Page 1

GAMBLE: Confessions of an over-apologizer revealed – Viewpoints, page 8

The Marquette Tribune SPJ’s 2010 Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper

Spoken word poetry in Former MU stars MKE speaks for itself shining bright abroad PAGE PAGE 2010

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Since 1916 www.marquettetribune.org

Volume 96, Number 48

Students suffer sniffles as spring allergies arrive

Thursday, March 29, 2012

March poll: Romney up Local, natl. elections the focus for latest “On the Issues” By Allison Kruschke allison.kruschke@marquette.edu

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney has reclaimed the top spot among Wisconsin Republicans and Scott Walker is running a close race with his Democratic challengers, according to the third installment of Marquette Law School’s politics poll. Charles Franklin, a professor at Marquette Law School and polling expert, went “On the Issues” with Mike Gousha Tuesday to talk about the poll, which was conducted March 22 to 25. Phone volunteers called 707 randomlyselected Wisconsin residents and asked, among other political questions, who they would vote for in the Republican primary.

Gousha opened the discussion Minnesota,” Franklin said. by talking about the significance “Since then, Santorum has taken of the April 3 presidential pri- more wins in the South (than in mary, which is now less than a the North).” week away. Franklin also discussed how the “People are looking at Wiscon- four candidates still in the race sin and what’s going to happen – former House Speaker Newt on Tuesday,” Gousha said. “The Gingrich, Romney, Santorum, Wisconsin primary could help and U.S. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas (former Pennsylvania Sen.) Rick – have gone up or down in terms Santorum change the race or help of favorability and unfavorability Mitt Romney all but lock it up.” ratings. He said Franklin anamong Repubnounced that “The Wisconsin primary could help licans, Romney while Santo- Rick Santorum change the race or has made gains rum was lead- help Mitt Romney all but lock it up.” in favorability ing in Wisratings, while consin among Santorum has Republicans in seen a slight Mike Gousha increase in unFebruary’s poll, Distinguished Fellow in Law f a v o r a b i l i t y Romney has surpassed him ratings. in the most recent poll, claiming “Generally within the GOP, 39 percent to Santorum’s 31 per- there are favorable views of Romcent. Franklin attributed Santo- ney and Santorum, and also Ron rum’s earlier lead to his victories Paul,” Franklin said. “There are before the February poll. mixed views of Newt Gingrich.” “At the time, Santorum was coming off a big win in See Poll, page 7

MPL tunes in, goes “Freegal” New service offers cardholders free music downloads By Joe Kaiser joseph.kaiser@marquette.edu

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

A tree’s flowers bud in front of Schroeder Hall, welcoming the beginning of an early allergy season this year.

Early seasonal shift increases effects of common malady By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

The mild Wisconsin winter was enjoyable while it lasted, but consequences of the pleasant weather are leaving many people red-eyed and sniffling with particularly bad allergies this spring. According to Clinical Associate Professor Christine Shaw of the College of Nursing, seasonal allergies are more severe in springs like this one, when there is a burst of overly warm weather. While allergies vary, specific causes this season include cedar, birch and maple trees, grass, weeds and snowmelt residue, which releases mold into the air.

Shaw said seasonal allergies are “hyspersensivity type I reactions,” which cause a person’s body to overreact to harmless substances. “This means that the person’s immune system mistakes a substance that would normally be harmless for something that could hurt the body,” Shaw said. Shaw added that the immune system creates a specific antibody to defend itself from the substance. Consequently, the next time such substances enter the body, the antibody recognizes the material and calls for the release of a histamine chemical. According to Shaw, typical allergy symptoms such as itchy eyes, a runny nose, swollen tissues or rashes are in reaction to the histamine. Students could take over-the-counter antihistamine medication to alleviate these symptoms, Shaw said, See Allergies, page 7

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS.....................8 MARQUEE..................10

STUDY BREAK....................14 SPORTS..........................16 CLASSIFIEDS..................19

The Milwaukee Public Library is now allowing city residents who hold a library card to download three free songs per week from the Sony music catalog through the launching of the library’s new Freegal music service on March 19. Library card holders can download the songs by visiting the Photo by A. Martina Ibanez-Baldor/angela.ibanez-baldor@marquette.edu library’s website and entering Along with checking out CDs, library patrons will soon be able to downtheir library card number and ID load mp3 files. The new service costs the library $45,000 per year. number. “It’s a great way to bring also offers a quick way to get the music online from the library creates flexibility for users. more traffic to the website,” said songs.” Marketing professor Syed “They are creating time and Gwendolyn Long of the library’s communications and marketing Akhter said this new program place utility,” Akhter said. “You is a must for the library moving are saving time also — you can department. forward. do it from your home.” Library Technical “The library has The service will cost the liServices Manager “The library has to to adapt to the new brary $45,000 per year, which Bruce Gay said Free- adapt to the new digital environment has already been approved in its gal opens up a lot of digital environment people want,” Akhter 2012 budget. Gay said the money opportunities for both people want.” said. “They want to comes from a fund that had althe library and users. “It really gives us a Syed Akhter read books on the ready been set aside. download “(The $45,000) will be part of way to present a lot of Professor of Marketing Internet, movies on the In- our materials budget,” Gay said. material in a way that ternet and down- “We set aside about $1.5 milpeople are looking for load music on the lion. That’s all the money the city today,” Gay said. “It expands our gives us for books and what we catalog and gives us thousands Internet.” Akhter said the ability to get of albums we may not have. “It

See Library, page 7

NEWS

VIEWPOINTS

MARQUEE

The Talk

YAKOB

THe Hunger Games

Catholic universities vary in their approach to sexual health. PAGE 5

It’s a sign from above! Or –– wait –– is it? PAGE 9

Blockbuster film adaptation could use more bite. PAGE 11


NEWS

2 Tribune

Sobelman’s succeeding

Thursday, March 29, 2012

DPS Reports Monday, March 26 At 10:17 a.m. a student reported that unknown person(s) removed his unsecured, unattended property from the Helfaer Recreation Center. The estimated loss is unknown. Between 11:30 a.m. and 1:40 p.m. an employee reported that unknown person(s) removed her unsecured, unattended property estimated at $1,065 from the William Wehr Physics building. The Milwaukee Police Department was contacted. Tuesday, March 27 At 12:13 a.m. a student reported that unknown person(s) removed her unsecured, unattended property estimated at $1,500 from the Weasler Auditorium.

Between Monday, March 26 at 7:45 p.m. and Tuesday, March 27 at 6:40 p.m. a student acted in a disorderly manner in Mashuda Hall. At 9:06 p.m. an unidentified suspect snatched a purse from a student walking in the 1700 block of W. Kilbourn Ave. and fled the scene. MPD was contacted. Most of the property was later recovered. The estimated loss is $20. Wednesday, March 28 At 2:07 a.m. the Department of Public Safety observed, via camera, two people not affiliated with Marquette prowling in Campus Town Lots 1 and 2. One of the suspects fled the scene. DPS detained the other suspect. Upon investigation, it was determined that he had removed property from a business in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. MPD was contacted and cited the suspect.

Events Calendar Photo by Rebecca Rebholz/rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Sobelman’s at Marquette, located on 16th and Wells, is a well-loved addition to the campus.

