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GAMBLE: Asking makes you a smoother operator than you realize – Viewpoints, page 8

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Volume 96, Number 55

Thursday, April 26, 2012

MUSG eliminates spring concert series Lack of space and ticket sales among chief concerns By Simone Smith simone.smith@marquette.edu

Marquette Student Government last Thursday approved the organization’s 2013 fiscal year budget, which included a notable departure from recent years’ budgets in its unanimous decision to discontinue funding to the “Major Events” budget line, which included funding for the annual spring concert. Matt McGonegle, MUSG program vice president and a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said the decision is the culmination of discussions over the past three to four years. He said MUSG has conducted surveys, talked to people and asked for feedback after each event. McGonegle and Brittany Riesenbeck, MUSG financial vice president and a sophomore in the

College of Business Administration, both said the decision was made for several reasons. McGonegle said one of the biggest reasons for the cut was that the concerts in recent years were too expensive to host per student in attendance. According to Riesenbeck, feasible attendance has been disproportionate to the amount of money supplied from the student activity fee each year, meaning that the past money spent on the concerts was being used to cater to a smaller than desirable number of students, despite the fact that all students’ money was used to fund it. When all undergraduate students pay their tuition each semester, they pay a $30 student activity fee, which goes to MUSG and is used to estimate the MUSG budget. Even though all the roughly 8,000 undergraduate students pay their activity fee each semester, only a certain number of students can attend the concert due See Concerts, page 7

Photos courtesy of Guster, MUSG, Pitch Perfect PR and Lab Records

Past MUSG Spring Concert artists have included Guster, Sara Bareilles, Girl Talk and Hellogoodbye.

Blue and Gold get greener

Photo by Rebecca Rebholz/rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Marquette was named a green college last week by the Princeton Review.

Amid Earth Week events, conservation efforts recognized By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

As Earth Week events continue on campus this week, Marquette is also celebrating being named one of seven green colleges in Wisconsin last week by the Princeton Review. According to the Princeton Review website, Marquette was cho-

sen because the university received high points on a green rating scale based on its sustainability practices and campus-related green programs. Kevin Gilligan, general manager of dining services for Sodexo at Marquette, said he is not surprised at Marquette’s recognition, considering the recent steps the university has taken to improve sustainability, such as implementing the “No To-Go Campaign” across campus, which raises awareness of the waste of to-go containers. “I’ve been on campus three years, and I have seen a lot of change in

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS.....................8 MARQUEE.....................10

STUDY BREAK....................14 SPORTS..........................16 CLASSIFIEDS..................18

that time,” Gilligan said. “Three years ago we had recycling, but it wasn’t near what is it now. We’re just getting better and better.” Gilligan said Marquette’s green scores on other sites like College Prowler have increased over the past few years. Earth Week events later this week will include guest speakers discussing topics like water sustainability and energy conservation, a native tree tour on campus and an “energy fast” in which students will be encouraged to turn off lights and unplug appliances. Prior events included Meatless Monday in the dining halls, a clothing and book swap in the Alumni Memorial Union and an environmental-themed online film, “The Story of Stuff,” shown at Marquette Hall. The week’s events are sponsored by Students for an Environmentally Active Campus, the Sigma Kappa sorority, the Great Outdoors Club, Global Medical Brigades, the Omega Delta fraternity and UNICEF. Others involved in Earth Week at Marquette include Heather Kohl, an environmental economist and Marquette adjunct economics professor, who gave a speech yesterday regarding water sustainability. “I am proud of Marquette’s See Earth, page 7

MU joins planning for Catholic school

High school would broaden options for low-income students By Andrea Anderson andrea.anderson@marquette.edu

The city of Milwaukee is exploring the possibility adding a Catholic high school geared towards low-income students, and led by the Cristo Rey Network, a national organization that oversees 24 private Catholic high schools with 6,500 students across the United States. These private high schools have a history of getting students with limited education opportunities into college. At the beginning of this month, a formal announcement was made that the Cristo Rey Network is launching a one-year study to see if Milwaukee is ready for another Catholic high school in partnership with Marquette and the Bradley Foundation — a private, independent grantmaking organization based in Milwaukee that supports research and educational programs and projects.

Three years ago, the Milwaukee community expressed interest in adding a Cristo Rey school. Robert Birdsell, the president and CEO of Cristo Rey, and the Rev. John Foley, the organization’s founder, came to Milwaukee to speak about a possible Cristo Rey high school. The only hold-up at the time was that a feasibility study — the research to determine if the school would take away from other private schools and if Milwaukee was fit for such an institution — had to be conducted by a Catholic entity. Marquette’s William Henk, the dean of the College of Education, was present at the meeting and asked Milwaukee Archbishop Jerome Listecki if Marquette could assist in the research and be the Catholic entity involved. The response was yes. “The total funding needed for the study is approximately $100,000 to $150,000,” Henk said. “We sought funding and got about half, maybe 40 percent, and we are going after the rest coupled with in-kind support. In addition, we have free time given by myself, the College of See Catholic, page 7

NEWS

VIEWPOINTS

MARQUEE

Europe

EDITORIAL

Comedy

International business event takes on debt crisis abroad. PAGE 3

Campus concert cancelled is a big disappointment. PAGE 8

Shakespeare gets a 1960’s update in Helfaer’s latest offering. PAGE 13


NEWS

2 Tribune

Creative, or just drunk?

Thursday, April 26, 2012

DPS Reports Monday, April 23 At 11:09 a.m. an employee reported that unknown person(s) forcibly removed secured, unattended university property estimated at $80 from Cudahy Hall. The total estimated damage is $240. Between 6:22 p.m. and 8:43 p.m. a student reported being harassed by individuals not affiliated with Marquette but known to the student. Between 6:45 p.m. and 10:25 p.m. unknown person(s) forcibly entered a student’s secured, unattended vehicle in the 500 block of N. 17th St. and removed property estimated at $31. The total estimated damage is $200. MPD will be contacted.

Tuesday, April 24 Between 11:34 a.m. and 11:36 a.m. an unknown person(s) removed a student’s unsecured, unattended bicycle estimated at $200 in the 1500 block of W. Kilbourn Ave. At 1:28 p.m. a student reported that unknown person(s) removed his unsecured, unattended property estimated at $100 from McCormick Hall. Wednesdaty, April 25 At 3:55 a.m. a student was in possession of a fake ID in 16th Street Structure.

Events Calendar Friday 27

April 2012 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Photo Illustration by Danny Alfonzo/daniel.alfonzo@marquette.edu

A University of Illinois-Chicago study found that a lack of focus can help improve men’s creative problem-solving.

Study finds link between alcohol and inspiration By Sarah Hauer sarah.hauer@marquette.edu

A few drinks probably won’t help you pass a final, but they could help you be more creative, according to a study published in the March edition of the research journal Consciousness and Cognition. Jennifer Wiley, lead researcher on the study and professor of psychology at the University of Illinois-Chicago, said in an email that intoxication at a .075 blood alcohol content level reduces performance on tasks that require focus but may help on creative problem-solving tasks that benefits from less focus. The experiment was designed to test the popular assumption that alcohol benefits the creative process. Wiley said she is interested in the relation between attention control and cognition, especially in understanding which tasks require focus and which tasks too much focus may harm. The study recruited 40 male social drinkers aged 21-30 through Craigslist and the University of Illinois-Chicago. Participant

eligibility was based on a typical consumption of at least four alcoholic beverages one day a week on average over the last three months. Individuals were excluded if they showed signs of problem drinking behaviors during screening. Screened participants in the alcohol group drank vodka cranberry drinks until their blood alcohol content reached a level of .075. Wiley said vodka cranberry drinks are the standard alcohol experiment procedure established in the field. The 15 problems participants solved came from the Remote Associates Test, which is similar to the board game Taboo. Participants were given three words such as “falling,” “actor” and “dust” and needed to come up with the solution word, “star.” The problems were presented on a computer with a one-minute limit per question. After each question, participants were asked to rate the amount of insight they had on a scale of one to seven. A score of one meant that at first they did not know the solution, but after thinking about it strategically, they found the answer. A score of seven meant that the solution came to them suddenly and they immediately knew it was right. Wiley said intoxicated individuals in the study solved more

problems in less time and were more likely to perceive their solutions as the result of a sudden insight. She said those in the alcohol group did worse on the working memory task. In this section participants tried to verify mathematical equations while remembering words. The data fit in well with previous research regarding mental control, self-regulation and creative problem-solving, which suggests that a deficit in executive functioning can provide benefits in creative tasks. For example, older adults who tend to have attention deficits are more likely than college students to be able to take advantage of hints embedded in the distracting information of a previous, unrelated, reading task. Mary Kate Daniher, a sophomore in the College of Health Sciences, said she thinks the sober participants did not perform as well because they overthought the problems. “If you are intoxicated, you probably aren’t thinking very analytically,” Daniher said. “It’s more of a simple realization.” John Hennessy, a senior in the College of Business Administration, said he thinks the intoxicated students would be more willing to say quick answers. “It’s in their mouth before it’s in their mind,” Hennessy said.

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Thursday 26 Poster session: ‘Advanced Composition: Ethnography of the University,’ Raynor Memorial Library Conference Center, 1 to 1:45 p.m. Amy Heart, Solar Program Manager for the City of Milwaukee, Lalumiere Hall 280, 4 p.m.

Juniper Tar, Turner Hall Ballroom, 7 p.m. Lucky Boys Confusion, The Rave, 8 p.m. My Week with Marilyn, Varsity Theater, 9 p.m.

Saturday 28 Under the Sea, Shedd Aquarium excursion leaving from SHAMU, $15, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Super Mash Bros, The Rave, 8 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-72463 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

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Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Marissa Evans Assistant Editors Andrew Phillips, Patrick Simonaitis Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Assistant Closer Look Editor Leah Todd Investigative Reporters Erica Breunlin, Olivia Morrissey Administration Erin Caughey Campus Community/MUSG Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Eric Oliver Crime/DPS Matt Gozun Metro Joe Kaiser Politics Allison Kruschke Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson Science & Health Elise Angelopulos General Assignment Monique Collins COPY DESK Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Travis Wood, Zach Buchheit VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-7940 Viewpoints Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Assistant Editor Kelly White Editorial Writer Tessa Fox Columnists Bridget Gamble, Ian Yakob, Kelly White MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Matthew Mueller Reporters Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris, Heather Ronaldson SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Michael LoCicero Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editors Trey Killian, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Christopher Chavez, Michael Wottreng Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Matt Trebby

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Could you help me get out of this box?


