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In This Issue: 2019 Summer Learning Institute | Spring Exhibits | MOAS Telescope Guide


IN THIS ISSUE 4 LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 8 MOAS NEWS

Volunteer of the Quarter and In Memoriam

10 GARDEN OF THE HEART'S DESIRE BY RUTH GRIM Interview with collector, Mahin Ghanbari

14 2019 SUMMER LEARNING INSTITUTE Program Guide and Registration Form

18 SPRING EXHIBITS & PROGRAMMING CALENDAR

ON THE COVER

Rashti-Doozi Applique and silk embroidery on wool flannel Floral and paisley motif Early 19th Century Northern Iran 75 x 46 inches Courtesy of Mahin Ghanbari

23 GAMBLE PLACE CLEAN-UP Thank You to Our Volunteers

24 ZACH IN TIME BY J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS Florida: A Sportsman's Paradise

28 MOAS GUILD NEWS

BY DR. BEVERLY MCMURTRY GRISSOM

The Guild’s Fundraisers Continue to Blossom this Spring!

31 THE MOAS GUIDE TO TELESCOPES BY SETH MAYO A Comprehensive Look at Telescope Use, Design, Purchasing, and Setup

For more, visit MOAS.org or follow us on

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SUMMER?

Register today for the MOAS 2019 Summer Learning Institute! See Program Guide on page 14.


MOAS STAFF

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Executive Director ANDREW SANDALL RUTH GRIM, Chief Curator and Gary R. Libby Curator of Art ERIC MAUK, Curator of Exhibits MEGAN FINLEY, Curatorial Assistant ROBERT WOHLRAB, Curatorial Assistant JAMES ZACHARIAS, Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History NICOLE MESSERVY, Education Associate KELSEY HANSEN-KRAUSE, Group Tours and Education Coordinator SETH MAYO, Curator of Astronomy JASON SCHREINER, Planetarium Coordinator NICOLE BAIRD, Planetarium Educator STEVE CONKLIN, Director of Finance DIANNE MORRIS, Finance Associate STEPHANIE MASON-TEAGUE, Director of Operations KRISTEN ALFORD, Director of Community Relations MONICA MITRY, Development Manager JENELLE CODIANNE, Director of Marketing and Public Relations ALEXANDRA MIDDLETON, Director of Sales and Special Events TORI CARTA, Rental Manager JOHN BRUCE, Security Supervisor BRANDON SHEPPARD, Facilities Supervisor Guest Relations Team MARK CARRUTHERS, Guest Relations Associate LORI HOEPFINGER, Guest Relations Gift Shop Coordinator CLARISSA LEON, Guest Relations Associate MICHELLE MCARDLE, Guest Relations Associate LISA SHAW, Guest Relations Coordinator DORIS STRNAD, Guest Relations Associate Maintenance Team DEAN CORMIER, Facilities Assistant ISRAEL TAYLOR, Facilities Assistant CARLOS ZELLARS, Facilities Assistant Security Team JUSTIN ALISA, Security CALEB CANLON, Security ANDY GION, Security EVE GREER, Security AMANDA MITCHELL, Security AMANDA ORGAN, Security ORLANDO PACHECO, Security ANGELO PIERCE, JR., Security Training Specialist ALEXIS ROMEYN, Security

Editor JENELLE CODIANNE Contributing Writers RUTH GRIM DR. BEVERLY GRISSOM SETH MAYO J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS Art Director NIKKI MASTANDO, MASTANDO MEDIA

Children enjoyed using the race track in the Children’s Museum during our last Family Craft Day which was superhero-themed in celebration of the new My Hero: Contemporary Art & Superhero Action exhibition.

DEAR FRIENDS,

It is hard to believe we are already so far into an exciting 2019 here at the Museum of Arts & Sciences. We have already had some great programs and events and are looking forward to the ones we are working on which I ANDREW SANDALL think you will all enjoy. Sometimes it is crazy to think about just how many events we have going on here each quarter. Hopefully you feel that there is something for everyone and that we are meeting our goal of continuing to make MOAS a great place to socialize for both our members and the community through the many weekend and after-hours events you can find in our calendar. We are trying something new in this month’s edition of Arts & Sciences Magazine by introducing a series of “How To…” articles written by our staff. We hope that you enjoy this new feature and wish for us to continue it in future issues. This idea came about after some conversations we had between staff regarding the types of questions that we are asked regularly. Many guests approach us looking to take the first steps to venture into a new hobby or interest and are in search of information to set them off in the right direction. The more I asked around to staff, the more I heard that there were a wide variety of these “How To…” topics that could be explored, so we thought we would start adding them to our magazine. It was interesting for me to hear from our staff about the types of questions we get and the wide range of subjects that our visitors request information on. It was also a great reminder of the vast number of subjects that we cover and that our staff specialize in. We are certainly a great resource for people wanting to start a new hobby in the arts, sciences, or in an aspect of history! All of this reminded me of one of the reasons that I first decided to make my career in museums way back in my hometown in the early 90s. I had held several other jobs while looking for a

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career that really excited me. A job in my town’s museum became available and by the end of my first week I realized that it was a career I could love. What amazed me in that first week was just how many different tasks were performed every day and how no two days ever seemed alike. All these years later it still feels the same way – with surprises and opportunities to learn new skills and explore new subjects seemingly around every corner. Something that struck me a little while ago was that even though I have worked in museums covering all kinds of subjects and collections, I have never really forgotten what I learned while in those early positions. With a career that has covered working in several medieval buildings, to working with the world’s biggest collection of railroad photography, to the social history of people working in the fishing industry in a small town in eastern England, and then later to managing and maintaining the house visited by George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, and where Aaron Burr was married in 1782, it is quite amazing the amount of information I have built up over the years and even more amazing how quickly I can recall it when asked a question. The information stored comes up in odd circumstances and situations sometimes – for instance, I have gotten used to the fact that my years working at the National Railway Museum in England have left me entirely unable to not correct anyone who refers to a locomotive as a “train.” I have tried, I promise! But it was drilled into me so deeply during my time in that museum that it is now a reflex action on my part. Moving forward, I hope you enjoy these articles – and if you have something you have always wanted to know how to do and would like an idea on how and where to start that we might be able to help with, then please get in touch with us and let us know! We really do value your feedback on the magazine and the Museum in general. It is vital in helping us understand how we can continue to provide the service we strive to produce for our community.


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ABOUT THE MUSEUM

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND SPONSORS

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES The Museum of Arts and Sciences is a not-for-profit educational institution, chartered by the State of Florida in 1962 and accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Museum collections and research include Cuban and Florida art, American fine and decorative arts, European fine and decorative arts, pre-Columbian and African artifacts, Pleistocene fossils, Florida history and regional natural history. Permanent and changing exhibitions, lectures, and classes highlight educational programs. The Museum houses changing arts and sciences exhibition galleries, permanent collection galleries, a gallery of American art, paintings, decorative arts and furniture, the Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum, the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, the Cuban Fine and Folk Art Museum, a state-of-the-art planetarium, library, the Frischer Sculpture Garden, maintains nature trails in a 90-acre preserve in adjacent Tuscawilla Park, and operates Gamble Place in Port Orange. The Museum of Arts and Sciences is recognized by the State of Florida as a cultural institution and receives major funding from the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. Major Museum programs and activities for members, school children and the general public are also supported by grants from the County of Volusia, the Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Elfun Community Fund, and over 30 Major Sponsors from the community. MUSEUM HOURS: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday The Museum of Arts and Sciences is committed to the Americans with Disabilities Act by making our facility and programs accessible to all people. If you have any special requirements, suggestions, or recommendations, please contact our representative, Executive Director, Andrew Sandall, at 386.255.0285. If you prefer, you may contact the Cultural Council of Volusia County representative at 386.257.6000, or the Division of Cultural Affairs, The Capitol, Tallahassee 850.487.2980, or TT 850.488.5779. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. THE TOLL-FREE NUMBER IS 1.800.435.7352. FLORIDA REGISTRATION #CH-1851

2019 EXHIBIT SPONSORS

2019 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

GOLD Brown & Brown, Inc. Cici and Hyatt Brown Destination Daytona Beach Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Halifax Health Zgraph, Inc.

Melinda Dawson, President SILVER Amy Workowski, First Vice President Cobb Cole Daytona Beach News-Journal Bill Chapin, FAIA, Second Vice President Daytona International Speedway Todd Huffstickler, Secretary Jon Hall Chevrolet Ellen O’Shaughnessy, Assistant Secretary Mastando Media Katharine Hurst Miller, Treasurer NASCAR Garrett Klayer, CPA, Assistant Treasurer RLF Architects Cici Brown, Trustee Liaison Gene and Diane Rogers SunTrust Foundation Tom Hart, Past President Randy Dye BRONZE Dr. Beverly Grissom, MOAS Guild Representative Advent Health J. Lester Kaney Bahama House Bomar Construction Carl W. Lentz III, MD, FACS Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University David Neubauer Gary R. Libby Charitable Trust Ann Phillips Giles Electric Family Rachel Samson Tom and Peggie Hart Dr. Kent Sharples L. Gale Lemerand and Jill Simpkins Jack White Elanor Murray Stuart and Lisa Sixma Allison Morris Zacharias David and Toni Slick

HONORARY TRUSTEES Miriam Blickman Anderson Bouchelle (Deceased) J. Hyatt Brown Alys Clancy (Deceased) Tippen Davidson (Deceased) Susan Root Feibleman (Deceased) Thurman Gillespy, Jr., MD Herbert Kerman (Deceased) Chapman Root (Deceased) Jan Thompson (Deceased)

Executive Director Emeritus Gary R. Libby

Sponsor of the MOAS Portable Planetarium

Arts & Sciences is published quarterly by the Museum of Arts & Sciences, 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, Florida 32114, telephone 386.255.0285, website www.moas.org. Income from contributors helps offset a portion of the expense involved in the production of this publication. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES All inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to the MOAS Communications Department at 386.255.0285, ext. 320.

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IN MEMORIAM

In Memoriam

Anita Parrish Emery Longtime museum member and Daytona Beach resident, Anita Parrish Emery, passed away unexpectedly but peacefully at her Daytona Beach home on December 25, 2018. Anita was a fixture at many of the Museum’s events over the years and a great supporter of the local arts community. Anita graduated from Seabreeze High School in 1956 and attended the University of Florida achieving her master’s degree in Education in 1963. She taught elementary education for 20 years in Volusia County at Highlands Elementary School. In 1967, Anita married Don W. Emery, a well-known local artist and instructor who

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was also native to Daytona Beach. There are examples of Don’s paintings currently on display at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Anita volunteered in helping to unearth the Giant Ground Sloth skeleton in 1975 when it was discovered at today’s Reed Canal Park. She helped to uncover a thighbone at the dig site. Anita was a generous person as she purchased many of her friends’ memberships to MOAS. She was a member of the Museum’s Renaissance Society and was a regular participant in the Museum’s Florida Vistas Book Club since its inception. She will be missed by everyone at the Museum.


VOLUNTEER OF THE QUARTER

Volunteer Spotlight

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In 2006 Carol left Warren, Ohio to fulfill a lifelong wish to live in Florida. Shortly after she moved to Daytona Beach, Carol joined the Daytona State adjunct staff as an Adult Education GED teacher where she taught until 2017. Once fully retired and following a quintuple heart bypass surgery, she dedicated more time to a healthier lifestyle by eating vegan, and doing pool workouts, Pilates, and yoga at the Port Orange “Y.� Carol has loved volunteering at MOAS, first in the gift shop and more recently in administration. As a member of the MOAS Florida Vistas Book Club, Carol has gained greater insight into the history and culture of Florida. Membership in the Daytona Beach Symphony Guild has been another exciting opportunity to contribute to the arts in the community. In her free time Carol likes to read, play golf, travel, and visit her two sons and their families, one in China and the other in Napa Valley. But, when in town, Carol enjoys the company of special friends and other family members.


