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IN THIS ISSUE 4

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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VOLUNTEER NEWS Annual Volunteer Brunch Celebration and Volunteer of the Quarter

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THE CURATOR'S CORNER BY RUTH GRIM

Forms of Fancy: Highlights from North Wing exhibit that feature sculptures from the MOAS Collection

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THE 2016 SMITHSONIAN JAZZ MASTERWORKS ORCHESTRA CONCERT The Legacy of Hard Bop Pianist Horace Silver ZACH IN TIME

J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS

The North Wing: A Treasure Trove of Decorative Arts and History

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SUMMER EXHIBITS & PROGRAMMING CALENDAR

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MOAS GUILD NEWS BY KATHY WILSON

The Guild celebrates a new season of funfilled events

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OVER AND OUT BY SETH MAYO

Juno's Journey to Jupiter

This issue of Arts & Sciences takes you inside the North Wing of the Museum, which houses the Kenneth Worcester Dow & Mary Mohan Dow Gallery of American Art, the Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage, the Helena and William Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art, and the Anderson C. Bouchelle Study Center and Gallery for International Decorative Arts We hope you enjoy rediscovering the treasures of the North Wing as MOAS continues to expand and evolve. Read about this sculpture and others from the MOAS Collection on page 8 as MOAS Chief Curator Ruth Grim reveals highlights from the Forms of Fancy exhibition, currently on display in the North Wing of the Museum.


MOAS STAFF

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Executive Director ANDREW SANDALL ASHLEY ADAIR, Security JUSTIN ALISA, Security LEE ASHTON, Security JOHN BRUCE, Security MARK CARRUTHERS, Guest Services Associate JENELLE CODIANNE, Director of Marketing and Public Relations STEVE CONKLIN, Director of Finance ROBERT CONSOLO, Planetarium Educator COREY COOK, Guest Services Associate DEAN CORMIER, Facilities Assistant STEVEN DALLAS, Head of Security MEGAN FINLEY, Curatorial Assistant ERIC GOIRE, Director of Operations RUTH GRIM, Chief Curator KELSEY HANSEN-KRAUSE, Education Assistant AUSTIN HARDIN, Security NICOLE HARPSTREIT, Guest Services Associate WAYNE HARRIS, Security ASHLEY HOLLIS BUSSEY, Planetarium Educator LORI HOEPFINGER, Guest Services Associate NICHOLAS INCANNELLA, Security ARIEL JENNIS, Planetarium Educator ERIC MAUK, Curator of Exhibits SETH MAYO, Curator of Astronomy NICOLE MESSERVY, Education Associate PETER MILLER, Maintenance Assistant ANTHONY MILLSAP, Security AMANDA MITCHELL, Security MONICA MITRY, Membership and Volunteer Coordinator HANH NGUYEN, Guest Services Associate PATRICIA NIKOLLA, Guest Services Manager FREDRIKA PAULIG, Events Assistant ANGELO PIERCE, Security CODY ROGERS, Security JASON SCHREINER, Planetarium Educator ERIN SCHWEITZER, Security ROY SHAFFER, JR., Maintenance Supervisor LISA SHAW, Guest Services Associate ISRAEL TAYLOR, Physical Plant Assistant JERMEY WALKER, Security ROBERT WAHLRAB, Curatorial Assistant J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS, Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History

Editor JENELLE CODIANNE Contributing Writers RUTH GRIM SETH MAYO MONICA MITRY KATHLEEN WILSON J. “ZACH” ZACHARIAS

Art Director NIKKI MASTANDO, MASTANDO MEDIA

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ATTENDEES AT THE 2016 SEAMD MEETING AT THE MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART, JACKSON MS. THE PHOTO SHOWS REPRESENTATIVES OF 36 DIFFERENT MUSEUMS FROM 8 STATES IN THE SOUTHEASTERN US.

DEAR FRIENDS,

ANDREW SANDALL

With all the construction we have had going on at the Museum these past four years, it is sometimes easy to overlook all of the other projects and initiatives we are constantly working on to improve and enhance our service to our community.

We still have more construction to come – I am not sure what it will feel like walking into the Museum the day after our new lobby opens as it will literally be my first day here as Executive Director without a construction project to talk about! The new entrance will really enhance the visitor experience while also giving us valuable extra exhibit and event space, especially with the new plaza being constructed at the front. Although considerably smaller in scale and in budget than our other projects, the lobby project is truly the final piece needed to reshape the whole feel of the Museum. Behind the scenes, both the Board of Trustees and staff have been working hard on a new strategic plan for the organization that looks at who we have become and where we should be heading now that all of these new buildings are up and running. It has been an intense, intellectually stimulating, and thoroughly rewarding process so far as we address the big issues that the Museum faces and move forward into a whole new world in terms of visitor expectations and economics. The whole region is growing and evolving and this work will give us a revised and updated vision that we can use to make our decisions and help us adapt and better anticipate the changing needs of our community. One benefit of the completion of construction is that we finally get many of our exhibit spaces back and available for use. This edition of the magazine features articles that focus on some spaces that are worth revisiting if you have not seen them in a while. With the Giant Ground Sloth back in a home of its own, the Bouchelle Changing Exhibit Gallery has been put back to its intended use and currently showcases some of the wonderful sculptures we hold in our collections. The other galleries throughout the North Wing, such as the Helena and William Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art, the Kenneth

Worcester Dow and Mary Mohan Dow Gallery of American Art, and the Anderson C. Bouchelle Gallery for International Decorative Arts, are all worth revisiting as they hold some wonderful historical treasures. Our Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage Building is well worth visiting as it continues to offer a unique insight into the contents of our artifact storage rooms. It can be easy to overlook these sections of the Museum that have not been part of the updates over the last few years, but I know from experience that very little draws a “Wow!” from guests I tour than when they walk into our visible storage for the first time! It is always interesting to compare what we have going on here with our colleagues across the country. I was recently invited to attend a meeting of art museum directors in Jackson, MS. With over 40 museum leaders representing 8 different states from across the southeast, it was a great opportunity to discuss best practices, help each other find practical solutions to issues we are dealing with at our own sites, and to generally discuss the state of the arts and cultural sector. What was most gratifying of all was to see the interest being taken in MOAS and all that we have achieved here. With representatives from many of the country’s largest and most prestigious organizations in attendance, it made me proud to be able to speak up in meetings and explain how we had successfully solved problems or found answers to some of the issues our colleagues were facing. Even now, long after returning to Daytona Beach – on a flight that confirmed you can get great aerial views of the Brown Museum if you sit by the window on your way home – the collaborations have continued and the camaraderie we enjoyed in person is not waning. Of course one of our most important collaborations is with the Smithsonian Institution, and I am happy to tell you that the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra will be back at MOAS for a 6th consecutive year this September. Anyone who knows me will tell you that this is always my favorite weekend of the year at the Museum. I really encourage you to come and see what all the buzz is about, but buy your tickets early as this event always sells out!


BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND SPONSORS

MAJOR SPONSORS

2016 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

GOLD Bright House Networks Brown & Brown, Inc. Cici and Hyatt Brown Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Halifax Health Travel Host Magazine Zgraph, Inc.