Thursday, April 26, 2012

NEWS

Tribune 3

South joins Pilarz’s team Forum takes on European crisis “Our task this year is reviewing the efficacy of the Academic Senate, where things have gone,” South said. “Everybody wants an engaged faculty and academic voice here at (the) university that represents faculty and students that help move Marquette in the direction that its population wants.” He said this year the Senate has approved a peace studies major and other certificate programs. South said the presence of MUSG, which sends nonvoting members to meetings, is helpful. “The Academic Senate receives regularly various issues that emerge from MUSG, committees and governing bodies,” South said. “MUSG does a very good job in expressing concerns. We try to advance concerns to (the) extent we can. Concerns related to academics, clickers, evaluations, advising — those are issues that we discuss. We refer them to committees in order to develop proposals and motions and proceed accordingly.” Joey Ciccone, a senior in the Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu College of Arts & Sciences and Academic Senate Chair James South sits in his Coughlin Hall office. an MUSG respresentative, said this is his second time on the faculty members, four deans Academic Senate. and three elected undergraduate “They do a lot of great work students from Marquette Uni- on issues pertinent to faculty versity Student Government, as members, but there is an area well as Vice Provost of Under- for growth on discussing issues graduate Programs and Teach- that affect both faculty meming Gary Meyer, Vice Provost bers and students, like advising, By Simone Smith for Research Jeanne Hossen- D2L usage and technology in simone.smith@marquette.edu lopp and Provost John Pauly. the classroom,” Ciccone said in There are eight standing com- an email. As chair of Marquette’s Aca- mittees that report to South urges studemic Senate, James South, a the Executive Comdents to ask and get professor of philosophy, plays mittee, co-chaired by involved in the proa key role in speaking for the both South and Pauly, cess through MUSG university’s academics. according to the Stator to contact memEver since he was added to utes of the University bers of the Academic the university leadership coun- Academic Senate, Senate. cil earlier this year, that role found on the univer“The more connow includes speaking directly sity’s website. cerns known through This is the fourth to University President the Rev. “We take on issues installment in a multi-part MUSG and us, the Scott Pilarz. from curricular pro- series on Father Pilarz’s stronger the academic “It’s been good to be around grams, majors and changing leadership team. side to the university the table and to have the oppor- graduate certificate will be,” South said. tunity to remind people of the programs,” South Overall, South said experiences of faculty and stu- said. “We worry about issues that his time on the Academdents on the ground. It’s been that affect students in different ic Senate has been a learning very illuminating to see some of ways like how students evaluate experience. the bigger picture issues that Fr. teaching, advising and campus “Having been involved for Pilarz and the rest of the cabinet life in general.” many years at the university, have to grasp and wrestle with,” South, who came to Mar- the opportunity for me to bring South said. “I think the chair of quette in 1995 after getting his experience and expand my hoAcademic Senate’s role on the doctorate from Duke Univer- rizon a bit while seeing a little Leadership Council is really sity, has been chair of the Aca- how the bits of university fit important just to give that fac- demic Senate since 2005. together … (has) been very reulty (and) student voice.” This year South said the Sen- warding,” South said. The Academic Senate meets ate has been working to include monthly and is made up of 29 voices from across campus.

Prof tackles issues as chair of the Academic Senate

Int’l Business dept. hopes for discussion of world issues By Eric Oliver eric.oliver@marquette.edu

The Marquette Department of International Business hosted a forum on the European debt crisis Tuesday, the first in what it hopes will be a series of such forums. The event’s keynote speaker was Freddy Van den Spiegel, an economic adviser with Paribas Fortis, one of Europe’s largest banks. The department chose the European debt crisis as the first topic of discussion because it is defining the tone of the international business community, said Jamshid Hosseini, a Marquette associate professor of management and the director of international business studies. “The idea is that anything that happens to the public debt and to the sovereignty of these countries will impact the entire Eurozone,” Hosseini said. “And anything that impacts the Eurozone is going to impact the world, so that’s where the fears are.” Hosseini said of the 17 countries that use the Euro as their currency, there are currently five on the bubble of bankruptcy: Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain. He said Greece is in the worst shape of the five. “Right now all of the conversations are about Greece and how Greece is handling its public debt, and how it might affect the Euro

and the Eurozone countries,” Hosseini said. Van den Spiegel said the debt crisis is having major effects across the globe. “The party is over,” he said. “It’s not another crisis. It’s a shift in the world economy.” He said the road to adapt to the new global economic economy will be long and bumpy, but this doesn’t mean the economy will be weak this entire time. It does show, however, that uncertainty has replaced risktaking, a trend he said will characterize this new economy. Also in attendance as panelists were Andrew Busch, a global currency and public policy strategist at financial services firm BMO Capital Markets; Ulice Payne, president of global trade group Addison-Clifton, LLC; and Mike Van Handel, the executive vice president and chief financial officer of business advisory firm ManpowerGroup. After Van den Spiegel concluded the keynote, the event shifted to the panelist discussion. Busch said if the banks of Europe don’t start lending money, a revolution will soon follow. Hosseini said the forums will raise public awareness of both the College of Business Administration and Marquette.3 “The idea is to get people at these kinds of levels to come on campus, and for us to publicize the activity both in the business community and among our undergraduate and graduate students,” Hosseini said. “We (want to) get a conversation going on about hot topics in the world.”

The Marquette Tribune so good you want to lick it.


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Thursday, april 26, 2012

Moody’s downgrades MKE bond rating Experts differ on possible effects; city tax base in decline By Joe Kaiser joseph.kaiser@marquette.edu

Moody’s Investors Service slightly downgraded Milwaukee’s bond rating last week over concerns about the city’s poverty rate, property tax base and cuts to state aid. The downgrade drops the city from Aa1, with a negative outlook, to Aa2, with a stable outlook, matching the AA rating given from Standard & Poor’s, which did not change. “The main things that go into a rating for a city are the economic performance of the metro area, the tax base, the operating reserves of the local government and management of the unit’s budget,” said Joseph Daniels, director of Marquette’s Center for Global & Economic Studies, in an email. Moody’s gave the city positive remarks on its fiscal management and the strength of its reserves but ultimately could not overlook the other facets. “The tax base (for the city), at $28 billion, has experienced three consecutive years of

Spenders Against Penny Discrimination

decline,” said Abdur Chowdhury, chair of Marquette’s department of economics. According to Chowdhury, the downgrade will end up hurting taxpayers and bondholders. “The downgrade will cost the city in terms of the price of borrowing,” Chowdhury said. “It will ultimately cost the taxpayer. For bondholders, the value of their bond holdings will diminish.” However, Dennis Yaccarino, one of the city’s budget and policy managers, does not believe the financial impact from the downgrade will be too negative moving forward. “We don’t think the financial impact is going to be very dramatic,” Yaccarino said. “Moody’s had been looking at us for a long time. A lot of their issues had to be related to our economy.” One of the issues of the city’s economy that Moody’s highlighted was the poverty rate, which is higher than the rest of the state. According to a report released yesterday by the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Institute for Research on Poverty, the poverty rate in the central-most part of Milwaukee as of 2010 hit 35.6 percent, while Milwaukee County’s poverty rate as a whole was 16.7 percent, the highest of any county in the state. Both these numbers exceed the state average

of 10.3 percent. “Milwaukee is continuing to be an area that has had high poverty,” said Tim Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. “That has been true for decades.” Smeeding said many factors contribute to Milwaukee’s high poverty rate. “Employment is low, there is a poor education system in the city, (and) a lot of people can’t find work,” Smeeding said. Though Yaccarino acknowledges the poverty problem in the city, he said there are other factors that Moody’s may have overlooked. “Something that did concern us is that we were not sure if Moody’s had the full information on the rating,” Yaccarino said. “There were a few big things that they may have overlooked. There is our $55 million pensions reserve. They should have thought that was a very good management issue. We made changes to our health care benefits. They neglected to include any of that (in their report).” Moody’s report listed “continued tax base diversification and reversal of trend of tax base contraction” as well as “sustained growth and maintenance of reserves” as possible ways for Milwaukee to improve the rating.

RATINGS

Moody's old bond rating for Milwaukee: Aa1

Moody's new bond rating for Milwaukee: Aa2

Poverty rating in the central part of Milwaukee: 35.6 percent

Poverty rating for Milwaukee County: 16.7 percent

Poverty rating for Wisconsin as a whole: 10.3 percent

Sources: http://www.moodys.com/research/MOODYS-DOWNGRADES-TO-Aa2-FROM-Aa1-AND-REVISES-OUTLOOK-TO--PR_243186 http://www.irp.wisc.edu/research/WisconsinPoverty/pdfs/WIPovSafetyNet_Apr2012.pdf Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

Remember when a pocket full of pennies went a long way? Don’t abandon an old friend.


NEWS

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Tribune 5

Barrett leads Falk declares debt crisis candidate’s recall primary Recall Marquette Student Loan Information initiative targets MKE mayor tops polls despite union support of rival Falk By Scott Bauer Associated Press

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is showing signs of pulling ahead of the Democratic competition in the race to determine who faces Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker in a recall election that has become a nationally watched battle over union rights. Polls show Barrett with a lead less than two weeks before election day, and a labor group supporting his chief opponent, Kathleen Falk, recently pulled its television ads off the air. A state teachers union that backed Falk now says it will support whoever emerges from the Democratic primary on May 8. “It’s pretty clear that Tom Barrett is winning the Democratic primary, which is remarkable considering those who are driving this recall support a different candidate,” said Mark Graul, a leading Republican strategist. Barrett’s strength suggests that the recall election, which has attracted heavy spending by liberal and conservative interest groups from across the nation, could be a rematch of the 2010 governor’s race, in which Walker beat Barrett by 5 percentage points and then pressed a legislative initiative to strip public employees of their collective bargaining rights. Walker’s move triggered huge protests and unions led the effort that forced Walker to face a recall ballot, but they haven’t been able to make their favorite candidate his likely replacement in office. Most of the state’s major unions, including the statewide teacher union, have backed Falk, the former county executive from the liberal capital city of Madison. Traditional Democratic backers including the Sierra Club, immigrants’ rights groups Voces de la Frontera and the Young Progressives of Wisconsin have also campaigned extensively for her. She has promised to veto any state budget that didn’t restore public workers’ bargaining rights. Barrett, who has clashed with unions during his eight years as Milwaukee mayor, refused to make the same promise. But he is much better known across the state as the result of his 2010 campaign and is considered more acceptable to moderate Democrats. The unions now face a predicament as Barrett appears to be leading the field. A Marquette University poll earlier this year showed him leading Falk 36 percent to 29 percent, and two recent polls have shown him with a solid lead. Two other Democratic

candidates, longtime Secretary of State Doug La Follette and state Sen. Kathleen Vinehout, have failed to gain traction. Polls have indicated that the recall election in June should be close, with Walker appearing to hold a slight advantage over a Democratic opponent. On Tuesday Barrett picked up significant backing from the statewide police union representing about 10,000 officers. Falk’s campaign maintains that the larger union organizations backing her will deliver heavy turnout both in the primary election and in the general election in June. “Kathleen continues to travel around the state, she continues to gain support and she’s the candidate who is best poised to defeat Gov. Walker because she has built the big tent,” said Falk’s spokesman Scot Ross. “That’s the only way you’re going to beat him.” Falk was active in circulating recall petitions against Walker after he launched his legislative budget initiative that curbed union bargaining rights. Falk, 60, served 14 years as Dane County executive before retiring in April 2011. But some unions are beginning to hedge their bets. The Wisconsin Education Association Council, the statewide teachers’ union, had endorsed Falk before voting last weekend to support whichever candidate emerges to take on Walker. Russ Young, a history teacher who proposed the measure though he supports Falk, said union members must be realistic in light of Barrett’s strength. “When we started the recall effort it wasn’t to elect Kathleen Falk,” Young said. “We started the recall to get rid of Scott Walker.” Last week, WEAC and unions that had spent an estimated $3 million on Falk advertising stopped their TV ads. A spokesman, Michael Vaughn, said the organization will return to the air soon. All three of the major candidates — Barrett, Falk and Walker — have blanketed the airwaves with ads. The Republican Governors Association and Walker both launched new spots Wednesday targeting Barrett. In her campaign, Falk has started to attack Barrett more vigorously, stressing that she is the “only one” who took on Walker from the outset last year. But former U.S. Rep. Dave Obey, who is backing Barrett, said Wednesday that Democrats can’t afford to weaken one another through attacks. “It would be a suicide pact for people not to get together behind the winner in the primary,” Obey said.