Garden of the

Heart’s Desire

A Disappearing Art Form Explored BY RUTH GRIM, CHIEF CURATOR/GARY R. LIBBY CURATOR OF ART

Beginning April 18 and running until July 21 of 2019, the Museum of Arts & Sciences will be showing a rare collection of 18th and 19th Century traditional Persian textiles in its West Wing and Root Hall Galleries. Over sixty examples of these elegant, sumptuously embroidered and woven works will be on display, providing a unique opportunity to experience the timehonored artisanship of this ancient culture. Following is an interview with Mahin Ghanbari, owner of the textiles in the Garden of the Heart’s Desire: Selections from the Golzar Collection exhibition. How did you begin with collecting textiles? I have always had a lifelong passion for collecting traditional Persian textiles from the past. I think it began with a gift from my Aunt Golzar of a very old silk brocade textile with a ragged lining. I was only a school girl then but I knew that objects like these were heirlooms that were handed down from generation to generation. I was very honored that my Aunt had entrusted this treasure with me and it sparked a lifelong desire to collect and preserve these precious and often delicate works of art.

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The intricate detail, elegant designs, and expensive gold embroidery on these pieces are indeed stunning but I think most modern Western audiences might be surprised to know how treasured these types of 18th and 19th century textiles were in their day. Can you provide a bit of historical background as to how these works became so valuable in Persian culture? Textiles are not only an intricate part of the daily life of Persians as they are used for coverings, clothing, decorations and gifts. The great deal of effort and passion that epitomizes their creation also characterizes Persian life and these textiles become symbolic, intimate objects tied to the most significant moments in one’s life. They are, therefore, rooted in personal and familial memory and are shared between spouses, families, and friends as well as passed down through generations.

Garden of the Heart’s Desire is an interesting title. Can you explain how you decided to give the exhibition this title? Gardens are very important in Persian culture. They are physical space for social interaction as well as religious activities and scholarly contemplation. But gardens have historically been hard to maintain in Persia due to its arid climate. So, they require a good deal of devotion and cultivation which has, over time, given them a good deal of cultural significance. These earthly paradises containing running water, flowering plants, fruit trees, lush greenery, and singing birds are very important to Persian culture. Garden of


the Heart’s Desire explores these ideals as represented by the sumptuous tradition of Persian textiles, which like gardens, require meticulous craftsmanship and dedication. In addition, motifs from nature such as flowers, plants, songbirds, etc. show up often in these textiles, proving how important a thriving natural environment is in Persian society.

What are the criteria you use to determine what pieces to add to your collection? I would say my criteria are that the pieces I collect are Persian and of great beauty and quality. In addition, I'm very interested in preserving this unique and quintessential Persian art form so, in many cases, I have rescued fragile textiles to save them for future generations to enjoy.

Where do you find most of the textiles you acquire? I have found a good number of Persian textiles in Iran, certainly, but also have found them all over the world in the United States, Europe, Canada, and other countries. I have met many people over the years that share my interest in preserving and showcasing this disappearing art form. Thankfully, this network of individuals has led me to important pieces to acquire and is still doing so.

You said this is a "disappearing art form." Can you explain that? Hundreds of years ago, Persian textiles were painstakingly created by hand by trained weavers and embroiderers who learned their art through passed-down instruction. This tradition has largely faded away with industrialization of textile industries throughout the world in the past century and a half. The type of time-consuming, highly-skilled artistry represented by the works in my collection is no longer abundant in Iran or, indeed, most places on the globe.

Which of the works on exhibit do you consider the most important and why? This is a good question that allows me to express my thoughts and feelings about the pieces I have in my collection, including the ones in the exhibit. I view each piece as a unique entity with its own characteristic that stands out and gives a very

Mahin Ghanbari was born in Iran to a family with a long artistic background and tradition. She holds an MFA degree in Ceramic Art from the University of Florida, and a B.Ph degree in Art from the College of Art and Architecture from PennsylvaniaState University. Mahin taught Ceramic Art at the University of Florida and several art centers for many years, and exhibited her work in numerous galleries and universities. She has been a lecturer, and presenter in national and international conferences. Along with her teaching and studio work, Mahin has always had a keen interest in Persian woven arts, which started in her early youth. She started collecting unique and rare pieces of Persian Textiles (18th through early 20th century), along with researching their origin, age, function, and restoration. It has been her passion to collect these exquisite woven pieces of art. Her goal is to promote awareness of this little - known art by sharing it with others.


"I want to see the visitors leaving the exhibit with a happy feeling and excitement of being an extension of a glorious past where and when human beings did the seemingly impossible, and created a world better than before, and left it for the future generations to do the same." clear message. Strangely, I sometimes spread them all around the house and literally communicate with them, feel them, examine them, and try to understand their response to me. I actually apologize to them when I feel I have not paid the attention they deserve. They are (like) my children. I love them each and all and I give them love each as I see fit, they are all important, and equally important. I hope the viewers of the exhibit share my feelings and observe them as each being unique and being its own entity; they all deserve that.

What are your plans for continuing to grow the collection? Any specific types of works you are most interested in finding?

Any interesting stories to recount regarding finding and acquiring certain pieces?

In closing, what is the most important thing you would like our visitors to take away from the experience of this exhibition?

Again, they all have very interesting stories, starting with my first �acquired� piece: GOLZAR. But what may interest your readers, is the story of finding, and acquiring a pair of Royal sashes. We were visiting Paris at the time, and learned about an Antique center in the outskirts. After a long taxi ride, I entered heaven. At one booth, there was a Persian lady from Northern Iran who had lost her husband who had been an avid collector of Persian Art and Antiques. Yes, she had the pair of Royal sashes that appeared to be late Safavid/ early Qajar period. She told me that Sotheby’s was interested in these and she expects them to show up in a couple of days. I told her that I am truly interested, and I am here. After long negotiations and convincing she agreed to sell them to me. I held them tight, all the way to the Hotel, and hand carried them all the way back home. They will be prominently displayed in the exhibit.

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I never planned to be a collector. I always felt that I am a Textile lover, and looked for opportunity to find what I love and acquire them to preserve and promote. I still follow my heart, and passion for preserving/promoting these unique art forms which are a window to the glory of the past.

I want to see the visitors leaving the exhibit with a happy feeling and excitement of being an extension of a glorious past where and when human beings did the seemingly impossible, and created a world better than before, and left it for the future generations to do the same. This should serve as an aspiration for all to join under the banner of humanity to create a better world perpetually. In addition, the Art of textile, and textile art was dominated by women artists. As the visitors leave the exhibit, I would like for them to remember the resourcefulness, the ingenuity, and the creativity of these dedicated women that have created these masterpieces in the face of the inherent obstacles of the period.


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ar Olds 4, 5 and 6 Ye Week 1: June 10-14 9am-12pm Dinosaur Crazy Your young paleontologist will enjoy an exciting hands-on opportunity to touch, hold, and discover real dinosaur fossils from the Museum’s private collection. Students will sort, dig, and learn about the life and times of dinosaurs from the Mesozoic Era. Junior paleontologists will learn about meat eaters, plant eaters, and the difference between mammals and reptiles. 1pm-4pm Art City Paint, draw, and create art beyond your wildest imagination. Utilize the Museum’s collection to explore art from all around the world. Create animal portraits, make a print on our printing press, and explore our fantastic art galleries. Paint your own crazy art and have fun discovering the possibilities of developing your creativity.

Week 2: June 17-21

1pm-4pm LEGO® City With a recent donation we now have over 200,000 LEGO®s in our collection! LEGO®s are a great social activity and fantastic learning tool, especially in a museum setting. Students will build all types of structures, visit the Museum galleries, view an astronomy show, and build a spaceship! Engineering, art, math, and science all come together within this classic toy!

Week 6: July 15-19 9am-12pm Paint, Print, and Splatter! Paint, print, and splatter your way through the world of art. Take a trip around the world and learn about art using the Museum’s extraordinary collection of fine art. Design prints, pottery, crazy art, finger paintings, and more! 1pm-4pm Science Crazy Every child is a born-scientist. Foster your child’s interest by exploring multiple sciences through a variety of hands-on activities. We will explore chemistry, paleontology, marine science, and even astronomy in the Planetarium! Explore a new branch of science each day with new opportunities to explore our amazing world and universe.

9am-12pm Animal Adventures If you love animals this is the class for you! Discover all of the cool animals that roam the world from lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!) to animals that make Florida their home. Take a trip around the world using the Museum galleries to find animals depicted in art. Use museum specimens like teeth, claws, and skulls to learn how animals eat their food. By land, air, and sea, the Museum showcases many amazing animals to learn about!

Week 7: July 22-26

1pm-4pm Build It Nation! Using materials such as clay, straws, wood blocks, and LEGO®s embeds mathematical learning and conceptual thinking. We have lots of materials for kids to build all types of crazy sculptures, contraptions, buildings, bridges, and more! This hands-on class is a great way to jump start informal science and math skills. We will also take a trip to our new “Block City” exhibit and visit the Museum galleries to search for images of unique architecture.

1pm-4pm Art, Nature, and Me! Animals come in all shapes and sizes, they fill all corners of the world. During this class students will learn about the diversity of animals from A to Z. Paint, draw, and sculpt your favorite animals. Learn how animals communicate, move, and acquire food. Vision, sound, touch, smell, and taste will be explored while your camper visits the Museum galleries and participates in related activities.

Week 3: June 24-28 9am-12pm Da Vinci Rules Paint, draw, and create art beyond your wildest imagination. Utilize the Museum’s collection to explore art from around the globe. Create portraits, prints, sculptures, and draw cool animals. Use all types of art mediums from watercolor to clay and be like Da Vinci. 1pm-4pm Science Giant You are never too young to begin your career as a scientist. The Museum has many hands-on science kits for all ages. Learn about physics, astronomy, fossils, nature, and even chemistry. Take a trip to the Planetarium, the Prehistory of Florida Gallery, and the Children’s Museum to discover the world of science that is all around you. Week4: No Classes July 1-5

Week 5: July 8-12 9am-12pm It’s a Pirates Life for Me! Shiver me timbers and skedaddle! Dress up like a pirate, design your own pirate flag, create your own treasure coin, and learn about a pirate’s life at sea. Enjoy pirate stories, arts and crafts, and a fun dress-up pirate party! Landlubbers need not apply.

9am-12pm Space Cats Learn about the stars, planets, the Milky Way Galaxy, and experience the life of an astronaut. Learn about rockets and visit the Museum’s planetarium for an incredible show. Create a solar system diorama and a cool spaceship that will whisk you away to the stars and beyond.

Week 8: July 29-August 2 9am-12pm Prehistoric Planet One of our most popular classes is back! Paleopreschool students will have exciting hands-on opportunities with real prehistoric specimens and dinosaur fossils from the Museum’s collection. Our junior paleontologists will dig, sort, and hold real fossilized bones dating back millions of years. Students will make plaster casts of fossils to keep for their own collection. 1pm-4pm My Five Senses There is no better place to explore your senses than the Museum. Vision, sound, touch, smell, and taste will be explored while your camper visits the Museum galleries and participates in different activities. This multi-sensory journey will explore artifacts, paintings, sculpture, food, and more as you take a journey around the world.

ar Olds 7, 8 and 9 Ye Week 1: June 10-14 9am-12pm Science Sleuth Explore the sciences including biology, chemistry, physics, and astronomy in this hands-on class. Work with electrical boards, slime, and test out our Van Der Graaf generator. Visit the Planetarium for a tour through the universe and walk through Tuscawilla Preserve to observe a rare ecosystem. Conduct your own experiments and learn from our many hands-on science kits to kick-start your career in science. 1pm-4pm Junior Archaeologist Learn excavation techniques and how early people adapted over time to create the society we live in today. Dig into Florida’s history and beyond. Learn excavation techniques, how early people adapted over time, and created the society we live in today. Discover what it takes to be a professional archaeologist while digging in our mock archaeology site.

