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IN THIS ISSUE 4 LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 6 MOAS BOARD, VOLUNTEER & INTERN SPOTLIGHTS

Spotlighting volunteer, Wayne Galya, and intern, Jasmine Ramos, and congratulating MOAS Board of Trustees President, Melinda Dawson, on receiving an Agency Champion Award

8 2017 ANNUAL DINNER

A celebration of the year's volunteers and contributors

10 EVENT SPOTLIGHT

A great time was had by all at 2017's Passport to the Caribbean

12 ÉMILE AUGUSTE REIBER: CHAMPION OF MID-19TH CENTURY JAPONISME BY RUTH GRIM

Exploring works from Émile Auguste Reiber, featured in the Attention to Detail: Architectural Arts and Design in the Collection exhibit on display beginning January 13

14 EXHIBIT SPOTLIGHT

Florida in Black and White: Documentary Photography

16 THE UNCONQUERED

ON THE COVER Welcome to the new MOAS Guest Entrance! Read more about the artistic vision behind our new entrance and other renovation projects on page 24. In this issue of Arts & Sciences, we explore some of the exciting new exhibits that await you at MOAS this New Year.

BY J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS

A look at the history of the Seminole tribes of Florida and how they are reflected in paintings in the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art

18 WINTER EXHIBITS & PROGRAMMING CALENDAR 22 MOAS GUILD NEWS

BY KATHY WILSON

The MOAS Guild welcomes a new board for 2018

24 THE (RE)MAKING OF A MUSEUM BY RICHARD REEP, AIA Architect Richard Reep discusses the creative process and design behind the recent Museum renovations

28 MILESTONES IN AVIATION: FROM THE COLLECTION OF EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY BY SETH MAYO

A peak at the exciting new exhibit that highlights different decades and eras throughout aviation history.

WHAT IS THIS OBJECT? Find out when you read all about the Milestones in Aviation: From the Collection of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University exhibt on page 28!


MOAS STAFF

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Executive Director ANDREW SANDALL RUTH GRIM, Chief Curator and Gary R. Libby Curator of Art ERIC MAUK, Curator of Exhibits MEGAN FINLEY, Curatorial Assistant ROBERT WOHLRAB, Curatorial Assistant JAMES ZACHARIAS, Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History NICOLE MESSERVY, Education Associate KELSEY HANSEN-KRAUSE, Group Tours and Education Coordinator SETH MAYO, Curator of Astronomy ROBERT CONSOLO, Planetarium Educator ASHLEY HOLLIS BUSSEY, Planetarium Educator ARIEL JENNIS, Planetarium Educator JASON SCHREINER, Planetarium Educator STEVE CONKLIN, Director of Finance DIANNE MORRIS, Finance Associate STEPHANIE MASON-TEAGUE, Director of Development MONICA MITRY, Membership and Volunteer Coordinator JENELLE CODIANNE, Director of Marketing and Public Relations ALEXANDRA MIDDLETON, Director of Sales and Special Events TORI CARTA, Rental Manager JOHN BRUCE, Security Supervisor PATRICIA NIKOLLA, Guest Services Manager BRANDON SHEPPARD, Facilities Manager Guest Services Team MARK CARRUTHERS, Guest Services Associate COREY COOK, Guest Services Associate LORI HOEPFINGER, Guest Services Associate HANH NGUYEN, Guest Services Associate LISA SHAW, Guest Services Associate DORIS STRNAD, Guest Services Associate Maintenance Team DEAN CORMIER, Facilities Assistant ISRAEL TAYLOR, Facilities Assistant CARLOS ZELLARS, Facilities Assistant Security Team JUSTIN ALISA, Security LEE ASHTON, Security WILL FIGUEROA, Security AUSTIN HARDEN, Security LINDSAY MCCALEB, Security AMANDA MITCHELL, Security ANGELO PIERCE, JR., Security ALEXIS ROMEYN, Security DORIS STRNAD, Security

Editor JENELLE CODIANNE Contributing Writers RUTH GRIM SETH MAYO RICHARD REEP KATHLEEN WILSON J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS Art Director NIKKI MASTANDO, MASTANDO MEDIA

4 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

MUSEUM TRUSTEES, STAFF, AND CITY OFFICIALS GATHERED OUTSIDE OF THE NEW MOAS GUEST SERVICES EXPANSION ON NOVEMBER 6, 2017 FOR THE OFFICIAL RIBBON CUTTING, OFFICIALLY DECLARING THE NEW LOBBY OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

DEAR FRIENDS,

The Museum of Arts & Sciences reached a longawaited milestone on the morning of Monday, November 6 as we opened our brand-new lobby and entrance plaza at the front of the main museum. If you have been to the Museum, you cannot really miss it, ANDREW SANDALL especially at night. But just in case it has been a while since you visited, there is a great photo of it on the cover of this magazine. When 10:00 a.m. rolled around, the new entrance was opened to the public. It brought to an end over five and a half years of work that has dominated my time here at MOAS which coincidentally started just around five and a half years ago. There is always the possibility of a construction project coming up whenever you work in a museum because that is just part of our reality. However, I can honestly say I had no idea how planning and overseeing construction would be such a major part of my time here when I first started in the position of Executive Director back in May 2012 and was promptly informed that we were going public with the news of the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Of course at that time, the Museum did not even have a name and even today the folder relating to that project in my email retains its original name, “The Nova Road Project.” Work started on the Brown Museum immediately as we knew time was of the essence, but I do not think anyone would have predicted that just a few weeks later, a change made to a law in Washington D.C. would suddenly make a long-submitted grant for FEMA assistance – to rebuild the West Wing of the Museum – become eligible and approved. In the way these things always seem to work out, the time limit placed on completing the West Wing projected meant that it would have to be undertaken simultaneously with the construction of the Brown Museum. We had already put together a great team to complete the initial planning on the Brown Museum, and timing meant that we quickly got into a groove with this team for both projects, bringing in Bomar Construction and RLF Architects to work on the Brown Museum and VOA Associates (now Stantec Architecture) and Hall Construction to work on the West Wing. The overall project team still met regularly to hear progress reports, but on a day-to-day level,

I worked closely with my invaluable advisors, David Neubauer and Bill Chapin to, as David would always say, really ‘get into the weeds.’ As you know by now, one project became two, then soon became three and, thanks to the generosity of the Root Family, then became four. With the Brown Museum, West Wing, Planetarium, and Root Train Station refurbishment all completed, it was obvious the final piece of the jigsaw was the construction of a grand entrance befitting of a Museum of our size. A generous donation from Trustee Emeritus and longtime museum supporter, Dr. Thurman Gillespy and his wife Elaine, along with a commitment from the Board of Trustees provided the match to a grant from the Volusia County ECHO Program. We were finally able to give our visitors an entry experience of the same quality as the rest of the Museum. The construction work has been so visible and has made such a tremendous difference to the Museum that it would be easy to assume that it is all we have been able to concentrate on for the past five years. That is far from the case, and at a Board of Trustees meeting back in October, we adopted our new Strategic Plan, compiled after two years of hard work by staff members and trustees. With the Museum changing and evolving around us, we sought the opinions from staff, trustees, and the wider community we serve to look at what we do well and what we could be doing better. By doing this we were able to put together a roadmap that we believe will lead the Museum forward to becoming the highquality community organization that our new surroundings promise. At the heart of the strategic planning process was the production of a vision statement for MOAS: “The Museum of Arts & Sciences provides opportunities that meet the visitor’s needs and desires by offering an intersection of cultural events and experiences, art, science, and history. It will have the flexibility to adapt to the evolving expectations of its audiences and the communities it serves.” Both the staff and trustees will be working hard over the next few years to make this vision a reality and to provide our community with the visitor experience our beautiful new space deserves. It is a truly exciting time to be involved with MOAS, and I look forward to hearing and seeing your reactions as we continue to move forward into the future!


BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND SPONSORS 2018 EXHIBIT SPONSORS

2018 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Melinda Dawson, President Linda Hall, Vice President Ellen O’Shaughnessy, Assistant Vice President Amy Workowski, Treasurer Katherine Hurst Miller, Assistant Treasurer Todd Huffstickler, Secretary Tom Hart, Assistant Secretary Bill Chapin, FAIA, Trustee Liaison Cici Brown, Past President Randy Dye Dr. Beverly Grissom, MOAS Guild Representative J. Lester Kaney Garrett Klayer, CPA Carl W. Lentz III, MD, FACS Rachel Samson Dr. Kent Sharples Allison Morris Zacharias

HONORARY TRUSTEES Miriam Blickman Anderson Bouchelle (Deceased) J. Hyatt Brown Alys Clancy (Deceased) Tippen Davidson (Deceased) Susan Root Feibleman (Deceased) Thurman Gillespy, Jr., MD Herbert Kerman (Deceased) Chapman Root (Deceased) Jan Thompson (Deceased)

GOLD Brown & Brown, Inc. Cici and Hyatt Brown Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Halifax Health Destination Daytona Beach Spectrum Zgraph, Inc. SILVER Cobb Cole Daytona Beach News-Journal Daytona International Speedway Jon Hall Chevrolet Mastando Media NASCAR RLF Architects SunTrust Foundation BRONZE Bahama House Best Western Aku Tiki Inn Bomar Construction Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Gary R. Libby Charitable Trust Giles Electric Family Tom and Peggie Hart Ed and Pat Jackson L. Gale Lemerand and Jill Simpkins Elanor Murray Silversphere Stuart and Lisa Sixma David and Toni Slick

ABOUT THE MUSEUM ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES The Museum of Arts and Sciences is a not-for-profit educational institution, chartered by the State of Florida in 1962 and accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Museum collections and research include Cuban and Florida art, American fine and decorative arts, European fine and decorative arts, pre-Columbian and African artifacts, Pleistocene fossils, Florida history and regional natural history. Permanent and changing exhibitions, lectures, and classes highlight educational programs. The Museum houses changing arts and sciences exhibition galleries, permanent collection galleries, a gallery of American art, paintings, decorative arts and furniture, the Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum, the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, the Cuban Fine and Folk Art Museum, a state-of-the-art planetarium, library, the Frischer Sculpture Garden, maintains nature trails in a 90-acre preserve in adjacent Tuscawilla Park, and operates Gamble Place in Port Orange. The Museum of Arts and Sciences is recognized by the State of Florida as a cultural institution and receives major funding from the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. Major Museum programs and activities for members, school children and the general public are also supported by grants from the County of Volusia, the Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Elfun Community Fund, and over 30 Major Sponsors from the community. MUSEUM HOURS: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday The Museum of Arts and Sciences is committed to the Americans with Disabilities Act by making our facility and programs accessible to all people. If you have any special requirements, suggestions, or recommendations, please contact our representative, Executive Director, Andrew Sandall, at 386.255.0285. If you prefer, you may contact the Cultural Council of Volusia County representative at 386.257.6000, or the Division of Cultural Affairs, The Capitol, Tallahassee 850.487.2980, or TT 850.488.5779.