Thomas Hart, President SILVER Melinda Dawson, Vice President Bethune-Cookman University Bridget Bergens, Second Vice President Cobb Cole Linda M. Hall, Secretary Daytona Beach News-Journal J. Lester Kaney, Assistant Secretary Daytona Beverages, LLC Daytona International Speedway Cory Walker, Treasurer Jon Hall Chevrolet Amy Workowski, Assistant Treasurer Mastando Media Carol Lively Platig, Past President NASCAR ® Cici Brown, Trustee Liaison RLF Architects Liz Chanfrau BRONZE Todd Huffstickler Bahama House Janet Jacobs Best Western Aku Tiki Inn Kim A. Klancke, MD Bomar Construction Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Carl W. Lentz, III, MD, FACS Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center Chris Lydecker Gary R. Libby Trust Eileen McDermott Giles Electric Family Katherine Hurst Miller Tom and Peggie Hart Consuelo and Richard Hartmann Ellen O’Shaughnessy Ed and Pat Jackson Kathy Wilson, MOAS Guild Representative Dr. and Mrs. Kim A. Klancke Allison Morris Zacharias Jill Simpkins and L. Gale Lemerand Stuart and Lisa Sixma David and Toni Slick HONORARY TRUSTEES SunTrust Bank Miriam Blickman Anderson Bouchelle (Deceased) J. Hyatt Brown Alys Clancy (Deceased) Tippen Davidson (Deceased) Susan Root Feibleman (Deceased) Thurman Gillespy, Jr., MD Herbert Kerman (Deceased) Chapman Root (Deceased) Jan Thompson (Deceased)

Executive Director Emeritus Gary R. Libby

Arts & Sciences is published quarterly by the Museum of Arts & Sciences, 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, Florida 32114, telephone 386.255.0285, web site www.moas.org. Income from contributors helps offset a portion of the expense involved in the production of this publication. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES All inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to the MOAS Communications Department at 386.255.0285, ext. 320.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES The Museum of Arts and Sciences is a not-for-profit educational institution, chartered by the State of Florida in 1962 and accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Museum collections and research include Cuban and Florida art, American fine and decorative arts, European fine and decorative arts, pre-Columbian and African artifacts, Pleistocene fossils, Florida history and regional natural history. Permanent and changing exhibitions, lectures, and classes highlight educational programs. The Museum houses changing arts and sciences exhibition galleries, permanent collection galleries, a gallery of American art, paintings, decorative arts and furniture, the Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum, the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, the Cuban Fine and Folk Art Museum, a state-of-the-art planetarium, library, the Frischer Sculpture Garden, maintains nature trails in a 90-acre preserve in adjacent Tuscawilla Park, and operates Gamble Place in Port Orange. The Museum of Arts and Sciences is recognized by the State of Florida as a cultural institution and receives major funding from the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. Major Museum programs and activities for members, school children and the general public are also supported by grants from the County of Volusia, the Guild of the Museum of Arts and Sciences, the Junior League of Daytona Beach, Target®, Elfun Community Fund, and the UCF Educational Partnership. MUSEUM HOURS: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday The Museum of Arts and Sciences is committed to the Americans with Disabilities Act by making our facility and programs accessible to all people. If you have any special requirements, suggestions, or recommendations, please contact our representative, Executive Director, Andrew Sandall, at 386.255.0285. If you prefer, you may contact the Cultural Council of Volusia County representative at 386.257.6000, or the Division of Cultural Affairs, The Capitol, Tallahassee 850.487.2980, or TT 850.488.5779. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. THE TOLL-FREE NUMBER IS 1.800.435.7352. FLORIDA REGISTRATION #CH-1851


VOLUNTEER NEWS

GROUP SHOT OF THE MOAS VOLUNTEERS WHO WERE IN ATTENDANCE FOR THE MUSEUM’S ANNUAL VOLUNTEER APPRECIATION BRUNCH.

Annual Volunteer Brunch Celebration On April 13, 2016, the Museum of Arts & Sciences held its Annual Volunteer Appreciation Brunch, in conjunction with National Volunteer Month, to celebrate another wonderful year at the Museum and to thank those who helped make it possible. The Museum’s volunteers were treated to a delicious brunch from Aunt Catfish, complete with mimosas, outside in the Florida Hospital Courtyard at the Brown Museum. Various milestone anniversaries were recognized from one year up to 10 years of service to the Museum. Volunteers were even treated to gift cards that could be found under select chairs, donated by The Hub on Canal Street and Panera Bread. After brunch, the festivities were moved into the Consolidated Tomoka Education Room. Volunteers were invited to paint a clay ornament they chose from a palm tree, a star fish, or a square tile. Many masterpieces were created and upon completion, were sent off to be fired at Whim Wham Pottery and Art Studio.

The Museum is forever grateful to all of its amazing volunteers. The dedication of this group of people is integral to the success of the Museum and does not go unnoticed. Our volunteers fulfill a wide range of jobs including serving as docents to tour groups, friendly faces in the Museum store and at the admissions desk, engineers from General Electric (GE) in the Children’s Museum, educators in the Summer Learning Institute, landscapers of the Museum grounds, archivists in the Museum library, and general helping hands. During 2015, volunteers donated 14,211 hours of service to MOAS and their generosity cannot be overstated.

CHONG REICHARD Museum Store BOB SKINNER Library/Docent PETER MILLER Children’s Museum MELISSA LINGO Administrative JOHN SCHIRTZINGER Events

Three Year Anniversary

CAROL ZOFKO Museum Store

Five Year Anniversary

JOYCE COFFMAN Museum Store

Ten Year Anniversary TOM DAVIS Docent

34 volunteers were in attendance, and we celebrated 14 anniversaries:

One Year Anniversaries

ANN COLMAN Docent CAROL GABRIEL Museum Store NANCY LAUBIS Admissions Desk CAROL ANN MORITZ Docent RUTHIE NICKELL CORTEZ Docent KAREN PIERCE Museum Store

EIGHT OF THE FOURTEEN MOAS VOLUNTEERS WHO CELEBRATED AN ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR.

VOLUNTEER OF THE QUARTER

Nancy Laubis

Nancy Laubis moved to Florida in 2014 after visiting the Sunshine State as a snowbird for a couple of years. This led her to begin volunteering at the Museum by helping at the admissions desk. Before officially moving to Florida, Nancy spent 20 years in Ohio but is originally from Washington D.C. Outside of volunteering at the Museum, Nancy is an experimental media artist. Some of her watercolor work is currently on display at Holly Hill City Hall. Nancy also belongs to the MOAS Guild, the Art League of Daytona Beach, the Art League of Ponce Inlet, and the Monday morning scrabble group at the library. 6 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE


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THE CURATOR 'S CORNER | BY RUTH GRIM, CHIEF CURATOR

S

panning many cultures, time periods, and media, the Forms of Fancy exhibition in the North Wing of the Museum of Arts and Sciences highlights the depths of the collections as one of the inaugural exhibitions celebrating the Museum’s new renovation and expansion. It mirrors the many facets of MOAS with works ancient to present day and classical to contemporary, focusing, primarily but not exclusively, on human or animal figures.

FREDERIC REMINGTON, BRONCO BUSTER SCULPTURE, CAST BRONZE, MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES

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Majestic busts of Napoleon and Josephine appropriately lead off the exhibition and remind us that MOAS is famous for its Napoleonic collection which is largely present in the Visible Storage behind these impressive pieces. The over-lifesized Bust of Napoleon, in particular, by the greatest sculptor of Neo-classicism, Antonio Canova (Italian, 1757-1822), is awe-inspiring in its massive yet simple grandeur. Based on famous depictions of Julius Caesar, Canova’s weighty, polished homage to Emperor Napoleon places him firmly within the lineage of the great emperors of Ancient Rome. The surface of the piece is smooth and refined, the subject’s features simplified and idealized in Canova’s trademark style – all in the service of a majestic French portrait in marble. Beside him is the Empress Josephine by an artist working after the French sculptor, Joseph Chinard (1756-1813). Napoleon’s bride is every bit as regal and attired in the high waisted dress she made famous which came to be called “Empire Style.” She is the perfect counterpart to the Emperor as if these two busts captured their time on the throne together in perpetuity.


ARTIST SPOTLIGHT One of the strengths of this exhibition is the display of the skill with which talented artists are able to animate a static piece of sculpture and “bring it to life” for the viewer. Other fine examples of 19th century neoclassicism in marble include a female bust by Pietro Barzanti (Italian, 1842-1881), a charming 18th century bust of a woman in exotic dress by an unknown artist and a faithful replica of one of the most famous marble sculptures from antiquity ---- the Hermes by Praxiteles. Joining this timehonored work of sculpture in the display vitrine are other figures from different cultures including a Spanish Colonial saint, a Chinese tomb figure, and a Precolumbian burial figure representing the variety in the MOAS collections. One of the strengths of this exhibition is the display of the skill with which talented artists are able to animate a static piece of sculpture and “bring it to life” for the viewer. For example, leading off the exhibition is a brilliant gilt bronze work from c. 1877 by Vasili Grachev (Russian, 1831-1905) showing a Troika carrying a wealthy couple being led at full speed past a peasant sled, nearly upsetting it. This eye-catching piece glitters like real gold and captivates with the dramatic action taking place as the peasant sled appears about to turn over.