Week 2: June 17-21 9am-12pm Paleontology: Dinosaurs and Beyond Travel back to prehistoric time and discover the amazing animals that lived from the Permian Age to the last Ice Age. Learn how to make casts of giant shark teeth and other animals from our selection of fossil molds. Learn about the diversity of extinct life through our massive collection of fossils. Sort, sift, and classify your way to becoming the best junior paleontologist you can be! 1pm-4pm LEGO® Empire Let’s build with LEGO®s! Let your imagination run wild while creating your cityscape, futuristic vehicle, or abstract sculpture. Explore basic concepts of engineering, physics, design, and more! Explore the Museum’s 200,000-piece LEGO® collection and create your own spaceship after visiting a planetarium show. Build your own empire out of LEGO®s!

Week 3: June 24-28 9am-12pm Weird History Sometimes history can be a little weird! Some things just cannot be explained. Join MOAS Education Associate, Nicole Messervy for an unusual look at history. Campers will have the chance to learn about different myths, legends, and other strange things that have happened throughout history. 1pm-4pm Art-ology Tour the Museum’s massive collection of fine art throughout its many galleries. Learn about the different types of art from portraiture and landscapes to abstract paintings and sculptures. Explore the concepts of line, color, perspective, and enrich your imagination. Use art and creativity to build confidence in self-expression, enhance math skills, and engage high-level thinking. Week 4: No Classes July 1-5

Week 5: July 8-12 9am-12pm Launch It! Join MOAS Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, to discover the basic principles behind rocketry while constructing different types of simple rockets to launch outside the Museum. Learn about propulsion, aerodynamics, and the history of space travel within the digital planetarium.


1pm-4pm The Nature of Things Explore the world around you and learn about nature from the Museum’s extensive collection of specimens including insects, bones, and teeth. Take a trip through Tuscawilla Preserve and collect your own natural history objects. Learn about the biodiversity in your own backyard.

Week 6: July 15-19 9am-12pm Mission Space Join MOAS Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo and visit the Planetarium to take a galactic journey through the universe. Discover cool constellations, planets, galaxies, and other wonders that make up our place in the universe. Learn how our planetarium works, how to use a telescope, and what it takes to be an astronaut. 1pm-4pm Anthropology Expert Become a junior anthropologist and learn about different cultures and their development. Explore the amazing aspects of anthropology by using the Museum’s extensive galleries and hands-on objects. Learn about human cultural diversity and how societies have changed over time. Each day is a different exploration through galleries that highlight art from Africa, China, and more!

Week 7: July 22-26 9am-12pm Chemistry Connection Join MOAS Educator, Kelsey Hansen and explore the world of chemistry through hands-on experiments and real-world situations. Learn what makes a volcano erupt and make your own bottle rocket using your knowledge of chemical reactions. Explore academic topics such as the periodic table and chemical compounds. Learn about the effects of acid, pH levels, and more. 1pm-4pm Zoology 2019 Learn about animal classification, adaptions for survival, and the importance of wildlife habitat conservation. This hands-on program brings children together who share similar interests and focuses on the proper care, handling, and maintenance of both rare and popular pets. This class will explore intriguing animals you may have never heard of and allows your child to interact and learn directly from these incredible creatures.

Week 8: July 29-August 2 9am-12pm Wide World of Art Paint, draw, and create art beyond your wildest imagination. Utilize the Museum’s collection to explore art from around the world. Create animal portraits, make a print using our printing press, and tour our fantastic art galleries. Paint your own wacky art and have fun discovering the possibilities while developing your creativity. 1pm-4pm LEGO® Guru Let’s build with LEGO®s! Let your imagination run wild while creating your own cityscape, futuristic vehicle, or abstract sculpture. Explore basic concepts of engineering, design, balance, physics, and more. Construct your next creation using the Museum’s collection of over 200,000 LEGO®s as well as other materials. A one-hour supervised “bring-yourown lunch” break between morning and afternoon sessions will be scheduled for all campers that will be staying for both morning and afternoon sessions. Also offering Extended Care from 4pm - 5:30pm! See student registration form for details! 16 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

Year Olds 13 d n a 12 11, , 10 Week 1: June 10-14 9am-12pm CSI Daytona Crime Lab Learn what it takes to become a criminal detective. Explore the science behind dusting for fingerprints and figure out how to identify and crack codes! Learn about how to enter a crime scene, search for clues, and interview witnesses. Discover how police detectives use evidence to unravel and solve mysteries. 1pm-4pm Wild World of Science Explore the sciences including biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, and more during this hands-on class. Work with electrical circuit boards, slime, and test out our Van Der Graaf Generator. Visit the Planetarium for a tour through the universe and walk through Tuscawilla Preserve to observe a rare ecosystem. Conduct your own experiments and learn about the science that makes the world a modern marvel. Your child will learn from our many hands-on science kits to kick start their scientific career.

Week 2: June 17-21 9am-12pm Oh Snap! Photography 101 Join award-winning professional photographer and Volusia County School instructor, Chris Bishop and learn how to snap photos like the pros! Bring your camera or camera phone and film the world around you. Learn about the basics of shot setups, editing, color, and customization. Practice using photography apps and the Museum’s Mac Lab to transform your own portrait, landscape, or nature photography into real gems! 1pm-4pm Table Top Gaming Hone your strategic thinking, communication, and teamwork skills in this exciting class. Your child will learn how to play many classic board games as well as some of the newest hits! Participants will enjoy a board game extravaganza on the final day.

Week 3: June 24-28 9am-4pm Short Movie Making Use digital special effects to create wild and wacky videos. This one-of-a-kind class teaches the young film director how to create a storyboard, edit their film digitally, use a digital video camera, set up a tripod, and how to create soundtracks using the “Garage Band” program. On Friday, film students will have a red-carpet preview of their film in the Root Family Auditorium. Week 4: No Classes July 1-5

Week 5: July 8-12 9am-4pm Claymation Movie Making Utilizing story boarding, set design, construction, and Claymation animation, participants will create original Claymation productions. Explore the editing and production techniques that will inspire our budding 21st century animators. Learn how to sculpt, create soundtracks, design titles, and use digital cameras. Enjoy a movie premier the last day of camp.

Week 6: July 15-19 9am-4pm It’s Magic This class is a unique way to learn to “WOW” your friends with cool illusions and magic tricks that will make you the life of the party! Learn about the science and terminology used by professional magicians. Work on your presentation skills through magic tricks using cards, cups, balls, coins, and more! Learn how to create your own gimmick tricks. Join us on Friday for a performance in Root Hall as your young magicians showcase their talents! The final performance is optional for campers who wish to participate.

Week 7: July 22-26 9am-12pm Earth Science 2019 Earth science is divided up into many different categories. Learn through hands-on activities incorporating meteorology, geology, astronomy, paleontology, and more during this new class. Blast-off into space within the Museum’s planetarium and study the complexity of the galaxy and our solar system. 1pm-4pm Chemistry With a Bang! Connect with real-world situations through hands-on chemistry experiments. Learn what makes a volcano erupt or create your own bottle rocket using knowledge of chemical reactions. Explore academic topics such as the periodic table and chemical compounds while learning about the effects of acid, pH levels, and more.

Week 8: July 29-August 2 9am-12pm Wizards Workshop Students will have the chance to experience different classes and activities that the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry has to offer. Get sorted into your house, play Quidditch against other houses, and learn about the fantastic beasts that roam the wizarding world. 1pm-4pm Science Big Shot Explore a different science each day from paleontology to physics. One day we will take a tour of Tuscawilla Preserve and another day we will visit the MOAS Planetarium for an in-depth look at the galaxy. Explore careers in science as well as the famous scientists who changed the world. Learn from using our handson STEM kits and get a head start in your career in science! 9am-4pm Everyone on the Bus! Join us for this combined history, ecology, and marine science camp! Take a daily trip to some of the most amazing sites in the county like the Bulow Ruins, Lake Woodruff Wildlife National Refuge, Gemini Springs, and more! Learn about our counties amazing history, its diverse ecosystems, and enjoy hands-on activities at each site. Thank you to 2019 Summer Learning Institute Scholarship Sponsors:

Barbara Wilsey Daytona Beach Racing and Card Club Florida Power and Light Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Thomas J. Yuschok, M.D. Radiology Associates Imaging Centers


EASY REFERENCE COURSE SCHEDULE AGE GROUPS

JUNE 10-JUNE 14

JUNE 17-JUNE 21

JUNE 24-JUNE 28

JULY 8-JULY 12

JULY 15-JULY 19

JULY 22-JULY 26

JULY 29-AUGUST 2

4-5-6 Years Morning

Dinosaur Crazy

Da Vinci Rules

It’s a Pirate’s Life for Me!

Paint, Print, and Splatter!

Space Cats

Prehistoric Planet

4-5-6 Years Afternoon

Animal Adventures

Art City

Build It Nation!

Science Giant

LEGO® City

Science Crazy

Art, Nature, and Me!

My Five Senses

7-8-9 Years Morning

Science Sleuth

Paleontology: Dinosars and Beyond

Weird History

Launch It!

Mission Space

Chemistry Connection

Wide World of Art

7-8-9 Years Afternoon

Junior Archaeologist

LEGO® Empire

Art-ology

The Nature of Things

Anthropology Expert

Zoology 2019

LEGO® Guru

10-11-12-13 Years Morning

CSI Daytona Crime Lab

Oh Snap! Photography 101

Earth Science 2019

Wizards Workshop

10-11-12-13 Years Afternoon

Wild World of Science

Table Top Gaming

Chemistry With a Bang!

Science Big Shot

10-11-12-13 Years All Day

Short Movie Making

Claymation Movie Making

Everyone On the Bus!

It’s Magic

Student Registration Form 2019

Name_________________________________ Age ____Address________________________________ City/State_____________________________Zip________Phone _______________________________ Parent(s)_____________________________________Email ___________________________________ Additional registration forms, online registration, and more information can be found online at www.moas.org NOTE: Tuition fees are indicated by museum member discount price first, followed by the general admission fee.

Programs Ages 4, 5 ❏ Dinosaur Crazy ❏ Art City ❏ Animal Adventures ❏ Build It Nation! ❏ Da Vinci Rules ❏ Science Giant ❏ It’s a Pirate’s Life for Me! ❏ LEGO® City ❏ Paint, Print, and Splatter! ❏ Science Crazy ❏ Space Cats ❏ Art, Nature, and Me! ❏ Prehistoric Planet ❏ My Five Senses

&6

$95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105 $95/$105

Programs Ages 7, 8 & 9

❏ Science Sleuth $95/$105 ❏ CSI Daytona Crime Lab $95/$105 ❏ Junior Archaeologist $95/$105 ❏ Wild World of Science $95/$105 ❏ Paleontology: Dinosaurs and Beyond $95/$105 ❏ Oh Snap! Photography 101 $95/$105 ❏ LEGO Empire $95/$105 ❏ Table Top Gaming $95/$105 ❏ Weird History $95/$105 ❏ Short Movie Making $190/$210 ❏ Art-ology $95/$105 ❏ Claymation Movie Making $190/$210 ❏ Launch It! $95/$105 ❏ It's Magic $190/$210 ❏ The Nature of Things $95/$105 ❏ Earth Science 2019 $95/$105 ❏ Mission Space $95/$105 ❏ Chemistry with a Bang! $95/$105 ❏ Anthropology Expert $95/$105 ❏ Wizards Workshop $95/$105 ❏ Chemistry Connection $95/$105 ❏ Science Big Shot $95/$105 ❏ Zoology 2019 $95/$105 ❏ Everyone on the Bus! $190/$210 ❏ Wide World of Art $95/$105 ❏ LEGO Guru $95/$105 Please make sure your student is enrolled at least one week prior to the start date to help ®

®

educators prepare for classes.