Executive Director Emeritus Gary R. Libby Sponsor of the MOAS Portable Planetarium

Arts & Sciences is published quarterly by the Museum of Arts & Sciences, 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, Florida 32114, telephone 386.255.0285, website www.moas.org. Income from contributors helps offset a portion of the expense involved in the production of this publication. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES All inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to the MOAS Communications Department at 386.255.0285, ext. 320.

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. THE TOLL-FREE NUMBER IS 1.800.435.7352. FLORIDA REGISTRATION #CH-1851


MOAS BOARD, VOLUNTEER, AND INTERN SPOTLIGHTS

VO LUN T EER OF T HE QUAR TER

Wayne Galya

By being a volunteer, you can serve as a role model to people of all ages. This is the case with Wayne Galya. Very impressed with his parent’s volunteer work in their Oklahoma community three days a week since their retirement, Wayne decided to give it a shot himself. He has been a volunteer in the MOAS Gift Store since January 2017, shortly after moving to the Daytona Beach area and is already quite at home with his position. Wayne assists museum guests with great retail product purchases and finds this experience to be very different, yet a welcomed change from his pre-retirement electrician career, pushing himself out of his comfort zone. Besides volunteering weekly in the Gift Store, he also makes himself available for MOAS special events, helping with ticket sales, check-in, or anything that needs to be done. Wayne enjoys other volunteer outlets as well. He may be spotted throughout the community cooking for charity events along with other service opportunities. While at home, he enjoys off-shore fishing and cooking his catch!

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C O N G R AT UL AT I O N S

Melinda Dawson Congratulations to MOAS Board of Trustees President, Melinda Dawson, on receiving an Agency Champion Award at the 2017 National Philanthropy Day celebration, presented by the VolusiaFlagler Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals on November 17. Melinda has been a long-time supporter of the Museum, joining the board as a representative of the Junior League in 2008. Since then, she went on to serve on the Executive Committee as Secretary, Vice President, and took the role of President in 2017. Melinda has served on the board during a time of major transition for the Museum and through several large expansion projects. Always stepping up to the plate to further the goals and mission of the Museum, she has overseen the formulation of our new strategic plan and new vision for the Museum which is the basis for the direction of MOAS for the next five years. We want to thank Melinda for her service and dedication to the Museum of Arts & Sciences.

I N T E R N S P OT L IGHT

Jasmine Ramos

Jasmine Ramos began her internship for the Museum’s Curatorial Department in May 2017. A recent Stetson graduate, with a B.A. in fine art, she developed her love of museums through her art history courses, museology course, and her job at the Homer and Dolly Hand Art Center. As an intern, Jasmine has had the privilege to curate the Delicious and Refreshing: Over 100 Years of Coca-Cola Advertising Calendars exhibition as well as the Florida Postcards and Brochures exhibit. She also helped to put together the Gods and Goddess: Greek Mythology in the MOAS Collection exhibit. She is now working on applying to graduate schools in hopes of getting her MFA in painting. She would like to thank everyone she has met during her time interning at the Museum.


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MOAS EVENT SPOTLIGHT | 2017 ANNUAL DINNER

2017 MOAS ANNUAL DINNER

A CELEBRATION OF THE YEAR'S VOLUNTEERS AND CONTRIBUTORS At this year’s Annual Dinner, this MOAS Board of Trustees recognized individuals who have made some of the most significant contributions to the Museum’s efforts with the following awards: The MOAS Marge Sigerson Volunteer of the Year Award, which recognizes exceptional volunteerism with MOAS was presented to Carol Ann Moritz. A dedicated volunteer with the Museum since 2015, Carol Ann traveled a lot due to her Father’s job in retail but chose to settle in Daytona Beach as a young woman after visiting Florida when she was eleven. Later on, in her early forties, Carol Ann moved to Japan to teach English to Japanese businessmen and women. What was supposed to be a year-long adventure turned into over fourteen years abroad. During that time Carol Ann travelled all over Asia, especially Japan, and found her way to Australia. Life brought her back to Florida where she now sees many of her favorite places again. Being a docent at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art is like taking guests on a weekly tour of these favorite places in Florida. Sharing some of Florida’s history and introducing these marvelous paintings to the Museum’s guests is truly a labor of love 8 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

for Carol Ann. Her newest volunteer activity has been facilitating the Florida Vistas Book Club. Members of the club select and read works centered within Florida. Each month before a book is discussed, they stroll through the galleries within the Brown Museum to look at art which reflects the readings. The book cub began in November 2016 and has been very successful. As we move into a second year, Carol Ann looks forward to adding new members and exploring a variety of books that bring Florida to life. The MOAS Award of Distinction, offered in honor of longtime support and outstanding service to the Museum, was presented to Hall Construction Co., Inc. Hall Construction has developed a long relationship with the Museum, spending the last five years working on the expansion of our main facilities. Besides contracted projects, they have also gone above and beyond to offer their help and expertise with things outside of those projects, including their rapid response after the past two hurricanes. Hall Construction has always looked for ways to maximize the impact of their construction and have helped us to investigate historic issues that we have faced. They have always


had the Museum’s best interest at heart and have become great friends of MOAS. The Museum’s Henry Saltzman Award, the highest recognition awarded annually by the Board of Trustees in appreciation of extraordinary efforts toward enriching the educational and cultural climate of Volusia County, was presented to Carol Lively Platig. Carol has been very active in the cultural community and as a longtime supporter of the Museum, has served as a board member since 2007, moving up the ranks to serve as Vice President in 2011 and President from 2012 to 2015. Carol also served for many years on the Halifax Area Advertising Authority board and chaired the Arts and Culture Committee. Executive Director of the Daytona Beach Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, Lori Campbell Baker said, “Carol was outstanding to work with. Her professionalism and expertise were always very valued in the tourism industry. While chairing the Arts and Culture Committee, she was instrumental in directing the production of several outstanding videos that shined a spotlight on Volusia County’s rich tapestry of cultural experiences.” Carol’s involvement in the cultural community continues on to the Daytona Beach Symphony Society. Lucy Jackman, a MOAS volunteer and member of the Symphony Society Guild said, “I have had the pleasure of working with and being a friend of Carol Lively Platig. We have participated in several fundraisers for the Symphony Society Guild. Carol is an amazing fundraiser and has succeeded in making sure the Symphony and MOAS continue to be successful for the future. Carol’s professionalism is extremely impressive along with her creativity and generosity towards the cultural arts of Volusia County.” Although Carol was not able to be with us to accept her award, we thank her for all she has done for the Museum and for the community. The Museum has been blessed to have countless groups volunteer their time and skills to help the Museum maintain its grounds. We have been especially lucky to have the consistent relationship with members of two specific groups. The Museum was honored to present our local Target store and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University with plaques in appreciation of outstanding volunteer service to the Museum. We hope to continue to grow these relationships for years to come and cannot not thank these groups enough for their selfless volunteerism.

Thank you to all of those who volunteered or contributed to MOAS in 2017...we look forward to your continued support in 2018! ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 11


MOAS EVENT SPOTLIGHT | PASSPORT TO THE CARIBBEAN

Passport to the Caribbean

This year’s annual Passport fundraiser was hosted at the beautiful Shores Resort & Spa in Daytona Beach Shores on October 27. Taking those in attendance on a tropical journey, Passport to the Caribbean was brought to life with tropical flowers and bright colors. Guests enjoyed delicious rum cocktails from Copper Bottom Distillery, an expansive silent auction, steel drum music by Steel Daddy, the beautiful live artwork of a plein air painter, and an amazing tropical dinner that was followed up with a live dessert demonstration of pineapple flambé! The event was a wonderful success thanks to our sponsors and attendees.

Thank You to our Passport to the Caribbean Sponsors:

Signature Sponsor

Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences

Entertainment Sponsor

Amy and Ken Workowski

Toasting Sponsor

Molto Bella Boutique

Valet Parking Sponsor Melinda Dawson

Table Sponsors

Bergens Periodontics and Implant Dentistry Brown & Brown, Inc. Cici and Hyatt Brown Hall Construction, Inc. / The Root Company Jon Hall Chevrolet, Inc. Lentz Plastic Surgery Ray and Carol Lively Platig Maserati Alfa Romeo of Daytona Samson Aesthetics Vystar Credit Union 10 10 ARTS ARTS&&SCIENCES SCIENCESMAGAZINE MAGAZINE


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Émile Auguste Reiber CHAMPION OF MID-19TH CENTURY JAPONISME

O

Émile Auguste Reiber, French (1826-1893), Design for a Jardinière, 1872

ne of the Highlights of the exhibition, Attention to Detail: Architectural Arts and Design in the Collection on display beginning January 13 in the Karshan Center of Graphic Art, is a group of design drawings by Émile Auguste Reiber (1826-1893). Reiber was born in the northeastern Alsace region of France close to Germany and Switzerland but made a name for himself in Paris designing decorative arts for the prominent Christofle design studio beginning in the 1860s. The highly-detailed, full-color drawings of Jardinieres (ornamental pots for growing plants), vases, cachepots, and other decorative arts on brown drafting paper

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in the MOAS collection are a real treasure trove of original drawings by this master of mid-19th century Japonisme. In fact, the collection may be one-of-a-kind as design drawings of this type were in past centuries thought of as merely preliminary steps necessary for the production of utilitarian decorative arts and have only in recent decades come to be looked upon as works of art in-and-of themselves. Many a beautiful, painstakingly rendered design drawing for an expensive vase, dinnerware set, candelabra, mirror, etc. has been discarded in years past once the objects were realized. Moreover, the artists who created these fine drawings were often only considered “artisans,” a class below fine artists. Many never even signed their drawings. In this, Reiber is somewhat unique in that his drawings

usually contained his very Japoniste cipher which can be seen at the bottom in between the two vases pictured below.

Émile Auguste Reiber, French (1826-1893), Design for Urns, 1872


MOAS EXHIBIT SPOTLIGHT | BY RUTH GRIM, CHIEF CURATOR AND GARY R. LIBBY CURATOR OF ART

“Some of the most famous works by late 19th Century masters of Western art were heavily influenced by the Japanese style and aesthetic, and this phenomenon lasted into the early 20th century, becoming a major factor in movements such as Art Deco.” The rage for all things Japanese in Europe was prompted by the reopening of trade with the west in 1853 after the famous American, Commodore Matthew Perry, led his four ships into the harbor at Tokyo Bay to re-establish for the first time in over 200 years regular trade and discourse. Soon Europeans were exposed to the full wealth of Japanese style in kimonos, silks, fans, lacquers, bronzes, and small replicas of Japanese architecture such as decorative pagodas. In addition, Japanese woodblock ukiyo-e prints were readily available and the trajectory of European art was forever altered. Giants of European and American art such as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Mary Cassatt, and James Whistler – to name only a handful – quickly absorbed the bright color palette, unique perspective and composition and, above all, the use of negative space in works by Japanese woodblock artists. Some of the most famous works by late 19th Century masters of Western art were heavily influenced by the Japanese style and aesthetic, and this phenomenon lasted

into the early 20th century, becoming a major factor in movements such as Art Deco. As is often the case with designers, Reiber began by studying architecture in Paris at the age of 21 in 1847. Three years later, he was awarded the Grand Prix. Soon, he became involved with industrial design and founded an influential periodical L’Art Pour Tous with the ceramicist, Theodore Deck (1823-91). By the early 1860s, he joined the Christofle design studio and was its head designer by the end of the decade. Specializing in Japanese metalwork, he mastered the arts of cloisonné and mokume (mixed metal objects) to such a degree that his works were often confused with true Japanese works. In efforts to advance the Japoniste style, Reiber also published a style book titled, Albums-Reiber that is a fascinating object in its own right. Inside, he included prints of all manner of Japanese types of art objects and their settings with anecdotes and bits of Japanese folklore, etc. to provide the

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901), Divan Japonais, 1892-1893

proper inspiration and insight into this foreign culture. “Style books” of this type are a thing of the past as technology has long since passed up the need to transfer knowledge like this in small book form. Nevertheless, the charmingly modest little Albums-Reiber exists to remind us that, in so many ways, methods to produce art and decorative arts have dramatically changed in the past century and a half. Similarly, the beautiful works by Émile Auguste Reiber in this exhibition remind us that immense talent and countless hours are behind the many varied decorative arts traditions of the past. We can count ourselves very lucky that some of the evidence of that has survived in the MOAS collection.