Impressionist paintings by Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, and others had raised the bar on artistic presentations of real life, and sculptors found themselves pressured to keep up. But not all of the works in the exhibition represent highly-animated form. Some of the other memorable works in the exhibition display hallmarks of 20th century art, mainly geometric abstraction. William Zorach’s (American, b. Lithuania 1887 – 1966) lovely fountain is in the form of a girl holding a shallow bowl of water. The folds of her dress are made up of regular, parallel ridges falling from her waist and her hair frames her face in an continued on page 10

Another dramatic piece full of movement is a sculpture by Frederic Remington (American, 1861-1909) titled Bronco Buster. One of Remington’s most famous pieces, this work demonstrates how skillfully he reproduced a cowboy attempting to tame a bucking bronco. The artist was able to capture a split second in time when the bronco has reared to his highest on his two hind legs and the rider – his whip about ready to crack in the air – is soon to be bucked off. Other animated works in the exhibition include a Bacchante by Frederick MacMonnies (American, 1863-1937) in which he captured the cheerful disciple of the Roman god of wine, Bacchus, skipping with delight as she carries the young god raised high on one arm. Prime examples of work by two of the best animal artists of the 19th century - Antoine-Louis Barye (French, 1796-1875) and Jules Mogniez (French, 1835-1894) - also are on view and show eagles in flight and on the attack. One of the challenges to 19th century European sculptors was to show just such action and drama in their art and, thereby, keep it on par with the great advances in Realism that were taking place in painting and two-dimensional arts. Realist and

ARTIST UNKNOWN, THE EMPRESS JOSEPHINE, 1805, WHITE CARRARA MARBLE, 76.20CM X 45.72CM X 30.48CM, MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES


almost perfect oval parentheses. All of the simplified lines and form turn inward in this piece to create a quiet, lovely ode to tranquility and peace. She is the antithesis to the wild, frolicking Bacchante by MacMonnies, opposite her in the gallery, and pays testament to the strong love for simplified geometry in early-to-mid 20th century Western art. This phenomenon in 20th century European sculpture is even more impressively represented in the exhibition in works by Alexander Archipenko (Russian, 18871964) that are on view. This giant of Russian Constructivism is renowned for his dynamic geometric abstraction of living forms and his King Solomon and Family Life in this exhibition do not disappoint. With skill and gleaming polish, Archipenko pulled strong diagonals and concave or convex shapes into a pared-down form of a striding king and an embracing couple to create powerful objects that speak to the rapid industrialization of Russia in the first decades of the 20th century. This is not the “quiet” geometric abstraction of William Zorach but, rather, geometry reflecting the pulse of the modern age. Works by the most contemporary artists in the exhibition reflect the vast variety of forms, media, and message used by artists in our current time. In this Post-Modern age, all is grist for the mill and the works on view are vibrant cats, four-legged birds, towers of glass, stylized dogs, and a highlypersonal “Clock of Life.” Wood, ceramic, glass and metal come together with works by nationally-known artists and Halifax Art Festival art winners over the years. They bear witness to the creativity and strength of the world of sculpture in our present time.

Forms of Fancy: Sculptures from the MOAS Collection will be on display at the Museum of Arts & Sciences now through 2016.

ALEXANDER ARCHIPENKO, KING SOLOMON, 1963, CAST BRONZE, 137.16CM X 58.42CM X 48.26CM, MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES

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7PM FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 11

7PM WEDNESDAY

JANUARY 11 Sarah Chang, Violin

7PM TUESDAY

JANUARY 31

7PM FRIDAY

FEBRUARY 10 Ray Chen, Violin

7PM FRIDAY

FEBRUARY 17

MUSIC CAN TAKE YOU PLACES

7PM FRIDAY

MARCH 3 World dance

7PM WEDNESDAY

MARCH 22

P E A B O DY AU D I TO R I U M

Nicola Benedetti, Violin

for more information 386.253.2901 or dbss.org Season Subscriptions on sale now. Single tickets available starting August 1st.


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ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 13


THE LEGACY OF HARD BOP PIANIST HORACE SILVER Join us September 24, 2016 for an afternoon performance from 3:00pm to 5:00pm and an evening performance from 7:00pm to 9:00pm of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra (SJMO) Concert: The Legacy of Hard Bop Pianist Horace Silver. Admission is $35.00 for future members and $20.00 for members. Please reserve in advance at 386-2550285 or in-person at MOAS. Reserve early! This event is popular and may sell out! Part of the 6th Annual Septembers with the Smithsonian at MOAS.

Messengers with Art Blakey, and was instrumental in launching the careers of many present-day jazz icons including trumpeter, Donald Byrd, saxophonist, Joe Henderson, and singer, Andy Bey.

Combining elements of rhythm-andblues, pop, gospel, and jazz, the HardBop era was a fertile period in jazz history that led to the development of a modern, soulful sound. As a pioneer in the tradition, pianist, Horace Silver, made more than 20 records for the Blue Note label, co-founded the influential Jazz

Charlie Young (Artistic Director, Conductor, and Woodwind Specialist) has had a rich career of performing and recording with various bands and orchestras such as the National Symphony Orchestra, the US Navy Band, the Count Basie Orchestra, and the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. Likewise,

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The SJMO program explores the musical compositions and legacy of Horace Silver from his pre-Jazz Messenger years of the 1950s through his final studio recording of 1998, Jazz Has a Sense of Humor.

THE MUSICIANS

Mr. Young has shared the concert stage with many of the music industry`s leading icons ranging from Clark Terry and Ella Fitzgerald to Stevie Wonder and Quincy Jones. Performance venues have ranged from London`s Royal Albert Hall to New York's Carnegie Hall. Charlie is a recognized clinician in the field of jazz education as well as classical and jazz saxophone performance. Clinic presentations in Brazil, Venezuela, Chile, Egypt, South Africa, and throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan have earned Charlie Young a stellar reputation among the most respected in music and education. Scott A. Silbert (Saxophone, Arranger), a prolific arranger and composer, he has contributed over 50 arrangements for use by the Navy Band's "Commodores" jazz ensemble, the Concert Band and


Ceremonial Band. In addition, Silbert has performed with the National Symphony Orchestra (Washington, D.C.), the Bruce Gates Jazz Consortium, and appeared with Rosemary Clooney, Bob Hope, Milt Hinton, Stanley Turrentine, and Bob Crosby. Tom Williams (Trumpet), a versatile performer, has played in the show bands of Pattie LaBelle, Stevie Wonder, Frankie Valli, Mel Torme, Natalie Cole, Joe Williams, and Harry Connick Jr. He has appeared at numerous jazz festivals and venues throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States with artists such as Donald Brown, The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, Gary Bartz, Hank Jones, Philly Joe Jones, The Woody Herman Orchestra, Frank Foster, Tommy Flanagan, The Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, Slide Hampton, Ben Riley, Larry Willis, Art Taylor, Milt Jackson, The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, Marlena Shaw, Barry Harris, Grady Tate, and Steve Turre. Jennifer Krupa (Trombone) is an active trombonist and composer in Washington, DC. A member of the United States

Navy Band “Commodores” jazz ensemble, Jen also performs regularly with the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, Sherrie Maricle and DIVA Jazz Orchestra, and her own group “JLQ” with saxophonist Leigh Pilzer. Jennifer has also earned a Bachelor of Music from the University of North Florida and a Master of Music from the University of Maryland. Tony Nalker (Piano) has served since 1989 as the pianist of the U.S. Army Blues, the premiere jazz ensemble of the U.S. Army, and is currently the group’s enlisted leader. Over the past twenty years, Nalker has performed with many musical talents including Doc Severinsen, James Moody, Clark Terry, Slide Hampton, Phil Woods, Sean Jones, and Kathy Mattea. He has performed on more than 100 recordings in a variety of styles including jazz, big band, folk, children’s music, pop, and country. James King (Bass) studied at Texas Southern University, Hampton University, and the University of the District of Columbia. Mr. King has lived and worked

in the Washington, D.C. area since 1977. During a musical career that spans more than 25 years, Mr. King, in addition to leading his own groups, has performed with Stanley Turrine, Buck Hill, Elvin Jones, Marlena Shaw, and Ronnie Wells, among others. He has appeared at major jazz festivals in North America and abroad, including North Sea, Montreal, and Pori. Mr. King regularly appears on the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage as part of the December Christmas Day Jazz Jam and K.C. Jazz Club. Ken Kimery (Drums), Executive Director of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and Jazz Oral History Program, has produced over 300 concerts in Washington, D.C. Since 1994, the SJMO has traversed the United States taking the Museum to the four corners of our country. Some of the many highlights include concerts at Symphony Hall in Atlanta, GA for the 1996 Olympic Games, the Washington National Cathedral for Duke Ellington’s Centennial, the Monterey Jazz Festival, the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, and Strathmore.