Extended Care Program

Extended Care Program will be offered from 4pm - 5:30pm for $25 per week. Extended Care students picked up after 5:30pm will be charged $10 for every 10 minutes of additional care provided. Please mark the weeks which your student will attend:

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

June 10 - June 14 June 24 - June 28 July 15 - July 19 July 29 - August 2

Programs Ages 10, 11, 12 & 13

❏ June 17 - June 21 ❏ July 8 - July 12 ❏ July 22 - July 26

Payment

Reservations for each class are confirmed by your payment. Fees are non-refundable, but the Museum will make every effort to find an alternative placement for a student in another session if cancellation occurs.

Total Number of Program Sessions_____________sub total $_________ Number of Extended Care Weeks________x$25

sub total $_________

Enclosed is my check #______________________TOTAL $___________ Charge my: ____Visa/MC ____Discover

____AMEX

Make check payable to: Account#__________________________________Exp. Date_______Sec. Code________ MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Charles Henry Alston (1907-1977), Oh Freedom, oil on canvas, Smithsonian Institution Mail to: Museum of Arts and Sciences Name as it appears on the card _______________________________________________ Attn: Summer Learning Institute 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 Signature_________________________________________________________________


SPRING EXHIBITS My Hero! Contemporary Art & Superhero Action

We Never Left: Artists of Southeast Indian Tribes

FEBRUARY 9, 2019 THROUGH MAY 5, 2019 – FORD GALLERY

THROUGH APRIL 14, 2019 – ROOT HALL

This exhibition focuses on Native American artists who are descendants of the indigenous peoples who survived and continued to thrive in some portion of their Southeastern homelands despite most of their populations being relocated in the 19th Century. Included are paintings, sculpture, photographs, drawings, collages, beadwork, and basketry by nationallyrecognized Native American artists of the Southeast. Photo Credit: Faren Sanders Crews, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (North Carolina), My Heros Have Always Been Indian Cowboys

Experience the escapades of iconic superheroes with this pumped-up collection of international artworks in a variety of media. As contemporary idols, superheroes provide a rich source of inspiration for artists around the world. My Hero! Celebrates and re-envisions the possibilities that exist when you have a magic cape, lasso, or some superhuman power that changes everything. Photo Credit: Mike Alcantara, Spider-Man, 2015 Homespun: Folk Art and Americana from the Collection

Upstairs, Downstairs: Porcelain and Pewter Decorative Arts THROUGH APRIL 28, 2019 – BOUCHELLE CHANGING GALLERY

This exhibition shows the everyday objects that helped define upper class and working-class lives. Expensive and fragile porcelain by such renowned manufacturers as the German Meissen company have filled the tables and cupboards of the wealthy since the 1700s while rustic, durable pewter had to suffice for the daily needs of the lower classes. Photo Credit: America, Pitcher, c. 1790, Pewter; America, Pitcher, c. 1800, Royal Vienna Porcelain with painting by Claudius Herr Garden of the Heart’s Desire: Selections from the Golzar Collection of Persian Textiles APRIL 18, 2019 THROUGH JULY 21, 2019 – WEST WING AND ROOT HALL

An exhibition of over 60 rare 18th and 19th Century Persian textiles from the private collection of Mahin Ghanbari which brings together two of the strongest artistic traditions in historic Persia – lush and beautifully cultivated gardens and gorgeously embroidered and woven textiles. Photo Credit: Velvet Embroidery (detail); possible garment fragment, silk velvet with metal and silk embroidery, 19th Century, Kashan Region, Iran, 18 x 21” Jacob Lawrence: Three Series of Prints THROUGH MAY 5, 2019 – KARSHAN CENTER OF GRAPHIC ART

Organized in 2017 to celebrate the 100th birthday of Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), this exhibition features 26 graphic works done between 1971-1997. Included are his Hiroshima Series of eight prints, the Genesis Series of eight prints, and 10 prints from the Toussaint L’Ouverture Series. The Jacob Lawrence: Three Series of Prints exhibition comes from the Collection of Alitash Kebede of Los Angeles, CA. The exhibition and museum tour were organized by Landau Traveling Exhibitions of Los Angeles, CA. Photo Credit: Jacob Lawrence, To Preserve Their Freedom, from the Toussaint L’Ouverture series serigraph, 1986-1987

MAY 4, 2019 THROUGH AUGUST 25, 2019 – BOUCHELLE CHANGING GALLERY

An exhibition depicting early American folk art from the 18th century through the 19th century including paintings, furniture, textiles, and decorative arts that provide a view into the early rural and working-class life of European immigrants in America. Photo Credit: Pennsylvania, 18th Century, Blanket Chest (detail), Polychromed wood, Gift of Daniel W. Callahan, 2018.04.001 Visions of the Future

ONGOING THROUGH 2019 – PLANETARIUM LOBBY

This colorful, creative poster series from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, now on display in the Planetarium Lobby, imagines possible future travel destinations to real exotic locations in space. The retrostyle artwork takes inspiration from travel advertisements of the past and combines them with intriguing objects within our Solar System and far-off exoplanets. Photo Credit: Trappist-1e, NASA Capturing the Cosmos: Florida Astrophotographs by Derek Demeter MAY 11, 2019 THROUGH AUGUST 18, 2019 – KARSHAN CENTER OF GRAPHIC ART

Marvel at the wonders of the universe through the stunning space photography by nationally renowned astrophotographer, and director of the Emil Buehler Planetarium at Seminole State College, Derek Demeter. With his work featured in numerous astronomy and space publications, Mr. Demeter's prints on display show the breathtaking views that can be captured through a small telescope and digital SLR camera. Capturing the Cosmos covers three major areas of astrophotography, all uniquely shot from Florida: scenic nightscapes that juxtapose the natural environment of Earth and the night sky, celestial neighbors we find within our Solar System, and wondrous deep sky phenomena of colorful nebulae and expansive galaxies. Image Credit: Derek Demeter

To Choose Our Destiny: The Lasting Legacy of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing MAY 18, 2019 THROUGH JULY 28, 2019 – FORD GALLERY

When Neil Armstrong took his first step onto the surface of the moon, his giant leap not only carried himself to uncharted territory, but also the entire world. Now 50 years after the momentous Apollo 11 Moon mission, the Museum has put together a collaborative exhibit to tell one of the greatest exploration feats ever undertaken by humankind. This exhibition is in collaboration with the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex and through the generous support of Preston Root. Image Credit: NASA

Stay in touch! For the latest exhibit and programming information, sign up for our e-newsletter on the Museum’s homepage at MOAS.org!

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Currently on Display in the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art "The Latest News from Florida": Wood Engravings from 19th Century Periodicals

A. WORLEY BROWN & FAMILY GALLERY Wood engravings from 19th century illustrated magazines and journals documenting events in the remote land of Florida - a state that few northerners knew a lot about or would ever visit. The works in this exhibit are grouped into three sections - "life", "industry", and "war". "Life" includes depictions of daily activities and amusements. "Industry" includes depictions of processes such as citrus growing and harvesting and preparing Spanish moss for commercial purposes. "War" includes depictions of the armaments, military activities, fortification structures, and naval events. These topics proved to be of interest to those who bought these publications. Featured Painting: Harper’s Weekly, Ft. Pickens 1861

Gone Fishin'

SENA H. AND THOMAS L. ZANE GALLERY This exhibition emphasizes Florida’s reputation for being one of the greatest sport fishing areas in the world. From locals with simple cane poles to celebrities on yachts decked out for challenging sailfish and tarpon. Photo Credit: Sam Stoltz, Strife of the Sea, Chicago Century of Progress Exposition, 1933-34

Florida Weather

FRANCE FAMILY GALLERY Experience a myriad of Florida weather in just one day. The Florida Weather gallery offers a look at Florida weather as represented by art. Florida is known for weather that changes with uncanny speed. Sun, rain, wind, clouds, storms, and fog all play a part in what the artist sees and wants to capture. The color, technique, rhythm, and texture are focused to evoke the full sensation of what is Florida's revealing environmental trait.Featured painting: Naomi Duckman (Furth); Storm on Seven Mile Bridge, Florida Keys, 1935

The Seminole and the Everglades

FRANCE FAMILY GALLERY The Everglades is a region of tropical wetlands that occupies the southern portion of Florida. Water leaving the vast, shallow Lake Okeechobee in the wet season forms a slow-moving river 60 miles wide and over 100 miles long. Human habitation in the southern portion of the Florida peninsula dates from 15,000 years ago. The region was dominated by the native Calusa and Tequesta tribes. After European colonization, both tribes declined. The Seminole nation emerged out of groups of Native Americans, mostly Creek, from what are now the northern Muscogee peoples. Artists from the early 19th century on have found the visual characteristics of the people and the land compelling subjects for artworks. The climatic conditions change frequently giving new dimensions of color, motion, and light to the landscape. The dramatic variables are a challenge to the painter attempting to capture a specific moment. The flora and fauna are often unique and fascinating. Rendering them is as often for scientific documentation as it is for the decorative motif. Featured painting: James F. Hutchinson; Seminole Man, 1992

Volusia County

The Volusia County gallery contains paintings with the county as the subject. Volusia County has encouraged both well-known and less-known artists to portray the environments and people from the county from the last quarter of the 19th century and on. Featured painting: James Calvert Smith; Stop the Train, ca. 1950

For more information about the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, please visit www.moas.org

SPRING PROGRAMS Ongoing Events Wednesday Yoga in the Gallery Wednesdays, 5:30pm-6:30pm Take a break from your busy day and enjoy weekly Yoga in the Gallery at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Meet in the lobby to join registered yoga instructor, Ashley Brooks of Holistic Movements, for an hour-long session that will provide you with an opportunity to practice a series of gentle yoga poses. Class is open to all experience levels. Please bring a mat, towel, and water. Space is limited and registration is required. RSVP to the Museum at 386-255-0285. $5.00 for members, $10.00 for future members.

April Thursday, April 11 5:30pm-7:30pm Wine Tasting: A Taste of Italy Join us at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art for our quarterly wine tasting series with S.R. Perrott. Spend the evening among friends while you sip up knowledge on swirling, tasting, and describing wine and learning about different pairings of light Italian appetizers from Panheads Catering. This month’s program will feature six wines from different regions of Italy. This event is for ages 21 and older. Seating is limited. Visit MOAS. org or call the Museum at 386-255-0285 to purchase admission and reserve your seat. No refunds after April 8. $25.00 for members, $35.00 for future members.