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student loan bills By Allison Kruschke allison.kruschke@marquette.edu

Democratic candidate for governor Kathleen Falk introduced the new “Wisconsin Student Loan Debt Crisis Initiative” last week, which aims to decrease the amount of student loan debt Wisconsin students accumulate over four years in college. According to data from the Project on Student Loan Debt, about 67 percent of college students in Wisconsin will graduate with debt. The amount of student loan debt accumulated averages at $24,627. Falk’s initiative claims to attack this problem by working with federal officials and instituting new consumer awareness programs. Scot Ross, Falk’s communications director, said the plan puts a necessary emphasis on research. “This issue hasn’t yet been addressed at the state level,” he said. “There is important analysis that needs to be done.” Falk’s plan outlines three main points to tackle student loan debt and bring university costs down. The first of these is implementing “Know before you owe” programs, which would aim to educate students and their families about student loan rules and regulations. Falk’s campaign claims that this program is currently “under development with the Federal Consumer Financial and Protection Bureau.” The plan also includes creating a “debt relief pipeline” for Wisconsin students and their families trying to pay for college. This would mean working with federal leaders to expand Pell grants and helping students work with colleges to keep costs affordable. John McAdams, associate professor of political science at Marquette, said the amount of student loan debt students graduate with should be manageable for most. “The average amount of debt,

Average debt of graduates in 2010: $32,824 Proportion of graduates with debt in 2010: 65% Percent of total graduates’ debt owed to govt. in 2010: 71% Full-time enrollment for fall 2009: 7,693 In-state tuition and fees in 2009-10: $29,096 Total cost of attendance in 2009-10: $41,026 % Pell Grant recipients in 2009-10: 15% Source: http://projectonstudentdebt.org/state_by_state-data.php Graphic by Kaitlin Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

a bit under $25,000, is hardly oppressive, especially given low and often subsidized interest rates,” he said. The final facet of Falk’s plan is to work with Wisconsin colleges and universities to negotiate costs and analyze the economic costs of students graduating with debt. Given the ambiguity of these plans, some students feel Falk’s plan is more focused on problem identification than actual solutions. Pat Garrett, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said that the program sounds too vague to work. “I would start off by saying that it is normal for students to graduate with a degree of student debt; college is expensive,” Garrett said. “The proposal here is very vague, and therefore I do not know if it will work or not. She doesn’t get specific on what this ‘actionable plan’ is. This is not really a plan; she is stating a problem and giving no specifics on how to fix it.”

Ross said Falk’s plan is mostly focused on research attempting to find out what problems can be fixed in the future. “We don’t know how much (student loan debt) is affecting the state’s economy,” he said. “Instead of buying homes and cars, college graduates are paying off student loans. If we do analysis to identify solutions, we can find out where we might need to legislate.” McAdams said Falk’s initiative may be more of a campaign ploy than an actual plan of action against student loan debt. “Everybody is pandering to college student voters, including Barack Obama and George Clooney, so it’s no surprise that Falk would,” McAdams said. “The irony here is that students ought to have to pay a substantial amount of their education costs with loans. It’s fundamentally unfair for taxpayers to pay for the education of higher income earners.”


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Thursday, April 26, 2012

Supreme Court may uphold Ariz. law Immigration enters national eye, could impact fall elections By Mark Sherman Associated Press

Bucking the Obama administration, Supreme Court justices seemed to find little trouble Wednesday with major parts of Arizona’s tough immigration law that require police to check the legal status of people they stop for other reasons. But the fate of other provisions that make Arizona state crimes out of immigration violations was unclear in the court’s final argument of the term. The latest clash between states and the administration turns on the extent of individual states’ roles in dealing with the nation’s 11 million illegal immigrants. Immigration policy is essentially under the federal government’s control, but a half-dozen Republican-dominated states have passed their own restrictions out of frustration with what they call Washington’s inaction to combat an illegal flood. Parts of laws adopted by Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina and Utah also are on hold pending the high court’s decision. Civil rights groups say the Arizona law and those in some other states encourage racial profiling and ethnic stereotyping, and debate over such laws could have an impact on this fall’s elections. More than 200 protesters gathered outside the court, most of them opposed to the Arizona law. However, in an unusual comment, Chief Justice John Roberts made clear at the outset of the administration’s argument Wednesday that the court was looking only at state-versus-federal power, not the civil rights concerns that already are the subject of other lawsuits. “So this is not a case about ethnic profiling,” Roberts said. That matter dealt with, both liberal and conservative justices reacted skeptically to the

administration’s argument that the state exceeded its authority when it made the records check, and another provision allowing suspected illegal immigrants to be arrested without warrants, part of the Arizona law aimed at driving illegal immigrants elsewhere. “You can see it’s not selling very well,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor told Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr. Verrilli tried to convince the justices that they should view the law in its entirety, and as inconsistent with federal immigration policy. He said the records check would allow the state to “engage effectively in mass incarceration” of immigrants lacking documentation. He said the law embodying Arizona’s approach of maximum enforcement conflicts with a more nuanced federal immigration policy that seeks to balance national security, law enforcement, foreign policy, human rights and the rights of law-abiding citizens and immigrants. But Roberts was among those on the court who took issue with Verrilli’s characterization of the check of immigration status, saying the state merely wants to notify federal authorities it has someone in custody who may be in the U.S. illegally. “It seems to me that the federal government just doesn’t want to know who’s here illegally and who’s not,” Roberts said. Verrilli did not mention Wednesday that the administration has deported nearly 400,000 people a year, far more than previous administrations, although the information was included in written submissions to the court. The other provisions that have been put on hold by lower federal courts make it a state crime for immigrants not to have registration papers and for illegal immigrants to seek work or hold jobs. Arizona’s Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, who signed the law two years ago, was at the court Wednesday. Arguing for Arizona, Paul Clement said the state law mirrored federal immigration law and that the state it took action because, with its 370-mile

4,400 MKE jobs lost last month Eight of Wisconsin’s metropolitan areas gained jobs in March, while four including Milwaukee lost jobs. The Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development reported Wednesday that all of the metro areas, and 67 of 72 counties, saw unemployment rates drop last month. The Milwaukee metro areas lost 4,400 jobs. The Green Bay area lost 1,500 jobs, Eau Claire lost 800 and Oshkosh-Neenah

lost 500. Of the state’s 32 largest cities, only Franklin saw its unemployment rate increase from 6.1 percent to 6.2 percent. The only counties that saw an increase were Ashland, Forest, Menominee and Vilas. Iron County had no change. Dane County had the lowest unemployment rate at 5 percent while Menominee County had the highest at 16.2 percent.

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Photo by Charles Dharapak/Associated Press

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer addresses reporters outside the Supreme Court following deliberations Wednesday.

border with Mexico, Arizona “bears a disproportionate share of the costs of illegal immigration.” But Roberts expressed unease with the state’s focus on illegal workers. “The State of Arizona, in this case, is imposing some significantly greater sanctions,” he said. Alone among the justices, Antonin Scalia appeared ready to uphold the entire law, which he described as an effort by Arizona to police its borders. When Verrilli said that Arizona’s immigration law could raise foreign policy concerns, especially with Mexico, Scalia said, “So we have to enforce our laws in a manner that will please Mexico. Is that what you’re saying?” Outside the courthouse, more than 200 protesters gathered. The law’s opponents made up a clear majority of the crowd, chanting and carrying signs such as “Do I Look Illegal To You?” Some shouted “shame” at Brewer when she emerged from the building after the argument. Brewer told reporters she was “very, very encouraged” by the justices’ questions. Republicans have far outpaced Democrats in pushing tough

anti-immigration laws, posing potential political problems in some states for GOP candidates including Mitt Romney. The Republicans’ aggressive stand has alienated many Hispanic voters, one of the electorate’s fastestgrowing segments. President Barack Obama won two-thirds of the Hispanic vote in 2008, and hopes to do better this fall. In the GOP primary contests, Romney took the harshest antiillegal immigration stance among the top contenders, but he has had little to say lately on the issue. Romney has not taken on stand on legislation proposed by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., that would allow some undocumented immigrants a chance at visas to remain in the United States. More than a decade ago, Republicans were making inroads among Hispanic voters. President George W. Bush, a former Texas governor, favored comprehensive immigration reform that could have established pathways to legal status for millions of illegal immigrants. But staunchly antiillegal immigration forces gained influence in the GOP, and the reform plans were dropped. Hispanic voters are especially

important in a few battleground states that will help determine the Nov. 6 presidential election. They include Florida, New Mexico, Nevada and Colorado. Romney’s problems with Hispanics also might tempt Obama’s campaign to make a push in Arizona, usually a reliably Republican state. A recent poll of Hispanic voters by the Pew Research Center found that 67 percent supported Obama, and 27 percent Romney. A decision in the high-profile immigration case is expected in late June. California, New York and nine other states with significant immigrant populations support the Obama administration. Florida, Michigan and 14 other states, many of which also are challenging Obama’s health care overhaul, argue that Arizona’s law does not conflict with federal law. Justice Elena Kagan, who was Obama’s first solicitor general, is not taking part in the case, presumably because she worked on it while in the Justice Department. The case is Arizona v. U.S., 11182.

curious? bored? uninformed?

marquette tribune

t o tthoe trhees cruees !c u e !


NEWS

Thursday, April 26, 2012 Continued from page 1:

Tribune 7

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Catholic: Funds still short Concerts: Series’s odds ‘stacked against it’ SCHEDULE OF A CRISTO REY NETWORK SCHOOL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM *Sample student names on schedule

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Education staff, the assistant dean, my executive assistant and from the College of Business Administration and the Diederich College of Communication who said they would provide help as needed. The Bradley Foundation also donated $50,000.” Funding is not complete but with the support of free time and other fundraising Henk is sure they will make ends meet. Birdsell said he is anxious to see the study get underway in June. With the average income of their students $35,000 for a family of four, he said students deserve every opportunity to receive a quality education possible. “I’m from Milwaukee, I taught at Marquette and I knew students who wanted to go to Marquette but couldn’t afford it,” Birdsell said. “I thought Milwaukee would be a great place for a Cristo Rey high school.” Every Christo Rey student participates in a work-study program. He or she takes a full course load while working in a professional job setting once a week during their four years to contribute to tuition and simultaneously learn job skills. Job locations have included law firms, banks, hospitals and corporate partners. “Working a real jobd, not an internship, not a charity case, they can be a receptionist, mail room (worker), work in research and development,” Birdsell said. “Students are seeing a world they have never seen. Some students who live in Chicago have never seen the Loop, or Lake Michigan; they live in an oyster.” Henk said he is remaining objective on the research front but has a positive opinion about the students working while doing their studies. “It really teaches the students the value of an education because they are working for it,” Henk said. “By having job experience it teaches them how to study, what they are going to face in college and (it provides) real life experiences they can reflect on.” Besides the Bradley Foundation and Marquette, the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce is invested in seeing a low-income high school in Milwaukee. Katy Venskus, MMAC’s legislative director, said the organization has been one of the most prominent voices in Milwaukee to expand the quality of schools and

increase student capacity. “A clear focus of the work we have engaged in has been to develop high-performing schools that serve the high poverty student population,” Venskus said in an email. “We will be an active participant as an organization and will support our individual members who are working on this project as actively as we are able.” The study will be conducted by Andy Stitch, a Marquette alumnus and vice president of institutional advancement at a Cristo Rey high school in Kansas City, Mo. “He is the perfect choice because he is in charge of all fundraising in Kansas City and that is what we need here.” Henk said. Listecki has voiced concerns in the past to Henk, Birdsell and the community about how the school may take away students from other Catholic high schools, but many of the people involved in making the high school possible do not foresee this happening. “The people who will be attending this school would never be able to attend a private institution on their own,” Birdsell said. “I don’t see a Cristo Rey high school taking away from other Catholic schools; they never have before.”

to space constraints, according to Riesenbeck. The largest space on campus to host a concert is the AMU ballrooms, which can only hold 700 people for a large-scale concert. “It deals with the concept of expenses versus the attendance we can feasibly cater to,” Riesenbeck said. McGonegle agreed. “To only fit 700 out of (a possible 8,000) is a shame and is irresponsible,” McGonegle said. Cheaper music and other entertainment offerings at nearby venues such as the Rave, the Bradley Center and the Marcus Center also played a role in the decision. “We can’t compete with that,” McGonegle said. “Especially considering they have a concert every day and a wide variety – we get one shot at it. Looking at all these things stacked against it, the activity fee is better spent in other places and will benefit students more.” MUSG has proposed a coffeehouse series in place of the spring concerts.