ZACH IN TIME | BY J. "ZACH" ZACHARIAS, SENIOR CURATOR OF EDUCATION

Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte’s bed that resides in the Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage Building at the Museum of Arts & Sciences.

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The North Wing: A Treasure Trove of Decorative Arts and History The many galleries of the Museum's North Wing are full of decorative and fine arts that demonstrate the ever changing tastes of societies from around the world. Each object contains symbolic value and reflects important attitudes and realities of the society where it was produced. The objects on display have many purposes: tell a story, commemorate an important event, show a religious ritual, create a social commentary, or record visual data. Many visitors may not be familiar with some of the astounding masterpieces residing in the Museum’s North Wing that reflect ideas of their place in the web of their history. A stroll into the Kenneth Worcester Dow and Mary Mohan Dow Gallery of American Art is an amazing walk through the material cultural history of our country. Beginning with the pilgrim age with pieces as early as 1694 and ending with objects from the Victorian Era, it represents some of the best painters and cabinet makers in American history. The Helena and William Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art represents exemplary pieces from the Museum’s Chinese collection with the oldest man-made pieces of art dating back to 240 B.C. The Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage Building is one of only a handful of open storage exhibits in North America and contains nearly 6,000 objects from a diverse cross section of the Museum’s amazing decorative arts collection. The Anderson C. Bouchelle Study Center and Gallery for International Decorative Arts houses important European decorative pieces.

Kenneth Worcester Dow and Mary Mohan Dow Gallery of American Art

In the Dow Gallery of American Art, you will discover an amazing oil painting by John James Audubon titled, Townsend’s Weasels, 1842, an oil on canvas. Audubon, the great painter and printer of the Birds of America, created our country's most famous art book. He was an artist-naturalist who raised bird portraiture to a fine art. After Audubon became famous for his Birds of America, he and his son, John Woodhouse, took on a new challenge in the early part of the 1840’s to paint and describe all of the mammals of North America. The book entitled, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, contained some 150 images but is smaller in scale. Audubon did not render many oil paintings, and when he did, it was to raise money to enroll subscribers for his art books. This painting is a preliminary study for a plate in Audubon’s second volume of nature studies for this series. The Museum’s Townsend’s Weasels, 1842 was a gift from Miss Mary Eliza Audubon (John J. Audubon’s granddaughter) to Rosalie Paul. Rosalie lived with the Audubon’s and attended the school in their home off Riverside Drive, New York. They called her their adopted daughter. This oil painting was a wedding gift to Rosalie at the time of her marriage. The fact that the Museum owns and displays an original Audubon oil painting is quite remarkable. Townsend was Audubon’s trapper and he

painted this oil painting depicting two weasels in a playful disposition. It is actually the same male weasel painted twice. What makes this piece a one-of-a-kind is that if you look closely at the weasel in the lower left section you will see it has two tails. Originally, Audubon did not like the placement of the original tail so he painted over it and placed a new tail higher up on the hip. Now, over the many years, the original paint has shown through due to a process called pentimento and now shows the glaring mistake of two tails on this weasel. In the 17th century, a person known as a joiner was also known as a cabinet maker. The word carpenter was not in popular usage until the 1800’s. Chests were usually made to order and sometimes they were initialed when bestowed as gifts. On display in the Dow Gallery of American

Art is a beautiful 1694 dowry chest with the initials MS. This rare pilgrim chest is a Hadley Chest named after the location it was discovered (Hadley, Massachusetts), and Blanket Chest, circa 1694, there are less than 150 Massachusetts, carved of them known to exist. Hadley and painted oak and pine They were discovered by a collector in 1898 and were created by cabinet makers within a 750-mile area. The initials stand for Mercy Smith who the piece was originally commissioned for. This oak chest stands 3 ½ to 4 feet tall and has a pine top. Kenneth Dow purchased this rare chest in 1939, and now it sits at the entry of the gallery as a sentinel to the beginning of a long and glorious history of American cabinet makers.

Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage

The Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage Building is a must-see walk through human history. Upon entering the amazing collections, your eye is caught by a fancy looking bed. This is no ordinary piece of furniture as it once belonged to Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte and resided in his private personal chambers at the Palace of Versailles. The classic Empire style of this blocklike bed is deeply rooted in the neo-classical fashion that was so en vogue during Napoleon's reign. The bed dates to c. 1810 and would have been pushed up against a wall with drapes dangling down each side. This Empire style bed is the forerunner of the American sleigh bed common today. How did the Museum acquire this piece? The bed was sold at auction to New York newspaper magnate, William Randolph Hurst, and then was auctioned years later by Sotheby’s and won by Kenneth Dow. Kenneth loved all things French, and he eventually donated it the Museum in 1989. Another amazing treasure sitting next to Napoleon's bed is a rare death mask of the famous general. If you want to see what the Emperor Napoleon really looked like, you can peer inside a non-descript box and see the plaster death mask of the famous emperor created two days after his passing. Napoleon

continued on page 18

Townsend’s Weasels, 1842, John James Audubon, oil on canvas


Anderson C. Bouchelle Study Center and Gallery for International Decorative Arts

Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte’s death mask that resides in the Helene B. Roberson Visible Storage Building at the Museum of Arts & Sciences.

A beautiful but mysterious portrait of one of America’s founding fathers, Thomas Paine (c. 1800), resides in the Anderson C. Bouchelle Study Center and Gallery for International Decorative Arts. Philosopher, political activist, theorist, and revolutionary, he wrote the famous and powerful pamphlet read by every rebel, Common Sense (c. 1776). Kenneth Dow purchased the portrait from a Mr. Abbott, a local London art dealer, in the summer of 1951. This important portrait is attributed to English painter, George Romney (b. 1734- d. 1802) who was the most fashionable painter of his day. In an interesting twist, there is evidence that this portrait could be attributed to another well-known American artist, Matthew Pratt. It could be that George Romney painted his portrait of Thomas Paine off of Pratt's painting which resides at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, the Museum’s painting lacks a signature, as does Pratt’s, but the Museum's appears to be older than the Paine portrait at Lafayette College. Could it be that the Museum's painting of Thomas Paine is by Mathew Pratt and the one at Lafayette College is a later copy by Romney? For now, our attribution lies with our portrait being the “lost” portrait of Thomas Paine by George Romney because of certain stylistic

Yellow Rice Bowl with Dragons, Ch’ing Dynasty, China (16441912), porcelain with yellow glaze and incised decoration

characteristics. Until further evidence comes forth clarifying this mystery, it is a must-see painting of this important founding father! The next time you are in the Museum, do not forget to stroll into the North Wing and observe these amazing pieces of fine art. It is important to realize that these examples are only just a few of the overwhelming amount of masterpieces found throughout the North Wing. Spend time in these amazing galleries and investigate, discover, and find your own treasures that speak to you!

died May 7, 1821, at age 51 on the Island of St. Helena with doctors from the United Kingdom and France in attendance. During the time of Napoleon Bonaparte, it was customary to cast a death mask of a great leader who had recently died. A mixture of wax or plaster was carefully placed over Napoleon’s face and removed after the form had hardened. From this impression, subsequent copies could be cast. His eyes are closed, lips slightly parted, and his shaven head is tilted backward, resting on a pillow garnished with a tassel at each corner. There are only a handful of these death masks known in the world.