Émile Auguste Reiber, French (1826-1893), Design for a Jardinière, c. 1872

Émile Auguste Reiber, French (1826-1893), Jardinière, c. 1878

Émile Auguste Reiber, French (1826-1893), Albums Reiber – Bibliothèque portative des Arts du Dessin 1877, Paris, Ateliers du Musee – Reiber, 54 R. Vavin


EXHIBIT SPOTLIGHT | BY PETER SCHREYER AND THE STORYTELLERS

COLLEGE PARK PUBLIX. PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER SCHREYER

LOCAL YOUTH FROM THE STORYTELLERS XVII TEEN DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS STAND IN FRONT OF MARY S. HARRELL BLACK HERITAGE MUSEUM IN WEST NEW SMYRNA BEACH. PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFF KRAUS

Florida in Black and White: Documentary Photography THE FLORIDA IN BLACK AND WHITE EXHIBIT FEATURES STORYTELLERS XVII, A 2016 BODY OF PHOTOGRAPHS AND ORAL HISTORIES CREATED BY TEEN PHOTOGRAPHERS FROM THE HISTORIC AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY OF NEW SMYRNA BEACH.

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DUSK ON LAKE APOPKA. PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER SCHREYER

Under the guidance of Crealde’s Executive Director and project creator, Peter Schreyer, young photographers were mentored and instructed in visual and narrative storytelling using traditional film-based photography. The project was produced in partnership with the Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage Museum in New Smyrna Beach. Students took fieldtrips to the art studios and galleries at Crealde School of Art in Winter Park, where they learned how to process film and turn negatives into exhibition photographs in the wet darkroom. The Daytona Beach exhibition will be augmented by the professional documentary photography of people and places by internationally exhibited photographer, Peter Schreyer. Highlights will be shown from his extensive body of work documenting Florida’s changing communities and social landscape over the last three decades. Schreyer has received a wide range of public art commissions, research grants, and recognition awards, including a Visual Arts Fellowship from the State of Florida. In 2005-2006, the Swiss-born photographer was honored with a major retrospective titled, Small Stories from a Big Country, at the Swiss Camera Museum in Vevey, Switzerland. Most recently, following his solo exhibition at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park, a collection of his Florida archival photographs were purchased for the Museum’s prestigious Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art. The Florida in Black and White exhibit will be on display at MOAS from February 16, 2018 through April 15, 2018.


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CICI AND HYATT BROWN MUSEUM FOCUS | J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS, SENIOR CURATOR OF EDUCATION AND CURATOR OF HISTORY

THE UNCONQUERED After the devastation of the Second Seminole War, the remaining members of this proud group of people decided Florida was their home and refused to relocate to the Oklahoma reservations. The Seminoles that live in the Everglades today are the descendants of those unconquered souls.

It was the last major Indian war east of the Mississippi River with both sides determined to stand their ground. For the Creek and Seminole Indians, they would feel the wrath of “Old Hickory” Andrew Jackson for years to come. The Seminoles called Andrew Jackson “Sharp Knife” and as President, he helped pass legislation in 1830 that would ignite the Florida frontier on fire with the Indian Removal Act of 1830. This decreed that the Florida problem, the Seminoles, were to be removed by force. Yet, one man who was not a Seminole, nor a Floridian, would rally the Seminoles to stay and fight for their Florida sanctuary. The name Robert Powell might not ring a bell, but when he shed his Anglo name he took on the name of “Osceola” that would make him forever world-famous. His father was a Scotts-Irishman and his mother was a fullblooded Creek Native and were both born in Northern Alabama on the Tallapoosa River. He and his family were forced to seek refuge in Florida as “Old Sharp Knife,” General Andrew Jackson, defeated the Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend during the War of 1812. The Creek Indians already living in Florida had been filtering down into the north part of the peninsula since the 1750s. The Spanish authorities called the Creeks living in their colony “Seminoles,” or Renegades.

B

Seminole Medicine Man, 1953, Charles John Hasz

eginning in 1835, the United States Army and its best general attempted to dislodge the Seminoles from their Florida sanctuary. One by one, the highly-touted generals left the new territory defeated. Noted generals like Winfield Scott, Zachary Taylor, and Thomas Jessup could not compete with the guerrilla warfare tactics waged by the Seminole warriors. Seven long years and 40 million

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dollars later, the Florida War eventually fizzled out with no surrender or treaty. Relative to today, the war would have cost nearly a half billion dollars to defeat approximately 2,000 warriors. The guerrilla warfare, unfamiliar terrain, confused leadership, and the unpopularity of the war with the public foreshadowed another war 140 years later in Southeast Asia.

After seeking refuge in North Florida, Robert Powell’s village was defeated again by General Jackson on Lake Miccosukee near present-day Tallahassee. Historians have dubbed this a major defeat and part of the First Seminole War. Powell and his mother were on the move south again as refugees fled to the Tampa area. It was there that he became a man and shed his Anglo name for Osceola, “The Black Drink Singer.” His kin gave him that name because of his consumption of a noxious ceremonial tea made from the yaupon holly tree. In Florida, the Seminoles were an amalgam of native peoples from Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina numbering no more than 5,000 souls. To the United States government, the Seminoles were always in the way of land-hungry pioneer people looking for cheap land. The other taboo issue involving the Seminole people were runaway African slaves escaping southern plantations. Slaves


were fleeing to the sanctuary of Florida where Seminoles welcomed them with open arms. Living amongst the Seminoles, they too had a great stake in keeping the Americans out. Border raids by both Seminoles and Americans attributed to a stewing pot of hostility. A series of fraudulent treaties perpetrated on the Seminoles infuriated the war leader Osceola. By the outbreak of war his influence had grown significantly. He would become the leader of the resistance and a convincing voice for the Seminoles to stay and fight. Osceola, the great war chief, planned a twoprong opening salvo for the United States which ignited the Second Seminole War and the Florida frontier. The first was the killing of American Indian, Agent Wiley Thompson near Fort King (present-day Ocala) and the second was ordering the ambush of Major Francis Dade’s Brigade near Brooksville. All but one of 110 soldiers in Dade’s brigade survived to tell the tale. This act of war led to the American Army invasion of the Florida Territory. After a series of long stalemates throughout the peninsula, the United States became desperate and engaged a more radical strategy. In the spring of 1837, under a white flag of truce, General Joseph Hernandez captured Osceola near St. Augustine. General Hernandez, a plantation owner from Flagler County and leader of the Florida Militia, was under orders from his superior General Thomas Jessup to seize the war leader. Osceola was surrounded and taken into custody. Despite suffering from Malaria, he was paraded through the streets of St. Augustine and then imprisoned in Ft. Marion. General Jessup would later resign his commission as a result of the scandalous capture under a false truce. Osceola was transferred from Ft. Marion to Ft. Moultrie, South Carolina. There the famous Native American portrait artist, George Catlin captured the ailing war chief’s image on canvas. After three months of imprisonment, despite support from the American people and press, Osceola died at the age of 34. Although the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art at MOAS does not currently have a portrait of the influential Osceola on display, it does currently have an exhibition that includes many excellent paintings of the Seminoles. Portraits, genre scenes, and dramatic scenes of life in the Everglades are showcased in the exhibit titled, The Seminoles and the Everglades. The exhibit reveals the flora, fauna, and the culture of the Everglades and the unconquered Seminoles. One of the most interesting watercolors is a painting titled, Seminole Family Going on a Visit, 1955 by Fred Beaver (1911-1980). Beaver sets a scene deep in the middle of a cypress swamp showing a very stylized image of Seminole culture. Beaver was a prominent Muscogee Creek-Seminole painter and muralist from Oklahoma. He became an all-state football and basketball star player in high school and was primarily

a self-taught artist. He became the first “Master Artist” named by the Five Civilized Tribes from the original Oklahoma Territory. In this painting, he shows a Seminole family leaving in a dugout canoe in formal clothing. Beaver depicts them just as their departure begins leaving their encampment behind in the background. The tall, leafless cypress trees that line the waterway have an ominous feel and the geometric machine-like look gives vertical perspective to the piece. No doubt his style has an art deco flavor which makes his paintings so unique and unusual. Intense colors and great attention to detail are why this painting has won several awards and confirms his status as a master artist. Another great painting depicting Seminole culture is titled, Seminole Indian Family, 1926 by Frank C. von Hausen (1894-1974). Hausen was born in Dresden, Germany and studied at the prestigious Vienna Royal Academy. As World War I erupted he made his way to the United States. After a few years of painting out of his studio in Maine, he moved to balmy Palm Beach in the early 1920s. He was a prolific painter and was known to paint realistic portraits of notables such as Henry Flagler, Thomas Edison, and Addison Mizner. The Seminole Indian family paintings show Hausen’s great skill not only as a portrait artist but also his ability to deliver an excellent landscape behind his subjects. Formal Seminole attire and a family going about its daily life give us a glimpse of traditional life in the Everglades. Vibrant colors, attention to detail, and the tone of a setting sun romanticize the image. Von Hausen also includes the amazing Chickee Hut which is still prominent throughout Seminole culture and South Florida today. Chickee Huts were homes raised on a platform above any potential flood waters. It was a structure that could be constructed in a day out of cypress logs and thatched with saw palmetto fronds. Growing up in South Florida, I spent many summers as a youth thatching Chickees and am quite familiar with the surprising strength of the structure.

In the permanent gallery is a portrait called Seminole Medicine Man, 1953, an oil on canvas by Charles John Hasz (1895-1984). Here, a noble medicine man is shown in a sitting position wearing traditional clothing with a classic red bandana around his neck. His bright yellow attire contrasts with his dark sun-weathered skin. His face shows a man who over the years played a vital role among his people. This medicine man would have employed roots, herbs, animal parts, and other ingredients of nature to treat a variety of physical and mental disorders. Traditional chants and other customs, unexplained outside of the Seminole tribe, can also be important parts of the medicine man’s technique. Hasz paints very little background to ensure that the viewer is focused on his subjects. Charles Hasz was born in Hungry and came to the United States in 1905. Living in the Cincinnati, Ohio area he moved to Broward County sometime before 1943. Once in South Florida, Hasz became infatuated with the Seminoles, painting many portraits and studies of Indians who lived close to his home. The Seminoles are a tough and rugged group who survived many hardships over their 250-year presence in Florida and deliver a story of survival and success. Their culture is remarkable and still endures today. They have proven to be successful at adapting to new circumstances while still preserving important aspects of their culture. The next time you are at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, take time to reflect on the images of the Seminoles that are caught on canvas. Let this amazing collection be your window back in time to reveal the important interactions of people and their environment.