Saturday, April 13 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Hypnotica 8:00pm Laser Vinyl 9:00pm Pink Floyd – The Wall $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Wednesday, April 17 5:00pm-7:00pm Opening Reception: Garden of the Heart’s Desire Join us at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for an opening reception for the new exhibition titled, Garden of the Heart’s Desire: Selections from the Golzar Collection of Persian Textiles from the private collection of Mahin Ghanbari. Enjoy a discussion on the many rare and exquisite 18th and 19th Century Persian textiles in the exhibit from the collector herself. Ms. Ghanbari is one of the preeminent collectors of this art form and is an authority on this uniquely Persian tradition of excellence in handcrafted textiles. Enjoy a cash bar throughout the evening. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Thursday, April 18 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: For Sale American Paradise – How Our Nation was Sold on Impossible Dreams in Florida by Willie Drye Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art where we will be discussing the book For Sale American Paradise – How Our Nation was Sold on Impossible Dreams

in Florida. Learn more about the book at MOAS.org. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Thursday, April 18 3:00pm-4:00pm Gamble Place Nature Walk Gamble Place is more than a historic site – it is also home to critical ecosystems that house many types of Florida’s flora and fauna. Join MOAS Education Assistant, Kelsey Hansen, at Gamble Place in Port Orange for a hike through some of Gamble Place’s trails while discussing the native, and non-native, plants and animals of the area. Space is limited. Advance RSVP is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Friday, April 19 1:00pm-3:00pm Printmaking Demonstration with Printer, Adrian Gonzalez – Member Exclusive Join us in the Education Room at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art to explore the world of printmaking with Printer, Adrian Gonzalez as he demonstrates the various steps needed to create a series of prints. Adrian is currently the master printer at the Flying Horse Editions, a collaborative research studio for visual artists at the University of Central Florida, and received his BFA from the University of Central Florida. Space is limited. RSVP in advance by calling the Museum at 386255-0285 Free for MOAS members. Must be a MOAS member to attend.


SPRING PROGRAMS

Friday, April 19 7:00pm-9:00pm The 38th Asbury Short Film Concert Join us in the Root Family Auditorium at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for the debut of The 38th Asbury Short Film Concert in Daytona Beach, presented by MOAS and Asbury Shorts USA. The Asbury Short Film Concert will feature a fast-paced and highly entertaining line up of the best in short film comedy, drama, and animation. This two-hour showcase will include Oscar Nominees, US film festival ‘Best of Show’ winners, and international honorees from the past and present. This event is recommended for ages 16 and older. Doors open at 6:00pm for a reception with a cash bar and light hors d’oeuvres. Visit MOAS.org or call the Museum at 386-255-0285 to purchase admission and reserve your seat. No refunds after April 15. $20.00 for members, $25.00 for future members. Wednesday, April 24 3:00pm-4:00pm Masterworks Tour – Member Exclusive Join Senior Curator of Education and History, Zach Zacharias, for a tour of the Permanent Gallery at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art which contains many of the masterworks in the collection. Discover the many famous artists who came from all over the United States and around the world to document the Florida landscape. Learn about Florida history and ecology through this remarkable collection of fine art paintings. Space is limited. RSVP in advance by calling the Museum at 386255-0285 Free for members. Must be a MOAS member to attend.

Friday, April 26 2:00pm-3:00pm Porch Talk at Gamble Place: Florida Under Five Flags Florida has the oldest European history in North America. The peninsula sat on the edge of the empire for many European powers to fight over. Five different flags have flown over the state from various competing powers. There might just be a sixth flag as well. Join Senior Curator of Education and History, Zach Zacharias, at Gamble Place in Port Orange for a look at the history of Florida through competing powers. Space is limited and advanced registration is required by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Friday, April 26 5:00pm-11:00pm MOAS Space Night Join us for the Museum’s biggest space event of the year! For the 5th anniversary of Space Day, we are excited to announce that we are hosting this event in the evening, celebrating all things space in an engaging and interactive environment for the whole family. You will learn about the science, exploration, and beauty of space through exciting lectures, shows in our main planetarium and portable planetarium, hands-on activities, displays from local organizations, and stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting) in our front entrance courtyard. Food trucks will also be set up in our courtyard for your enjoyment. We cannot wait to see you for this out-of-this-world event. To view the event’s full schedule visit MOAS.org. Admission to the Planetarium presentations is free for MOAS members in celebration of member appreciation and $5.00 for future members. Availability is on a first-come, first served basis. All other activities held within the museum and outside are free to the public.

Sunday, April 28 4:00pm-9:30pm MOAS Astronomy Night at the Ballpark Join the Museum of Arts & Sciences for a special night at the Jackie Robinson Ballpark! Bring your children to the ballpark for an afternoon of fun. Experiment with the Museum’s science kits and be sure to be one of the first 500 fans at the ballpark to receive a free Astronomy Night t-shirt! Enjoy the 5:35pm Tortugas game followed by a live astronomy class with MOAS Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo and other MOAS Planetarium staff members. Thursday, April 25 With the ball field lights turned off, Mr. 3:00pm-4:00pm Mayo will point out the prominent spring Comic Book Art: How It All Comes Tostars and constellations with a bright green gether – Member Exclusive laser. Following the brief live tour of the Have you ever wondered what it takes to night sky, there will be telescopes set up create a comic book or a graphic novel? Join Illustrator, Alex Ray, in the Ford Gallery on the field for guests to peer through and get a close-up view of the celestial at the Museum of Arts & Sciences as he wonders up above! Game tickets can be walks you through the creation of a comic purchased at daytonatortugas.com. book and graphic novel series. Alex is an illustrator based out of Orlando, FL and is Monday, April 29 currently teaching at the Crealde School 5:00pm-7:00pm of Art. In his current art career, Alex is MOAS After Hours – Baseball Night! focusing on illustrating comics, children’s Join us at the Museum of Arts & Sciences books, posters, storyboards, and other for exclusive after-hours access to the media. Space is limited. RSVP in advance Museum’s galleries, live music, happy hour by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285 drink specials, and a planetarium show. Free for members. Must be a MOAS MOAS has partnered with the Daytona member to attend.

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Tortugas to celebrate the opening of the 2019 baseball season! Wear your favorite baseball team memorabilia and receive free MOAS After Hours event entry. Special appearance and photo ops with the one and only Shelldon, the official mascot of the Daytona Tortugas! Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Tuesday, April 30 3:00pm-4:00pm In Celebration of the Kentucky Derby: The Art of the Horse The horse in art is one of our oldest art forms dating back 30,000 years. The horse was the perfect companion animal for humans to evolve into a modern society. Join Senior Curator of Education and History, Zach Zacharias in the Root Family Auditorium and learn how the horse has been documented throughout the history of mankind by the hand of the artist through many wonderful pieces on display at MOAS. Also, learn about the shocking early history of the Kentucky Derby! Free for members, $7.00 for future members, or included with paid museum admission.

May Saturday, May 4 11:00am-2:00pm Family Craft Day: Star Wars® Join Educators, Kelsey Hansen and Nicole Messervy in a galaxy far, far away! There will be plenty of Star Wars® themed activities and crafts for everyone to enjoy. We encourage children (and parents!) to dress up as their favorite Star Wars® characters. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, May 4 5:00pm-7:00pm May the 4th Be with You Trivia Night & Star Wars® Planetarium Showcase Is the force strong with you? Join us in Root Hall at the Museum of Arts & Sciences to test your Star Wars® knowledge. Sign up for trivia as a team (must be 4-8 people) or as a free agent to be placed on a team. After trivia, experience a Star Wars® themed planetarium show. A cash bar with Star Wars® themed cocktails and snacks will be available. We strongly encourage themed attire! This event is for ages 18 and older. RSVP in advance by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. $5.00 for members, $8.00 for future members. Thursday, May 9 6:30pm-9:00pm Dueling Piano Show Join us in Root Hall and the Root Family Auditorium at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for a dueling piano show and reception with Amy and Randy Keith of Premiere Piano Shows out of Orlando, FL. Guests can enjoy a preshow mixer with light appetizers and a cash bar from 6:307:00pm with the show to follow from 7:009:00pm. This interactive piano show is sure to create a unique experience for those in attendance! RSVPs are required by visiting MOAS.org or by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. No refunds after May 6. $25.00 for members, $35.00 for future members.


SPRING PROGRAMS Saturday, May 11 11:00am-2:00pm 4th Annual American Muscle Car Show Stop by for one of our most popular shows all year! DJ Frank Roberts will be spinning tunes from the 50s and 60s while you browse one of the area’s best and most comprehensive muscle and vintage car shows. Many American muscle cars including Mustangs, Camaro’s, Cadillac’s, and other hotrods will be showcased in the Museum’s front entrance courtyard and parking lot. Enjoy vintage automobiles, food trucks, and music making for a great day of nostalgia at the Museum! Muscle Car Show is free to the public. Museum entry is standard pricing. Saturday, May 11 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Beatles 8:00pm Laser U2 9:00pm Rush 2112 $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Thursday, May 16 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: At First Light by Vanessa LaFaye Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art where we will be discussing the book At First Light. Learn more about the book at MOAS.org. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members.

Saturday, May 18 5:30pm-7:00pm Exhibition Reception: To Choose Our Destiny Enjoy an opening reception for the new exhibition titled To Choose Our Destiny: The Lasting Legacy of The Apollo 11 Moon Landing which tells the story of one of the greatest exploration feats ever undertaken by humankind. Take a brief exhibition tour during the evening with Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo. Enjoy a cash bar throughout the evening. Free for MOAS members, $5.00 for future members. Wednesday, May 22 12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch and Learn: Local Flavor Many famous artists ventured into the Volusia County area and rendered fantastic landscapes over the last 100 years or more. Many of these artists had either full or part-time residences in the area. The St. John’s River, beach scenes, and local landmarks were popular subject matters for the hand of the artist. Join Senior Curator of Education and History, Zach Zacharias, at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art for lunch and a discussion about local paintings currently on display. Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 to RSVP and place your lunch order. Space is limited and advanced RSVP and paid lunch are required. Lecture is free plus the price of paid lunch for members. Lecture is $5.00 plus the price of paid lunch for future members.

Wednesday, May 22 3:00pm-4:00pm Friday, May 17 Gallery Talk – Capturing the Cosmos: 2:00pm-3:00pm Florida Astrophotographs by Derek Porch Talk at Gamble Place: The Life and Demeter Times of James Gamble Take a cosmic stroll through the Karshan James Norris Gamble was one of Florida’s Center of Graphic Art with Seth Mayo, earliest snowbirds who came to the Spruce Curator of Astronomy, as he explores Creek area for hunting and fishing. He loved the beautiful space prints by nationally the area so much that he built a hunting renowned astrophotographer, Derek lodge to entertain family and friends. Join Demeter. Mr. Demeter’s many years of Senior Curator of Education and History, expertise in photographing the universe Zach Zacharias, at Gamble Place in Port can be seen throughout this stunning Orange for a history talk on the life of the exhibit: from scenic nightscapes that famous Captain of Industry. Take a tour of juxtapose the natural environment of the main houses as well as the Black Forest Earth and the night sky, objects within Cottage based on the famous Snow White our Solar System, and wondrous deephouse from the movie. Space is limited and sky phenomena – all shot on location in advanced registration is required by calling Florida. Mr. Mayo will discuss what each the Museum at 386-255-0285. image tells us about the universe and of Free for members, $5.00 for future members. our home planet Earth. Free for members or with paid museum Friday, May 17 admission. 5:30pm-7:00pm Renaissance Society Preview: To Choose Saturday, May 25 Our Destiny 3:00pm-4:00pm The Museum of Arts & Sciences invites Lunar Tour Alpha – To Choose Our Desour MOAS Renaissance Society Members tiny: The Lasting Legacy of the Apollo 11 to enjoy an exclusive preview of the new Moon Landing exhibition titled To Choose Our Destiny: Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the The Lasting Legacy of The Apollo 11 Moon Apollo 11 Moon mission with the first Landing which tells the story of one of the public tour of the exhibit by Seth Mayo, greatest exploration feats ever undertaken Curator of Astronomy. In collaboration with by humankind. Take a brief exhibition the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex tour during the evening with Curator of and the generous support by Preston Astronomy, Seth Mayo. Enjoy light hor Root, the Museum has put together an d’oeuvres and an open bar throughout the exhibition that will take you back in time evening. Kindly RSVP by May 10 by calling to tell one of the greatest exploration feats the Museum at 386-255-0285 ext. 315 or by ever undertaken by humankind. Through emailing membership@moas.org. You must large scale prints of photographs taken be a Renaissance Society Member to attend on the lunar surface during the mission, this preview. and Apollo era artifacts, To Choose Our Free for Renaissance Society Members. Destiny, will demonstrate the technology