Helena and William Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art

In The Helena and William Schulte Gallery of Chinese Art sits a small yellow porcelain rice bowl. It appears simple but it is actually incredibly important. It is one of the rice bowls belonging to the court of the last emperor of China, AisinGioro Pu Yi (b. 1874- d. 1912). In Chinese culture the color yellow is long associated with royalty. This color was reserved exclusively for the emperor. The emperor even wore yellow robes. Also, etched on the side of this rare artifact is a five-clawed dragon. This symbol was also reserved only for the emperor. A dragon with four claws was reserved for nobles and threeclawed dragon for commoners. Two more amazing artifacts located in the middle of the Schulte Gallery are the Chinese Writing Folios. One is a female folio and the other is for males. The two bound painting books were compiled at the same time and represent the differences between men and women. The men’s folio shows a combination of calligraphy with images of philosophers, kings, and court officials. This painting folio was produced for wealthy, educated men and bureaucrats. The women’s painting folio depicts images of women enjoying daily life and children playing. What makes this so interesting is that on the opposite page of the painting it remains blank with no writing whereas the male folio includes Chinese characters. Women were not encouraged to read or write. These amazing folios were produced as a series of paintings from the 15th through the 18th centuries. . 18 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

Portrait of Thomas Paine, ca. 1800, attributed to George Romney, oil on canvas


Women’s Painting Folio, Ch’ing Dynasty, China (1644-1911), watercolor and gouache on silk

Two amazing artifacts located in the middle of the Schulte Gallery are the Chinese Writing Folios. One is a female folio and the other is for males. The two bound painting books were compiled at the same time and represent the differences between men and women.

Men’s Painting Folio, Ch’ing Dynasty, China (1644-1911), watercolor and gouache on silk


SUMMER EXHIBITS Forms of Fancy: Sculptures from the MOAS Collection

NOW THROUGH 2016 From an ancient tomb figure from China to a 21st century painted ceramic “Kitty Hawk�, this exhibit represents 2,000 years of sculpture from across the globe.

REAL ESTATE OF THE ANCIENTS

NOW THROUGH AUGUST 7, 2016 In the 18th and 19th centuries, numbers of travelers visited and explored Europe with its historic landscapes and architectural sites. None were more focused and determined than those who were the passionate artists of their day.

Designed to Sell: 100 Years of Poster Art from the MOAS Collection

NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 A colorful, exuberant selection of 26 advertising posters from the heyday of late 19th-early 20th century European graphic design combined with fine later examples up to 1975.

Companions through the Ages: Animals in Art from the MOAS Collection

NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 18, 2016 This exhibition looks at some of the ways our constant companions throughout the ages have been represented in art. From images of beloved pets to dedicated servants and vital livestock, to symbolic images from many religions, animals frequently show up in the art of all cultures from around the world.

Hiram Williams

NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 1, 2016 Paintings by artist, Hiram Williams. Hiram Williams taught at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He received the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1963 which allowed him to write and publish a book on art, Notes for a Young Painter. His art is part of the collections of major museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art.

Captured Moments: Highlights from the Works on Paper in the Collection

AUGUST 13, 2016 THROUGH OCTOBER 15, 2016 From brief sketches to polished pastels, watercolors and prints, the MOAS collection contains many impressive works of art that were executed on paper. This exhibition will look at the many beautiful examples that celebrate the arts sur papier in the MOAS Collection.

Stay in touch! For the latest exhibit and programming information, sign up for our e-newsletter at MOAS.org/newsletter.html!

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SUMMER PROGRAMS Ongoing Events Wednesday Yoga in the Gallery Wednesdays, 5:30pm-6:30pm Take a break from your busy day and enjoy weekly Yoga in the Gallery at the new Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Meet in the lobby to join registered yoga instructor, Ashley Brooks of Holistic Movements, for an hour-long session that will provide you with an opportunity to practice a series of gentle yoga poses. Class is open to all experience levels. Please bring a mat, towel, and water. Space is limited and registration is required. RSVP to the Museum at 386-255-0285. $10.00 for future members, $5.00 for members.

July July 8 4:00pm-4:45pm Special Planetarium Show: Journeying to Jupiter More than 13 years have gone by since the last dedicated mission to the gas giant Jupiter, and now that has all changed with the new Juno mission beginning this July. Learn about the exciting mission in store for the Juno spacecraft in this immersive planetarium show as you are whisked away hundreds of millions of miles to Jupiter. We will explore how revealing the underlying layers of this massive planet’s atmosphere may unravel clues on the formation of the Solar System. Free for members, with paid museum admission, or $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children. July 9 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm iPOP 8:00pm Laser Retro 9:00pm Laser Spirit $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. July 13 3:00pm-4:00pm Curator’s Talk and Walk: Companions through the Ages: Animals in Art from the MOAS Collection Join James “Zach” Zacharias, Senior Curator of Education and History, for a look at the Museum’s vast collection of animal companions in art. Learn

about the history, the science, and the cultural significance of these beloved pets, dedicated servants, and animals that show up in the art of cultures from all around the world. Free for members or with paid museum admission. July 13 4:00pm-4:45pm Special Planetarium Show: Journeying to Jupiter (Encore Showing) More than 13 years have gone by since the last dedicated mission to the gas giant Jupiter, and now that has all changed with the new Juno mission beginning this July. Learn about the exciting mission in store for the Juno spacecraft in this immersive planetarium show as you are whisked away hundreds of millions of miles to Jupiter. We will explore how revealing the underlying layers of this massive planet’s atmosphere may unravel clues on the formation of the Solar System. Free for members, with paid museum admission, or $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children. July 14 5:30pm-7:30pm Italian Wine Tasting Join us at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art for an Italian wine tasting with S.R. Perrott. Spend the evening among friends while you sip up knowledge on swirling, tasting, and describing wines from Italy. This event is for ages 21 and older. Seating is limited. Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 to purchase your admission and reserve your seat. $25.00 for future members, $15.00 for members. July 21 3:00pm-4:00pm Treasures from the North Wing: America, China, and More! Join James “Zach” Zacharias, Senior Curator of Education and History, for a unique look at the many amazing objects residing in the North Wing Galleries. Discover the oldest man-made objects in the Museum that are thousands of years old and learn about rare furniture, portraits, and ceramics. You do not have to go far to take a cultural trip around the world. Free to members or with paid museum admission. July 27 3:00pm-4:00pm Gallery Talk: Companions through the Ages: Animals in Art from the MOAS Collection Join Chief Curator, Ruth Grim, as she discusses the ways that animals are represented in works from the many different cultures and media in art from the MOAS collection. From images of beloved pets to dedicated servants and vital livestock to symbolic imagery from many religions, animals frequently show up in the art of all cultures from around the world. Free for members or with paid museum admission. July 28 5:30pm-9:00pm Members Only: Take Me Out to the Ball Game! Come out to the Jackie Robinson Ballpark to watch the Tortugas take on the Clearwater Threshers. Before the game, enjoy great food provided by Dustin’s BBQ on the Dustin’s Picnic Porch from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. To sign up, call the Museum at 386-255-0285. Purchased tickets and picnic porch wrist bands can be picked up at Will Call the evening of the game. Must RSVP by July 25th. $20.00 per person. Includes picnic porch and baseball game. July 29 6:30pm-7:30pm Birding Cuba: A Trip to That Beautiful Land to Our South Join David Hartgrove, Conservation Chair of

the Halifax River Audubon Society, in the Root Family Auditorium and learn about his recent birding and nature trip to the island of Cuba. The program, set to music, runs approximately 22 minutes and concentrates on native birds and natural wonders. See truly amazing images from several gifted photographers on the trip. After the presentation, join David for a question and answer session. $5.00 for future members, free for members. July 30 7:00pm-9:45pm Summer Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Electropop 8:00pm Laser Vinyl 9:00pm Laser U2 $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows.