Explore more Seminole history and art in The Seminole and the Everglades exhibit in the France Family Gallery within the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art at MOAS.

Seminole Indian Family, 1926, Frank C. von Hausen


WINTER EXHIBITS Florida Postcards and Brochures: Sunshine State Tourism in the Early to Mid-20th Century OPEN NOW THROUGH JANUARY 28, 2018

The history of the state of Florida can be told through the postcards and attraction brochures of the first half of the 20th century. Not only can the history be told, it can be recreated by today’s tourists and Florida residents alike by visiting the original attractions of the early 20th century that continue to be operated to this day.

“The Latest News from Florida:” Wood Engravings from 19th Century Periodicals OPEN THROUGH 2018

Wood engravings from 19th century illustrated magazines and journals documenting events in the remote land of Florida – a state that few northerners knew a lot about or would ever visit. The works in this exhibit are grouped into three sections – “life,” “industry,” and “war.” “Life” includes depictions of daily activities and amusements. “Industry” includes depictions of processes such as citrus growing, harvesting, and preparing Spanish moss for commercial purposes. “War” includes depictions of the armaments, military activities, fortification structures, and naval events. These topics proved to be of interest to those who bought these publications.

Milestones in Aviation: From the Collection of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University JANUARY 6 THROUGH MARCH 4, 2018

To conquer the skies, humans have relied upon innovations built upon advancements in engineering and science. Featuring objects from the world-class aviation and aerospace institution, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and private collectors, this exhibit highlights significant aircraft artifacts ranging from a Junkers Jmo 004 turbojet engine to a Heurobotics Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, and an entire gas-electric hybrid aircraft, the Eco-Eagle – the first of its kind in the world. Take a journey with us – spanning many decades and eras throughout aviation history – as we explore how technology has propelled us to new heights.

Spiritual Quests: Sculpture by Joan Baliker JANUARY 13 THROUGH APRIL 29, 2018

Joan Baliker is an interfaith minister who currently calls Ormond Beach, Florida home. She has written books celebrating and honoring all spiritual paths and also creates paintings and sculptures depicting inspirational figures from around the world. The Dalai Lama and Gandhi along with others are featured in bronze and oil on canvas in this homage to spirituality and leaders of faiths from across the world.

Attention to Detail: Architectural Art and Design from the Collection JANUARY 13 THROUGH APRIL 15, 2018

Throughout history, talented artisans have spent untold hours (and their patron's untold riches) embellishing architectural interiors around the world. This exhibition brings to light beautiful hand-drawn sketches and watercolors together with prints and design additions such as mirrors and fire mantelpieces from the MOAS collection that were all a part of the design aesthetic that continued from the Renaissance to the early 20th century in Europe and America.

Shotgun Houses: America via Africa a Photo Exhibit by Kenneth Thompson FEBRUARY 4 THROUGH APRIL 29, 2018

Originating in West Africa, a shotgun house is an often overlooked staple in American architecture. Learn more about these fascinating structures and their significance in this nation’s development. All images have been captured in Kenneth’s hometown of Bessemer, Alabama.

Florida in Black and White: Documentary Photography by Peter Schreyer and the Storytellers FEBRUARY 16 THROUGH APRIL 15, 2018

This exhibition features Storytellers XVII, a 2016 body of photographs and oral histories created by teen photographers from the historic African American community of New Smyrna Beach. Under the guidance of Crealdé’s Executive Director and project creator Peter Schreyer, the young photographers were mentored and instructed in visual and narrative storytelling using traditional film-based photography. The project was produced in partnership with the Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage Museum in New Smyrna Beach. Students took field trips to the art studios and galleries at Crealdé School of Art in Winter Park, where they learned how to process film and turn negatives into exhibition photographs in the wet darkroom. The Daytona Beach exhibition will be augmented by the professional documentary photography of people and places by internationally exhibited photographer Peter Schreyer.

Luster: Realism and Hyperrealism in Contemporary Automobile and Motorcycle Painting MARCH 10 THROUGH JUNE 10, 2018

Drawing on the legacy of the first generation of American photorealist painters, many late 20th century and early 21st century painters have continued to exalt triumphs of vehicular design through extremely realistic, almost trompe l'oeil renditions of cars, motorcycles, and other conveyances. This exhibition brings together 45 works by 15 of today's leading artists working in this style in a true celebration of chrome, curves, speed, and power - the essence of modern car and motorcycle culture.  Produced by David J. Wagner, L.L.C., David J. Wagner, Ph.D., Curator/ Tour Director

Stay in touch! For the latest exhibit and programming information, sign up for our e-newsletter on the Museum’s homepage at MOAS.org!

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WINTER PROGRAMS Ongoing Events Wednesday Yoga in the Gallery Wednesdays, 5:30pm-6:30pm Take a break from your busy day and enjoy weekly Yoga in the Gallery at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Meet in the lobby and join registered yoga instructor, Ashley Brooks of Holistic Movements, for an hour-long session that will provide you with an opportunity to practice a series of gentle yoga poses. Class is open to all experience levels. Please bring a mat, towel, and water. Space is limited and registration is required. RSVP to the Museum at 386-255-0285. $5.00 for members, $10.00 for future members.

january

Saturday, January 6 5:30pm-7:00pm Member Exhibition Reception: Milestones in Aviation Enjoy a member exclusive reception for the new exhibit, Milestones in Aviation: From the Collection of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. This exhibition looks at the nearly 100-year history of Florida’s important contribution to the field of aviation. Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar throughout the evening. Kindly RSVP by January 4 by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315 or by emailing membership@moas.org. MOAS Members – bring a guest for $5.00 (up to two guests per membership) Free for MOAS Members Wednesday, January 10 3:00pm-3:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Alpha: A First Look Join Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, as he takes you on an inaugural tour of the Milestones in Aviation exhibit in the Ford Gallery. Learn how certain significant inventions and technologies propelled aviation into a new frontier through the fascinating objects on loan from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other private collectors. You will get a chance to view the Eco Eagle Hybrid Aircraft, developed by ERAU, on display inside the gallery and learn how it became the world’s first hybrid-electric turboprop. Along the way, we will encounter jet and radical engines, propellers, vintage aircraft paintings, and the Heurobotics Unmanned Aerial Vehicle – all part of ERAU’s vast collection of aeronautical artifacts. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Thursday, January 11 5:30pm-7:30pm Wine Tasting: Turn Back Time Join us at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art for our wine tasting series with S.R. Perrott. Spend the evening among friends while you sip up knowledge on swirling, tasting, and describing wines while learning about different food pairings. Travel through time and explore the differences between wine vintages. This event is for ages 21 and over. Seating is limited. Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 to purchase your admission. $20.00 for members, $30.00 for future members. Friday, January 12 5:30pm-7:30pm Spiritual Quests Exhibition Reception Join us for a sneak preview of the Spiritual Quests: Sculpture by Joan Baliker exhibition. Baliker is an interfaith minister who currently calls Ormond Beach, Florida home. She has written books celebrating and honoring all spiritual paths and also creates paintings and sculptures depicting inspirational figures from around the world. The Dalai Lama and Gandhi along with others are featured in bronze and oil on canvas in this homage to spirituality and leaders of faiths from across the world. Kindly RSVP by January 8 by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285 ext. 315 or by emailing membership@moas.org Free to the public. Saturday, January 13 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Vinyl 8:00pm Laser U2

9:00pm Laser Zeppelin $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Thursday, January 18 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: Mullet on the Beach: The Story of the Minorcans in Florida 1768-1788 by Patricia C. Griffin Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. In the history of St. Augustine, the story of the Minocans, who still exert tremendous political and social influence, rivals the drama of the Jamestown or Plymouth settlements. Patricia C. Griffin describes their first twenty years in the North World, including the hardship of their arrival in British East Florida in 1768, their starvation and suffering on an indigo plantation, and their revolt and flight to sanctuary in St. Augustine. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Thursday, January 18 4:00pm-4:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Bravo: Exploring Embry-Riddle’s Research and Development Learn how Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is taking aviation to new frontiers. Join Dr. Richard Pat Anderson, Director of the Embry-Riddle Eagle Flight Research Center, and Professor of Aerospace Engineering, as he discusses the cutting-edge research his department is involved with, especially the Eco Eagle aircraft and Heurobotics Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, on display in the Milestones in Aviation exhibit. After his lecture that takes place in the Planetarium, Dr. Anderson will conduct a short tour through the gallery to discuss the objects first hand. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, January 20 10:00am-4:00pm 3rd Annual Florida History Con Join us for an all-day celebration of Florida history. Enjoy meeting various Florida history authors, book signings, reenactors, mystery objects, historical displays and costumes, trivia and prizes, local history clubs, food trucks, and much more! Free for members or with paid museum admission. Schedule: 11:00am: The Three Mrs. Flaglers Each woman loves Henry Flagler in her own way. Henry’s tremendous drive and magnificent accomplishments during Florida’s Gilded Age come to life through the eyes of his three captivating wives as each beautifully gowned lady tells of years with the man who took the blank canvas of Florida and created a rich man’s paradise. Join St. Augustine historical reenactor, Dianne Jacoby, for a performance of drama, passion, and history. 12:00pm: The Founding of Port Orange and Edgewater: The Remarkable Story of Dr. John Milton and Dr. Esther Hill Hawks Join local reenactors and presenters, Joseph Vetter and Kimberly Vicars, and learn about the local history of Dr. John Milton, Union Army Surgeon and Abolitionist, and Dr. Esther Hill Hawks, one of the first female physicians in the U.S. and educator at the first integrated school in Florida. From their Florida honeymoon in 1854 to their service at Hilton Head Island throughout the Civil War at General Hospital #10 (the first “colored” hospital for soldiers and families), this mostly unheard story deserves to be told. As Esther said, “in the training of children rests the hope of the world,” a motto for the two educators interpreting their story.