New location boon to business, takes pressure off original By Monique Collins monique.collins@marquette.edu

Sobelman’s, a popular restaurant chain, opened its newest location on Marquette’s campus six months ago. Now, owner Dave Sobelman looks back on the successes his three locations have made. “Mike Whittow, assistant to the vice president of Marquette, said he wanted to talk to me about opening a location on campus, since Angelo’s shut down,” Sobelman said. “I wasn’t looking for a third restaurant, but the offer was pretty flattering, so I took it.” Located on the corner of 16th and Wells Streets, Sobelman’s at Marquette is in the heart of campus, attracting many hungry students. “There’s usually a large crowd, but the food is worth the wait,” said Jeffrey Djoum, a sophomore in the College of Business Administration. The relaxed atmosphere gives students a place to talk and enjoy good food with friends.

“Sobelman’s at Marquette is one big room, so it’s a more personal environment,” said Andy Hampel, a freshman in the College of Engineering. “There are usually all Marquette kids there, so it’s a fun place to be.” Located at 1900 W. St. Paul Ave, the original Sobelman’s was born in 1999, when Dave and Melanie Sobelman took over the original Schlitz Taverns and renamed it Sobelman’s Pub and Grill. Since then, Sobelman’s has been subject to immense recognition for its service and food. In 2009, Sobelman’s was voted Best Marquette Bar and Best Bar in Milwaukee. It also won second place on WISN 12’s A-list award for Best Burger. “It’s arguably the best burger in Milwaukee, and if it’s good enough to be on the Travel Channel, it’s good enough for me,” Djoum said. The feeling is mutual. “I love Marquette,” Dave Sobelman said. “The best thing I ever did was open Sobelman’s at Marquette.” Sobelman’s other location, Sobelman’s East Side Grill, took a swing at a west coast trend: tall grass-fed beef. He hoped to bring the trend to Milwaukee’s East Side. “Eastsiders are very savvy when it comes to trends like

vegetarianism and veganism. They like that kind of stuff,” Sobelman said. However, customers were less than thrilled by the new burger. “When it came down to it, the burger was drier because it didn’t have as much fat. Milwaukee didn’t like that,” Sobelman said. “We’ve since then gone back to our original burger.” Since the opening of Sobelman’s at Marquette, fewer students have visited the original Sobelman’s Pub and Grill. The decrease in student customers could have contributed to a reported 10 percent decrease in revenue, according to Sobelman. “We aren’t as busy during the day now,” Sobelman said. “I can’t attribute that all to the opening of the Marquette location though.” However, Sobelman thinks business has been better since the opening of his newest restaurant. “It was hard when all of Milwaukee and Marquette students were trying to cram into the small St. Paul location,” Sobelman said. “We’re better off losing that 10 percent because our workers aren’t overstressed and the customers are happy.” “You can always tell when the customers are happy,” Sobelman said. “They always buy more beer and Bloody Mary’s.”

The

TRIB is bananas.

B a n a n a s

march 2012 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Thursday 29 Milwaukee Mustangs vs. Pittsburgh Power, Bradley Center, 7 p.m. Dan Hicks, Turner Hall Ballroom, doors open at 7 p.m. “Coach: The Untold Story of College Basketball Legend Al McGuire,” Marcus Center Vogel Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Friday 30

Milwaukee Admirals vs. Oklahoma City Barons, Bradley Center, 7 p.m.

Saturday 31 I Set My Friends on Fire, The Rave, 6:30 p.m. Milwaukee Bucks vs. Memphis Grizzlies, Bradley Center, 7:30 p.m. “The Tempest,” Off the Wall Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

Sunday 1 April Fools’ Day Milwaukee Admirals vs. Rockford Icehogs, Bradley Center, 3 p.m.

Fight the Silence Tour, The Rave, 7 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Marissa Evans Assistant Editors Andrew Phillips, Patrick Simonaitis Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Assistant Closer Look Editor Leah Todd Investigative Reporters Erica Breunlin, Olivia Morrissey Administration Erin Caughey Campus Community/MUSG Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Monique Collins Crime/DPS Matt Gozun General Assignment Elise Angelopulos Metro Joe Kaiser Politics Allison Kruschke Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson Science and Health Eric Oliver COPY DESK Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Travis Wood, Zach Buchheit VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-7940 Viewpoints Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Assistant Editor Kelly White Editorial Writer Tessa Fox Columnists Bridget Gamble, Ian Yakob, Kelly White MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Matthew Mueller Reporters Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris, Heather Ronaldson SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Michael LoCicero Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editors Trey Killian, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Christopher Chavez, Michael Wottreng Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Matt Trebby

VISUAL CONTENT Design Editor Zach Hubbard Photo Editor Elise Krivit Closer Look Designer Katherine Lau Sports Designers A. Martina Ibanez-Baldor, Haley Fry News Designers Kaitlin Moon, Andrew Abraham Marquee Designer Rob Gebelhoff Photographers Rebecca Rebholz, A. Martina Ibanez-Baldor, Danny Alfonzo ----

STUDENT MEDIA INTERACTIVE

Director Kaellen Hessel Content Manager Katelyn Baker Technical Manager Michael Andre Reporters Alex Busbee, Shannon Dahlquist Designer Eric “Trevian” Ricafrente Programmer Jake Tarnow Social Media Coordinator Jill Toyad ----

Advertising

(414) 288-1738 Advertising Director Courtney Johnson Sales Manager Leonardo Portela-Blanco Art Director Joe Buzzelli Production Manager Lauren Krawczyk Classified Manager Erin LaHood Account Coordinator Manager Maude Kingsbury

The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 2883998.

Have a good weekend!


Thursday, March 29, 2012

NEWS

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NEWS

4 Tribune

Thursday, March 29, 2012

One team, three events Local elections loom in MKE Mayor Tom Barrett to face off against Ed McDonald By Allison Kruschke allison.kruschke@marquette.edu

Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Condit.

The triathlon team was founded in 2009 and competes in events across the Midwest and the rest of the country.

Triathlon athletes balance intense training with school By Eric Oliver eric.oliver@marquette.edu

Running a triathlon isn’t easy. But the Marquette Triathlon Team, founded in 2009, has made an impact on its members through training, motivation and a lot of conditioning. Team President Jeffrey Condit, a junior in the College of Health Sciences, loves the endurance sport lifestyle. His and the team’s motto is simple: swim hard, ride fast and run like it’s the last thing you’ll ever do. It’s a motto he applies to all parts of his life. “I find incredible joy in crossing the finish line if I’ve put together a well-run race,” Condit said. “I also love to see the emotions of my teammates and competitors when they have had a successful race and accomplish their goals for the day.” The triathlon team strives to provide all the necessary utilities for students and alumni to participate in multisport races, meet other individuals with similar

Re

interests and encourage the growth of people dedicated to a healthy and active lifestyle. “I have always been looking for memorable experiences with the triathlon team,” Condit said. “This is college. It takes some seriously hard work to balance school and training successfully, but now is also a great time to have some fun.” Rebecca Avena, the team’s treasurer and a sophomore in the College of Engineering, is like many members of the team in that she runs because she loves to do it. “I love having that time of day I can de-stress and take a time out from a busy week,” Avena said. “Training for long distance races takes a large chunk of time, which isn’t easy to manage when being a full-time student and balancing a job. So if I’m spending a lot of free time, I want to be doing something I love.” The triathlon team participates in a number of single- and multisport events throughout Wisconsin and the Midwest. The team’s athletes range from first-timers to those who regularly bring home hardware for top age-group finishes. Maureen Ricken, the team’s secretary and a junior in the College of Engineering, joined the

h eTr T d a

team after running a triathlon before coming to Marquette and was immediately addicted to the atmosphere. “We really become a team on the 13-hour car rides to our races,” Ricken said. “I hoped to get a sense of team togetherness out of the triathlon club like there was on the track and cross country teams in high school, and I found it.” Ricken said she loves the idea that members can decide how much they want to train. “I love that the team is laid back in the sense that you decide when and how long you want to train, while still knowing someone will be there to ride next to you on those three-hour bike rides,” Ricken said. Everett Brown, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences and team member, is a triathlon addict. “I had joined the team before my first triathlon, and I was going to go to Nationals, but a knee injury kept me from going,” Brown said. “I really enjoy being a part of the team because it provides a great group of people who love to swim, bike and run. I ran my first triathlon last spring ... I ended up running four more triathlons last summer.”