AUGUST August 3 12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch and Learn: St. Augustine, the Most Paintable City in America Join us for a lunch and learn at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art for a unique look at the vast collection of paintings depicting the City of St. Augustine. Learn about paintings from 1839 to the 1950’s. Take a trip through the streets of the ancient city with Senior Curator of Education and History, James “Zach” Zacharias, and learn about America’s oldest city. Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 ext. 312 to RSVP and place your lunch order! RSVP and paid lunch are required. Lecture is $5.00 plus the price of paid lunch for future members, and free plus the price of paid lunch for members. August 10 3:00pm-4:00pm Gallery Talk: Forms of Fancy: Sculpture in the MOAS Collection Exhibition Forms of Fancy: Sculpture in the MOAS Collection in the Bouchelle changing gallery reflects the many facets of MOAS with works ancient to present day and classical to contemporary, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on human or animal figures. Join Chief Curator, Ruth Grim, and learn about the masters of sculpture in this exhibition including Antonio Canova, Antoine-Louis Barye, Alexander Archipenko, Frederic Remington, William Zorach and more! Free for members or with paid museum admission. August 13 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Beatles 8:00pm Pink Floyd – The Wall 9:00pm Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. August 19 7:00pm-8:30pm Evening with Florida History: The Naturalist Explorers Audubon in Florida Join James “Zach” Zacharias, Senior Curator of Education and History, in the Root Family Auditorium and learn about the amazing travels of the famed artist-naturalist John James Audubon’s journey through Florida’s frontier. Audubon discovered 52 bird species new to him for his legendary art book The Birds of North America. Audubon visited Florida on two occasions but had mixed feelings about his Florida adventures. The Legends of John and William Bartram Join Florida Historian and Reenactor, Joseph Vetter, in the Root Family Auditorium as he


SUMMER PROGRAMS features the legends of John and William Bartram, the celebrated King’s botanists before the Revolution whose Travels book was a best seller in the 19th Century. John Bartram’s best friend was Ben Franklin and his gardens in Philadelphia were a haven to the entire Continental Congress! His journey through Florida and his visits to Blue Springs added to their legacy of art and travel writing. Come enjoy the story of “Puc Puggy,” his Seminole name meaning “Flower Hunter.” The Shipwreck Saga of Stephen Crane Join us in the Root Family Auditorium for a captivating story of the legendary writer of The Red Badge of Courage and the incredible short story The Open Boat. Crane was shipwrecked off the Ponce Inlet coast and survived, only to die while recuperating in Germany at the age of 28. His adventurous life from Syracuse, NY, to the Spanish-American War, to a love affair with a Jacksonville madam, to his fate at sea will make for an amazing story!  $7.00 for future members, $5.00 for members. August 20 11:00am-2:00pm Family Craft Day Come join educators, Kelsey Hansen and Nicole Messervy, in Root Hall for a fun filled day of arts and crafts! Different stations will be set up for you and your family to enjoy. Free for members, with paid museum admission. August 20 4:00pm-4:45pm Special Planetarium Show: You Run the Show! Join Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, for a special presentation guided by you! Take a journey to anywhere in the universe that you would like to explore. Come to the show prepared with a brief topic of your choice and let’s travel there to discuss it. We cannot wait to star gaze and navigate the galaxy with you! Free for members, with paid museum admission, or $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children.

August 23 11:00am-1:00pm Members Only: Ormond Memorial Art and Garden Museum Meet us at the Ormond Beach Memorial Art and Garden Museum to enjoy a private tour of the Museum and Gardens. Join us for lunch afterwards at the Rose Villa Southern Table Restaurant located on Granada Blvd. For lunch menu options, please go to www.moas.org. Call the Museum at 386-255-0285 ext. 315 to place your lunch order and to reserve your spot. Space is limited. $25.00 per person. Includes museum admission and lunch.

SEPTEMBER September 1 6:30pm-8:00pm Wings of Victory: Keeping our Warbirds Flying Join us in the Root Family Auditorium to view the Telly Award winning documentary, Wings of Victory: Keeping our Warbirds Flying, which takes an inside look at the increasingly rare American military aircraft that were pivotal in helping allied forces win World War II, as well as the efforts of New Smyrna Beachbased American Aero Services to restore and maintain these treasures of American history. Of the tens of thousands of military aircraft produced during the war, only a handful remain flying today. Most of this amazing story was filmed in Volusia County. Please join us for a panel discussion with veterans after viewing the film! Free event for members and future members September 10 7:00pm-9:45pm Second Saturday Laser Rock Concert 7:00pm Laser Spirit 8:00pm Laser Rock

9:00pm Laser Zeppelin $5.00 for one show, $7.00 for two shows, and $9.00 for three shows. September 15 3:00pm-4:00pm The Natural History of Florida To truly appreciate a place, it helps to understand its history. Join Jeff Rodgers, Director of Education for the South Florida Museum and Director of the Bishop Planetarium, a Smithsonian Affiliate Museum, in the Root Family Auditorium for a sweeping talk designed to give you a broader appreciation and awareness of Florida’s natural history as a unique, dynamic and ever changing place. Jeff will trace Florida’s deep roots through plate tectonics, geology, paleontology and archaeology, and challenge you to see the Florida you know and love today from a completely different perspective. $7.00 for future members, free for members.

2016 SEPTEMBERS WITH THE SMITHSONIAN EVENTS September 17 10:00am-3:00pm Natural History Festival and Fossil Show! Join us for our annual celebration of all things natural history. Enjoy natural history specimens on display from rarely seen MOAS collections with many examples of fossils, mollusks, corals, insects, and more. Many other exhibitors will have displays set up including The Orlando Fossil Hunters Club, The Paw Paw Chapter of Native Plants, Halifax River Audubon, Department of Environmental Protection, Lyonia Preserve, Marine Discovery Center, and many more! Bring in a fossil specimen for identification and learn about past life on Earth with our children’s PaleoLab! Free for members or with paid museum admission. Schedule of Events: 11:00am The “Paleo” Diet: What Did Our Prehistoric Ancestors Really Eat? Dr. Briana Pobiner, leads the Human Origins Program’s education, outreach efforts, and public programs with the Smithsonian Institute Join Dr. Briana Pobiner from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington D.C. as she discusses facts, fallacies, and fantasies about prehistoric human diet. Using a variety of lines of evidence including early human, animal, and plant fossils, ancient stone tools, DNA, and living human and chimpanzee diets, she examines significant changes in the evolution of human diets and discusses what makes human meateating unique. 12:00pm PBS Fossil Hunters TV Show and Cast: Episode 6 “Something Old Something New” Fossil Hunters television series, created by Don and April Brunning, follows the adventures of a group of amateur paleontologists and friends as they travel to amazing fossil sites around Florida to discover fantastic remnants from our past. Watch episode 6 as the Fossil Hunters head for Echinoid Island and meet cast members for a question and answer session!

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SUMMER PROGRAMS 1:00pm What’s Up with the Indian River Lagoon! Chad Truxall, Executive Director Marine Discovery Center The Indian River Lagoon is one of the great estuarine ecosystems in North America. This important ecosystem is 156 miles along Florida’s east coast, from Ponce Inlet to Jupiter Inlet, and is composed of three inter-connected estuaries. Learn more about this diverse estuary and its health.

immersive Planetarium technology, Mr. Jones will discuss his 25 years of training for, flying in, consulting on, and writing and speaking about space. Following his 30 minute presentation, there will be ample time for a question and answer session where you can get a more personal touch on the astronaut experience. This presentation was made possible by the Smithsonian Lecture Program. Tickets for this program are on a first-come, first-served basis due to limited seating in the Planetarium. $10.00 for future members, $5.00 for members.

2:00pm The Forgotten Extinction: How the Terminal Triassic Event Shaped the ‘Age of Dinosaurs’ Dr. William C. Parker, Associate Professor, Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University

September 21 5:00pm-5:30pm Book signing of Ask the Astronaut, by Tom Jones Copies of Ask the Astronaut will be sold before and after presentations. The book signing will take place in Root Hall.