Revolutions. This presentation will tell the stories of these revolutionary rogues and their leaders, how they planned to free Florida from Spanish rule, and how the United States intervened to stop them. Dr. Head will also do a book signing of his book, Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic, which was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015. 2:00pm: Truly Off the Beaten Path with MOAS Senior Curator of Education and History, James “Zach” Zacharias Join Zach Zacharias and discover truly unique Florida day trips that are not found in your average tour guide. This presentation will show everyone, including life-long Floridians, the hidden corners of our beautiful state. Look at scenic drives, historic destinations, and natural wonders from North Florida to South Florida and everything in between. 3:00pm: Florida Sports History: It’s Not Just Fun & Games with Dr. Steve Noll, University of Florida Sporting activities shape our lives, unite (or divide) us, and help us celebrate who we are as Floridians. This presentation examines Florida history and society through the lens of sports – looking at how sporting activities both shaped and reflected the Sunshine State. Explore the many varieties of Florida sports from participatory events to professional leagues. Wednesday, January 24 3:00pm-4:00pm Attention to Detail: Architectural Arts and Design from the Collection Join Chief Curator/Gary R. Libby Curator of Art, Ruth Grim, in the Root Family Auditorium for a lecture that will examine detailed architectural drawings as well as prints, paintings, and decorative arts from the Attention to Detail exhibit and will explore their significance in the development of European 18th and 19th century interior design. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, January 27 11:00am-12:00pm Family Art Class: Ink Tiles Design a beautiful and colorful ceramic art tile for display. Create interesting effects inspired by an idea or by one of the Museum’s galleries. Each piece is a unique work of “heart.” Space is limited. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $6.00 for members, $10.00 for future members. Saturday, January 27 1:00pm-4:00pm Film Class: One-Minute Short Film Participants will use their personal tablets, iPads, or smartphones to learn how to shoot and edit a project for a one-minute short film. Award-winning filmmaker Gary Lester will teach you about creating a one-minute story, filming, and editing. Space for this class is limited. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $15.00 for members, $20.00 for future members. Saturday, January 27 4:00pm-4:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Charlie: Aircraft Engines and Airframes Through Time Explore the rich history of aircraft engine and airframe development through the fascinating objects found in the Milestones in Aviation exhibition. Led by Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Aviation Maintenance Science, Charles Horning, who will conduct a tour through the gallery as he discusses the various engine designs, propeller types, and aircraft wing on display. Free for members or with paid museum admission.

Monday, January 29 5:00pm-7:00pm 1:00pm: Privateers of Americas: Spanish American MOAS After Hours Join us for the kick-off of MOAS After Hours which Privateering from the United States in the Early will be hosted on the last Monday of each month. Republic with Dr. David Head, Department of Enjoy after hours access to all of the galleries at the History at University of Central Florida Museum of Arts & Sciences, live music, happy hour Two hundred years ago in the summer of 1817, drink specials, and food from the Sweets-N-Eats a group of pirates and privateers invaded Amelia food truck! Island, then still a Spanish colony, in hopes Free for members, $5.00 for future members. of striking a blow for the Spanish American


WINTER PROGRAMS February Saturday, February 3 1:00pm-3:00pm Family Art Class: Mixed Media and Abstract With the help of artist and art instructor, Mike Mullaney, who teaches art and critical thinking for Volusia County Schools, learn how to apply both two and three-dimensional mixed media to create artwork that emulates the abstract nature of classical and modern artists. Participate in a studio activity and become inspired by visual examples and methods used to create abstract art. Create a myriad of forms of beautiful contrasts in color and materials as you create your own abstract art in the classroom. Space for this class is limited. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $6.00 for members, $10.00 for future members. Saturday, February 3 3:00pm-3:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Delta: A Second Look Join Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, as he takes you on an interactive tour of the Milestones in Aviation exhibit in the Ford Gallery. Learn how certain significant inventions and technologies propelled aviation into a new frontier through the fascinating objects on loan from EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University and other private collectors Free for members or with paid museum admission. Wednesday, February 7 3:00pm-4:00pm Shotgun Houses: America via Africa with Kenneth Thompson Join photographer, Kenneth Thompson, in the Root Family Auditorium for a lecture exploring the small “shotgun house” – common in many American communities – and its origins in African architecture. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, February 10 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Beatles 8:00pm Pink Floyd – The Wall 9:00pm Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Tuesday, February 13 6:30pm-9:00pm Cocktails & Creations: Aviation Paint Night Join us at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for the first Cocktails & Creations event of 2018 with Paint Nite’s Johnny Yarbrough. Take a tour of the new Milestones in Aviation: From the Collection of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University exhibit and get inspired for this instructed painting themed around the artwork in the exhibit. Enjoy a signature cocktail, light appetizers, music, and raffles while letting the creative juices flow! This event is for ages 21 and older. Seating is limited. RSVP by February 9 by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $30.00 for members, $35.00 for future members. Wednesday, February 14 6:00pm-8:00pm Love, Lasers, and the Cosmos: A Special Valentines Planetarium Event Bring along your special someone to the MOAS Planetarium for an evening celebrating love. We will begin with our live astronomy show at 6:00 p.m. Love and the Cosmos, where we will search for love through all corners of the universe, from night sky constellation folklore to Valentine’s themed cosmic coincidences that can be found in planets, nebula, and even galaxies. The love keeps on going at 7:00 p.m. with our Laser Love Show, featuring love-themed songs synced to brilliant laser imagery. Each ticket includes a complimentary glass of champagne.Seating is limited. Advanced RSVP is recommended by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $8.00 for members, $10.00 for future members.

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Thursday, February 15 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. The Orchid Thief is Susan Orlean’s wickedly funny, elegant, and captivating tale of an amazing obsession. Determined to clone an endangered flower, the rare ghost orchid Polyrrhiza lindenii, a deeply eccentric and oddly attractive man named John Laroche leads Orlean on an unforgettable tour of America’s strange flower-selling subculture, through Florida’s swamps and beyond, along with the Seminoles who help him and the forces of justice who fight him. In the end, Orlean and the reader will have more respect for underdog determination and a powerful new definition of passion. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Thursday, February 15 4:00pm-4:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Echo: Aircraft Engines and Airframes Through Time Explore the rich history of aircraft engine and airframe development through the fascinating objects found in the Milestones in Aviation exhibition. Led by Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Aviation Maintenance Science, Charles Horning, who will conduct an encore tour through the gallery as he discusses the various engine designs, propeller types, and aircraft wing on display. Free for members or with paid museum admission Friday, February 16 2:00pm-3:00pm Gamble Place Nature Walk Gamble Place is more than a historic site – it is also home to critical ecosystems that house many types of Florida’s flora and fauna. Meet at Gamble Place in Port Orange to join Kelsey Hanson, MOAS Education Assistant who has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of South Florida, for a hike through some of Gamble Place’s trails while discussing the native, and non-native, plants and animals of the area. Space is limited. Advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Friday, February 16 5:30pm-7:00pm Florida in Black and White Exhibition Reception Join us for a sneak preview of the Florida in Black and White: Documentary Photography by Peter Schreyer and the Storytellers exhibition. The exhibition will feature Storytellers VXII, a 2016 body of photographs and oral histories created by teen photographers from the historic African American Community of New Smyrna Beach. Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar throughout the evening. Kindly RSVP by February 9 by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315 or by emailing membership@moas.org Free to the public. Wednesday, February 21 3:00pm-4:00pm Famous Black Floridians in History Join Senior Curator of Education and History, James “Zach” Zacharias, in the Root Family Auditorium to celebrate Black History Month with a unique look at the many famous contributions by African Americans who have been part of the Florida history experience for over 500 years. Learn about the history of notables such as Zora Neale Hurston, Ana Kingsley, John Milledge, Daniel “Chappie” James Jr., Jorge Biassou, and many more! Free for members or with paid admission. Friday, February 23 2:00pm-3:00pm Porch Talk at Gamble Place: Historic Hotels of St. Augustine St. Augustine was the premier winter retreat in

Northeast Florida in the 1880s and 90s. Henry Flagler wanted to make the ancient city the “New Port of the South.” Join Senior Curator of Education and History, James “Zach” Zacharias at Gamble Place in Port Orange for a unique history talk about the days of glorious hotels that made St. Augustine a luxury resort town in the “Gilded Age.” Discover the hotels that Henry Flagler built and other hotels that attempted to compete against him. Space is limited and advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-2550285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Saturday, February 24 1:00pm-4:00pm Film Class: Intermediate Makeup and Prosthetics Prosthetic makeup was revolutionized by John Chambers in movies such as Planet of the Apes and Little Big Man. Join award-winning filmmaker Gary Lester, as he guides participants through the prosthetic-making process, from sculpting and molding to applying the final product. The use of prosthetics helps create advanced cosmetic effects for more realistic filmmaking. Space for this class is limited. RSVP in advance by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $15.00 for members, $20.00 for future members. Monday, February 26 5:00-7:00pm MOAS After Hours Enjoy after hours access to all of the galleries at the Museum of Arts & Sciences, live music, happy hour drink specials, and food from a local food truck! Free for members, $5.00 for future members.

MEMBER APPRECIATION WEEK Monday, February 26 – Friday, March 2

Monday, February 26 5:00-7:00pm MOAS After Hours – Member Exclusive In conjunction with the MOAS After Hours, come out and enjoy great food and drinks. MOAS Members will enjoy an exclusive tour of the Root Family Museum Train Station with Preston Root as well as exclusive access to the train cars. Must be a member to attend this exclusive tour. Not a MOAS Member? Become one today by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315. Free for members. Tuesday, February 27 4:00pm-4:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Foxtrot: Member Exclusive Learn how Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is taking aviation to new frontiers through their cutting edge research and development. Join Dr. Richard Pat Anderson, Director of the Embry-Riddle Eagle Flight Research Center, and Professor of Aerospace Engineering as he takes you on a private tour of the Milestones in Aviation exhibit, highlighting the Eco Eagle hybrid aircraft and Heurobotics Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Free for members. Wednesday, February 28 2:00pm-5:00pm Painting Demonstration with Florida Landscape Artist – Member Exclusive Join classically trained artist, Arnold Desmarais, as he recreates a painting from his private collection right before your very eyes. Please join us in the Education Room at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art as Mr. Desmarais exhibits the intricate craft of fine art painting. Mr. Desmarais will narrate the process and answer as many questions as time allows. Must be a member to attend. Not a MOAS Member? Become one today by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315. Free for members.