McGonegle said the benefit of the coffeehouse series is its ability to reach more people. “They will be frequent, not one day out of the entire year. There will be several,” McGonegle said. McGonegle also said the coffeehouse series would have have the potential to reach 1,000 students over the year rather than 700 and that the new series could be tailored to different interests. “We can theme each one, have a country night, have something like an orchestra night, have a creative space for students to share thoughts and opinions,” McGonegle said. McGonegle said it was important for MUSG to keep music on campus. “We know music impacts people,” McGonegle said. “People have diverse opinions about music. It’s also a place to make bonds over, another outlet for students to go out and make connections.” Both Riesenbeck and McGonegle maintain that MUSG re-

sponds to trends and that there is a possibility the spring concerts will return in the future. “Maybe if we come back in 20 years, we’ll see Marquette has the ability to make a concert (that caters to all students) happen,” Mcgonegle said. “But with the capacity we have now, we can’t do it.” “The change in budget lines is not cemented for several years. We look at how we can best address student needs,” Riesenbeck said. “Keep in mind, if we see that there is a trend going somewhere else, the budget will respond that way.” McGonegle and Riesenebeck said they welcome concerned student discussion. Erin McGarry, a senior in the College of Communication, attended the Girl Talk MUSG Spring Concert and said MUSG should consider keeping the concerts. “They should keep it,” she said. “It’s good for people who aren’t 21 as an alternative to other outings.”

Continued from page 1:

Earth: Campus dining waste a concern commitment to becoming more green,” Kohl said. “I think we have a ways to go still, but we have made stellar progress.” Mallary Flatley, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences and member of Global Medical Brigades, said her organization was very interested in joining Earth Week Marquette. “Global Brigades got involved because we recently did an Environmental Brigade in Panama,” Flatley said. “SEAC seemed interested in what we did in Panama and wanted students to learn more about it.” Flatley said a few Panama trip members even made a special visit to McCormick Hall for Meatless Monday to support the university’s efforts. McCormick, unlike many other dining halls, does not offer togo containers. Gilligan said students and faculty should be cautious of the waste they produce because such containers take up space in landfills and are not easily

broken down. Gilligan said he has totaled 2,500 to-go containers used this week from the dining halls, which he said is indicative of a larger problem with the attitude towards the environment on campus. “At (Marquette) Place especially we get a lot of students who ask for a to-go container but then sit down and stay to eat,” Gilligan said. Jessica Leibert, a junior in the College of Nursing and philanthropy chair of Sigma Kappa, said she tries not to fall into the trap of wastefulness. “I am, however, guilty of using to-go containers once in a while at the AMU because sometimes it just seems easier to eat out of the containers,” Leibert said. She said she feels guilty creating more waste because Marquette does offer greener solutions such as china and reusable products. Leibert added that Earth Week has helped her better understand the reality of accumulated waste on campus and what she can do to

change her behavior. Leibert said the visual signs of improvement, such as the new green buildings on campus like Engineering Hall, are proof of Marquette’s dedication. But like Kohl, she admits that Marquette must continue efforts like decreasing wastes in Brew locations or other campus areas. Kohl said in order to be green, Marquette must continue to make concerted efforts toward reducing its waste. “Just as in private markets, Marquette has to balance the cost of implementation with the benefits of a greener public image,” Kohl said. “So the more students express their desire to have a greener Marquette, the more benefit the administration can see. Further information regarding locations and times for Earth Week may be found at Marquette’s website.


Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Tessa Fox, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Marissa Evans, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Mike LoCicero, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor Elise Krivit, Photo Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Don’t cancel the concert — pick better artists

Thursday, April 26, 2012

TRIBUNE TRIBUTES To: All my friends... For making my 21st birthday perfect. To: The Kings ... For knocking the Canucks out.

To: The apples in Johnston... Why can’t you replenish yourselves for late night? To: WhatShouldMUCallMe... Haha.

To: Jack White ... For being awesome.

To: Chris... Thank you for sharing your MU community with me. Love you bro.

To: Library crushes... Thank you for making college worthwhile.

To: Bruce Springsteen... For making cut-off flannel shirts look good for decades.

Column

Asking is not a buzzkill

Once upon a time, Marquette students looked forward to attending the annual spring concert. That’s the story we younger generations of students have been told, but for the past few years, this hasn’t been particularly true. The majority of students have not been attending the spring concert in years past. Instead, they express their disapproval of the featured band and continue on with their lives. But fear not students, your passionate complaints have been heard! Next year there will not be an unpopular musician playing at the spring concert, because there will not be a spring concert. Last week, the Marquette Student Government passed a budget for next year that eliminates the Major Events Commission, namely, the spring concert. The decision was made in order to save money in response to low concert attendance and disinterest among students. We understand that MUSG has a tight budget and can only dedicate a certain amount of funds to booking a concert and it is no surprise that the more popular the musician is, the more expensive it is to book them. But it appears that MUSG looked at the simplest approach of eliminating the concert rather than take a practical approach to improve it. It’s not like the past few concerts have been unsuccessful because Marquette students hate music — we just don’t like the musicians being chosen for the spring concert. In its defense, MUSG did survey students earlier in the year to see which band they were most interested in seeing. However, all of the bands on the list were rather unpopular, in our opinion; Hellogoodbye just happened to be the least unpopular selection. No one wants to spend money on a band they don’t even listen to, which might be the primary reason not even half of the tickets were sold for this year’s concert. This lack of ticket sales was a major cause for

Photo courtesy of Pitch Perfect PR

the budget cut because it resulted in MUSG spending more money than they got back in revenue. We at the Tribune believe that saving money that was only being wasted is a great idea, but we would really enjoy having an on-campus concert with a generally appreciated artist. Concerts are a normal part of college life, and we’d like to keep it that way. Two years ago, UW-Milwaukee had KiD CuDi at its annual concert at the Marcus Amphitheater whereas Marquette had Sara Bareilles in the AMU Ballrooms. This year we had Hellogoodbye — they had Lupe Fiasco. Ask virtually any college student which school’s concert they would go to, and we’re pretty sure it wouldn’t be Marquette’s. If other schools are able to bring in popular entertainment, there must be some way Marquette can too. What about the idea of having a concert every other year instead of annually? That way, MUSG could have double the funding to dedicate to booking an artist that students would actually pay to see. Another suggestion would be partnering with The Rave to book and host a concert. If that were possible, we would have a cooler venue than the AMU and make the event more profitable by opening it up to non-Marquette students. No one wants to see a band that used to be cool, but that doesn’t mean people don’t want to go to a concert. So let’s focus on other ways to make the concert successful rather than disregarding it altogether. We would love to see MUSG revisit its decision to cut the Major Events Commission. We understand that this may not be possible for next year, but it should definitively be reevaluated in the near future. We shouldn’t take this fun opportunity away from incoming students because the past two years have had lackluster turnouts. We’re smart kids that go to a great school, so let’s put our heads together and find a way to bring quality entertainment to campus.

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.

be expressed through implications; walking home together or kissing at a bar. There was no gray area or need for verbalization. At Marquette, no one challenged my definition, which I’ve found many people share. During freshman orientation, sex was successfully avoided in disBridget Gamble cussions. Groups promoting awareness for sexual violence popped up on my radar during O-Fest, but I respectfully A few weekends ago, my friend vis- passed them over, thinking their causes ited a college a couple hundred miles had no real connection to my life. away. When the keg was tapped at a Oh, to be young and naïve. party, she went home with a guy she’d Being a student at a Catholic college been hitting it off with. doesn’t just mean hearing church bells It wasn’t until she saw the cinder- every hour and having a priest down block walls and lofted bed that she was the hall in the dorms to bless our penstruck with the sad realization that this cils every finals week. It means havfellow was an uning to balance the binary of derclassman, and But if we don’t ask for the right youth and tradition, of rules she was in his and exceptions, and trying to take off a person’s clothes, dorm room. to have safe and consensual According to how do we know we have it? sex in a place where nobody my friend, the age will come close to telling us difference didn’t what that really entails — subtract from their encounter, but it let alone say the word “sex.” did add an awkward element: He asked Thankfully, Marquette is finally startpermission for every move he made. ing to take initiative. This year marked “It was polite of him, I guess,” she the very first in which all freshmen said. “But it was more of a buzzkill.” were provided with mandatory sexual I sat across from her, nodding and misconduct awareness and prevention agreeing wholeheartedly. In bedrooms, training. questions are cumbersome. They’re The underclassmen with whom my snags in the sheets. They delay and friend spent the night had probably confuse, and if exceptionally peculiar, gone through this training at his school, they can halt a hookup completely. and all the more power to him for actuBut if we don’t ask for the right to ally applying his newfound knowledge. take off a person’s clothes, how do we We upperknow we have it? classmen, and According to V.O.I.C.E. scores We upperclassmen... may like to the (Violence Opposition in think our experience gives us the of classes Community Education), a upper hand, but if we haven’t been who’ve come group of Marquette peer before, may educators committed to practicing consensual sex, our like to think promoting safe relation- experience is nothing more than our experiships, there are three main a hindrance. ence gives considerations in judging us the upper whether or not a sexual act hand, but if is consensual: Participants must be old we haven’t been practicing consensual enough to consent (in Wisconsin, this sex, our experience is nothing more means over the age of 18), have the ca- than a hindrance. It’s younger people pacity to consent and agree to take part. who will be more in-the-know than we The first is typically not a problem were at their age, who will ask permison a college campus. But the last two sion before acting, who will know that make the entire issue of consent espe- sexual violence is everywhere on colcially grainy in the context of college lege campuses and not some abstract hookups. sociological problem. We might think We all know when people hook up: of their new customs as awkward, but after bar close, when neither person’s they’re right. brain is functioning at its finest. In Still, the rest of us aren’t necessarfact, in college culture, inebriation is ily lost causes. Just as consent must be practically a requirement for hooking actively expressed, an education about up, since doing it sober qualifies you consensual sex must be actively puras a “creep.” sued. Although it’s still difficult to talk But did you know Wisconsin law as- about sex at Marquette, adding your serts that since intoxicated people can- voice to the conversation will only not give legitimate consent, having sex make it easier. with them is rape? I never learned this until my senior bridget.gamble@marquette.edu year, and although I easily could’ve Googled it at any point prior, I saw no reason to. In my head, consent could