Dr. Parker teaches courses at Florida State on various Earth systems including paleontology and evolutionary paleontology. Join award winning professor, Dr. William C. Parker, and learn about how a previous mass extinction event shaped dinosaur evolution which led to the rise of these amazing long lived reptiles! 3:00pm ENCORE PRESENTATION The “Paleo” Diet: What Did Our Prehistoric Ancestors Really Eat? Dr. Briana Pobiner, leads the Human Origins Program’s education, outreach efforts, and public programs with the Smithsonian Institute Join Dr. Briana Pobiner from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington D.C. for an encore presentation as she discusses facts, fallacies, and fantasies about prehistoric human diet. Using a variety of lines of evidence including early human, animal, and plant fossils, ancient stone tools, DNA, and living human and chimpanzee diets, she examines significant changes in the evolution of human diets and discusses what makes human meat-eating unique. September 21 3:00pm-4:00pm September with the Smithsonian Presentation: Fine Art of the Jazz Age In conjunction with September with the Smithsonain at MOAS and its highlyanticipated annual Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Concert, MOAS Chief Curator, Ruth Grim, will give a lecture on the visual arts and design of “the Roaring 20s,” considered the heyday of the Jazz era. Including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, fashion and design, and streamline architecture, this lecture will present a thorough overview of this dynamic period known for a zeitgeist that still fascinates to this day. Popular Art Deco artists such as Tamara de Lempicka, Demetre Chiparus and Erté will be presented alongside fine art masters such as Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keefe and Thomas Hart Benton who also reflected the spirit of the times in their work. The world-famous period architecture of Miami Beach and Daytona Beach – remnants of the jazz that surround us to this day - will round-up the discussion. Free for members or with paid museum admission. September 21 4:00pm-5:00pm Special Planetarium Presentation: Ask the Astronaut, with Tom Jones Join us for the most unique presentation with Tom Jones, the first astronaut to speak in our new MOAS Planetarium. Using our

September 21 7:30pm-8:30pm Auditorium Presentation: Ask the Astronaut, with Tom Jones Come hear what it is like to be an astronaut in our Root Family Auditorium with Tom Jones. In this more complete talk based off his new book, Ask the Astronaut, Mr. Jones will discuss his 25 years of experience in the exciting space exploration field. His amazing career includes four space shuttle missions to Earth orbit, three spacewalks to install the centerpiece of the International Space Station, asteroid study for NASA, and engineering intelligence-gathering systems for the CIA. With his fifty-three days of cumulative time working and living in space, Mr. Jones will literally give you an out of this world presentation. This presentation was made possible by the Smithsonian Lecture Program. $7.00 for future members, $5.00 for members. September 21 8:30pm-9:00pm Book signing of Ask the Astronaut, by Tom Jones Copies of Ask the Astronaut will be sold before and after presentations. The book signing will take place in Root Hall. September 24 10:00am-5:00pm Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live! Enjoy free Museum admission when you present a Museum Day Live! coupon. Beginning August 1st, visit Smithsonian.com/ museumday for details and to download your coupon. Coupon does not include planetarium

admission or Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Concert. September 24 3:00pm-5:00pm Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Matinee Concert: The Legacy of Hard Bop Pianist Horace Silver Combining elements of rhythm-and-blues, pop, gospel, and jazz, the Hard-Bop era was a fertile period in jazz history that led to the development of a modern, soulful sound. As a pioneer in the tradition, pianist Horace Silver made more than 20 records for the Blue Note label, co-founded the influential Jazz Messengers with Art Blakey, and was instrumental in launching the careers of many present-day jazz icons including trumpeter Donald Byrd, saxophonist Joe Henderson, and singer Andy Bey. The SJMO program explores the musical compositions and legacy of Horace Silver from his pre-Jazz Messenger years of the 1950s through his final studio recording of 1998, Jazz Has a Sense of Humor. Admission: $35.00 for future members, $20.00 for members. Please reserve in advance at 386-255-0285 or in-person at MOAS. This event is popular and may sell out. September 24 7:00pm-9:00pm Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Concert: The Legacy of Hard Bop Pianist Horace Silver Combining elements of rhythm-and-blues, pop, gospel, and jazz, the Hard-Bop era was a fertile period in jazz history that led to the development of a modern, soulful sound. As a pioneer in the tradition, pianist Horace Silver made more than 20 records for the Blue Note label, co-founded the influential Jazz Messengers with Art Blakey, and was instrumental in launching the careers of many present-day jazz icons including trumpeter Donald Byrd, saxophonist Joe Henderson, and singer Andy Bey. The SJMO program explores the musical compositions and legacy of Horace Silver from his pre-Jazz Messenger years of the 1950s through his final studio recording of 1998, Jazz Has a Sense of Humor. Admission: $35.00 for future members, $20.00 for members. Please reserve in advance at 386-255-0285 or in-person at MOAS. This event is popular and may sell out.


GUILD NEWS | BY KATHY WILSON, GUILD PRESIDENT

THE GUILD CELEBRATES A NEW SEASON OF FUN FILLED EVENTS MOAS GUILD 2016-2017 EVENT CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 13 GUILD MEETING

Welcome back and get ready for the new season. OCTOBER 11 GUILD MEETING: TBA

Support the upcoming Halifax Art Festival by becoming a PATRON NOVEMBER 1 HAF PATRON AND SPONSOR RECEPTION

Held at Zappi’s Italian Garden on Beach Street. Time: 5pm to 7pm. Contact: Kathy Wilson 386-756-2342 NOVEMBER 5 AND 6 54TH HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL

H

ow quickly a year has gone by! The Guild is proud to post a profit of $75,995 for this past year. The final “fun” event was the Boomer Bash with the recognition of Armed Forces Day, held on May 21st. Thanks to all of our Guild members and friends as we continue to increase our support for the Museum of Arts & Sciences. This goal could not be accomplished without all of the support and “hands-on” involvement that our members provide. Now, onto another calendar year beginning in September when we all gather for our first meeting on Tuesday, September 13, 2016. We welcome everyone back from their summer hiatus. Many of our members have been working diligently during the summer months, planning our signature events. Please take special note of the Calendar of Events, since two of our events have changed for this upcoming year. The 54th HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL will take place on Saturday, November 5th and Sunday, November 6th. This event is always a crowd pleaser and we will need our “army” of volunteers to make it the BEST EVER. The FESTIVAL OF TREES will begin on November 12th and will run through December 3rd. Stop

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in and view all of the beautifully decorated holiday trees and wreathes for auction and sale. The FESTIVAL OF TREES GALA has been moved to Thursday, December 1, 2016. Kindly save the date and join us for this special night of great food and champagne while listening to holiday music. The spirit of the holidays will move you. The year 2017 will bring many events for our enjoyment. On Monday, February 13, 2017 get ready for our Annual Fashion Show and Luncheon, being held at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. This is definitely a “must attend” event. On April 3, 2017 we will have our 7th ANNUAL CHILDREN’S MUSEUM GOLF CLASSIC, followed by the Annual Garden Party Luncheon on April 11, 2017. This event sells out quickly! Throughout the year there will also be Artful Interludes for our members to enjoy. All of the proceeds from our Guild special events and activities help to benefit the Museum of Arts & Sciences which includes, the Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum and the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. As President, I am deeply grateful for the dedication that our members provide. As I always say, “It takes a village,” and we have the best villagers ever! Cheers to another amazing year!

Our annual signature fundraising event brings Beach Street alive with artists, crafters, music, food, and fun. Volunteers are needed for a variety of duties. Come and be a part of this historic event. Contact: Karrie Houlton at 386-206-3256 NOVEMBER 8 GUILD MEETING: TBA NOVEMBER 12 - DECEMBER 3 FESTIVAL OF TREES

Featuring designer holiday trees and decorations. All designer trees are up for silent auction throughout Festival days and will go to the highest bidders at the conclusion. The event is open during regular museum hours and is included with paid admission for future members and is free for members. DECEMBER 1 FESTIVAL OF TREES GALA

Stroll through the Museum of Arts & Sciences from 6pm to 9pm and view the professionally decorated holiday trees which are all up for silent bids until December 3rd. Enjoy the tastes offered from over 20 local restaurants along with complimentary champagne. Cost: $ 50 Contact: Carol Ann LaRoza at 386-409-3606 DECEMBER 13 GUILD MEMBER HOLIDAY PARTY

Details TBA


JANUARY 10 GUILD MEETING: TBA FEBRUARY 13 ANNUAL FASHION SHOW AND LUNCHEON

Held this year at the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. Cost: $ 35.00 Contact: Jennie Palmer at 386-236-9810 MARCH 14 GUILD MEETING: TBA

Elections of the new board for 2017-2019 APRIL 3 7TH ANNUAL CHILDREN’S MUSEUM GOLF CLASSIC

Come play in our Golf Tournament held at Plantation Bay Golf & Country Club. Sign up and “Help Play for our Kids!” This is a great golf outing for all. Enjoy 9 or 18 holes of golf followed by a late lunch. There are plenty of silent auction items and prizes throughout the day. Cost: $ 125 for 18 holes and lunch Contact: Mike Armstrong at 203-414-2379 APRIL 11 4TH ANNUAL GARDEN PARTY LUNCHEON

Welcome in spring by picking out beautiful plants and herbs for sale while enjoying a delicious luncheon. Cost: $ 35 Contact: Marilynn Sternberg at 386-585-4047 MAY 9 GUILD MEETING

Annual meeting with the induction of new officers.