WINTER PROGRAMS MARCH Thursday, March 1 5:30pm-8:00pm Museum Secrets Revealed: Chateau of Versailles – Member Exclusive There is always more than meets the eye at a museum. Join us in the Root Family Auditorium for an exclusive look at the secrets that fill Chateau of Versailles in association with the Smithsonian Institution. Take a virtual private tour roaming the galleries to get an insider’s look, revealing countless secrets. Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar throughout the evening. Kindly RSVP by February 22 by calling 386-2550285 ext. 315 or by emailing membership@moas. org. Free for members. Friday, March 2 3:00pm-4:00pm Conservation 101 Ever wonder how museums take care of their collections? Join Bonnie Jones of Pruett Conservation in the Root Family Auditorium as she gives an introduction to restoration and preservation of fine art. Learn how conservators preserve museum’s art and artifacts for future generations to enjoy and learn from. Find new ways to care for your own art collection. Please do not bring artwork with you for the conservator to view. Must be a member to attend. Not a MOAS Member? Become one today by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315. Free for members. Saturday, March 3 11:00am-2:00pm Family Craft and LEGO Day Join educators Kelsey Hansen and Nicole Messervy, for a fun-filled day of Earth Day themed crafts and LEGO activities. Different stations will be setup in the West Wing and outside the new MOAS lobby! Free for members and with paid museum entrance. Saturday, March 3 3:00pm-3:45pm Milestones in Aviation Presentation Golf: A Last Look Join Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, as he takes you on the last interactive tour of the Milestones in Aviation exhibit in the Ford Gallery. Learn how certain significant inventions and technologies propelled aviation into a new frontier through the fascinating objects on loan from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other private collections. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, March 10 3:00pm-4:30pm Art in Perspective with Mike Mullaney Learn drawing methods that can be applied to create any form of art you desire. Every art project begins with a plan, and in this class, you will learn the importance of precision in design. Students will be taught with regards to opportunities for careers such as engineering, architecture, and drafting that have their foundations in precision mathematically based drawing methods such as perspective drawing. Students will apply this method to produce two and three-dimensional artwork within the art classroom. Space is limited and advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $6.00 for members, $10.00 for future members. Saturday, March 10 5:30pm-7:00pm Member Exhibition Reception: Luster: Realism and Hyperrealism in Contemporary Automobile and Motorcycle Painting Enjoy a member exclusive reception for the new exhibit, Luster. This exhibition brings together 45 works by 15 of today’s leading artists working in this style in a true celebration of chrome, curves, speed, and power – the essence of modern car and motorcycle culture. Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres

and a cash bar throughout the evening. Kindly RSVP by March 2 by calling 386-255-0285 ext. 315 or by emailing membership@moas.org. MOAS Members – bring a guest for $5.00 (up to two guests per membership) Free for MOAS Members Saturday, March 10 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Country 8:00pm Laser Zeppelin 9:00pm Laser Metallica $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Thursday, March 15 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: Hotel Ormond: A Lost Treasure by Donald D. Spencer Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. This is a story of a hotel with a 104-year old history. It is also a tribute to John Anderson and Joseph Price, who built the hotel in 1887. For over 100 years the hotel was the skyline signature of Ormond Beach. It entertained the great from every walk of life and saw the city grow and spanned the years of vast changes the society it served. The Hotel Ormond rules supreme for many years, however, in 1992 the hotel became the victim of the wrecking ball and the historic hotel was no more. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-2550285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Wednesday, March 21 8:30am-5:00pm MOAS Member Trip to the Orlando Museum of Art and Shakespeare Theater Join us at the Orlando Museum of Art for a private tour of the new exhibit State of Excellence: Treasures from Florida Private Collections. The exhibit will present 60 outstanding works from private collections throughout the state of Florida that are not typically viewed by the public. After a tour of the Museum enjoy the matinee performance of Shakespeare in Love at the Shakespeare Theater directly adjacent to the Orlando Museum of Art. The synopsis of the play can be found on the MOAS website. Must be a member to attend. Kindly RSVP by February 28 by calling 386-2550285 ext. 315 $75.00 for members only. Price includes transportation, museum admission, theatre ticket, and lunch. Friday, March 23 2:00pm-3:00pm Ponce Preserve Nature Walk The Ponce Preserve is a 41 acre park stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Halifax River. Along the trails and boardwalk, we will see the terrain shift from sand dunes to maritime hammock, then on to wetlands as we near the Halifax. Meet in the parking lot at the Ponce Preserve Park to join Kelsey Hanson, MOAS Education Assistant who has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of South Florida, for a leisurely hike through the preserve. Space is limited. Advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Saturday, March 24 10:00am-5:00pm Worm Grunting, Monkey Fishing, and the Power of Curiosity: Photography, Storytelling, and Creating a Sense of Place and Purpose with Eric Dusenbery Join documentary photographer, Eric Dusenbery, in the Root Family Auditorium for a program on storytelling and visual communications. Incorporating hands-on activities and demonstrations, participants learn how to expand their capacity to see, express, explore, and create. Participants will learn how to communicate authentically, how curiosity leads to innovations, shifts in perspectives and honest

communications, photography, and storytelling techniques. The workshop will feature photography, storytelling, multimedia, and participant interaction. This workshop is for adults only and advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386255-0285. Boxed lunches may be purchased in advance from the HoneyBaked Ham Café for an additional $10.00. $50.00 for members, $60.00 for future members. Monday, March 26 5:00-7:00pm MOAS After Hours Join us at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for exclusive after hour access to galleries in the West Wing and North Wing, docent tours of the new Luster Exhibit, live music, happy hour drinks specials, and food from a local food truck. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Wednesday, March 28 3:00pm-4:00pm Luster: Realism and Hyperrealism in Contemporary Automobile and Motorcycle Painting Join Chief Curator/Gary R. Libby Curator of Art, Ruth Grim, for a gallery walk of the new Luster exhibit. This walk and talk will focus on these dynamic paintings by contemporary photo-realist artists who celebrate chrome, curves, speed, and power – the essence of modern car and motorcycle culture. The artists in this exhibition represent the best of today’s automotive painting and their works show car and motorcycle design from vintage vehicles to classics of the 1950s and 60s, to road and racing, off-road vehicles, exotics, and more. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Wednesday, March 28 6:30-8:30pm Wine Pairing Dinner Join us for an exclusive wine pairing dinner in the galleries at the Museum of Arts & Sciences while we pair interesting wines with a four course meal of eclectic food. Enjoy guest speakers presenting behind the scenes facts about the MOAS art collection, as well as a guest wine expert presenting on the history of wine making. This dinner is for ages 21 and older. Seating is limited. Reserve your seat today by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $65.00 for members, $75.00 for future members. Friday, March 30 12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch and Learn: The Latest News from Florida: Wood Engravings from 19th Century Periodicals Join Senior Curator of Education and History, James “Zach” Zacharias at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art and discover the 40 wood engravings from 19th century illustrated magazines and journals documenting events in the remote land of Florida – a state that few northerners knew a lot about or would ever visit. Images were often important to give the reader a vision of terrain and the activities of the day. The works are grouped in three stations – “life,” “industry,” and “war.” Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 ext. 312 to RSVP and place your lunch order. Space is limited and advanced RSVP and paid lunch are required. Lecture is $5.00 plus the price of paid lunch for future members. Lecture is free plus the price of paid lunch for members. Saturday, March 31 1:00pm-4:00pm Family Art Class: Easy Glass and Glue Sun Catchers Join art instructors, Ann and Amber Lester, for this fun family arts and crafts class for all ages. Sun catchers made of glass and color can be hung and displayed anywhere in your house or yard. Create a myriad of colors of glass to reflect the brilliant sun’s rays. Space is limited and advanced RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $6.00 for members, $10.00 for future members.

Visit MOAS.org for event updates and details!


GUILD NEWS | BY KATHY WILSON, MOAS GUILD PRESIDENT

A New Year and New Guild Officers On December 12, 2017, the Guild celebrated the upcoming holidays with all of its members during a holiday luncheon. At the luncheon, the new executive officers were installed on the Guild’s board. We also celebrated our successes this past fall as we wrapped up the Halifax Art Festival and the Family Festival of Trees. I can already tell you that there is so much in store for 2018! As the baton is passed to our new Guild President, Dr. Beverly Grissom, I look back and am pleased with all that we have accomplished over the past two and a half years. I wish to thank the outgoing board for their support and ability to work together so well. The Guild has become synergistic with the MOAS Board of Trustees, particularly in the development of the five-year strategic plan, which was a very successful process.

From left to right: Dr. Beverly Grissom, President; Andrea Pair, First Vice President; George Fortuna, Treasurer; Sandy Buckley, Recording Secretary; Karrie Houlton, HAF Assistant Treasurer. Not pictured: Hilary Reilley; Second Vice President; Brenda Rivers, Corresponding Secretary.

It has been my privilege to work alongside both the Board of Trustees and our Guild members. We all will continue our duty to make the Museum of Arts & Sciences the best ever, both locally and regionally. I am proud to be a member of MOAS and the Guild.

Thank You to our Event Sponsors and In-Kind Partners IN-KIND PARTNERS

55th Annual

SPONSORS

Bank of America City of Daytona Beach Daytona Beach Area Convention & Visitors Bureau Daytona Beach News-Journal Downtown Development Authority Gage Publishing Halifax Area Advertising Authority Helen Wessel Foundation Lamar Outdoor Advertising Maserati Alfa Romeo of Daytona Ponce Inlet Women’s Club Riverfront Shops of Daytona Beach Southern Stone Communications of Florida LLC Spectrum Networks WLOV 99.5 FM 22 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

Biggby Coffee Daytona Playhouse Daytona Tortugas Diana Minotti Fine Art LLC Donnie’s Donuts Embroidery Plus Florida Global International Realty, LLC Halifax River Yacht Club Homewood Suites by Hilton Daytona Beach Speedway-Airport Hot Action Sportswear Jack White Land Company Kelly White Krispy Kreme Lorale Mullins Marina View Masotti’s Media Services Mastando Media Tic Toc Zappi’s Italian Garden

SPONSORS

MAJOR GUILD SPONSOR Bank of America STORY TIME SPONSOR The Palmetto Club SANTA WORKSHOP SPONSOR Hall Construction Co., Inc. Special thanks to Michaels for supplying us with beautiful trees to decorate.


TH

SEASON

G i f t C e r t i fi c a t e s a v a i l a b l e

JAN

Royal philharmonic orchestra

SAT

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, CONDUCTOR & VIOLIN

JAN

helsingborg symphony

13

28

London

SWEDEN

SUN

Nareh Arghamanyan, PIANO

FEB

Puccini’s madamA butterfly

10 SAT

TEATRO LIRICO D'EUROPA

FEB

Staatskapelle GERMANY weimar orchestra

23 Fri

FEB

25 SUN

MAR

04 SUN

Vadym Kholodenko, PIANO 2013 Van Cliburn Gold Medal Winner

Jacksonville Symphony

Behzod Abduraimov, piano

national symphony orchestra of cuba Pavel Nersessian, piano

Tickets On Sale Now PEABODY AUDITORIUM

We are delighted to offer MOAS Members a special 10% discount on Single Tickets, Reference Code: MOAS.

for more information call 386.253.2901 or visit dbss.org


THE

(Re)Making

OF A MUSEUM

The Museum’s main entry, conceived as a cube, gives the visitor a clear signal where to arrive. 24 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE


MOAS EXPANSION FEATURE | BY RICHARD REEP, AIA

Early MOAS study model

WITH THE OPENING OF THE NEW GUEST SERVICES EXPANSION,

THE MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES VAULTED TO THE POSITION OF ONE OF THE LARGEST MUSEUMS IN THE SOUTHEAST. The Museum’s architecture is an expression of hope for the 21st Century, providing a platform to showcase its unique and eclectic collection. It is useful to look at where the Museum’s architecture came from, and how memories, and the specific locale of the Museum, influenced its design – and where the future is headed. Stantec was awarded the commission in 2011 through a design competition. Often, this strategy brings out the best ideas, but more often not. Designers do not have the chance to dialogue with their owners, to ask questions, and to mix it up with the staff and the Board. Stantec’s design team was successful during the competition because the intent was to preserve the Museum’s original design, rather than wipe it clean and begin fresh. Our vision showed a willingness to persevere through existing conditions which aligned with the Board’s vision, and as a result, the competition process served the Museum well. This project arose from flood damage suffered during the heavy rains of May 2009.