Thursday, April 26, 2012

VIEWPOINTS

Tribune 9

COLUMN

Congratulations on your new internship Ian Yakob Summertime is approaching so that means everyone has their summer internships in the bag. You don’t? Yeah, me neither. It’s not that I consider getting an internship unimportant, but I just have a case of lazy bones when it comes to applying. That’s actually the most important part of the process though, so I don’t know what my problem is. I mean, we only apply to an internship so we can add something that sounds good to our résumés. Once we get it on there, it makes no difference to us whether or not we do it, right? Sorry for the cynicism, but nobody really wants to do all the cutesy work for a company even if it gives us “real world experience,” because we’re still just interns keeping

ourselves busy. Don’t misunderstand — a lot of internships are high quality positions and are entirely worthwhile, but those are the ones with meaningful work and significant pay. Think of it this way: for any given intern position, the three possible elements are valuable experience, solid compensation and reasonably low time-commitment. Now pick two. I think that’s why it seems so hard to choose an internship. Because even if there is a perfect internship made just for you, somebody else probably gets it. And if you’re one of those lucky guys or gals that lands the glamorous position at Nike or Microsoft, I hope you feel special because mostly everyone else resents you. As for the rest of us, there are always other possible drawbacks to make you think you could waste your summer, such as doing something you’re not very interested in, being in a ghost town or just working with a bunch of meanies who never smile. Look, if I can’t occasionally prank my intern boss by unscrewing the legs to his desk chair or changing his ringtone to “Call Me Maybe,”

I don’t want to work with him. Honestly, I’m already making enough egotistical sacrifices in taking this position as it is. I need to be able to have fun if I’m not getting paid. Did I mention that many unpaid internships are technically illegal? I know this because my daddy is an all-powerful lawyer, so I can sue you just for reading this. Or not reading this. You don’t believe me? OK, I’ll sue you for that, too. But to use a word I made up and be sincerious, there are five criteria besides the nonpayment agreement for an unpaid internship to be legal under the U.S. Department of Labor. The internships are supposed to adhere to these guidelines but employers often ignore them. Altogether, the internship has to be similar to the kind of training given in an educational environment, it must benefit the intern rather than the company, it cannot replace the roles of regular employees by alleviating their work, it cannot provide an advantage for the employer and theoretically should impede productivity, and it cannot entitle the intern to a job after completion.

See, most of these are pretty difficult to uphold.That’s why so many internship postings require students to receive college credit, since there’s an understanding that the position becomes an extension of the intern’s educational environment. If that’s an acceptable loophole, then I’m my own grandpa. But by all means, I’m not advocating a revolt from internships unless you’re actually getting coffee for people every day — nobody has done that since the ‘90s, which is alarmingly long ago. What I am suggesting is that you take your internship less seriously this summer because it’s a dishonorable system to begin with. Yet, what’s even more important to remember is that we’re dishonorable too since we just want the extra résumé flair. So when you mess up on the job, don’t beat yourself up over it because not too many people care. You’re an intern, and that’s your excuse. You already accomplished the hard part of getting the position. ian.yakob@marquette.edu

Reader’s Submission

In the recent article “Stossel: Individuals key,” the Tribune interviewed Andy Suchorski, Wisconsin State Chair of the College Democrats. I felt like the interview could have given some of the readers the wrong interpretation of John Stossel’s visit to the Marquette University campus. Suchorski was quoted saying, “but we believe the choice between the parties is clear.” This gives the reader the impression that John Stossel represents the Republican Party. Although Stossel, a proclaimed Libertarian, lines up with the party concerning economic policy, his social policy ideas are quite liberal. Stossel advocates for the legalization of gay marriage, drugs and many other social issues on the Democratic platform. The fact that

Libertarian, far from Republican

Suchorski believes that everything that Stossel says represents the Republican Party is unfair, to say the least, because all that Young Americans for Freedom was trying to do by putting on this event was to show diverse political views to students. The most interesting and hypocritical statement made by Suchorski is that he believes that “it is important that Marquette students engage in open and vigorous political debate.” Yet, a day before the event Suchorski tweeted “The @MarquetteCrs are so backward thinking, they should bring in a guy who opposes the Civil Rights Act to campus #JohnStossel.” Then when the Marquette College Republican Chair invited Suchorski to the event via Twitter, and informed Suchorski there would be a

question and answer session so that he could ask him why he has such a unique stance on these issues; Suchorski responded on twitter by saying, “I’m good. Open-minded liberals are too busy recalling our Governor at the moment.” It is ironic that he chooses the words “openminded” because that would imply that he would have an understanding and respect towards Stossel’s unique views on the issues. Obviously Suchorski doesn’t support the open debate nor does he want to learn more about why somebody would have a view that isn’t in line with his or his party’s. As a conservative myself, I often found myself disagreeing with some of the things John Stossel said, but I find that it is important

to listen and actively discuss views that don’t represent my own thinking. There were parts in the speech, like the ones dealing with drugs, homosexuality, and prostitution, which I found myself not applauding when some students were, because I highly disagreed with Stossel’s opinions, but the open debate is important to listen to. Unfortunately, I have been unable to attend any liberal speakers on campus yet, which I would gladly do. I certainly hope that the College Democrats bring in new speakers soon because I would love to listen to what they have to say and maybe even question them on their beliefs. Joshua Drevs Sophomore, College of Business Administration


Marquee

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 10

Thursday, April 26, 2012

ENtertainment with just a splash of paint New addition to MKE mixes art with alcohol commissioned paintings as featured on their website. Styles vary from anime to still life, abPainting while drinking might stract and landscape, and are all sound like a sloppy way to created by local artists who are spend an evening. But at Splash hired by the painting bar. PaStudio painting bar, local art trons then reserve a three-hour proves to be the perfect mixer session with the artist to learn to any alcoholic beverage. the history, inspiration and proThe newest addition to the cess of how to create the seHistoric Third Ward neighbor- lected piece. In the words of the hood replaced Brothers Cafe website: paint, drink, repeat. on 184 N. Broadway St. in “Free paint is intimidating, mid-March. and a blank Last Friday, it “I really like watching people canvas can be opened to the realize they can do something a scary thing,” public with a Co-founder grand opening they did not know they could Marla Hahn celebration that do.” said. was filled with That’s why glow-in-theDavid Poytinger having the artdark painting Co-founder, Splash Studios ists present to tutorials, dance kick off the music and, you session helps guessed it, alcohol. create a sense of comfort. Al“There is nowhere like Splash ready, the bar has attracted in the country,” said co-found- regulars — people who simply er David Poytinger. “We’re enjoy sitting in the presence of not anybody’s competitor so local art. Freelance artist, Beata we’re able to collaborate.” Chrzanowska, 24, started workAlready, Splash has donated ing with Splash in early March. 10 cents for every “like” they get “They’re not just pushing the on Facebook to Artists Working company — they’re giving us in Education, Inc. Last week, spaces,” she said. Splash partnered wine tasting And that’s exactly the point. with a “create your own painting Hahn and Poytinger moved to experience” for Splash @ Swig. the Third Ward two years ago Here’s how the process after falling in love with the works: Customers choose tight-knit community and lofrom one of Splash’s 33 cal art scene. They had been By Heather Ronaldson

heather.ronaldson@marquette.edu

Photo by Heather Ronaldson/heather.ronaldson@marquette.edu

Splash Studio, a Milwaukee painting bar, was founded by married couple David Poytinger and Marla Hahn.

looking to do something in the city in addition to their full-time jobs. Blending Milwaukee’s beer and wine culture with art seemed like the perfect fit. They worked with

Photo by Heather Ronaldson/heather.ronaldson@marquette.edu

Two patrons drink while they learn to paint at Splash Studio’s grand opening last Friday night in the Third Ward.

emerging artists in the area to come up with a concept that would give them a platform. After being flooded with applications, Hahn and Poytinger picked seven artists with a variety of styles. These hired artists commission pieces that can be taught to customers and use the venue’s wall-space to sell other pieces from their collection. Artists earn 100 percent of the profit from paintings they sell. “Every element in this bar, we put a lot of thought and care into,” Hahn said. She and Poyntinger personally built and worked on nearly every aspect of Splash Studio to give customers the most creative, social and cultural experience possible. “I think this is the right community for this concept,” grand-opening attendee Heather Krause said. “It’s a great idea for people who want to express themselves but do not want to buy all of (the supplies).” At Splash, adults can pay between $28 and $33 (depending on the night) to receive a 16”x20” canvas, acrylic paint, an apron and, best of all, no cleanup. Hahn and Poytinger said artistic talent is not a requirement for Splash sessions. They are simply an opportunity to learn the creative process — no

matter how different that may look for each person. “I really like watching people realize they can do something they did not know they could do,” Poytinger said. “People walk out of here feeling good about themselves.”


Tribune 11

MARQUEE

Thursday, April 26, 2012

A trip around the bases with Nine More Outs Three friends turn idea into a home run on YouTube By Vanessa Harris vanessa.harris@marquette.edu

As friends get older, the real world comes after them with a vengeance. It’s harder to keep in touch as people advance in their careers, move to different cities and start families. Scott Blumenthal, David Kreshover and Mike Levy know what that feels like. The three childhood friends were faced with the same predicament a few years ago, so they thought up a brilliant plan to stay connected and share the experience with the world. The plan was simple: Go to various baseball stadiums across the country, and pretend to be fans. The result was Nine More Outs, a series of YouTube videos that shows the trio’s experience posing as fans for various baseball teams. This past summer, Nine More Outs took their shenanigans to Miller Park. With Brewers season up and running, we thought we’d ask them about their experience in Brew City.

Q&A with Blumenthal, Kreshover, and Levy

The three of us have been friends for 30 years. We grew up together. These days, though, we live hundreds of miles apart. A few years ago, we found a way to get a few solid days together every year — and, at the same time, live this dream of visiting every major league baseball stadium. Then the idea got nutty: Let’s experience each team from the perspective of the ultimate insider — the diehard fan. Let’s study up on each team, learn the quirks of each fan base, “disguise” ourselves as real fans and mingle with the natives. And, of course, film it all. The next thing you know, we’ve got about 25,000 YouTube hits. It’s been a fun ride.

A:

Q:

You guys have been to a few stadiums around the country, why those particular ones? Where do you plan to go next?

A:

No real rhyme or reason. Our first foray was to the Rogers Centre in Toronto, which allowed us to scratch “all Canadian teams” from our checklist. Then came PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Fenway Park in Boston, and, most recently, Miller Park in Milwaukee. We’re on a “Park” roll, I guess. Each visit has its own short film at ninemoreouts.com. One even has a drunken mascot.