While Milwaukee has been buzzing with political talk about the Republican presidential primary on April 3, Marquette students and local residents have other ballots to consider as well. Next week, Marquette students have the opportunity to vote in several races, including those for city treasurer, city attorney, mayor and alderman. Robert Bauman, the alderman in Marquette’s district (4), is unopposed. Democratic incumbent Mayor Tom Barrett faces opposition from Ed McDonald, a business owner and community leader, in his race for re-election. Barrett, who ran against Scott Walker in the 2010 gubernatorial election, has been mayor since 2004. Patrick Guarasci, a campaign advisor for Tom Barrett for Milwaukee, said the mayor is feeling confident but is still taking the election seriously. “The mayor is honored to be supported by and be able to serve Milwaukee,” Guarasci said. “He takes no issue or election for granted.” Guarasci added that Barrett’s campaign has tried to reach out to young people in Milwaukee, especially college-age voters. “(Barrett) has attended a number of events and forums aimed at young voters,” Guarasci said. “We have been targeting young voters and encouraging them to vote early. We are also trying to make sure that they know where to vote and what they need to vote.” Barrett’s opponent, Ed McDonald, is a Milwaukee native and has a nonpartisan platform,

according to his website. “As a public administrator one must be able to work with all communities to facilitate a unified vision for the community and administer the implementation of that vision so the collective dreams of a community can be realized,” McDonald’s website reads. While Barrett’s platform focuses heavily on job creation and stabilizing the Milwaukee economy, McDonald’s focuses on other challenges the Milwaukee community faces, such as racial and wealth segregation and the need for more access to fresh food. Guarasci said Barrett’s jobs platform particularly applies to college students. “Tom Barrett believes that some of our best and brightest college students are here in Milwaukee,” Guarasci said. “He wants to create jobs to keep them here.” McDonald calls for community collaboration to help face Milwaukee’s challenges. “The call is to build Milwaukee - to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for all; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of human unity in our great city,” his website reads. Janet Boles, a Marquette professor emerita of political science and expert in local elections, said while the mayoral race has received a great deal of attention, Barrett will likely win. She added that the mayor may have higher aspirations than his current office. “The mayor of Milwaukee is essentially running uncontested, and there has been little attempt to mobilize any group except the large donors,” Boles said. “Since Barrett is raising money he doesn’t need in this campaign, one can only assume he’s raising it for a run at Scott Walker again.” McDonald’s campaign could not be reached for comment as of press time.

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Thursday, March 29, 2012

Tribune 5

Students questioning Church’s sex stance holds discussions and educational programming and also distributes condoms. Though the program may seem radical for a Catholic campus, Boston College is not the first Jesuit institution to have such a By Sarah Hauer group of students. Georgetown sarah.hauer@marquette.edu University has a similar group, Hoyas for Choice. Neither stu“Cura personalis,” the trade- dent group is officially affiliated mark Latin phrase of Marquette with its respective university beand other Jesuit institutions, cause of the groups’ conflicting translates to “care for the entire stances with Catholic teaching. person.” Translating the phrase Marquette does not have any stuto English is simple, but the dent groups dedicated to sexual translation of “cura personalis” health, either affiliated or unafinto sexual health on Jesuit cam- filiated with the university. puses is not as The BC Students easy. for Sexual Health The Second website says, “we Vatican Council seek to implement a said sex is meant distribution method to transmit husimilar to Georgeman life through town, where an una mutual selfrecognized student “the giving of spousorganization has apes. pointed captains in Student groups each dorm where it This is the third story in a at some Cathois widely known that three-part series on sexual health at Marquette. lic institutions condoms are availacross the counable; the administratry believe “cura tion at Georgetown personalis” includes providing has chosen neither to condemn contraceptives to students. the group and its actions nor supJessica Tarny, a sophomore at port it.” Boston College, is a member of Tarny said the group works offBC Students for Sexual Health, campus because they are not ala student group whose mission is lowed to host events on campus, to work for health education ser- which makes starting conversavices on campus. tions with students difficult. “We focus on providing sexual Jennifer Beste, associate prohealth resources for students,” fessor of theology at Xavier UniTarny said. versity, researches the “hook-up The group started in February culture” on her campus. Beste of 2009 when the Undergraduate said she thinks universities are Government of Boston College at the cusp of attending to what surveyed its students on whether students really want in sexual the college should provide more health education. Xavier is also information and services on sex- a Jesuit university located in ual health to its students. Nearly Cincinnati, Ohio. 90 percent of the student body “Students wanted to change,” said Boston College should offer Beste said. “But some real more services. ly struggled. Students need a BC Students for Sexual Health deeper grounding.”

Contraceptives one of contentious issues discussed

talk”

Beste’s research started in 2005 when students in her Christian sexual ethics course said they wanted to focus on the hook-up culture, which led her to interview and work with students about why the culture exists. Beste turned to Ignatian spirituality, which takes time to reflect everyday on the positive and negatives of life, and gave students a safe space to talk about sexuality. Beste said she facilitated a discussion that went deeper than abstinence. She said sexual education should provide both values and a discussion. “I want to empower people to not settle,” Beste said. “We don’t live in a social context where people are respected for waiting (to have sex).” Beste said she is not sure if there is a difference between sexual health on Jesuit and nonJesuit campuses. “Jesuit universities have a lot of work to do before they can say, ‘We have addressed and integrated sexuality and cura personalis on our campuses,’” Beste said.. Laurel Bauer, media relation coordinator at Xavier, said statistics about Xavier’s sexual culture generally mirror the averages in the National College Health Assessment. Nationally, 71 percent of college students have been sexually active within the last year and 56.8 percent used contraception the last time they had vaginal intercourse, according to the NCHA. Amy Melichar, coordinator of health education and promotion at Marquette, said Marquette does not compare its data on sexual health or students to other universities. Beste said she thinks that Jesuit universities need to work together to address sexual health

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2011 Trojan Condom Sexual Health Rankings 129

122

University of Notre Dame

Boston College

2011 Troja

103

93 Villanov

105

Georgetown University

Marquette University

103 Georg

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122 Boston

129 Univer

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Source: Tro http://www

Rankings are based on grades across 13 categories, including student opinion of health centers, availability of contraceptives and condoms, and campus programs, among others. Source: Trojan Sexual Health Rankings http://www.trojancondoms.com/assets/ pdfs/2011_SHRC.pdf

on campuses. She also said she thinks sexual health education and discussion need to be campus-wide initiatives. “For social change to happen, it’s got to come from a student movement supported by faculty,” Beste said. Some Catholic universities across the country have, despite church teaching, promoted the use of contraceptives. Villanova University — a Catholic, though not Jesuit, university — advocates for abstinence before marriage. However, the school does encourage its sexually active students to use barrier methods to help prevent STIs and pregnancy if students do engage in sexual relations, according to their health center’s website.

Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

On the University of San Francisco’s website, the Jesuit university provides a comprehensive list of methods of birth control and their effectiveness as well as signs and symptoms of common sexually transmitted infections. Loyola University Chicago provides STI and pregnancy testing on campus for its students and HIV screening is free. Marquette does offer HIV, STI and pregnancy testing for a charge. “A Catholic university is a good place to explore sexual health and what it means to you,” said Steve Blaha, assistant director of campus ministry. “It is the job of a Catholic university to help students answer those questions.”

Remember when a pocket full of pennies went a long way? Don’t abandon an old friend.


NEWS

6 Tribune

Thursday, march 29, 2012

MU service receives recognition Wishich one

University nationally honored for projects helping community By Erin Caughey erin.caughey@marquette.edu

Marquette was named to the president’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll March 12 due to the university’s service programs and service learning opportunities. The Corporation for National and Community Service and the U.S. Department of Education released the list. Marquette is one of 11 Wisconsin schools named on the list, which consists of 672 colleges and universities from across the country. Marquette has been named to the list every year since 2008. In university President the Rev. Scott Pilarz’s March 20 forum with students, he said service is a continuing theme in university discussions. Kimberly Jensen Bohat, Marquette’s director of service learning, was part of the group in charge of the application process and said this listing is great for Marquette’s service background. “It’s a great recognition, especially with the recent call to service brought in with Fr. Pilarz’s inauguration,” Jensen Bohat said. “It’s a nice highlight to have at Marquette.” Schools can apply in two categories: general service

commitment and special focus areas, she said. The three special areas include promise neighborhoods, summer learning and innovations in earlychildhood education. The three general area service programs used as part of the university’s application were the Marquette School of Dentistry Rural Outreach Initiative, where dental students and faculty provide care for high risk populations; the Trinity Fellows Program, a 21-month graduate fellowship promoting the university’s mission; and the MARDI GRAS service program, which has brought service to the Gulf region after the disaster of Hurricane Katrina. The three special focus area projects considered under the summer learning category for Marquette were the iHeels Summer Academy, a handson engineering experience for women; NurseCamp, a program sponsored by the College of Nursing’s BEYOND (Building Ethnic Youth Opportunities for Nursing Diversity) project; and Upward Bound, a program servicing low-income high school students in tutoring and advising. Projects are judged both on their depth and their effectiveness and impact in the community. The final decision on the list is left to President Barack Obama, but the application is something Marquette plans on continuing every year to build on the importance of service, Jensen Bohat said.

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Key Participating Students Service Hours

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Sources: Kimberly Jensen Bohat and Marquette Service Honor Roll application Graphic by Katy Moon/ kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

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Walker vs. Democratic challengers: 47%

45% Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett

49%

45% former Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk

49%

41% State Senator Kathleen Vinehout

Thursday, March 29, 2012

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NEWS

Tribune 7

Continued from page 1:

Allergies: Medical can Poll: Obama still holds lead over GOP 49% 42% Secretary of State help of Wisconsin Doug LaFollette ease symptoms Obamasuffering, vs. Republican candidates: though 48%such drugs--while 43% Mitt safe Romney and effective--are not necessarily Kristina Kollauf, a sophomore the best option. in the College of Arts & Sciences, 51% are also 39% Rick Santorum “There prescripsaid her allergies have been partion medications that may be a ticularly random and threatening better choice for40% the Ron student,” 50% Paul this spring. Shaw said. “I barely ever have allergy Allergies tend to be permanent problems, and I have been sneez53% 36% Newt developments resulting fromGingrich ing non-stop for the past week,” genetics, and Shaw Kollauf said. said they can begin at Shaw urges stu“I barely ever have any age. dents suffering this “Some people de- allergy problems, and spring to understand velop allergies as I have sneezing Source: Marquette Lawbeen School Poll their allergies’ root children, whereas non-stop for the past causes and avoid others develop them week.” those substances, or, as adults,” she said. Kristina Kollauf at the least, get help “Even the elderly Sophomore, Arts & Sciences for reactions to them. can develop new “They should seek allergies.” assistance from their Lindsey Livacich, a sopho- health care provider: their nurse more in the College of Business practitioner, physician’s assistant Administration, said her allergies or physician,” Shaw said. have been particularly unbearable While Student Health Services this year. was unavailable as of press time, Livacich said her face swelled Shaw said most health care proup this year in Milwaukee – fessionals could determine which a reaction her hometown of kind of medications will be most Los Angeles never caused. beneficial for the individual.

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Tara Holderness, a senior in the College of Business Administration, smells a flower, provoking her seasonal allergies.

WALKER VS. DEMOCRATIC CHALLENGERS

OBAMA VS. REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES

47% WALKER 45% MAYOR TOM BARRETT

48% OBAMA 45% MITT ROMNEY

49% WALKER 45% FORMER DANE COUNTY EXECUTIVE KATHLEEN FALK

51% OBAMA 39% RICK SANTORUM

49% WALKER 41% STATE SENATOR KATHLEEN VINEHOUT

50% OBAMA 40% RON PAUL

49% WALKER 42% SECRETARY OF STATE OF WISCONSIN DOUG LaFOLLETTE

53% OBAMA 40% NEWT GINGRICH

SOURCE: Marquette Law School Poll

Graphic by Zach Hubbard/zachary.hubbard@marquette.edu

According to the poll, President to Governor Scott Walker. Barack Obama still closely leads If Barrett decides not to run, all of the Republican candidates Franklin said former Dane Counin general election polls with 48 ty Executive Kathleen Falk would percent of the vote. However, likely lead the Democratic field. the lead has decreased slightly Walker is in a virtual dead heat since the Februwhen matched ary poll. up against “The race “The race is tightening, mostly beDemocratic is tightening, cause of the strength of the Romney c h a l l e n g e r s . mostly because campaign.” Walker holds of the strength a 47 percent to of the Romney 45 percent lead campaign,” over Barrett and Charles Franklin a 49 to 45 perFranklin said. Professor of Law Poll particicent lead over pants were also Falk. In these questioned about the gubernato- polls, about 5 percent of Wisconrial recall primary and other local sin residents who participated races. Even though Milwaukee said they were undecided. Mayor Tom Barrett has not an“With a race this close, that nounced his candidacy for gov- undecided 5 percent could make a ernor, he leads the polls among difference,” Franklin said. potential Democratic challengers Audience member Mary

Czech-Mrochinski said she wasn’t surprised by the data shown from the poll. She said the poll results she found most interesting were those showing that 29 percent of Wisconsin households use only cell phones and not land lines. Gousha brought up the issue of gas prices and how the public views the record high prices Wisconsin recently experienced. Franklin said participants were split almost evenly between those who thought the president can do a lot in terms of gas prices and those who said it is beyond his control. “As long as we are paying over $4 a gallon, I don’t think this issue is going away anytime soon,” Franklin said.