The Museum lies in a wooded lowland running parallel to the Intracoastal Waterway. The Museum’s oldest portions, built in these lowlands, disastrously flooded. The flooded wing included the Planetarium, and the galleries of the West Wing. Designed in the 1960’s by architect William R. Gomon, it consisted of a series of hexagonal “pods” in a honeycomb pattern. This latticelike plan was quintessential 1960s: think Buckminster Fuller and his theories about Spaceship Earth; think geodesic dome, think Epcot. The design captured the Space Coast’s optimism during the Apollo era. It was appealing to add on galleries, and indeed the Museum grew quickly in the decades after its founding. This hexagonal geometry is still quite legible in the ceiling of the orientation gallery. It is here, immediately after traversing the Guest Services Entry, one has an initial impression, and the original design intent of the Museum is part of this experience. Many of the Museum collections were damaged from the flood. This required a


MOAS EXPANSION FEATURE | THE (RE)MAKING OF A MUSEUM

The new West Wing gallery space more effectively displays the Museum’s permanent collection with more useable wall and floor space than the previous structure’s inefficient floor plan.

positioned to make the most of the future. With Florida’s ascent as one of the most populous states in the country, more visitors are expected. Museums today are integral parts of the identity of a city, but the city is undergoing massive social, demographic, technological, and economic shifts. What has kept museums in the forefront, however, is the fact that they represent a cultural hub around which all this change occurs. Inside the Daytona Beach Museum of Arts & Sciences, one can still have the rare experience of viewing an actual thing. Museums are also changing their relationship with their audiences. The design allows curators to stage exhibits of varying sizes with different levels of interaction – passive, active, or otherwise. The Museum also can be a gathering place, and the galleries can be refitted for many kinds of community gatherings, from classroom to workshop to studio.

re-set of much of Gomon’s early thinking. Brilliant in conception; the pods were difficult to display artwork, and the collection had grown in both scope and significance. The hexagonal pods fought with the contemporary interpretation needs of art and artifacts. The planetarium and galleries of the West Wing were low, with newer wings built up much higher off the ground. We relocated the Planetarium to the courtyard of the front of the structure to recognize its operating hours and raise it up higher. Blending the Planetarium’s form into the Root Family Museum’s outdoor train station allowed a new front door to take place. The train station, in particular, became a focus of design. We saw that the form of the roof was appropriate in scale and architectural language to recall the train stations that these cars must have pulled into. When we added the Planetarium, we enclosed the train cars with a clean, contemporary design that frees the visitor to imagine these cars rolling into passenger stations nationwide. And indeed, with the enclosure of the train shed, the space becomes free. The row of windows under the roof eave allows light to wash into the space, filling its volume like a cathedral. Reflected light brings forth the car’s beautiful luster without glare or deep shadows. The space has a contemplative atmosphere that elevates the historic train cars, now fully restored. In contrast, the Planetarium’s exterior architecture speaks in a new language. The design team sought to create an impactful lobby entrance and let the dome be a surprise within the space. The Planetarium’s curved feature is presented to the visitor within, a promise of the experience awaiting inside the Planetarium itself. The dome’s significant height dictated the lobby ceiling height. Inspired by the mission of the Planetarium, the architectural elements confront the visitor with rising horizontal layers, accentuating the height of the lobby. Where wall and ceiling meet, the planes are pulled apart and glow, further accentuating the scale of space. Architecture is our opportunity to tell a story. In this case, the story of the flood was apocryphal in the Museum’s history, and tied to its genus loci, or sense of place. 26 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

The new West Wing gallery space more effectively displays the Museum’s permanent collection with more useable wall and floor space than the previous structure’s inefficient floor plan. The new wing unites disparate concepts of 1960’s and 1990’s architecture that remained, raised the building above the flood zone, and healed the Museum together in a single unified statement. The spirit of the new Museum wing reinforces the inter-connectedness of the arts, sciences, and history though the infusion of iconic form, connectivity, and accessibility. The Museum’s vision has evolved over the generations, with a significant collection and a membership that expects the facility to be utilized in many ways. And finally, museums themselves are transitioning from the conventional “antiquities” model and becoming vibrant social gathering places for the community. It was vital, therefore, to create an interior architecture that reflects these different goals. The Guest Services Expansion is clearly identified as the primary entry, resolving itself into an iconic cube shape completely distinct from the rest of the campus. Facing towards the northeast, the cube captures light from the sky without the direct Florida sun. The black reception desk and black floors join together monolithically. A white quartz jacket over the desk acts as an arm, offered to the arriving guest by a well-dressed and gracious host. With this space, the Museum can accommodate multiple groups of all sizes, befitting its size. The MOAS main facility is complemented by the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. These institutions together, along with Tuscawilla Preserve, constitute Daytona’s true cultural capital. The Museum’s design started with a hopeful hexagon pattern, but additions and alterations became ad hoc as time went on. By the time of the flood, the Museum’s collection was well developed, but its architectural identity had deteriorated. The flood was simply an environmental crisis on top of an existential crisis that was long in the making. The Museum of Arts & Sciences reconciles its collection of objects through architecture. It expresses its own sense of place and time while being of the earth. With the Museum’s collection growing, and its place in the community growing, the facility is now

Besides being an architect, I am also an artist. Art itself is changing, with performance art, installations, and multimedia work taking over much of the contemporary art scene. This museum can display new media with ease, and the presentation of art – whether object or experience – is enabled by the facility. The museum must perform these functions, while remaining a still, quiet space that is needed now more than ever in our culture of chaos and permanxiety. Whether the Museum is “sustainable”, or capable of being sustained, will be judged by future generations. The true measure of sustainability is whether the choices made today will allow future generations to make choices of their own. We designed this facility with this principle in the forefront of our minds. This early part of the twenty first century will be remembered as a time of exciting change. The Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach is designed around a few core principles to allow freedom to adapt to this change. The institution has gained a facility that identifies it with the heart of the region’s rich culture. Richard Reep, AIA, LEED-AP is an awardwinning architect with a history of museum design. He has worked worldwide and currently works with Stantec Architecture, Inc. which acquired VOA Associates in 2016. He practices in Orlando, Florida.

We enclosed the train cars with a clean, contemporary design that frees the visitor to imagine these cars rolling into passenger stations nationwide.


Embry-Riddle’s Eagle in flight over Daytona Beach, Fla., of the world’s first hybrid gas-EDUCATOR OVER AND OUT |Eco BY SETH MAYO, CURATOR OF ASTRONOMY ANDone JASON SCHREINER, PLANETARIUM electric aircraft. Built and designed by students at Embry-Riddle’s Eagle Flight Research Center, this aircraft would take off using a gas engine, and transition to an electric motor in cruise to obtain very high efficiencies. Image credit: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

When the Wright Brothers embarked on their inaugural flight from breezy Kill Devil Hills, four miles outside Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, in 1903, they relied upon the growing foundation of innovative technologies and engineering to make the longsought, human dream of flight, a reality. In the 115-year span since that pivotal moment – a blink of an eye in human history terms – there have been leaps-andbounds in our ability to conquer the skies, propelling ourselves to new heights as we ONE VERSION OF THE HEUROBOTICS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE. THIS VEHICLE TAKEOFF LIKE VERTICALLY have continued to EMBRY-RIDDLE push theEXPERIMENTAL boundaries ofCAN aeronautical development. LIKE A HELICOPTER, LEAN AT A 90-DEGREE ANGLE, AND FLY HORIZONTALLY LIKE A FIXED WING AIRCRAFT. UAVS SUCH AS THIS ARE INCREASINGLY OPERATED IN A WHOLE RANGE OF APPLICATIONS, LIKE AGRICULTURE, CONSTRUCTION, DISASTER SURVEILLANCE, MILITARY, LAW ENFORCEMENT, AND SEARCH AND RESCUE. IMAGE CREDIT: EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY 34 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 28


T

o explore these lofty achievements, our new temporary exhibition, Milestones in Aviation: From the Collection of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, highlights selected artifacts through the presentation of various propeller designs, an array of engine types, and even an entire next-generation aircraft, altogether representing many different decades and eras throughout aviation history. This could not have been accomplished without the extensive collection on loan from the world-class institution, EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University. With its main campus right next door here in Daytona Beach, Embry-Riddle is the world’s oldest and largest, fully accredited university specializing in aviation and aerospace. There have been many fruitful collaborations between Embry-Riddle and MOAS in the past: through their students volunteering during Museum events, professors giving thought-provoking lectures in the Planetarium, and in developing a three-dimensional poster exhibition of celestial objects with their Department of Physical Sciences. The curation of the Milestones in Aviation exhibition is the most ambitious partnership yet to date, striving to expand upon the rich history of the aviation field that has made flight ubiquitous in everyday life. The artifacts on loan not only help tell an interesting aviation story, but also serve as a reminder of the influence that Embry-Riddle has on aviation advancement through their cutting-edge research and in training pilots, aviation, maintenance technicians, engineers, and professionals working in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). With Embry-Riddle’s fascinating collection, along with intricate scaled-down models of a multitude of aircraft on loan from local private collectors, Milestones in Aviation seeks to celebrate aviation in many different forms and media.

Powering Through the Air

At the turn of the 20th century, when Orville Wright daringly piloted the Wright Flyer while his brother, Wilbur, stood by to assist the takeoff, their achievement was in a powered, heavier-than-air sustained flight – even though it lasted a mere 12-seconds and traveled less than the wingspan of a modern Boeing 747. This kind of flight could only be made possible by a reliable engine.

OVER AND OUT | BY SETH MAYO, CURATOR OF ASTRONOMY

Major aspects of this exhibit are found with the impressive aircraft engines on display. In aviation speak, this essential piece of an aircraft is also known as the powerplant, providing a source of propulsion. These engines reside in Embry-Riddle’s Department of Aviation Maintenance Science. As a major component of Embry-Riddle’s educational breadth, the Department of Aviation Maintenance Science (AMS) offers degree programs and engages in the training of aircraft aviation maintenance technicians (through the FAA Airframe & Powerplant program) in maintaining the integrity of aircraft. One of the largest engines to encounter in this exhibition is the Pratt and Whitney R2800 Double Wasp radial engine. This workhorse of a powerplant, developed in the 1930s, was configured in a circular fashion, whereby the actuating pistons – driven by combustion – radiated outward from a central crankshaft to rotate a propeller. The R2800 on loan is conveniently cutaway in key areas, exposing the underlying mechanical workings within. Of note are the exposed pistons within their respective cylinders near the propeller section. Impressively, the R2800 boasts 18 of these cylinders, arranged in a twin-row configuration, with 9 cylinders radiating outward in each row. With the combined reciprocating nature of all 18 cylinders firing, the massive R2800 could produce anywhere from 1,500 to 2,800 horsepower, depending on the variant of the engine and its usage. Pratt and Whitney, an American aerospace company since 1925, built these engines in the late 1930s, eventually supporting well-known aircraft in World War II, like the F4U Corsair with their signature oddly shaped gull wing, the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, and the Grumman F6F Hellcat. In the 1940s, the R2800’s massive size and output were crucial in pushing single engine aircraft to surpass airspeed records of the time, reaching then blistering speeds of over 400 mph

(348 knots).

The fact that radial engines could be built so large and aircooled led to an increase in power-to-weight ratio – an important measurement of an aircraft's performance and efficiency. These came as a replacement for the earlier generation of the rotary type engine, where the entire powerplant spun with the propeller.