Photo courtesy of Scott Blumenthal

Scott Blumenthal, David Kreshover and Mike Levy created Nine More Outs, a comedy tour of baseball parks.

How was the Miller Park experience? The Brewers lost that game, unfortunately, but it seemed like you met a ton of interesting fans. How did Miller Park compare to other stadium experiences while filming?

Q:

A:

In terms of pure fun, Milwaukee was probably our favorite trip so far. Great

city, great fans, great stadium. Unparalleled brats, beer and cheese. The tailgating scene was phenomenal and unlike anything we’d seen or heard about — just a giant party. Perfect for guys who like to dress up as a hot dog and mustard and run through parking lots. Just about everyone we asked let us draw Rollie Fingers mustaches on them. Who could ask for more?

What are Nine More Outs’ plans for the future? Visiting more stadiums? Returning to the most interesting stadiums? Infiltrating other professional sporting arenas?

Q:

The plan is to visit all 30 teams. If we continue at one per year, we’ll hit the last one in 2037. After that, who knows? There’s always the Mexican leagues.

A:

To learn more about Nine More Outs, and to see all over their videos, visit ninemoreouts.weebly.com.

Can you tell us a little about yourselves and the history of Nine More Outs? What was the idea behind the “Stadium Shmadium Tour?”

Q:

Illustration by Rob Gebelhoff/robert.gebelhoff@marquette.edu

IF YOU COME TO A

FORK

IN THE ROAD,

TAKE IT.

-YOGI BERRA


MARQUEE

12 Tribune

Thursday, April 26, 2012

COLUMN

‘Lucky One’ places poor Take a look at a bet on predictable clichés poetry book Despite impressive always searching for inspiration in our lives. We are constantly defining and redefining who we are as individuals, and much of that self-evaluation is motivated by the things we read, write and listen to. And, generally, when we come across something that inspires us, the need to express it comes with it. Sarah Elms One of the beautiful aspects of poetry is not only that it can If you don’t already know, trigger self-reflection, as Fr. PiApril is National Poetry Month. larz pointed out, but that it can And with May less than a week also serve as a wonderful form away, if you haven’t read, written of self-expression. Whether or listened to any poetry recently, through writing or performance, poetry is a unique method of now is the time to do so. It is no secret that our new communication that deserves a president, the Rev. Scott Pilarz, month of recognition. It can also be quite relaxing, is a Bruce Springsteen fanatic, so it came as no surprise to me that and in the weeks before the stress someone with such a love for mu- of finals rolls around, I encourage you to emsic would have brace the end of a passion for One of the beautiful aspects National Poetry poetry as well. of poetry is not only that it can Month and find In the email Fr. Pilarz sent trigger self-reflection, as Fr. Pilarz a piece that has meaning to you. to the Mar- pointed out, but that it can also If you don’t quette commu- serve as a wonderful form of know where to nity to kick off self-expression. start, head to National Poetry the library. Not Month, he said, only is there “In addition to putting us in touch with deep book after book filled with poetry emotions and insights — and of all kinds, there is also an easel making us feel more alive — set up on the first floor of Raynor great poetry invites us to reflect where people of the Marquette and see our lives in new ways.” community can share their faHe also shared a poem from one vorite poems through the end of of his favorite writers, Mary Oli- the month. It is really neat to see what pieces other people at Marver, titled “Mysteries, Yes.” I think Fr. Pilarz touched on quette are reading and writing. I’ve heard many people say exactly what draws so many people not only to great poetry poetry just isn’t their thing, but to great writing in general. but I’m willing to bet they just We read stories that make us haven’t looked hard enough. think, and we listen to music that Poetry comes in many more makes us feel. And, I’m guess- forms than what you read in ing, all of your favorite books, your high school English classes. songs, stories and poems mean From sonnets, to haiku, to free something more to you than just verse to spoken word, I guara pretty arrangement of words. I antee you’ll find a poem out there that speaks to you. know they do for me. Even if we are not always consciously aware of it, we are sarah.elms@marquette.edu

direction, Sparks’ story fails to ignite

By Matt Mueller matthew.mueller@marquette.edu

In the first five minutes of “The Lucky One,” based on the Nicholas Sparks book of the same name, a group of Marines are ambushed, landmines and tanks blow up, and a survivor struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder in his everyday life. It’s an unexpectedly jarring start to what seems like typical romantic fluff. Is it possible that Sparks’ storytelling has evolved, resulting in an intriguing hybrid of recent Iraq War dramas like “The Hurt Locker” and “The Messenger?” Nope. After the promising opening moments, star Zac Efron begins blabbing via voiceover about his generic philosophy — something romantic about fate and destiny, of course — and stares off into the distance with his deep blue eyes while the audience realizes they’ve started their descent into yet another cliché and tedious Nicholas Sparks tale, albeit one better made than usual. Efron plays Logan, a Marine who survives a series of close encounters during his three tours in Iraq. He thinks much of the credit for his survival belongs to Beth (Taylor Schilling), a dog groomer in Louisiana whose photo Logan found before a landmine killed most of his team. The veteran walks halfway across the U.S. — literally — to find and thank her, but Beth’s struggle with her military brother’s death in Iraq makes his story hard to tell. Logan decides to stick around and help out Beth and her grandma (Blythe Danner) at the dog kennel, hoping to find the right time to tell his tale and perhaps even fall in love in the process. “The Lucky One’s” story is pure romantic hokum, but Sparks and screenwriter Will Fetters do it no favors by piling on overused clichés and irritatingly onedimensional characters. Beth predictably has an adorably mopheaded son whose lone purpose is to be cute and precious. Danner’s grandmother character, the typical wise elder who provides sage advice and snappy comedic relief, is just as trite, but luckily, she’s given a little life by the veteran actress. The most egregious cliché, however, comes in the form of Keith (“Mad Men’s” Jay R. Ferguson), Beth’s jealous and often creepy ex-husband. Sparks and Fetters mindlessly combine almost every ’80s sports movie bully into one constantly awful

Photo via Warner Bros. Pictures

“The Lucky One” stars former “High School Musical” star Zac Efron.

character. Whether he’s stalk- least in this case, it’s decently ing Beth, calling Logan “soldier made schmaltz. Outside of inboy” or starting drunken fights dulging in about three too many on the street, every scene is dog-washing montages, director written and performed for maxi- Scott Hicks gets some beautifulmum hatred. He even threatens ly colorful and composed shots to shoot a dog, in case domes- of their Louisiana locations. The tic abuse wasn’t a clear enough tediousness of the story goes indication of pure evil. down much more smoothly when Keith is even mixed with more annoy- “The Lucky One’s” story is pure luxurious iming since the romantic hokum, but Sparks ages of sunlight movie techni- and screenwriter Will Fetters seeping through cally doesn’t a tree-filled rivneed his over- do it no favors by piling on erbank. the-top theat- overused clichés and irritatingly Efron and rics. The begin- one-dimensional characters. relative newning of the film comer Schilling sets up Efron’s may not be the struggles with finest young PTSD, but the movie unfortu- actors, but they are enjoyable nately abandons that complex to watch on screen. Neither get and intriguing conflict for an eas- too under the skin of their charier, more identifiable villain. acters’ war-related troubles, Considering Sparks’ appall- but when the movie settles ing history of pillaging real into its romantic beats, they’re medical and mental ailments pleasant enough to watch. for easy drama and tear jerking, But I suppose if there were such as in the abominable “Dear four words to describe “The John,” maybe the cartoonish Lucky One,” “pleasant enough bully route was for the best. to watch” would be perfect. Despite the plethora of cli- It doesn’t surpass its expectachés, however, “The Lucky One” tions in any way but doesn’t doesn’t merit the same kind of fall below them either. And anger as other recent Nicholas considering the typical romanSparks projects and their knock- tic dreck that comes out of the offs, like “The Vow.” It may be Nicholas Sparks factory, that’s tired romantic schmaltz, but at almost a compliment.


MARQUEE

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Tribune 13

Comedy brings Shakespeare into new decade

Photo courtesy of Marquette Department of Performing Arts

The cast of “The Comedy of Errors” rehearses in preparation for the last show of the Marquette Department of Performing Arts’ 2011-2012 season. The comedy is set in the 1960s.

Antipholus of Syracuse searches for his long-lost identical twin brother, while his servant, Dromio, is also searching for his longlost twin. As the show unfolds, the characters get hilariously entangled in each other’s different investigations and shenanigans. By Liz McGovern Shakespeare’s wit and irony can elizabeth.mcgovern@marquette.edu sometimes get lost in the heavy language of his plays, which can Shakespeare became famous for make it hard to distinguish comhis ability to make art with words. edy from tragedy. However, this However, it is how we continue is not a problem for “Errors” to bring this powerful language — the show doesn’t do subtlety. to life hundreds The comof years after the edy is highly original stories physical, overwere written that the-top and keeps Shakeblissfully riWhat: The Comedy of speare’s name reldiculous. Errors evant today. The acting in Marquette’s Dethe show was When: April 26-28 at partment of Perimpressive. 7:30 p.m., April 29 at forming Arts is Tim Braun, a closing their main 2:30 p.m. senior in the stage productions College of for the season with CommunicaHelfaer Where: The the Shakespearean tion, plays both Theatre classic, “The ComAntipholus of edy of Errors.” But Ephesus and Cost: $10 for students this time, ShakeAntipholus of speare comes with Syracuse, and a new twist — this is particularly version of “Errors” funny. His is set in the 1960s. large stage presence and exaggerFor those who don’t remem- ated facial expressions are never ber the Shakespeare unit during short of entertaining. sophomore English class in high Kelsey Lauren, a senior in school (or who slept through it), the College of Communication, “The Comedy of Errors” is a long, plays the Abbess and Courteblunder-filled and amusing jour- san. As the Courtesan, Lauren is ney to find one’s family. tempting and seductive, while Egeon has been shipwrecked also amusingly maniacal. for 24 years, separated from his The Turkish conjurers, played wife and their twin sons, An- by Kyle Conner, a freshman tipholus of Ephesus and An- in the College of Communicatipholus of Syracuse. Meanwhile, tion, and Ian Burr, a junior in the

Not many ‘Errors’ to be found in latest MU production

RSVP

College of Communication, have smaller parts but are two of the most memorable characters. They are slightly quirky and even a little creepy but hilarious and inquisitive at the same time. Their exaggerated physical movements take over the stage and demand the audience’s attention. The switch in time period from Shakespearean time to the ’60s is originally confusing because the costumes are the only indication of the show’s more modern setting. However, the second act embraces the new decade by incorporating more of the iconic gimmicks from the ’60s into the show. The actors poke fun at “Charlie’s Angels” and use guns instead of swords, which adds additional laughs. The show uses very few props and virtually no furniture. The set is made out of wooden blocks, with each side of the block painted to represent a certain room or place. The drawings on the block are simple and cartoonish, effectively embodying the ’60s theme. The actors constantly change the set to fit the scene by moving the blocks around. Hanging tapestries are also an integral part of the set. In one scene, cutouts of the actors are placed behind a tapestry, creating an interesting formation of shadows. The show’s lighting is also particularly powerful. The Courtesan’s entrance is particularly notable, filled with dramatic, thick smoke and moody lighting. So take a study break this weekend and celebrate a timeless author by going back in time with Marquette’s Department of Performing Arts.

Photo courtesy of Marquette Department of Performing Arts

Tim Braun and Allie Bonesho, both seniors in the College of Communication, star in “The Comedy of Errors.”