explore it

you live in a city

Continued from page 1:

look around

Library: Milwaukee joins endless likes of NYC, San Antonio

possibil-

learn something

Milwaukee

use for our databases.” have no due date. Library director Akhter said the cost was likely Paula Kiely said in a press release not a concern for the library. that this arrangement could allow “This is a serviceMilwaukee residents orientated orga- “This is a serviceto have access to nization,” Akhter oriented organizamore than 65 million said. “Profit motive tion. Profit motive songs in total. does not drive their The Freegal music does not drive their decisions.” service is already ofThe files are MP3s decisions.” fered in public librarSyed Akhter ies in other parts of and can be downloadProfessor of Marketing ed to a Mac or PC and the country, including can be transferred to New York City, San an iPod or smart phone. They can Antonio, San Jose, Seattle and also be stored in iTunes libraries Scottsdale, among others. and kept indefinitely since they

you live in a city

adventures

you live in a city

you live inDiscovery a city

Donʼt Litter!

you live in a city

exploration

you live in a city

you live in a city

(itʼs dirty)


Viewpoints PAGE 8

The Marquette Tribune Thursday, March 29, 2012

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Tessa Fox, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Marissa Evans, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Michael LoCicero, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Elise Krivit, Photo Editor Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Be smart with downloads

TRIBUNE TRIBUTES MAKING EVERYONE’S DAY THAT MUCH BETTER

To: The bros riding a tandem bike through campus... more power to ya. To: Joey and Trent... nice work. To: Broseph Maz ... Congratulations on being hired as the new Aladdin at Disneyland! Kiwi is so proud of you!

ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING IN THE U.S. Percentage of music purchased legally in 2009:

37%

Total amount of all digital storage downloads containing copyrighted material:

{

Cancel

Source: The Recording Industry Association of America, http://www.riaa.com/ Infographic by Rob Gebelhoff/robert.gebelhoff@marquette.edu

Virtually everyone loves music, but as CDs increasingly become artifacts, the amount of people attaining their music online continues to increase. With the immediacy and availability of online music, it can be very tempting to download songs illegally. However, various institutions are finally catching up with the times and are changing the way people share and listen to music. The Milwaukee Public Library is now offering a safe alternative to illegally downloading music. The library and the Freegal download service have recently started working together to allow Milwaukee residents with public library cards to download three free songs — legally — from the Sony music catalog each week. We at the Tribune love this idea. It not only allows us to quickly download free music, but it also provides us with a smart and legal way to do it. There are other outlets that also provide legal ways to download music. Many bands offer their singles as free downloads in hopes of getting you to eventually buy the entire album. Similarly, aspiring musicians typically hand out free copies of sampler CDs at concerts and festivals to expand their recognizability and fan base. These inexpensive alternatives are great ways to become exposed to new music without paying any additional fees. There are also other ways to access free, legal music online. Websites such as Pandora, Spotify and Grooveshark provide free online streaming. Oftentimes you can register for these websites and access a certain amount of free downloads as well. For example, when you register for a free trial of Spotify, you have 30 days to download as much music as you want. Once your trial is over, you can discontinue Spotify’s service

at no cost. So what exactly is the big deal about how you download your music? There are variations of legal and illegal ways to do so, but it goes beyond that. This isn’t just about avoiding computer viruses or staying off of the government’s radar. It’s about rewarding the musicians who produce our lives’ soundtracks. Some people may not care about how they get their music, but musicians do care – a lot. Multiple bands have made YouTube videos asking their fans to buy their CDs as opposed to illegally downloading them. The popular British band Radiohead actually allowed fans to choose how much they paid for their 2007 album “In Rainbows” — but asked for payment nonetheless. It’s clear these musicians care about their fan base and their music. But people need to remember being a musician is often a band member’s only job. If a band’s songs or albums are downloaded illegally, they are not getting financially rewarded for their work. The music labels are still finding ways to generate income, but the hardworking musicians are getting shortchanged. It’s not clear exactly how many students at Marquette illegally download music, but it’s safe to say that many of us have, at least at some point in our lives. Thanks to services such as the Milwaukee Public Library’s download program and others, there are safe alternatives to getting great music at no cost. We’re not expecting illegal downloading to stop in its tracks. In fact, we’re not expecting you to immediately stop downloading illegal music either. We do want you to be smart about how you do it. There are multiple legal options now available to get the music you love. Take advantage of them.

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.

To: The 20 percent of students who voted ... thanks for not being apathetic.

Sorry I’m ... Sorry

17.5%

10% of which was music

To: The winner of MUSG elections ... congrats!

Column

Total amount of Internet bandwidth taken up by digital theft of copyrighted material:

91%

To: Rachel Morrison ... I volunteer you as tribute!

Bridget Gamble I over-apologize. And I’m sorry. It happens all the time. When there’s no room for my bag in the overhead luggage compartment, a tall friend hits his head on my dining room chandelier, or a wobbly stranger bumps into me on public transit, profuse apologies always erupt from my mouth faster than a knee-jerk reaction. Last summer, I worked at the front desk of a hotel downtown, checking weary travelers in and out of rooms and acting like a therapist who’d write down each complaint and try to compensate. Since every situation was unique, I was never trained with scripted plans of action. The one guideline I was given, however, was to never apologize. Saying sorry is a dangerous acceptance of responsibility, which big companies, similar to people in a fender bender, avoid with adamancy. Whether a missed mini-fridge delivery was my fault, the computer’s or someone else’s, all I was able to offer was a free breakfast coupon and a smile. Hotel lobbies and car crash scenes aside, apologies are everywhere. Last week, Newt Gingrich urged Robert DeNiro to apologize after he made an “inexcusable” joke about Callista Gingrich, Karen Santorum and Ann Romney. The actor later said that his jokes were “not meant to offend,” and the case was closed. After the discovery of fabricated facts in Mike Daisey’s show, “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,” the journalist issued an apology to journalists everywhere for “(making their) jobs harder.” Sunday, Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah made a public apology for throwing a ball at a referee during a game — a move that saved him from suspension. Public apologies are key to image restoration after public fumbles. The examples of DeNiro, Daisey and Noah are just from the past week’s headlines.

We’re in a constant tornado of public apologies from different loudmouths and hotheads who claim to be sorry. Whether or not we believe there’s heart behind public apologies, we do know this much to be true: Those words have power. Apologies give people power by stripping them of it. Self-deprecate a little, and forgiveness will follow. But most of us, myself included, can’t handle that initial ego blow, so we just try to look humble and fake remorse for inconsequential things, like stepping on someone’s heel. For me, standing behind that hotel desk — never offering apologies to guests who were panicking over booking complications and obscene credit card charges that were almost always a result of my carelessness — was remarkably easy. Clearly, I’d had practice dodging responsibility. Over the past couple of years, I’ve nullified so many things that haven’t needed nullifying, like sneezing in the middle of a friend’s story, that I’ve lost sight of what is actually hurtful and worth an apology. To make it worse, my overuse of “sorry” has diluted the word to the point of uselessness in cases when I need it most. Noah, Daisey and DeNiro will most likely be OK after their mishaps. Their words, because they are used so scarcely, their words still have potency. But if the apologies I’ve offered for every banal mistake were heard in press conferences and published in newspapers, my reputation would be shot. I’d be a fraud with nothing convincing to say when I was genuinely sorry. Over-apologizing is one of my unhealthiest habits, making my obsessive knuckle cracking look like cardioaerobics. In apologizing for having a carry-on bag, a dining room chandelier and feet, I’ve not only repeatedly denounced my basic existence — I’ve debilitated a crucial word. Hopefully with age and practice, I’ll shake this habit. I’ll make eye contact instead of excuses. I’ll figure out the difference between fault and flaw. I’ll stop mistreating “sorry” so that when I mistreat someone, I’ll have something to heal the hurt. The word means close to nothing to me, but on the receiving end, it’s an entirely different story. bridget.gamble@marquette.edu