innovation, the amazing team effort, and extraordinary human will it took to embark on such a daring journey to the Moon. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Wednesday, May 29 – Friday, May 31 Meet at 8:00am Member’s Trip to Savannah, GA Savannah, GA is known for its quaint cobblestone streets, antebellum architecture, and the arts. Join us for a MOAS member trip to Savannah to learn about the history of the city through a trolley tour, exploring Fort Pulaski, wandering through the galleries at the SCAD Museum of Art, and more. Stay at the Holiday Inn Express in the heart of Downtown Savannah on Bay St., giving you the opportunity to explore all that historic downtown has to offer in the evening. You must be a MOAS member to attend. Kindly RSVP by April 29 by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Please meet at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art no later than 8:00am and no earlier than 7:30am. A full schedule can be found in the online calendar at MOAS.org. $480 per person for a double room. $680 per person for a single room. Includes bus transportation, breakfast, lodging, and museum admissions. DOES NOT include lunch, dinner, and personal spending. Additional $40 for optional Sunset River Cruise. A 50% deposit is due at sign up with the remainder due by April 29. There will be no refunds after April 29.

June Saturday, June 1 3:00pm-4:00pm Gallery Talk – Capturing the Cosmos: Florida Astrophotographs by Derek Demeter Join the nationally renowned astrophotographer of the exhibit, Derek Demeter, as he takes you on a lively tour through his beautiful night sky images. Mr. Demeter’s many years of expertise in photographing the universe can be seen throughout this stunning exhibit: from scenic nightscapes that juxtapose the natural environment of Earth and the night sky, objects within our Solar System, and wondrous deep-sky phenomena – all shot on location in Florida. Mr. Demeter will


SPRING PROGRAMS movie, stay with us in the Planetarium for a discussion on the real difficulties of spaceflight. $8.00 for members, $10.00 for future members.

discuss his personal stories on how he captured and processed each image, and his passion to keep skies dark and pristine for future generations. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Thursday, June 6 6:00pm-8:00pm Summer Brews & BBQ Join us in the Root Family Museum Train Station at the Museum of Arts & Sciences for a summer-themed social! Enjoy samples of summer beers from local breweries, BBQ, and live music. Take an exclusive tour inside the Silver Holly & Hiawatha Train Cars. Advanced RSVP is required by purchasing admission online at MOAS.org or over the phone by calling 386-255-0285. $15.00 for members, $20.00 for future members. Saturday, June 8 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Electrolaze 8:00pm Laser Zeppelin 9:00pm Pink Floyd: The Dark Side of the Moon $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Friday, June 14 7:00pm-10:00pm Movie Night in the Planetarium: First Man Expanding from our Sci-Fi Movie Nights programming and continuing our celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, we are pleased to present the biographical drama, First Man. Gifted, young director Damien Chazelle focuses on the human behind the legend, Neil Armstrong, as he blazes a trail from test pilot to the first person to step foot on the Moon. Critically praised for direction, performances by Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy, musical score and the Moon landing sequence, First Man was nominated for four Academy Awards and won for Best Visual Effects. This film will be displayed in 16:9 aspect ratio on the Planetarium dome in stunning 4K Ultra High Definition. Popcorn and snacks will be available at the concession stand. Please arrive no later than 6:45pm, as this event will start promptly at 7:00pm with no late entry. Rated PG-13. After the 22 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

Saturday, June 15 7:00pm-9:30pm Encore Movie Night in the Planetarium: First Man Expanding from our Sci-Fi Movie Nights programming and continuing our celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, we are pleased to present the biographical drama, First Man. Gifted, young director Damien Chazelle focuses on the human behind the legend, Neil Armstrong, as he blazes a trail from test pilot to the first person to step foot on the Moon. Critically praised for direction, performances by Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy, musical score and the Moon landing sequence, First Man was nominated for four Academy Awards and won for Best Visual Effects. This film will be displayed in 16:9 aspect ratio on the Planetarium dome in stunning 4K Ultra High Definition. Popcorn and snacks will be available at the concession stand. Please arrive no later than 6:45pm, as this event will start promptly at 7:00pm with no late entry. Rated PG-13. $8.00 for members, $10.00 for future members. Thursday, June 20 2:00pm-3:30pm Florida Vistas Book Club: The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida and the Politics of Paradise by Michael Grunwald Join us for our next Florida history book club meeting at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art where we will be discussing the book The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida and the Politics of Paradise. Learn more about the book at MOAS.org. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by calling the Museum at 386-255-0285. Free for members, $5.00 for future members. Thursday, June 20 4:00pm-5:00pm Gallery Talk: Capturing the Cosmos: Florida Astrophotographs by Derek Demeter Take a cosmic stroll through the Karshan Center of Graphic Art with Seth Mayo, Curator of Astronomy, as he explores the beautiful space prints by nationally renowned astrophotographer, Derek Demeter. Mr. Demeter’s many years of expertise in photographing the universe can be seen throughout this stunning exhibit: from scenic nightscapes that juxtapose the natural environment of Earth and the night sky, objects within our Solar System, and wondrous deepsky phenomena – all shot on location in Florida. Mr. Mayo will discuss what each image tells us about the universe and of our home planet Earth. Free for members or with paid museum admission. Saturday, June 22 3:00pm-4:30pm Afternoon with Florida History Join us in the Root Family Auditorium for a presentation on Florida history. Free for members, $7.00 for future members, or included with paid museum admission.

Florida: The Fire in the Sky Join Senior Curator of Education and History, Zach Zacharias for a lecture on a history that few know anything about, Florida’s historic urban fires. Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Ocala, DeLand, and other major cities once endured epic fires that destroyed swaths of their original downtown areas. These fires left death and destruction in their wake before modern fire fighting could save towns. Fort Peyton and the Capture of Osceola Join James Fiske, Florida Agricultural Museum Historian and Flagler County Historic Board Member and learn about the amazing story of the capture of Osceola and Fort Peyton. Learn about how Osceola was captured by General Thomas Jesup under a flag of truce and taken to St. Augustine to be imprisoned. Discover how Fort Peyton played a role in his capture and other Seminole War outposts in the area such as Fort Fulton. Saturday, June 22 7:00pm-9:45pm Summer Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser X 8:00pm Laser Vinyl 9:00pm Laser Metallica $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. Admission goes on sale one week prior to the shows. Monday, June 24 5:00pm-7:00pm MOAS After Hours Join us at the Museum of Arts & Sciences of exclusive after-hours access for the Museum’s galleries, live music, happy hour drink specials, and a featured food truck! Enjoy an exclusive tour of the new exhibition titled To Choose Our Destiny: The Lasting Legacy of The Apollo 11 Moon Landing with MOAS Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo. To Choose Our Destiny tells the story of one of the greatest exploration feats ever undertaken by humankind. Free for members, $5.00 for future members.

MOAS Gallery Specialist Tours

Join our Gallery Specialists from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the second Tuesday and fourth Thursday of every month as they provide in-depth information on individual galleries around the Museum of Arts & Sciences. These tours are open to the

public unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday, April 9 – Nevin Mercede (Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art) Thursday, April 18 – Kelsey Hanson (Gamble Place Nature Walk – special tour, please RSVP to 386-255-0285) Tuesday, May 14 – Anne Gayla (Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art) Thursday, May 23 – Juan Junco (Cuban Gallery) Tuesday, June 11 – Carol Ann Moritz (Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art) Thursday, June 20 – Rose Swedlow (Root Family Museum)


Gamble Place Clean-Up: Thank You to Our Volunteers!

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he staff at the Museum of Arts & Sciences is always working to ensure that the Gamble Place property in Port Orange is properly maintained. Consisting of over 175-acres, a historic home, a cottage, and a Citrus Packing House, consistent maintenance of the grounds as well as the buildings themselves truly takes a team effort. During large quarterly cleanups the Museum is always looking for volunteers to help assist. For the first quarter of 2019, a cleanup day was arranged in February where we were joined by a team of volunteers from the Port Orange Target as well as Florida Landscaping and Design and Fowler Land Services. Landscapers by trade, the teams at Florida Landscaping and Design and Fowler Land Services came fully equipped with the tools and talents to help transform the Gamble Place property. Together, they mowed and cleared all of the land surrounding the historic houses and removed several large trees that were obstructing the entry way, parking lot, and dock. All together through their efforts they created a debris pile that totaled over 14,000 pounds in size! Using their

equipment, they were able to remove this from the property leaving us with a clean slate. The volunteer team from the Port Orange Target cleared all of our trails and nature bridges that span the property and dug holes in all of the walking trails for posts with new “No Trespassing� signs. They also gave all of the houses a thorough cleaning and created a chain gate to prevent anyone from driving through the nature preserve. Volunteers are integral to the work we do at the Museum of Arts & Sciences. Gamble Place in Port Orange is a beautiful location and we are so thankful for the donation of the time and talents that these three companies have provided us with.

ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 23


ZACH IN TIME | BY JAMES "ZACH" ZACHARIAS, SENIOR CURATOR OF EDUCATION AND CURATOR OF HISTORY

Florida:

A Sportsman’s Paradise

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Waldo Peirce with Ernest Hemingway Shark Fishing in the Tortugas, 1932, Waldo Peirce


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nce Florida became a territory in 1821, the state’s reputation as a tourist paradise began to grow. At first, the territory was advertised to invalids seeking refuge from what was called the graveyard cough (tuberculosis). St. Augustine became a mecca for the ill, and in a way, the first tourist destination. As people from around the United States became familiar with the 27th state in the union, Florida began to be promoted for reasons other than just a warm place for invalids. An obvious selling point was as a winter playground marketed to wealthy northern tourists as a chance to escape the long, dark, cold season. Railroads built by entrepreneurs like Henry Flagler and Henry Plant allowed wealthy northern tourists an easy and safe way to travel to the nation’s playground. Florida was marketed not just as a tourist destination, but as a paradise for the adventurer and the sportsman. Florida has long enjoyed a reputation as one of the finest fishing locations in the world. It’s reputation as a sportsman’s paradise is unequaled. Even Ponce de Leon, one of Florida’s first tourists, as he searched for wealth untold, commented on the abundant fish, pumas, alligators, and other animals inhabiting the land. Fishing has deep roots in Florida as demonstrated by the archaeological record. The first true Floridians, such as the Timucua and Tequesta Tribes, included fish as an important part of their staple diet. John James Audubon, while traveling through Florida in 1831, described how the immense amount of fish in the Halifax River impeded the progress of his boats. Audubon was a guest at the Bulow Plantation and was headed to Ponce Inlet, then known as Mosquito Inlet, to document and paint the Brown Pelican. Once Florida became part of the United States, its reputation as a sportsman’s paradise exploded, especially for fishing. Getting there was part of the experience. Even before the coming of the railroads, northerners flocked to remote parts of Florida. The pre-Civil War Brock House Hotel, located on the east side of Lake Monroe, was the first northern style hotel catering to the avid tourist fishermen. During the winter season, the hotel became so crowded

The new exhibit at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art titled, Gone Fishin’, is a wonderful collection of paintings documenting every aspect of sport fishing in Florida. with sportsmen that guests slept on the billiard tables. Two famous sportsmen found their way to the Brock House Hotel and fell in love with the area. Frederick deBary and Henry DeLand invested heavily in the Volusia County area as a result of their fishing adventures on the St. John’s River. Their legacies live on in the two towns named after them.

hooks, hand lines, and spears. In 1885, a sensational catch by a rod and reel from Sanibel Island made international news and instantly designated southwest Florida as the epicenter of Tarpon fishing.