WE AT THE MARQUETTE TRIBUNE APOLOGIZE IN ADVANCE FOR MAKING YOU READ THIS POINTLESS SENTENCE.


Study Break

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 14

Thursday, April 26, 2012

cross word PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

THE BIG PICTURE ACROSS   1 Budding band’s handout   5 It’s the same as an F 11 Fox competitor 14 Spooky sign 15 Like a yellow polka dot bikini in a 1961 No. 1 hit 16 Amateur-hour shunner 17 What an entrepreneur hopes his/her business becomes 19 Ad ___ committee 20 Particle in a charged state 21 Consider again 23 Biblical song 26 CEO degree, often 28 Chopping tool 29 All-American dessert 31 Waited for the laughter to die down 33 Verb in a retrospective 34 Opens, in a way 36 Egoists 41 Somber and grave 42 Bell-bottoms bottom 44 Chew out 47 “The danger has passed” 50 Court cry 51 Put before a jury 52 ___ and raves 53 Frozen pizza brand 56 Big part of a dinosaur skel-

eton 7 Frequently, to Shakespeare 5 58 What the costliest ticket carries 64 Prompt 65 Part of a cast of thousands 66 Eye part 67 Like an antique 68 Most like Solomon 69 Wicked look DOWN   1 Musical note (Var.)   2 Bird that cannot fly   3 Foster or Tilly of Hollywood   4 “Mourning Becomes Electra” playwright   5 Vingt-___ (casino game)   6 “Just a ___!” (“Hold on!”)   7 “___ Ramsey” (Richard Boone series)   8 End of “the end of”   9 ___ to the occasion 10 Bothersome person 11 Plant assailants 12 Third-place medal 13 Ready to fire 18 Vague quantity 22 African ethnic group 23 Boxer’s foot?

24 Junk email or canned meat product 25 Site for stained-glass windows 26 North Dakota State Fair city 27 Tarnish or stain 30 Beating of one’s heart 31 Talking heads group 32 Self-proclaimed “Greatest” boxer 35 In the wee hours 37 Surgical dressing 38 Bering Sea bird 39 “Big Brother” host Julie 40 An anagram for “east” 43 “___ Dalloway” 44 Post-baroque 45 Check-out limit? 46 Sang loudly (with “out”) 48 Burn the midnight oil studying 49 Legitimate 51 Sends a message, in a way 54 Short-billed merganser 55 Prepare to take off 56 Fair and honorable 59 Angry reaction 60 Rustic mothers 61 “Now ___ seen everything!” 62 Formerly known as 63 You may eavesdrop with it

cryptoquips Marquette Tribune 4/12/12 CryptoQuips

PuzzleJunction.com

The CryptoQuips below are are quotes in substitution code, where A couldwhere equal R,A H could could equal P, etc. to break the code The CryptoQuips below quotes in substitution code, equal R,One H way could equal P, etc. One is to look for repeated letters. E, T, A, O, N and I are the most often used letters. A single letter is usually A or I; OF, IS and IT are way tocommon break 2-letter the code to THE lookandfor repeated letters. T, A, N and I are the most often used letters. A words;isand AND are common 3-letter E, words. TheO, codes are different for each puzzle. single letter is usually A or I; OF, IS and IT are common 2-letter words; and THE and AND are common 3-letter words. The codes are different for each puzzle.

CryptoQuip 1 JEK TDGHUJQ RC G XKOPRM‘P HUCK UP UM LUOKZJ XORXROJURM JR JEKUO ZRFFUJFKMJ JR KSZKHHKMZK, OKBGOLHKPP RC JEKUO ZERPKM CUKHL RC KMLKGNRO.

~NUMZK HRFYGOLU

CryptoQuip 2 MAUIVMT LB MSVWA JL VLN WBZZHLJGN JT TB GBGVSSN RAZBWUVGJW VT GIA GBEL SJDUVUN. GIA BLSN ALGUVLWA UAFHJUAZALG JT JLGAUATG.

~SVRN DJUR QBILTBL


STUDY BREAK

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 16

Men’s Golf

One last shot at the hole Senior Matt Haase looking for Big East tourney success

By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

Coach Steve Bailey has advertised the Big East Championships in Orlando, Fla. as the ultimate goal and biggest event for the men’s golf team all season. Bailey and his team have spent a lot of time preparing for the tournament and hope their hard work finally comes to fruition. It’s been a difficult spring for the Golden Eagles. They’ve had difficulty placing in the top 10 in three major tournaments. Marquette’s best performance came at the Bandon Dunes Championship in March, where the team finished in a tie for 10th place in a field of 15 teams. While solid individual efforts have been a constant for the Golden Eagles, Bailey said the team has yet to post a complete top-to-bottom performance and its held Marquette back from high overall finishes. “We’re looking for contributions from all five guys,” Bailey said. “We’ve talked all year long about people showing up at different times, and that’s promising, but there’s no better

time than now for everyone to peak at the same time.” Bailey said it’s going to be important for his squad to have confidence in the work they’ve put in all season to prepare for the championships and to play smart golf. “Golf is a tricky sport,” Bailey said. “If you have a couple bad holes you’re not going to get them back in one shot. It’s a 54-hole event and it’s a matter of us being patient and not being overly aggressive, but taking opportunities when we can. On tough holes, making good pars is good enough for me.” Last week, the team traveled to Florida for a dual match with Florida Atlantic. Bailey took advantage of the trip to get the team accustomed to the turf they would compete on in the championships. Sophomore Michael Motz thinks the experience will give Marquette an edge this weekend. “We don’t get to play on Bermuda (grass) obviously a whole lot up here, so it was good to get down there and get some experience on the greens,” Motz said. “We’ll have a couple days before the tournament starts to work with it, but I think (the trip) helped out a lot.” Senior Matt Haase is no stranger to coming up big in the championships. As a redshirt freshman in 2009, Haase recorded the lowest round in the history of the tournament,

firing an 8-under par 64 and pacing Marquette to a second-place finish. Haase remembers that day fondly but said he wouldn’t expect to repeat such a feat. Haase said his time with the Golden Eagles has been special and is focused on ending his Marquette career with a bang. “I’ve really appreciated my time here and this weekend’s really going to be about not getting down on myself in any way, shape or form,” Haase said. “I try to stay away from expectations and thinking about scores when I’m out on the golf course and just take the clichéd one-hole-at-a-time type of approach. I feel like my game is as good as it’s been in a while. Things are clicking and it would be huge for me to go out on a positive note.” Bailey said he’s excited about the team’s opportunity to place high in the Championships and for Haase’s opportunity to create a fitting end to his career. “Everything leads up to this,” Bailey said. “Both Matt (Haase) and C.J. (Swift) have had top-ten finishes this season, and I just look forward to seeing their play carry over into this week. It would especially be big for Matt to go out on a high note, and if he hits it as good as he did last week I think he’s got a great opportunity to have a good finish.”

Column

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The enemy of my girlfriend is my friend

Matt Trebby My girlfriend is as diehard a Chicago sports fan as I have ever met. I never planned on dating someone like her, a fan of all things Chicago. But she never expected to date someone who supports all things Milwaukee. In fact, prior to coming to Marquette, her family specifically told her, “Don’t date a cheesehead.” So naturally we started dating, and as of tomorrow, April 26th, we will have survived a year together. There definitely are pros and cons to dating a sports lover. It’s great to be able to go to a sporting event on a date and have her be enthusiastic about it. Also, I can have an intelligent conversation about sports with her. Then comes what I like to call our little “competitive rivalries.” The only teams we both cheer for are Arsenal Football Club in England, still a learning experience for her, and at certain times of the year the Blackhawks - I’m one of those bandwagon fans. Otherwise, our rooting interests lie elsewhere.

This has caused plenty of trouble in the past. About three months before we started dating, the Green Bay Packers won the Super Bowl. I, of course, was elated. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for her. The next day I was doing some on-air work with Marquette Television, and she was too. Knowing she was a Bears fan, I definitely bragged about it and probably crossed the line between acceptable and obnoxious. She will gladly admit this almost made her not date me. But, luckily, my boyish charm prevailed in the end. I am of the opinion the Cubs will never, ever win a World Series, and no matter how well they may do, the Bears still suck. Luckily for me, the Brewers and the Packers have been far superior to their Chicago rivals since the commencement of our relationship. The Bucks are really my only disappointment at the moment, especially with the Bulls’ consistent success over the past few years. But all things considered, I am pretty happy with the position of my teams at the moment. While I am able to go to games and enjoy them with her, there still are a few problems. We’ve gone to two Brewers-Cubs games together, both of which the Brewers won. The second was earlier this month at Wrigley Field. See Trebby, page 17

women’s basketball

A step closer to the basketball ‘Summitt’

Son of legendary basketball coach joins MU staff By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Photo Courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Senior Matt Haase is focused on ending his Marquette golfing career with a big bang this weekend in Florida.

It’s never easy stepping into the shadow of a legend. Just ask Green Bay Packers’ quarterback Aaron Rodgers after he took over for Brett Favre. There has to be even more pressure when your mother is Pat Summitt. Tyler Summitt doesn’t seem to think so. Tyler Summitt was hired to become the newest assistant coach on the Marquette women’s basketball team on April 19, the same day his mother resigned as the head coach of Tennessee after 38 seasons. “I went about the job the way any person would go about it,” Summitt said. “I looked up every single school who had an opening and asked advice from my mom and assistant coaches and went from there.” Summitt, 21, a senior at Tennessee, will graduate with a degree in communication studies in early May and begin his duties as an assistant coach under Terri Mitchell on May 21. Tyler Summitt spent his first two years in Knoxville, Tenn., as a student assistant under his mother before walking on to

the men’s program his final two years. Summitt said that experience will be critical in his ability to be an effective coach at Marquette. “I learned a ton from coach (Bruce) Pearl and coach (Cuonzo) Martin in addition to the things that I learned from my mom and her assistants in my four years at Tennessee,” Summitt said. “Each person has a different leadership style and philosophy, and I think that will translate well at Marquette.” Summitt said he applied to both Indiana and Illinois for assistant roles as well as several smaller schools before choosing Marquette. Choosing may not be the proper word, however. Summitt cold-called Mitchell shortly after the season ended and found out that the team likely wouldn’t be hiring in the offseason. He then called Mitchell back to thank her for her time and the two hit it off. Soon after, Mitchell flew Summitt in for an interview, and he was hired. Sophomore guard Gabi Minix is excited to have a coach who is close to the rest of the team in age and also blends the experience of working under Pat Summitt. “We don’t care where someone comes from, as long as they See Summitt, page 17


SPORTS

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Tribune 17 TRIBUNE Player of the Week

Sports Calendar

Saturday 28

Track & Field Marquette Invitational - 10 a.m

Sat.

28 Women’s Soccer at Wisconsin - 10 a.m.

Sun.

James Muehleman Senior

Sunday 29

Men’s Golf at Big East Championships

Sat.

28

Sun.

Women’s Soccer vs. Milwaukee at Madison, Wis. - 12 p.m.

29 Men’s Soccer vs. TBA - 1:30/2 p.m.

Mon.

30

Men’s Golf at Big East Champaionships

29 Men’s Soccer vs. Milwaukee 9:30 a.m.

Tue.