THE JUNKERS JUMO 004 TOP: The entire Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine, found on the world’s first jet fighter, the German Messerschmitt Me 262. This was one of the first axial-flow compressor engines that was mass-produced and installed on thousands of aircraft. Two of these engines attached to the Me 262, making it the fastest aircraft in the latter part of World War II. BOTTOM LEFT: The aft end of the Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine reveals turbine blades, in red, that are driven by hot gases coming from the combustion chamber farther down the engine. The turbine is connected by a shaft to the blue compressor blades at the front end, allowing this type of engine to be self-sustaining. The hot gases leaving the turbine section depart through the very end of the engine that consists of a narrowed jet nozzle, providing the thrust needed for flight. BOTTOM RIGHT: Seen here is the first set of compressor blades found on the Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine, one of the first of its kind in the world. The blades, painted in blue, would compress incoming cold air, increasing the pressure and temperature for combustion farther down the engine.


AVIATION PAST & FUTURE RIGHT: In flight is a newer version of EmbryRiddle’s Heurobotics Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. With its nine-foot-long wingspan and six-foot diameter propellers, the UAV can be seen here taking off vertically like a helicopter. Once in the air, the UAV can transition to horizontal flight and fly like a traditional fixed wing aircraft. Image credit: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University BOTTOM LEFT: Embry-Riddle's experimental Eco Eagle, pictured at the Daytona Beach Campus, is the world's first direct drive hybrid gas/electric aircraft. This highly efficient aircraft is a result of a project by students and faculty completed in 2011 at the university's Eagle Flight Research Center. Image credit: EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University TOP LEFT: James Howell Douglas, one of Embry-Riddle's first pilots in 1928, wore this leather flying helmet, goggles and scarf. Douglas served as an airmail pilot and flight instructor. Image credit: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Although these engines became the dominant powerplant choice for aviation through the 1940s and beyond, radials were eventually phased out of production as newer and more efficient engines became available. While the R2800 radial engine took to the skies powering large aircraft all over the world, the Germans would be developing an entirely different type of engine – one that would drastically transform aircraft performance and capability. On the gallery floor next to piston-driven engines, is the famous Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine. Considered to be the world’s first turbojet engine put into production and use, the 004 powered the first fighter jet, the German Messerschmitt Me 262. As World War II was nearing a close, air combat was still dominated by piston-driven prop aircraft from both allied and axis powers. The Me 262 was one of a few exceptions, blazing through the skies at unprecedented airspeeds of over 530 mph (460 knots) with its twin 004 turbojet engines. This only became possible by the revolutionary design of the 004, utilizing what is called axial-flow compression – one of the first of its kind in the world. Developed by the German engineer Hans von Ohain in the 1930s, this turbojet engine boasted higher efficiency and an increase in mass flow rate, allowing a shift into a much higher airspeed regime. Although Ohain was a pioneer in the turbojet development history, he shared this feat with the British engineer, Frank Whittle, who also independently developed this type of engine. In the end, Ohain’s 004 became the first turbojet to be mass-produced and successfully flown on thousands of aircraft. For an axial flow compressor type of turbojet, air is brought in through an inlet and flows parallel to the axis of rotation. As air passes through the inlet, it first hits the compressor blades. The 004 on loan is completely cut in half, revealing this first stage of compressor blades that are painted in blue. As the name suggests, these blades compress the cold air coming inwards, and in doing so increases the pressure and temperature. The combustion chamber, painted in red, takes advantage of this “energized” air, which is mixed with fuel 30 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

and burned. The resulting hot expanding gases drive the turbine blades that are also in red. The turbine is connected by a shaft to the compressor section, providing a continuous flow that is self-sustaining. Hot air leaving the turbine at the aft end of the engine leaves through a narrowing jet nozzle that provides the thrust for forward movement. Two of these 004 engines found their way onto the design of the Me 262 aircraft, making it the fastest and potentially the most capable fighter during World War II. Even though the Me 262 had superiority over its prop driven counterparts, it arrived late to the war in 1944 and never made a significant impact for the Germans. Although the turbojet engine helped with the war effort on the axis side, it eventually became a springboard of a technology that would bring aviation into the jet era worldwide. Turbojets such as the Jumo 004 eventually evolved into designs that could break the sound barrier, and its influence helped pave the way to turboprops and turbofans, in widespread use for future generations of aircraft. The jet age brought faster travel times, higher efficiency, and more reliability to all forms of air travel, completely reshaping transportation indefinitely.

Pioneers of the Past

Although the focus of Milestones in Aviation centers on technology development, the human element is the driving force behind the innovation. Embry-Riddle’s University Archives celebrates this notion with carefully preserved artifacts that not only reflect the University’s history, but also aviation as a whole. As a vital repository for old documents, records, photographs, audio/video media, artwork, and memorabilia, the University Archives serves students, faculty, alumni, and the public. The oldest pieces of the Archives collection, and prominently on display in the exhibit, are the flying helmet, scarf, and goggles of one of Embry-Riddle’s earliest pilots. As hallmarks of pilot attire from an early aviation era, these signature pieces of clothing were a crucial part of protection from the harsh environment of being aloft. Before enclosures

were commonplace, the earliest aircraft had open cockpits, exposing pilots to blisteringly cold temperatures and tremendous wind speeds. These articles of pilot gear date back to 1928, and were worn by James Howell Douglas, who joined the Embry-Riddle company as an airmail pilot and flight instructor. Before his tenure at the Embry-Riddle company, Douglas served in World War I and spent time afterward in the National Guard, first as a mechanic, and eventually becoming a military pilot. He was later promoted to 1st Lieutenant, where he supervised engineering, maintenance, and operations of the 105th Observation Squadron. As one of Embry-Riddle’s first business ventures, it started the first regularly scheduled commercial airmail service between Cincinnati and Chicago on December 17, 1927. Along with barnstormers, airmail pilots were a major part of the advancement of aviation as a growing profession and supporting the economic potential of aviation.

Lifting Off into the Future

Considering the past is always a useful exercise in recognizing how we got here today. Celebrating technology that pushes the boundaries of what is possible helps us foretell what exciting things are to come. This is all the more true behind Embry-Riddle’s cutting-edge research and development facility, the Eagle Flight Research Center (EFRC). Affiliated with the Embry-Riddle’s College of Engineering, the EFRC supports a whole range of aerospace disciplines, utilizing the efforts of the University’s students at all levels. One of the EFRC’s related business spinoffs and research success stories is the relatively new company, called Heurobotics. Prominently on display in the exhibit is the company’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. As a burgeoning part of the aviation industry, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), or more commonly known as a drone, is simply an aircraft with no human aboard. UAVs have shown up in plenty of applications, from hobby to commercial, and even military uses. Featured in Milestones in Aviation, the


Heurobotics UAV is no hobbyist’s toy you can buy online. At first glance, it may look like a typical flying machine, but it behaves in a unique fashion. With its nine-foot wingspan supporting two motors with six-foot diameter rotors attached for propulsion, all bisected by an aerodynamically shaped fuselage, this UAV launches vertically like a helicopter, and can then transition to horizontal flight like a typical fixed-wing aircraft (VTOL-vertical takeoff and landing). With complex flight capabilities, coupled with the fact that it is controlled remotely and robotically, the Heurobotics UAV could only accomplish these tasks by a sophisticated computer with algorithms that were adapted from spacecraft attitude control. With lightweight materials, precise engineering, and the right computational brains, this UAV can cover up to 250 acres and fly for 20 minutes using only battery power. Gas powered versions bring that up to 4 hours and a much-expanded range. This UAV is dubbed the Mark I and is the first iteration of multiple versions that are continually improved and optimized. Heurobotics hopes to see this UAV in realworld scenarios and applications from use in agriculture, construction, security and surveillance, and rescue operations, all conducted in a much cheaper and safer way. Embry-Riddle’s EFRC has many exciting successes to its name, but the one that forms the pièce de résistance of the exhibit is the Eco Eagle hybrid aircraft. This will be, by far, the most attention-grabbing component of Milestones in Aviation since the entire aircraft sits in the exhibition space. To say this is truly a one-of-its-kind aircraft is

not a hyperbolic statement. The Eco Eagle is the world's first diret drive, hybrid gas/electric airplane. It was developed at Embry-Riddle's Eagle Flight Research Center with patents awarded in 2015 and 2016. Students and faculty participated in developing this revolutionary technology. Similar to a hybrid car commonly found on the road today, the Eco Eagle’s use of two different power systems allows it to attain very high efficiency at different phases of flight. This innovative design is accomplished with both a 100 horsepower Rotax four-cylinder engine and a hyper-efficient 40 horsepower electric motor onboard. The use of both systems allows this aircraft to utilize the advantages currently found with gas and electric engines; it utilizes gas-type propulsion for the very power-hungry stages of takeoff and landing, and electric for the longer and less power consuming nature of cruise flight. In addition to the hybrid powerplant design, the Eco Eagle’s ultra-light airframe and hugely important high lift-drag ratio contributes to its fuel-efficient status. The lift-drag ratio is a measurement of the lift generated, divided by the drag created as an aircraft moves through the air. Its massive 75-foot wingspan – in relation to the Eco Eagle’s small fuselage – allows it to attain a very high 50:1 lift-drag ratio. In comparison, modern airliners attain efficiencies from 15-20:1, while a typical trainer aircraft, like the Cessna 172, has around a 10:1 ratio. The Eco Eagle’s wingspan is so large, that it could not fit into the Museum’s Ford Gallery in its entirety. Fortunately, the wings have been folded back into a triangular configuration to allow the aircraft to be staged inside. As a major project for the EFRC, it took two

years to design and construct the Eco Eagle by ERAU students and faculty. The aircraft was even submitted to a NASA competition in 2011, called the Green Flight Challenge, to test designs of some of the most efficiently engineered aircraft. As the only all-university led team, Embry-Riddle’s Eco Eagle was the only hybrid aircraft in the competition and rated among the top four aircraft out of fourteen challengers, many of which were built by major companies and institutions around the United States. As more efficient motors are built, and lighter and higher capacity batteries become available, the Eco Eagle stands as an important milestone in a growing green aviation industry and is likened to the Wright Flyer – a launching point that will pave the way for future aircraft.

A Team Effort

For this exhibit to become a reality, the MOAS team extends their utmost appreciation to the time and dedication spent by many faculty and staff at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. They not only aided in finding and securing the objects for display, but helped develop the story we wanted to tell and the vision for the kind of exhibit we hoped to curate. Most notable are the contributions by the University Archives, Marketing and Communications, Aviation Maintenance Science, the College of Engineering, and the Eagles Flight Research Center. Come and enjoy the marvels of human flight through amazing technologies and artifacts in Milestones in Aviation, running from January 6th to March 4th. Check the event calendar starting on page 19, and visit www.moas.org for upcoming lectures and tours led by MOAS staff and Embry-Riddle faculty.


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Arts & Sciences Magazine Winter 2018 Edition  

Official magazine of the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. Winter 2018 edition.

Arts & Sciences Magazine Winter 2018 Edition  

Official magazine of the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. Winter 2018 edition.

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