"Spring is nature’s way of saying 'Let’s Party'!" -Robin Williams


VIEWPOINTS

Thursday, march 29, 2012

Tribune 9

COLUMN

If you saw the sign, it was not Ace of Base

Ian Yakob I was unimpressed while looking over my depleted list of column ideas, and I felt like I needed a sign. Then it hit me. Needing a sign was my sign. Think about how that sort of thing works. I was searching for some answer and then, as if I understood a secret design to the world around me, my mind found one. We do variations of this all the time. Whenever my dog winks at me I think it’s a sign that something dramatic is about to happen. It’s called apophenia, the formation of unmotivated mental connections that makes us attach significance to insignificant things. It’s our natural tendency to find meaningful patterns in meaningless noise. I heard a story from a girl who only knew her soon-to-be husband for five weeks when they had their first Christmas together. As spoof gifts, they ended up getting each other the same Spongebob coloring book. We can’t help but think that was “totally a sign,” and now they’re happily married. Oddly enough, these signs are useful for us because we often take them as cosmic messages telling us to understand or do something. Whether or not they are

naturally meaningless, we attach artificial as providential messages from God. If they meaning to them, and that becomes actual are entirely non-supernatural, then they would just be recognizable synchronisms meaning. Personally, I wish I could comprehend which we naively believe to be significant. To me, since these signs make a differmy own example that happened last week regarding my graduate school decision be- ence at least to our degree of understanding, I think they’re significant with or without tween two places over 2,000 miles apart. I was walking home when someone proper justification anyway. They help us understand passed me on the sidewalk ourselves wearing a T-shirt of one of the schools, and right as we crossed These things could have because our interpretapaths he tripped on the uneven pavement and lurched toward happened to me a million times tions reveal we me. No less than an hour later before I had a decision to make, but what I was sitting in my apartment now that it was relevant, I noticed want through what we watching “Jeopardy!” when one them, and they meant something. want things contestant mentioned having to mean. graduated from the exact proWhether digram of my other option. These things could have happened to me vine or fabricated, we use them to make a million times before I had a decision to ourselves more comfortable in the surmake, but now that it was relevant, I no- rounding world. I personally believe God may have a lot ticed them, and they meant something. Look, anything can become a sign if we to do with it, and the cat and mouse game frame it right. You can take this next offer we play when trying to decipher signs from as a sign if you want to, and I promise every God versus signs from our silly selves is what makes us interestingly capricious in bit of it is true. The first Marquette student that tweets thought. It’s an area where we let faith conor emails me saying “I want $5” will get sistently overpower logic, and I think that’s $5 from me, no strings attached. The only pretty cool. Still, even if we knew for sure where catch is that I can’t already know you, because that wouldn’t be fair. We’ll meet up signs come from, things wouldn’t be so at the AMU, and you’ll take my money. I mysterious and fun. But seriously, don’t might wear a trench coat for good measure. ever be foolish enough to think you should But what’s the real answer? Are signs get engaged because your 267th turn in external messages given to us by an exte- Draw Something had the word “baby” or rior agent or force? Or are they just coin- anything. cidences within a pattern we’ve mentally ian.yakob@marquette.edu constructed? If they are external, then we can take them

NEWS

IN THE

“Just because someone wears a hoodie does not make them a hoodlum.” - Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Illinois, on the Trayvon Martin case before he was removed from Congress for wearing a hoodie against dress code rules

“I won’t get in Stan’s way. I won’t get in our manager’s way. I will be heavily involved. I’m writing a big check here.” - Magic Johnson on his corporation’s purchase of the Los Angeles Dodgers franchise

“They’ve gone for the children for whatever purposes - in large numbers. Hundreds detained and tortured... it’s just horrendous.” - United Nations’ Human Rights Chief Navi Pillay on Syrian authorities’ targeting children in recent conflict


Marquee

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 10

Thursday, March 29, 2012

THE

VOICES

BEHIND

SPOKEN WORD

Poetry in Milwaukee talks to young crowd Friday during a screening of “Mark My Words,” a featurelength documentary that follows Autumn Blaze coolly eight local slam artists’ lives for approaches the micro- 24 hours on stage, in their homes phone. She gazes into and with Milwaukee youth. the audience mem- The Milwaukee Art Museum bers’ eyes, ruffles her showed the film in conjuncafro and tauntingly tion with the Milwaukee Artist traces her fingers from Resource Network and the Milthe nape of her neck waukee Chapter of the Black to the center of her Public Relations Society. “I wanted to take a slice of chest. The Milwaukee spoken word artist, the poetry community and take entangled in a love affair a look at some of the artists, which, in my opinion, happen with a married man, bares all: “Metaphoric phrases drizzled to be not only some of the most in excessive syllables being powerful artists in our city, soaked in adjectives and be- but some of the most powerful ing fondled in similes. Not me artists I’ve ever heard,” said … Hell you can just give it to Brad Pruitt, writer, director and producme quickly er of “Mark Daddy because the sex is so “The poetry scene (in Milwau- My Words,” in a Radio good when it’s kee) is a mini society within s p o n t a n e o u s itself in that it goes in cycles.” M i l w a u k e e interview. … And I feel S p o k e n so comproDan Vaughn word is just mised because Spoken Word artist and poet what it sounds I know that like – the oral second to God not even your mama could love performance of written poetry. you more than me. And the sad It can be a way to tell stories, thing is: your wife? Well, she express a feeling or communicate an idea. It is often intended probably says the same thing.” There is no applause. Only for on-stage performance and can be as eccentric or subtle as snaps. Artists like Autumn Blaze the poet intends. “Just like any form of commanded attention last By Heather Ronaldson

heather.ronaldson@marquette.edu

artistic expression, it gives people an outlet,” said Justice Shorter, a senior in the College of Communication who also performs spoken word. During the Q-and-A segment that followed the movie screening, some audience members expressed frustration at not being more informed of the spoken word scene in Milwaukee. One woman said she had never heard of any poetry slams or open-mic nights after 10 years of living in the city. The panel, composed of artists featured in the film, jokingly replied, “Do you leave your house? How ’bout a Google search?” Every Tuesday night, Kwabena Nixon hosts “Poetry Unplugged” at Club Nostalgia, 7155 N. 43rd St. Poets who take the stage are accompanied by music by DJ Mr. Martin and local band Cigarette Break. Linneman’s, 1001 E. Locust St., devotes Monday evenings to open-mic readings. “The poetry scene (in Milwaukee) is a mini society within itself in that it goes in cycles,” said Dan Vaughn, spoken word artist and poet. “I think our cycle is on a low right now, whereas five years ago, you probably had an open-mic every night of the week.” According to freelance

