotograffiaeth gan Gene Lee

95


BEYOND PATTERN

An exploration into the cultural meanings of pattern, through exhibition, commission, publication and debate Oriel Davies Gallery 21 November - 27 January 2010 An Oriel Davies Touring Exhibition

Acknowledgments Oriel Davies Gallery would like to thank the following individuals and organisations who have helped with the realisation of the exhibition, offsite project and publication: Laura Mansfield; Lesley Millar; Ceri Hand and Lucy Johnston at Ceri Hand Gallery, Liverpool; the Workplace Gallery, Gateshead; Pippy Houldsworth, London; Susan Palmer, Sir John Soane’s Museum; Llinos Jones; Ben Papworth; Wyn Venables; the Wool Marketing Board, Newtown; Kerry Hill Flock Association; Russell Morgan; Carrie White; Emma Williams; Robin Spalding; Powys County Council; Jean and David Burd and Mark Thomas and family. Oriel Davies and Catherine Bertola would like to express an enormous thank you to all those who participated in the production of the commission The Palace at HillStreet: Steve Attwood-Wright, Josie Barton, Berni Bertola, Janet Bertola, Alex Boyd, Angela Brady, Naomi Buttery, Lynne Coles, Marianne Cook, Esmee Corfield, Kate Crapnell, Carole Deiutch, Annie Evans, Janet Farahar, Amanda Farr, Vivica Flynn, Kimberley Gaiger, Amy Goolden, Jan Hadfield, Matilda Hawes, Rachel Hawes, Jan Heaney, Melissa Hinkin, Lisa James, Cheryl Jones, Dan Jones, Helen Kennedy, Nicola Knapton, Harriet Lane, Ruth Lane, Helen Lawson, Amber Lloyd, Justin Lloyd, Michele Lloyd, Mary Low, Clare Martin, Jack Martin, Barbara Matthews, Lottie McGregor, Phillip McGregor, Gina Newman, Bev Newton, Brenda Oakes, Mary Oldham, Judith Papworth, Kelly Pearson, Dieuwke Phillpott, Helen Pugh, Catherine Saunders, Amy Sterly, Students from Kings School Tettenhall, Tumin & Prendergast, Ken Wardle, Margery Wardle and Lisa Whiting. Our greatest thanks are extended to all the artists.


BEYOND PATTERN Archwiliad o ystyron diwylliannol patrwm, drwy arddangos, comisiynu, cyhoeddi a thrafod Oriel Davies Gallery 21 Tachwedd 2009 – 27 Ionawr 2010 Arddangosfa Deithiol Oriel Davies

Cydnabyddiaethau Hoffai Oriel Davies Gallery ddiolch i’r unigolion a’r sefydliadau canlynol sydd wedi cynorthwyo i wireddu’r arddangosfa, y prosiect oddi ar-safle a’r cyhoeddiad: Laura Mansfield; Lesley Millar; Ceri Hand a Lucy Johnston yn Ceri Hand Gallery, Lerpwl; Workplace Gallery, Gateshead; Pippy Houldsworth, Llundain; Susan Palmer, Sir John Soane’s Museum; Llinos Jones; Ben Papworth; Wyn Venables; Bwrdd Marchnata Gwlân, Y Drenewydd; Kerry Hill Flock Association; Russell Morgan; Carrie White; Emma Williams; Robin Spalding; Cyngor Sir Powys; Jean a David Burd a Mark Thomas a’r teulu. Hoffai Oriel Davies a Catherine Bertola ddiolch yn fawr iawn i’r holl rai hynny sydd wedi cymryd rhan i gynhyrchu’r comisiwn The Palace at HillStreet: Steve Attwood-Wright, Josie Barton, Berni Bertola, Janet Bertola, Alex Boyd, Angela Brady, Naomi Buttery, Lynne Coles, Marianne Cook, Esmee Corfield, Kate Crapnell, Carole Deiutch, Annie Evans, Janet Farahar, Amanda Farr, Vivica Flynn, Kimberley Gaiger, Amy Goolden, Jan Hadfield, Matilda Hawes, Rachel Hawes, Jan Heaney, Melissa Hinkin, Lisa James, Cheryl Jones, Dan Jones, Helen Kennedy, Nicola Knapton, Harriet Lane, Ruth Lane, Helen Lawson, Amber Lloyd, Justin Lloyd, Michele Lloyd, Mary Low, Clare Martin, Jack Martin, Barbara Matthews, Lottie McGregor, Phillip McGregor, Gina Newman, Bev Newton, Brenda Oakes, Mary Oldham, Judith Papworth, Kelly Pearson, Dieuwke Phillpott, Helen Pugh, Catherine Saunders, Amy Sterly, Myfyrwyr o Kings School Tettenhall, Tumin & Prendergast, Ken Wardle, Margery Wardle a Lisa Whiting. Llawer o ddiolch hefyd, i’r holl artistiaid.


Oriel Davies Gallery, The Park, Newtown, Powys SY16 2NZ T: + 44 (0)1686 625041 F: + 44 (0)1686 623633 E: enquiries@orieldavies.org www.orieldavies.org

Edited by Alex Boyd and Amanda Farr. Designed by Matthew Richardson. Printed by MWL. Catalogue published by Oriel Davies Gallery 2010. ISBN 978 1 870797 55 8 Golygwyd gan Alex Boyd ag Amanda Farr. Dyluniwyd gan Matthew Richardson. Argraffwyd gan MWL. Cyhoeddwyd y catalog gan Oriel Davies Gallery 2010. ISBN 978 1 870797 55 8

This project has been made possible through an Arts Council of Wales Beacon Company Award 2008-10. Thanks to the Laura Ashley Foundation and Arts Council England Grants for the Arts for their generous support of Beyond Pattern. Catherine Bertola is represented by Workplace Gallery, Gateshead; Doug Jones is represented by Ceri Hand Gallery, Liverpool; Adam King is represented by Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London Fe wnaethpwyd y prosiect yma’n bosib drwy Wobr Cwmni Beacon 2008-10 Cyngor Celfyddydau Cymru. Diolch yn fawr i Sefydliad Laura Ashley a Grants for the Arts Cyngor Celfyddydau Lloegr am eu cefnogaeth hael. Caiff Catherine Bertola ei chynrychioli gan Workplace Gallery, Gateshead; caifff Doug Jones ei gynrychioli gan Ceri Hand Gallery, Lerpwl; caiff Adam King ei gynrychioli gan Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, Llundain.

© Oriel Davies Gallery, the artist, the authors. All works are reproduced courtesy of the artist. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in form by any means, electrical, mechanical, or otherwise, without first seeking the permission of the copyright owners and the publisher. © Oriel Davies Gallery, yr artist, yr awduron. Atgynhyrchir y gwaith i gyd drwy gwrteisi’r artist. Cedwir pob hawl. Ni all unrhyw ran o’r cyhoeddiad hwn gael ei atgynhyrchu a’i storio mewn system caffael na’i drosglwyddo drwy unrhyw ddull, trydanol, mecanyddol neu fel arall, heb ofyn caniatád perchnogion yr hawlfraint a’r cyhoeddwyr yn gyntaf.


Beyond Pattern  

'Beyond Pattern' Catalogue designed by Matthew Richardson

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