1

Men’s Golf at Big East Championships

Continued from page 16:

Track & field

As I mentioned, I can be a bit obnoxious when my teams are doing well. Luckily for me, she is not that way. I don’t know if she knows that her not saying anything would be painful in itself, but she is not a very boastful person. But on that night when the Brewers came out victorious, I had to contain some of my excitement so she would talk to me on the drive back to Milwaukee. I prefer to focus on the positives of the relationship, such as how nice it is to have a girl that is genuinely interested in sports, especially because my teams should continue to have the upper hand for the next few years. The Bears can make all the

Will and Kathryn Koeck set records in field events

Trebby: Cubs always suck moves they want to try to compete with the Packers, but with Aaron Rodgers, I don’t see any shift in power there. On the diamond the Cubs are building from the ground up, to put it nicely. I am definitely content with giving her the Bulls, for now. In all seriousness, though, I would much rather have a heated sports debate where she and I get mad at each other than have to teach her every little thing about every sporting event we watch on television. Our loyalties may not be the same, but I’ll take her every day of the week over that girl that doesn’t get my obsession with sports. matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Continued from page 16:

Summitt: Young age a plus

can coach,” Minix said. “Tyler’s age being in close proximity to us helps because he can relate with some of the things that we are going through easier than others.” Tyler Summitt said the decision to leave his mother wasn’t as tough as some thought, despite Pat’s diagnosis of early onset dementia before the beginning of last season. “The thing about my mom is that she’s doing great,” Summitt said. “She’s her old self, and if

you ask some of her longtime friends, assistants or staff, they would tell you the same thing. So that didn’t factor in at all.” Summitt said that he was looking forward to working with a coach who does things the right way, referring to Mitchell. “That’s all you ever hear about when you ask people about the Marquette program and coach Mitchell,” Summitt said. “They treat people right and that’s the kind of place that I want to be a part of.”

Photo by Daniel Alfonzo/ daniel.alfonzo@marquette.edu

Sophomore Gabrielle Minix believes Summit will be able to relate to the players.

the facts Muehleman recorded a personal record in the triple jump at the Bryan Clay Invitational in Azusa, Calif., on Friday with a leap of 47 feet, 5 3/4 inches. That jump was good for the No. 3 mark in program history. Muehleman finished sixth in that event. The senior then followed that up with a 12th place finish in the triple jump at The Beach Invitational in Norwalk, Calif., on Saturday with a mark of 47 feet, 1 1/2 inches.

Siblings bring the power By Chris Chavez christopher.chavez@marquette.edu

For Will and Kathryn Koeck, throwing has been in their family’s bloodlines for a few generations. Their father and his brothers were throwers and their sisters threw discus and shot put. The decision to attend Marquette and join the track and field program just happened to pan out perfectly for them. Hailing from Winneconne, Wis., the Koecks were teammates on Winneconne High School’s track and field team. It was there that the chemistry between Will and Kathryn blossomed as they started to understand how similar their throwing styles were. “During practice we would be pushing each other to do the best that we could do and give pointers here and there,” Will Koeck said. “At this point, we know how the other reacts to certain information and helpful hints.” During the 2011-’12 indoor track season, Will set the freshman record in the weight throw in his first attempt at the event. His sister similarly set a record in her freshman year in the hammer throw. Kathryn, a sophomore, credits their high school coach as a root to the Koecks' early collegiate success since he allowed them to weight lift under his supervision. “When we arrived at Marquette, the adjustment to lifting was a lot easier. The weights were heavier and some of the drills were different, but we had an upper hand in that,” Kathryn Koeck said. “The coaching style was also different, but in the end it helped us become better athletes.” Coach Michael Koenning works closely with both of the Koecks as the associate head coach. From lifting sessions and practices, he believes that the motivation to improve is one of

their strengths as a pair. “They’re both really hardworking and willing to put the time in to be successful,” Koenning said. “Having the same attitude from both of them helps. They keep an eye on each other to see who’s working hard, and who can work harder.” Will was very fortunate to have senior Jonathan Kusowski take him under his wing from the very first day of practice, where the freshman was monitored at all times. The two of them helped carry the throwers during the indoor season as they both qualified for the Big East Conference Championship in New York City. Former Marquette thrower Jaime Roth was Kathryn's model in the hammer throw last year, but this year freshman Samantha Kennedy has taken on the role of pushing her in the weight room and the thrower’s field. Koeck will be a junior next year and believes that she will use the

experiences with Roth and Kennedy to impact the incoming underclassmen. Both Will and Kathryn Koeck had nothing but positive things to say when assessing each other's potential. Will believes that his sister has the skill set to make it to the regional championship and put on a good performance. “(Kathryn) has got the hard work ethic, effort, and dedication there to do well,” Will Koeck said. “She’s just got to put it in the right spot to get out there and compete.” Similarly Kathryn believes that a school record is within her brother’s reach based on what he has shown thus far. “He’s on track to have much bigger school records,” Kathryn Koeck said. “He’s shown that he can throw farther. He’ll be able to smash any of the school records.”


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Thursday, April 26, 2012

MEn’s basketball

SPORTS Women’s Volleyball

Tribune 19

Benford lands first Beyer helps capture title MU star head coaching job Former leads Swedish team

Marquette asst. hired to lead North Texas Mean Green

Texas and Chicago, Benford was one of the main recruiters for Jimmy Butler, Jae Crowder and Junior Cadgouan. Benford was the lead recruiter on 2012 commits T.J. Taylor and Steve Taylor, as well as Marquette’s By Mark Strotman two 2013 recruits, Duane Wilson mark.strotman@marquette.edu and Deonte Burton. The Mean Green will have a Former Marquette associate head coach Tony Benford was named chance to contend for a Sun Belt head coach at North Texas on Tues- championship in 2012, especially day. Benford spent the last four sea- if Benford can convince freshsons at Marquette and will replace man forward Tony Mitchell to Johnny Jones, who coached the stay another year. North Texas’ leading scorer last Mean Green the last 11 seasons. Benford was officially announced year averaged 14.7 points and 10.3 as the program’s 17th head coach rebounds and was named to the at a press conference Wednesday All-Sun Belt first team. A year ago, afternoon at Apogee Stadium, the Benford was the lead recruiter of football team’s home field. Benford 6-foot-8 Mitchell, a Dallas native, signed a five-year contract, accord- who considered Marquette before choosing North Texas. ing to an ESPN.com report. Mitchell is considering declarThe 48-year-old Benford interviewed for the position in Denton, ing for the NBA Draft, and his Tex., over the weekend, where he deadline is April 29. A bevy of also took in the youth awaits football team’s “I told them ‘The program is going Benford at North spring game. Texas. Along “I have talked to be about you guys.The current with Mitchell, with Tony (Ben- players, the future players and the the top three ford) multiple former players.’ ” scorers from times about the last year’s team values of these Tony Benford were freshmen, young men as North Texas Head Coach including guard athletes and Chris Jones students and putting them first,” North Texas (14.1 points) and forward Jordan president V. Lane Rollins said at the Williams (10.9 points). When Benford arrived in press conference. “And he gave me heartfelt and honest answers. And Denton late Tuesday night, the I’m really thrilled, and I feel he’s first thing he did was meet with the right person for UNT at this the current roster. “I told them, ‘The program is time, and the right person for these young men, which is number one going to be about you guys. The current players, the future players on my list.” Benford entered the coach- and the former players,’” Benford ing ranks in 1992 as an assistant said. “I want to make sure they get coach at New Mexico, where a great education and grow as peohe worked until 1998. He also ple. The basketball is going to take held assistant coaching positions care of itself.” at Arizona State from 1998 to 2004 and Nebraska from 2006 to 2008 before being hired by Buzz Williams at Marquette. “I am absolutely thrilled for Tony. He is more than deserving of this opportunity and is walking into an area of the country where he will be able to have immediate success,” Williams said in a statement. “We will forever be grateful for Tony’s daily investment in our program during his tenure here.” North Texas athletic director Rick Villareal said the school was looking for someone with strong Texas ties, someone who cared about relationships with his players, a hard worker and someone who would win championships for the Mean Green. “A lot of people think this should have happened a long time ago,” Villareal said. “We were fortunate enough to make this decision, and it’s the last one I’m making for a while, I can tell you that. I think we made a great one.” Along with Williams, Benford ’s presence on the recruiting trail improved the depth of talent on Marquette ’s roster over the last four years. With his connections in both

to promised land

By Michael Wottreng michael.wottreng@marquette.edu

The Al McGuire Center has had its fair share of spectacular athletes walk its halls, but there is one type that stands out above the rest. It’s the person wearing gold around their neck, not just on their shirts or pants. Marquette legend Dwyane Wade won a gold medal in the 2008 Olympic Games. Women’s basketball coach Terri Mitchell won gold at the 2008 Women’s U18 Women’s FIBA Championships. The athletic department can now add Ashley Beyer to the recent recipients. Beyer used the spring semester to play volleyball professionally in Sweden for Lindsberg Volley. The three-time All-Big East selection helped a veteran team capture gold over Hytle/Halmstad in the Elitserien championships. Beyer started playing in Sweden during the middle of the team’s season. Coach Bond Shymansky had a personal relationship with the head coach for Lindsberg Volley, Matthew Botsford. Shymansky believed Beyer would be able to play right away and help the team win a championship. “It’s such a great experience for her,” Shymansky said. “She had some opportunities to play in better leagues or tougher programs, but I didn’t think she would play as much.” Playing in Sweden was an easier transition than some other countries may have been. The majority of citizens in the country speak English, allowing Beyer to adapt to a new culture quickly. Beyer was the anchor as an

outside hitter for a team that earned Marquette’s first invitation to the NCAA Tournament last season. Beyer only played three years at Marquette but ranks fourth on the all-time kills list. Her skill set is unique and has translated well to the international game. “To see her adapt to a different style, an international style was no shock to me,” Shymansky said. “International volleyball prizes a six-rotation player like Beyer.” Beyer is the third Golden Eagle to play professional volleyball. Doors were opened for her by former teammates Nikki Klingsporn and Rabbecka Gonyo, who played a professionally overseas after their college career at Marquette concluded. Beyer is continuing a budding tradition that gives current and future players hope of making a career out of playing the sport they love. “I think that means that our program is developing in a

positive way,” sophomore defensive specialist Rachel Stier said. “Marquette provides players the opportunity to do that with the high level that we play.” Beyer will be back on the Marquette campus soon to finish her degree in communication studies. The Bloomington, Ill. native hopes to have a long-lasting career playing professional volleyball. “As long as my body will allow me to play volleyball I think that I will play,” Beyer said. “I have a teammate now that is 31 years old, so if I play that long I still have 10 years under my belt. But as long as I have the opportunity to play I think I will continue playing for a while.” Shymansky expects Beyer to have plenty of chances to continue her career playing internationally. Where Beyer will play is undecided, but one thing is certain. The former All-American will have a chance to add to her golden legacy at Marquette.

Tribune File Photo

Ashley Beyer helped her team capture gold in the Elitserien championships.


SPORTS

20 Tribune

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Best Tribune sports photographs of 2011-’12 Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Tribune File Photo

Tribune File Photo

Photo by Rebecca Rebholz/ rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/ elise.krivit@marquette.edu

April 26, 2012 | The Marquette Tribune  

Thursday, April 26, 2012 issue of the Marquette Tribune.

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