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OVER AND OUT | BY SETH MAYO, CURATOR OF ASTRONOMY

28 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE


Barreling through space after traveling for five years and covering 1.74 billion miles, NASA's Juno spacecraft will triumphantly arrive at Jupiter on July 4th of this year. Not since 2003 has there been a dedicated mission to this faroff gas world - when the Galileo probe was concluding its nearly eight year stint that brought back a plethora of data on the planet. Yet there are still BIG conundrums to tackle about such a BIG planet. The Juno mission is planned to answer some challenging questions that will not only reveal details about Jupiter, but also paint a clearer picture of the origin story of the Solar System. NASA's mission name "Juno" is certainly an appropriate one. The name goes back to ancient Greek and Roman mythology from one of Jupiter's (king of the gods, also known as Zeus by the Greeks) wives, the goddess Juno, who was the only being that could see through the cloudy veil that Jupiter hid behind to mask his mischievous ways. This is a perfect analogy of what the goddess-named spacecraft will do: pierce through the thick clouds of Jupiter to reveal its true nature.

An artist's rendition of the Juno spacecraft in front of Jupiter. Juno is the farthest spacecraft ever to use solar panels for power, each 29 feet long. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Those clouds that Juno will study are what gives Jupiter its gas planet designation. Much like the Sun, Jupiter is mostly composed of hydrogen and helium, with a smattering of gases such as methane, ammonia, ethane, and even water vapor. Jupiter's gaseous environment makes it much less dense than the inner rocky planets of our solar system, however the amount of "stuff", or mass is exceedingly high. Its mass is 2.5 times more than the other seven planets combined, and to hit closer to home, that equals about 318 Earths. It truly deserves its giant status! Once Juno arrives on July 4th, it will be carefully maneuvered into what is called a polar orbit. This trajectory will take it over both poles of Jupiter at distances close to 3,000 miles, as well as swinging out to more than 1,100,000 miles in its highly elliptical, or stretched out orbit. As the spacecraft quietly passes over Jupiter every 14 days, it will hone in on the clouds of gas that can be seen as colorful bands that wrap around the giant planet. Juno will spend much of its time studying these cloud bands to better understand their composition, temperature, and

motion at varying depths with instruments such as the Microwave Radiometer – an instrument that will bounce particular frequencies of microwaves off of the clouds. A detailed look at the gases will give scientists an enhanced understanding of the overall circulation patterns of Jupiter's atmosphere, which will better explain the nature of complex storms that rage on continuously, many bigger than Earth and with winds that can exceed 300 miles per hour. Juno will peer deep within the tumultuous atmosphere of Jupiter to measure the water and ammonia that can be found there. These molecules – especially water – can help scientists to piece together clues about the processes that formed our own solar system. Current theories suggest that the solar system formed from a large gas cloud or nebula. The nebula condensed down about 4.6 billion years ago – probably kick-started by a violent nearby supernova - birthing our Sun in the middle and eventually the planets around it. Jupiter is most likely the oldest in our planetary family representing the early ingredients of the nebula that formed the solar system. The problem is, Jupiter has many more heavy elements than the Sun, such as carbon and nitrogen, therefore current theories need to be revised or even changed completely. The amount of water found in Jupiter will in turn help us to determine the amount of oxygen that exists there, and potentially solve a debate on whether Jupiter formed where it is now, or maybe farther out from the sun. These findings from Juno will have huge implications on how all the other planets formed, including Earth. Knowing how water and oxygen got to Jupiter can help to further explain how life may have emerged on our planet as well. For


Artist's depiction of Jupiter in orbit around the Sun. Jupiter is nearly 483 million miles from the Sun on average, taking close to 12 Earth-years to orbit around. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

scientists, Jupiter acts like a four billion year old time capsule, that can help explain our own history. Since the Juno spacecraft will make close flybys of the vast polar regions on the Jovian planet, it will have an opportunity to study the most powerful auroras in the solar system with instruments such as JIRAM (Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper), JADE (Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment), and the JEDI (Jovian Energetic Particle Detector Instrument). Just like the northern or southern lights on Earth, charged particles streaming from the Sun bombard Jupiter. Also like Earth, Jupiter has a powerful magnetic field (actually 14 times more powerful than Earth’s) that acts as a shield that channels many of the charged particles to the poles that interact with Jupiter’s atmosphere, creating dazzling light shows. When Juno maps out and captures these Jovian auroral displays, it will be able to learn how the magnetic field works and how it interacts with the dynamic atmosphere. Perhaps the greatest conundrum to solve for on Jupiter is how magnetism is generated in the first place. Earth’s magnetosphere comes

Hubble Space telescope image of Jupiter in visible light as well as an auroral display shown in purple in x-ray emission viewed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Image Credit: NASA/ESA/CXC/SwRI

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from its iron core found deep within the planets center. Its spin allows Earth’s core to shoot out magnetic field lines from the poles, just like a magnet. What has confounded scientists for many years is what is at Jupiter’s center which is no easy task. Just like the mythological Jupiter, the planet of the same name obscures its inner nature with its thick gaseous clouds. The strongest hypothesis to date is that hydrogen at the center is squished down from enormous pressure by high gravity producing a most puzzling substance called liquid metallic hydrogen. The liquid metallic hydrogen would conduct electricity, thereby, generating a magnetic field. Juno’s suite of instruments will hopefully determine the size of this potential core by studying the magnetic field. In addition to looking at the magnetosphere, the Gravity Science experiment will use radio waves to understand gravity fluctuations that Juno will experience through spacecraft velocity changes as it orbits Jupiter. These instruments may reveal that Jupiter has a robust core and can determine its

Close-up of a spectacular aurora on Jupiter caused by charged particles from the Sun bombarding the gas planet's atmosphere and creating a light display. This view is in ultraviolet light taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Image Credit: NASA/ESA/John Clarke (University of Michigan)

characteristics or that it doesn’t have a core at all or maybe that the core was eroded away over time. Each one of these observations would explain how Jupiter formed long ago and can be applied to gas planets that are being discovered around other stars many light years away from our own solar system. After 37 total orbits, Juno will be purposefully plunged into Jupiter’s atmosphere for an exciting end in February of 2018. This fateful ending for Juno is needed to protect possible impact or contamination of Jupiter’s many moons, especially for future missions that are planned to study those worlds as well. Although Juno’s mission at Jupiter is relatively short, its timeline is packed with intriguing observations and experiments that will bring us closer to decoding Jupiter and its evolution. It may also reveal to us how our entire solar system came into existence and possibly to understand our own history a little better. Come join us for immersive showings of the live show, Journeying to Jupiter, in the planetarium this July. Please check the calendar for further details.

Close-up of the Great Red Spot - a giant storm seen from the Voyager 2 spacecraft that has been active for hundreds of years and could fit almost three Earths inside. Part of Juno's mission is to study the gas giant's clouds to better understand the nature of these mega storms. Image Credit: NASA/JPL

Jupiter's signature cloudy bands can be seen strewn across this image taken by Voyager 1. Juno will spend time studying these clouds to determine composition, temperature, and movement. Image Credit: NASA/JPL


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Arts & Sciences Summer Magazine 2016  

The official publication of the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach, FL. Summer 2016 Edition.

Arts & Sciences Summer Magazine 2016  

The official publication of the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach, FL. Summer 2016 Edition.

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