The Lakeside Inn in Mount Dora also served as a famous resort for sportsmen who had a passion for bass fishing. It is the oldest continually operated hotel in Florida. The Inn was founded in 1882 and originally was called The Lake House. John Donnelly, a retired confederate officer, and other investors founded the hotel. It became such a popular destination that it was expanded to 87 rooms. It was not easy to travel to Mount Dora before the railroads were built. It was a twelve-day journey by boat and required several different steamships.

The new exhibit at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art titled, Gone Fishin’, is a wonderful collection of paintings documenting every aspect of sport fishing in Florida. Fishing boats, shrimpers, docks, fish camps, and even one very famous fishermen and writer are displayed in this unique collection of paintings. One of the world’s most famous writers is also one of Florida’s most famous fishermen. Earnest Hemingway is shown in the exhibit as the rugged avid sport fisherman. His love of fishing started as a young boy at his family’s summer house on Lake Walloon, Michigan. Upon the advice of a friend, he traveled to Key West and instantly fell in love with the old city.

The first fish to draw sportsman just for the sport of the catch was the mighty Tarpon. Men came from all over the world to fight the mighty jumping fish with rod and reel. Even before this, local fishermen hunted the Tarpon with

Hemingway loved to travel on deep sea fishing trips with his trusted friends that he referred to as “his mob”- artist Waldo Peirce, Charles Thompson, boyhood friend Bill Smith, and others. One trip to the Dry Tortugas, a famous spot for Ft. Jefferson, Dry Tortugas ca. 1950, Emile Albert Gruppé


day with seagulls above, sailboats, and a billowing sky behind the foreground action. James Calvert Smith died in Holly Hill, Florida in 1962.

Fishing Station, Sarasota, Fla. ca. 1960, Davd Davidovich Cherson shark fishing 70 miles west of Key West, they became stranded for thirteen days at the old Civil War fort on Garden Key known as Fort Jefferson. One painting depicting the quest for sharks at the Dry Tortugas is by his friend Waldo Peirce. The watercolor titled, Waldo Peirce with Ernest Hemingway Shark Fishing in the Tortugas, 1932 shows Hemingway in the back of a small boat manning the oars on a rough sea. His companions capture the shark not with a rod and reel but with a comical-looking blunderbuss shotgun. The whole scene is fairly cartoonish with lots of colors and high drama. Loosely painted, the mid ground is full of action with Hemingway and part of his “mob” struggling with the mighty beast as blood begins to fill the sea surrounding their craft. A breathtaking impressionistic painting by Emile Albert Gruppé titled, Ft. Jefferson, Dry Tortugas ca. 1950 is an oil on canvas. It shows a cabin cruiser parked at the dock of the old Fort Jefferson with the lighthouse in the background. Gruppe was known for his impressionistic landscapes. This painting shows just a section of the fort on a windswept day. The artist used colors typical of a Florida tropical day with bright blues, whites, greens, and red for the bricks that make up the colossal fort. When constructed in the mid-1850s, Fort Jefferson was the largest brick structure in the Western Hemisphere. It sits on the thirteen-acre Garden Key, one of the seven islands that makes up the Dry Tortugas. It was designed to show American power 26 22 ARTS ARTS & & SCIENCES SCIENCES MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

and keep Europeans out of our sphere of influence. The colossal fort was never finished. Twenty-one million bricks were used in its construction. Fort Jefferson was designed to mount over 420 large cannons, although only 120 were ever mounted in the fort. It remained in Union hands for the entire Civil War and was used as a military prison. After the war, its most famous prisoner was Dr. Samuel Mudd, co-conspirator of Lincoln’s assassination. Created as a National Monument in 1935, it is the second least visited national park due to its remoteness. James Calvert Smith was born in the small town of Micanopy, Florida in 1879. He was a cartoonist for the Florida Times Union and a painter who was friends with Norman Rockwell. Smith also worked for Harper’s and Post Magazines, and his style was influenced by Rockwell while living in New York City. Perfecting his landscapes while living in Connecticut, he began receiving commissions for representational paintings. A large group of paintings depicting the Daytona Beach area are featured in the Cici and Hyatt Brown Collection. The watercolor on paper, He Couldn’t Have Done It If He Tried, ca. 1950, depicts a humorous scene on a fishing dock in Daytona Beach where a fisherman has snagged the back of the dress of a young woman fishing on the dock behind him. As he attempts to cast his line behind him and launch his rig into the ocean, the woman is caught off guard with a horrified look on her face as the hook lifts her dress into the air. Behind the scene is a typical pleasant Florida

The style of David Davidovich Cherson Burliuk is unique and impressive with a heavy thick painting style coupled with unblended strokes and the use of a palette knife. Using unusual color choices, he creates a bright style with less detail and his paintings reflect a folkart style. Burliuk was born in Russia in 1882 and was an avid modernist painter while working in Europe. Coming to America in 1922, he became a snowbird visiting Florida in the 1940’s and living in the Sarasota area. In the painting, Fishing Station, Sarasota, Fla. ca. 1960, he shows a crusty coastal fish camp that looks disheveled. A clothes line hangs in the center of the canvas while an old metal roof on the main building and a bait shack give the whole scene a rustic look. The painting shows a bait shack on the left foreground and squat looking people scurry about preparing for a day of fishing. There are many paintings belonging to Burliuk in the exhibit that depict a folksy style of fishing life on the west coast. The Gone Fishin’ exhibit at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art showcases a slice of Florida as a sportsman’s paradise. Tourists have flocked by the tens of millions over the years to fish in the endless mangrove swamps, saltwater marshes, rivers, lakes, and coastal fishing spots. Florida has a long history of fishing from prehistoric times to today. In fact, a record number of salt water fishing licenses where issued in 2018. With an ever-growing population, conservation work will need to be done in the state to keep its beauty and natural resources for future generations. He Couldn’t Have Done It If He Tried, ca. 1950 James Calvert Smith


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GUILD NEWS | BY DR. BEVERLY MCMURTRY GRISSOM, MOAS GUILD PRESIDENT

The Guild’s Fundraisers Continue to Blossom this Spring! Photo Caption: Back stage at the Guild’s Fashion Show Fundraiser. From left to right: Michael Politis, Billie Wheeler, Jenelle Codianne, Julie Barrow, Mary Teasley, Eileen McDermott, Linda Epps, Gita Raymond, Georgia Foster, Marget Toth, James Wise

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he holiday season offered a much needed (but all too brief!) breather from the very busy months invested in planning our several signature events. Truth be told, even during the holiday “break”, several Guild members spent a good deal of time working on our spring events. A devoted volunteer’s work is never done! Our January meeting included a most enlightening program. Patricia Appleton, a Trustee on the Board of the Atlantic Center for the Arts, shared her research into the life and artistic works of the late Doris Leeper. Most of the audience members knew of the famed Doris Leeper yet learned so many new fascinating anecdotes describing her significant contributions to the art community here and beyond. This program was a superb way to begin our new year! On February 12, 2019, the Guild presented an excellent and distinctive fashion show to an impressed soldout crowd. The show was unique and memorable thanks to the creativity and skill of Eileen McDermott, who designed the event in every detail. The show, “The Art of Travel”,

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showcased clothing which Eileen personally selected for each model. She even secured sponsorship that covered the cost of the show so that there were no overhead costs! Added features were the inclusion of a Master of Ceremonies, a role that local attorney and philanthropist Michael Politis filled with charm and finesse. An additional and very elegant feature were two ballroom dance performances by Artur Kozun of the Oceans Dance Studio and his dance partners, Christine Schneider Downs and Cami Kent. In addition to a sumptuous lunch, guests enjoyed bidding on lovely enticing gift baskets. Sincere thanks go to Eileen’s committee, our sponsor, our music provider, the models, and to Dillard’s for collaborating with us. Based on preliminary analysis, this show may be the best fundraiser we have had in this category. A huge debt of gratitude is owed to Eileen McDermott! This year’s annual Garden Party will include some unique features, with a focus on herbs, and will be held at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Scheduled for April

9, guests may purchase herb gardens, flowering plants, and hand-painted flower pots. Guests will enjoy a delicious lunch, sipping a mint julep, and visiting the “Secret Garden” for special surprises. No surprise to anyone, the Halifax Art Festival Committee has already begun meeting to plan and organize our nationally recognized and highly rated Art Festival. Kathy Wilson is the chair of the festival for this year. She and her team will gratefully welcome you to come join in the joy of working on this very special event. With Kathy’s leadership, in concert with her talented committee, there is no doubt that the Festival will be stellar.

As always, I encourage you to join the Guild and reap the benefits of working with fantastic people to stage excellent events with the goal of supporting our extraordinary museum.


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THE MOAS GUIDE TO

TELESCOPES

BY SETH MAYO, Curator of Astronomy

If you have ever had a yearning to observe the universe up close with a telescope, this may be helpful in accomplishing those pursuits. This guide is intended to give a comprehensive look at telescope use, design, purchasing, and setup. Happy sky observing!!

WHAT IS A TELESCOPE?

A telescope is an optical device that collects and brings light to a focus to magnify a distant object. Telescopes have many applications - from terrestrial viewing on the Earth’s surface to astronomical observation throughout the skies above.

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE TELESCOPE

The invention of the telescope is primarily credited to a Dutch eyeglass maker, Hans Lippershey, in 1608. His optical device contained two glass lenses within a tube to magnify an object three times, eventually becoming known as a refractor. Just a year later, Italian astronomer, Galileo Galilei, learned of this Dutch refracting telescope and built his own, improving on the original design. Galileo then became one of the first to point the telescope skyward to study the Moon’s surface, spots on the sun, and discovered Jupiter’s moons. His early observations of Jupiter’s moons in particular helped to solidify the heliocentric, or sun-centered, view of the solar system. Six decades after the invention of the refractor, the reflecting telescope – primarily using mirrors instead of lenses – was devised by Isaac Newton. The reflector design became useful in building telescopes much larger in size with greater ease. These early optical devices laid the groundwork for the telescopes that are found today.

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TELESCOPE DESIGNS THERE ARE THREE MAJOR CATEGORIES OF TELESCOPES THAT ARE FOUND TODAY: REFRACTOR, REFLECTOR, CATADIOPTRIC. EACH TYPE HAS VARIOUS SUBCLASS DESIGNS, ALL WITH VARYING ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES. BELOW ARE BASIC DESCRIPTIONS AND DIAGRAMS OF EACH CATEGORY:

REFRACTOR – uses an objective lens and an eyepiece to bring light to a focus within a long thin tube. Light enters the larger objective lens in the front, which then bends the light rays converging them to a point. The eyepiece has a lens within it and can be moved forward and back to bring the point of light into focus, making it clear to the viewer’s eye at the back of the telescope.