writer Kenya Evans, spoken the line, “The truth is…” Nixon word gained popularity in Mil- emphasizes the freedom of this waukee about 15 years ago, es- exercise, telling students to nepecially after the movie “Love glect correct grammar, spelling Jones” came out in 1997. The and writing rules. One student revival of the black renaissance started to cry while reading her is a major theme poem, revealing in the film and is feelings of hopedepicted through “Just like any form of lessness and the lovers who meet in artistic expression, it memory of being gives people an outlet.” raped as a child. a poetry café. Nationally Vaughn does a known poet and Justice Shorter similar exercise musician Gil Senior, College of Communications called “I Am.” Scott-Heron He approaches stirred up spoken students as an word popularity, particularly outside voice – one differin the 1970s and ’80s. After ent from their principal or his death in 2011 at age 62, teacher – to help them find the Radio Milwaukee ran a tribute root of their anger. segment featuring local art“It’s therapeutic especially ists who read poetry in homage for young people. It’s a chaotic of the “grandfather of rap.” age and confusing time, and The lyricists featured in “Mark (spoken word) is a centralized My Words,” including Dan way to let all of that out through Vaughn, Tina “Ms Jazzy” Nix- the form,” Shorter said. on, Muhibb Dyer, Shelly Davis Vaughn has participated in and Dasha Kelly, follow in Her- and helped coach all 10 of Milon’s footsteps and rally emo- waukee’s poetry slam teams in tional responses from listeners – the past 10 years. Due to lack especially among youth. of fan support and particiThe artists visit local pants this year, however, there high schools to lead poet- will not be an 11th. ry workshops that will help “Milwaukee has some of the kids through the process best poets in the country, and of finding their voice. we’re just not getting the sup“Mark My Words” shows port that we need to really Nixon at one such workshop, get out there,” Nixon said. prompting students to finish


Thursday, March 29, 2012

Tribune 11

MARQUEE

Robison provides different ‘Look’ at Asperger’s children. Robison was bullied as a young child and often took matters into his own hands. “I solved my bullying problem with one word: pliers,” Robison joked. After many failed attempts at friendships, Robison isolated himBy Liz McGovern self away from the world and beelizabeth.mcgovern@marquette.edu came engulfed in his passion for John Elder Robison has de- machinery. However, he found signed signature special effects high school classes to be unsatisguitars for KISS and helped build fying and boring, eventually dropPink Floyd’s sound equipment. ping out of school as a sophomore. “My loneliness gave me He is on the panels for both the Centers for Disease Control and free time to concentrate on Prevention and the National Insti- electronics,” Robison said. Robison channeled his inteltutes of Health. He is a published author of two books — one a ligence into electronics and New York Times bestseller — music. He studied the mechanics of electric circuits and soon with two more on the way. And he has Asperger’s became involved in the music scene. He created illuminated, syndrome. It’s the bestseller that gives it pyrotechnic guitars for KISS. away: “Look Me in the Eye: My He even toured with the band Life with Asperger’s,” a memoir and worked backstage. After a year on the road, Rothat focuses on the heartwarming, upsetting and hilariously bizarre bison wanted to get a job in the moments of life on the autistic corporate realm. His ability to spectrum. Last Thursday, Robison concentrate deeply and take in spoke at Boswell Books about his information at a seemingly impossible rate enabled trials, tribulations and him to teach himself successes. “The trait that hurt the two to three years Asperger’s was me so much ended worth of knowledge not a diagnosable about digital engidisease when Robi- up being a good neering necessary in son was a child, and thing.” just two weeks. while it was painful John Elder Robison He worked at Milenough being regardAuthor ton Bradley, although ed as “stupid” and he had to fabricate “strange” by teachers, his education in orRobison’s home life der to get the position. He eventuwas difficult as well. The public got an early glimpse ally quit his job after worrying he into Robison’s life when his would be caught in his lie. “I felt like a fraud. I was conbrother, Augusten Burroughs, wrote “Running With Scissors,” vinced that I was a failure,” the bestselling memoir about his Robison said. A friend gave Robison a book own strange childhood. Robison’s alcoholic father and schizophrenic about Asperger’s, and he was mother made life grueling, espe- soon officially diagnosed. He cially when Asperger’s prevented wrote “Look Me in the Eye” him from connecting with other and Asperger’s advice book “Be

Author’s childhood experience gives motivation, hope

Different,” and became heavily invested in autism research. Today, Robison now works with the nonprofit organization Autism Speaks, has been featured on a television shows about neurology, and has worked with therapists to help adults with Asperger’s learn job skills and team building. “The trait that hurt me so much ended up being a good thing,” Robison said. “Autism robbed me of my ability to make friends but set me free as an adult.” Robison also has a son with Asperger’s and is writing another comedic memoir on raising an autistic son from the perspective of an autistic person. He advocates for parents of special needs children because he wants to show these families that there is hope. “Special needs books can be cripplingly depressing. These books are full of heroic mommies and traumatized children,” Robison said. “There needs to be a happy book about special needs.” Carole Burns, director of the Wakerly Technology Training Center in Johnston Hall, attended Robison’s presentation. Burns has a personal connection to Robison’s story. She has a 20-year-old son with Asperger’s. “This is the first (autism) book I have read that I felt like (my son) could have a normal life,” Burns said. Burns wanted to find social opportunities for her son. She could not find any social clubs in Wisconsin for Aspergians, so she created a group online. Her club, Aspergers Empowerment, meets once a month at Marquette. “Adults with Asperger’s can get together with likeminded individuals and not feel ostracized,” Burns said. Autism advocacy and research has been a large component of Burns’ life. She is working to

Photo via Crown Publishing

Robison’s book, “Look Me in the Eye,” is a New York Times bestseller.

obtain a doctorate in communications, with a thesis on how social media can help people with Asperger’s. She is also working on the equal access board with the Office of Disability Services. She wants to create more opportunities for people with Asperger’s to obtain job skills, go to college and acclimate to a college lifestyle. Active Minds, Marquette’s mental ealth awareness group, is currently hosting its annual Mental Health Awareness week, and Monday was based on Asperger’s

syndrome awareness. The club watched an episode of “Community” and talked about Danny Pudi’s character, Abed, who has Asperger’s and attends college. Shannon Rohn, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, organized the event. She advocates for autism research for her brother who has Asperger’s. “A lot of people and families are affected by (Asperger’s),” Rohn said. “You do not always know how many people it affects and what they’re going through.”

question for both the characters and of the 150-minute running time. the real-life audience. The only time Lawrence’s perThe build-up to the games them- formance seems off-key is when selves is nicely done by direc- the script rushes her character tor Gary Ross and his co-writers, through emotions. When she volwhich include the original author. unteers for her sister or gives a Some of the satirical elements in- three-finger salute to a fallen comvolving the dystopian capital are petitor, it should be emotional, intriguingly played out, such as the but both scenes happen so fast development of on-screen perso- the audience has no choice but nas for the wealthy to to move along. root and invest in. Despite rushing at The first half of It reaches for points, “The Hunger “The Hunger Games” intellectual spectacle Games” still ends up also lets the dread of but lacks the spark feeling long, a side the situation linger or punch to reach effect of the film ampwith the characters. its goal. It aims high, ing up on both the roHutcherson, who starts mance and smart charoff seemingly naïve, which makes its fall acters making dumb has several quietly in- feel harder. decisions in the last tense scenes where he third. Katniss in parcomes to accept his ticular seems to have tragic fate. a death wish, standing too close to Much of the film’s power comes explosions and running out in the from Lawrence, who has risen from open. indie star to tabloid star seemingly Not helping are Ross’ jittery overnight. As she ascends into the cameras. A simple speech by the deadly game, there’s a true look of wealthy Effie Trinket (Elizabeth terror in her wide eyes, one that Banks) is shot with the same handsticks with the audience for the rest held intensity as an action scene

from “The Bourne Ultimatum” but without the same skill. Slight technical qualms can be more easily forgiven if a movie leaves an impact on the audience, and unless you’re an extreme fan, “The Hunger Games” won’t. Its dystopian future is interesting but ultimately childish. The idea of wealthy citizens dressed in extravagant clothes with gaudy hairdos may work on the page, but on the screen, it looks too absurd to be plausible. There’s no sense that this truly is where society may lead. There’s a lot to like about “The Hunger Games” — the nuanced performances, an intriguing concept, several intense sequences — which might be why it feels disappointing upon reflection. It reaches for intellectual spectacle but lacks the spark or punch to reach its goal. It aims high, which makes its fall feel harder. Or, to make the cliche food reference, the film could have been fine Italian cuisine, but ends up as a plate of Olive Garden fare.