REFLECTOR – uses a series of mirrors to collect and bounce light to an eyepiece. A

parabolic mirror at the bottom of a tube collects light and reflects it back up to a small slanted mirror near the telescope opening. The slanted mirror – or secondary – then reflects the converging light rays to an eyepiece at the side of the telescope to be focused for the viewer’s eye.

CATADIOPTRIC (CASSEGRAIN/ COMPOUND) – this design bounces and folds

light to a focus and is mostly related to a reflector but incorporates a lens element like a refractor. Light enters the top of the tube and passes through a thin correcting lens, or plate, that helps to cut down on aberrations (light errors) that occur when using spherical mirrors. The light then hits this spherical mirror at the bottom of the tube and reflects it back to a secondary attached to the corrector plate. The secondary mirror then reflects the focused light back toward the primary mirror which has a hole through the center. The light makes its way through that opening and into an eyepiece for the viewer to look through.

40 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 32


WHAT TYPE OF TELESCOPE SHOULD I GET? Before purchasing a telescope, make sure to have a basic knowledge of the sky. This can be accomplished through naked-eye viewing with the aid of a star chart or one of many stargazing apps available for smart phones and tablets. In conjunction with naked-eye observing, binoculars are a great tool for viewing the night sky. They provide a nice widefield view that telescopes cannot offer due to their narrow fields, and binoculars are more common in the household. Any binoculars can be used, but specific astronomical binoculars can be purchased that are relatively affordable and easy to use. Finding the right telescope combination can be a challenge and is dependent upon many factors: skill level, portability, types of observing, cost. Below is a general list of advantages and disadvantages of each telescope and mount design, and factors to consider when making purchasing decisions.

REFRACTOR

These types of telescopes are the first that many people think of when looking through options for buying. For the most part, refractors are usually the simplest in design and use, and can provide a good first step in the world of sky observing. Disadvantages Advantages • Most have small apertures, or light gathering area • Easier to setup and maintain • Great for terrestrial (on Earth’s surface), lunar, and • Deep sky objects like nebulae and galaxies are a bit dimmer planetary viewing • Sealed tube prevents distortion from turbulent air • Can be prone to color aberrations, or light errors, that can cause discoloration of certain objects currents and dust inside • Can get expensive quickly for large apertures and designs • Beginner designs are relatively inexpensive that limit aberration

REFLECTOR

Mirrored telescopes of this design may not get as much recognition as refractors, although they are just as common (even more so now with large observatories) and useful. Reflectors can be considered by both beginners and advanced users depending on the type of setup chosen Advantages • Many more options with large apertures • Great for deep sky objects like nebulae, galaxies, and star clusters • Less optical aberrations • Less expensive for large aperture sizes • Dew does not build up as much on primary mirror during long observing sessions

Disadvantages • Open air design of many tubes can introduce turbulent air flow and dust • Some designs can be quite large and less portable • Not as useful for terrestrial viewing since objects will be upside down • Requires occasional cleaning and realignment of mirrors

CATADIOPTRICS

These types of telescopes are usually thought of for advanced users but can be setup by beginners as well. Advantages • Large apertures can be condensed to shorter tubes due to folding of light path – better portability • Sealed tube prevents distortion from turbulent air currents and dust inside • Durable, and requires little maintenance • Can be useful for both terrestrial and astronomical viewing • Slightly less aberration due to mirror and lens combination

Disadvantages • Much more expensive, especially for large apertures • Some light loss due to the secondary mirror placement • Primary mirror will have to very occasionally be realigned • Dew buildup can occur a little easier on the corrector plate during long observing sessions


WHAT TYPE OF TELESCOPE SHOULD I GET? PURCHASING TIPS AND ADVICE „ Avoid purchasing cheap telescopes from big box stores that primarily advertise high magnification. These telescopes will most likely break easily and will not provide high quality optics and observing. „ Be prepared to spend at least $100 or more for a decent setup. „ Aperture, or light gathering area, is one of the most important factors to consider. Bigger is better for telescopes. Most purchases are made online since brick-and-mortar stores that sell telescopes are not very common in most areas. „ Major companies to consider (*not an endorsement for any particular manufacturer): Meade, Celestron, Orion, Explore Scientific, Astro-Tech, Coronado (solar), Lunt (solar). „ High quality eyepieces are just as important as a high-quality telescope. One or two eyepieces will suffice for the casual or beginner user, but a few more will be useful for the experienced user. The standard eyepiece diameter is 1.25 inches. There are some 2-inch options on the market but are not as common and much more expensive. „ Consider investing in a Moon filter. These act like little “sunglasses” for eyepieces when looking at the Moon in very large phases. When the Moon is very bright, it can be a little uncomfortable to view for long periods of time. The Moon filter will not only make it more comfortable to look at, but also provide a bit more contrast. Moon filters screw onto the back of most eyepieces.

34 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

MOUNTS All telescopes, or optical tube assembly’s (OTA), must have some type of mount to be placed on. Mounts allow the OTA to be pointed and maneuvered to different directions, and depending on the design, can be used to track certain objects in the night sky. Each type of mount listed below can be used for all the OTAs listed above, depending on the configuration chosen. ALTITUDE-AZIMUTH, OR “ALT-AZ” MOUNTS, are simply a point-and-shoot type of setup. They can be maneuvered up-and-down (attitude) or swiveled left or right (azimuth) to point to certain objects. These work the same as a standard camera tripod and can be a bit heftier for telescopes since they need to hold more weight and be stable enough to limit vibrations. Manual alt-az mounts are better for low magnification views of the sky since they are not able to track the objects due to Earth’s rotation. They are commonly found on beginner telescopes, are easiest to setup, and the least expensive. *A subset of alt-az mounts is called a Dobsonian. These mounts act just like an alt-az but are designed to hold very large reflectors. Dobsonians have a very simple design, and there are many homebuilt versions to choose from if a DIY setup is of interest. They are cost effective and can provide the most bang-for-your-buck when it comes to having a large aperture telescope.

Equatorial Mount. Image Credit: Marie-Lan Nguyen

EQUATORIAL MOUNTS are a bit more complicated to setup and have one axis aligned with the Earth’s axis. This means that the mount can keep the telescope oriented around the rotational axis of Earth, tracking more distant objects easily through the night. With manual equatorial mounts, a knob attached to the equatorial (right ascension) axis can be turned every so often to keep an object centered in the telescope. Some versions come with a simple motorized drive that spins the scope at the correct rate to compensate for Earth’s rotation, keeping the target in place continually. These types of mounts take more time and skill to setup since certain types need to be balanced with counterweights and must be aligned with the polar region of the night sky.

COMPUTERIZED, OR “GO-TO”, MOUNTS can be used on both alt-az and equatorial setups. They consist of motors attached to computers that can track all types of objects in the sky. Computerized mounts typically have a database of objects programmed in that allow the user to choose them, and the system will automatically drive to that target once selected. Some of these mounts can also be attached to separate computers for higher level tracking and automation and are commonly needed for long duration astrophotography. Computerized mounts still need some setup, and usually need to be aligned with various stars in the sky to enable the tracking features. These types of setups are more expensive and should be relegated to intermediate and advanced users.


TELESCOPE SETUP AND USE With a basic understanding of the various types of telescopes and factors to consider when purchasing, actually setting one up and observing objects in the sky is the next step. Here is a very general list of procedures to follow that can help make this endeavor a success: *These procedures can differ slightly depending on the telescope configuration used.

SETUP

1. Choose a location – Be sure to find a suitable place to setup the telescope that is fairly level with a clear weather forecast. An open space with less obstructions near the horizon is ideal. A darker sky is also preferable, but not a show stopper if bright targets are being observed (e.g., Moon and planets). 2. Setup the mount – The mount is usually the first thing to be placed on the ground. If tracking is involved, then the mount will need to be leveled. Most telescopes will come with a level if this is needed, or a simple household bubble level will work. For setups with tripods, each leg can move in and out to adjust for height and will have knobs for tightening. 3. Attach the OTA – Once the mount is in the intended place, the optical tube assembly can be attached if it is not already so. 4. Secure the finder scope – If not already attached, the finder scope should be secured to the OTA. Finder scopes commonly need to be aligned with the main telescope to operate correctly. To make sure of proper alignment, attach an eyepiece to the OTA and point the entire telescope toward a fixed object on the ground a fair distance away (a distant street/house light works well) and lock the telescope in its place so the object chosen is centered in the main eyepiece. Look through the finder scope and note if the object centered in the eyepiece is also centered in the finder scope. If not, then most finder scopes will have small adjustment knobs/ dials that can be turned to align with the main eyepiece. 5. Telescope alignment (if needed) – If using an equatorial mount, then one axis needs to be aligned with the celestial pole in the sky. If in the Figure 1 northern hemisphere, this point is known as the North Star, or Polaris (see figure 1) Some computerized mounts will either need to be oriented to the celestial pole or placed in some type of Aperture – opening diameter of the OTA “home” position (refer to the manufacturer’s manual). Eyepiece – the lens used to magnify the view 6. Final setup – Before starting an observing session, make sure Eyepiece Holder – holds multiple eyepieces while observing any other small items need to be completed – OTA cover removed, Finder Scope – a low magnification scope used to locate targets dew shield attached (if supplied), attach power if needed, Focuser – adjusts the focus for a clear image eyepieces are readily available, etc. Mount – supports and orients the OTA 7. Begin observing – Have fun viewing the universe. Optical Tube Assembly (OTA) – main tube that gathers light Star Diagonal – deflects light from the OTA to the eyepiece for more TELESCOPE USE TIPS AND GENERAL comfortable viewing Tripod – support legs that hold the entire telescope unit OBSERVING ADVICE

PARTS OF A TELESCOPE

• Make sure to read the instruction manual thoroughly during setup and use. If problems arise, there are many YouTube videos that may help with any problems or confusions for a specific telescope or type. There are also many telescope forums online that can be consulted. • Use a star chart or stargazing app on a smartphone to locate interesting objects in the night sky. • If multiple eyepieces are being used, find the right size for the object being observed. The number on the eyepiece (typically 40 or less in millimeters) is its focal length and will help to indicate its magnification. The smaller the number, the higher the magnification. To determine magnification, take the telescope focal length (usually found on the OTA or the manual) and divide by the eyepiece focal length. (Example: 1000 mm telescope focal length/20 mm eyepiece focal length = 50 times magnification, or 50x). Higher magnifications offer interesting close up views but sacrifice the clarity of the object since it will also magnify the atmospheric distortion above. Low magnification will offer clearer images with a much wider field.

Finder Scope

Optical Tube Assembly

Eyepiece

Star Diagonal

Aperture

Focuser Mount

• If looking to do astrophotography, there are special adapters that attach to the OTA for DSLR cameras and even smartphones that are available by various manufacturers. Long exposure astrophotography requires a motorized drive or “go-to” computerized mount. • Allow eyes at least 10 to 15 minutes to get dark-adapted before the observing sessions begins. Use a red flashlight around the telescope when observing at night. Red light does not interfere with dark-adapted eyes. • Have bug spray or long-sleeved clothes handy as protection from mosquitoes and other critters that may be present. • Dress like it is about 10 to 15 degrees cooler since standing around for long periods of time while observing can cool the body down. *Never point a telescope at the sun or any other extremely bright artificial light source. Without proper equipment and protection, looking at the sun through a telescope can damage eyes instantly. To observe the sun safely through a telescope, please consult a professional or install an approved solar filter from a reputable company. Solar telescopes built specifically to observe the sun safely are also available from certain manufacturers.

Tripod

Eyepiece Holder


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Arts & Sciences Magazine | Spring 2019  

Official magazine of the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. Spring 2019 edition.

Arts & Sciences Magazine | Spring 2019  

Official magazine of the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. Spring 2019 edition.

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