‘Hunger Games’ craves more emotion, realism

Shaky direction, goofy dystopia eat away at audience By Matt Mueller matthew.mueller@marquette.edu

The new blockbuster “The Hunger Games,” based on the extraordinarily popular book series by Suzanne Collins, deserves piles of awards. Or at least its marketing campaign does. Surely no one at Lionsgate thought that the dystopian novel featuring brutal childon-child violence would be an easy sell, much less result in one of the highest grossing opening weekends in movie history. For a non-reader, such as myself, much of the curiosity about “The Hunger Games” comes from its insanely fast rise to pop culture phenomenon. Large chunks of the movie justify this fandom, transferring the interesting characters and social commentary

from books to screen. But there’s also something missing in this film adaptation. While intense and well acted, the franchise starter comes off as relatively light and unaffecting — two words that aren’t often associated with televised child murder. For the five-ish people uninitiated into the cult of Collins, the story follows Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), a young girl living in a desolate near-future dystopia where the extravagantly wealthy Capitol lords over twelve impoverished districts. When she volunteers as “tribute” to save her younger sister from the same fate, she is forced to compete in a government-sponsored fight to the death with other randomly selected youths from other cities. During her training, Katniss learns how to appease wealthy sponsors and establishes a potential romance with fellow tribute, Peeta (Josh Hutcherson). How much of their young love is real and how much is orchestrated for their sadistic viewers is a


MARQUEE

12 Tribune

Thursday, March 29, 2012

COLUMN

Let the Summerfest countdown begin!

Sarah Elms Summerfest is one of the many reasons why I love Milwaukee. I know, I know, the week-anda-half-long music extravaganza won’t be here until the end of June. But the countdown is under 100 days, so I think it’s fair for me to start getting excited. That, and a bunch of headliners were just announced. Now I really can’t contain myself. When I think back, Summerfest actually served as my introduction to this wonderful city. I am one of the many Marquette students who, before college, called the suburbs

of Chicago home. In junior high of my summer. Take it from me: and high school, I got my live music If you’re going to be anywhere fix at barn shows, countless battles near Milwaukee this summer, of the bands, Libertyville’s Mick- you’d be missing out on a lot of ey Finn’s and Arlington Heights’ good music – and people watchKnights of Columbus Hall (where ing – if you don’t check it out Fall Out Boy got its start). for at least one day. Once I got my driver’s license, If my nostalgic reflections aren’t though, I started to think bigger. enough to persuade you, here’s Milwaukee is some informaonly an hour At what other venue would you tion that should. north of my have the opportunity to get your 24 ground stage hometown, and dance on to Lupe Fiasco and and seven MarSummerfest adcus Amphithemission is only Robyn for under 20 bucks? ater headlin$8 if you get ers are already there before 4 confirmed and p.m. Not only posted on the that, but this festival actually books Summerfest website, and there are an awesome variety of music. How many more to come. Some ground could I – or anyone else, for that stage standouts include The Avett matter – pass that up? Brothers, The Head and the Heart, Naturally, the summer after my Lupe Fiasco, Robyn and Fitz & the sophomore year of high school, Tantrums, and those are just the artI started making the trip to Henry ists I’m personally pumped to see. Maier Festival Park, and I haven’t The Avett Brothers played two stopped since. This 11-day celebra- sold-out shows at the Riverside tion of music has become a staple Theater earlier this year, and the

performance I saw blew me away. I knew they would be good, but their talent and stage presence was beyond what I expected. The Head and the Heart also graced Milwaukee with their presence this year, filling Turner Hall Ballroom with their inescapable energy. It was probably the second most fun concert I’ve ever been to, behind only Portugal. The Man (which is my favorite band, so I may be a little biased). Did I mention the ground stage shows cost nothing more than the general admission? At what other venue would you have the opportunity to get your dance on to Lupe Fiasco and Robyn for under 20 bucks? Fitz & the Tantrums are Summerfest veterans who opened for Maroon 5 at a free stage last year. The fans have spoken, and this time around, the soulful six-piece band has snagged their own spot as a headliner. The supporting acts have not been

announced yet, but often they are just as good as the main draws. The two amphitheater standouts so far are The Beach Boys on July 1 and Aerosmith on July 7. They are interesting choices after last year’s Katy Perry, Kanye West and Britney Spears amphitheater shows, but fun ones nonetheless. Better yet, there are still four amphitheater spots left to fill, and I wouldn’t be surprised if there are performers in the works that appeal more to the younger crowd as well. Summerfest offers something for everyone, no matter what your musical tastes are. It is also a huge part of what makes Milwaukee so much fun in the summer. If you’ve only experienced this city during the school year, I suggest you hang around once school lets out. There is a lot more to Milwaukee than Marquette’s campus, and Summerfest is a great place to get your feet wet. sarah.elms@marquette.edu

Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks kick it at Turner Hall 70-year-old swing music legend keeps his old school style By Matt Mueller matthew.mueller@marquette.edu

YOU MUST BE THE CHANGE

YOU WISH TO SEE IN THE WORLD

-GANDHI

The music industry has never been prone to long, extended careers. For every star like Madonna or The Rolling Stones, there are at least 10 one-hit wonders, such as the Baja Men, Lou Bega or Vanilla Ice. Their singles may live on, but their careers only do so as obscure pop culture trivia answers. After over forty years in the cutthroat industry, however, 70-year-old Dan Hicks continues to thrive. Much of his success is thanks to his unique brand of music, which Hicks – along with his band, the Hot Licks – is bringing to Turner Hall Ballroom tonight. Hicks’ music is a combination of twangy Western folk, jazz, pop, bluegrass and often humorous lyrics. He simply calls it swing. “Swing is a kind of jazz, and I like to think that’s the most influential (genre) for me,” Hicks said. “If a cabdriver were to just ask me what kind of music we play, I’d say from the backseat, swing.” His long-lasting passion for music began back in junior high with a love for jazz. He started to play drums in the school band, which inevitably led the California native toward joining other bands. It was also during this time when he began to learn some of the instruments he is known for today. “I was kind of a jazzer and then I picked up a folk guitar and got that going somehow,” Hicks said. “I was a big fan partly because I could do some of it myself, learn some tunes and get some gigs.” After a few years, Hicks banded together with some other musicians to create his current band, the Hot Licks. The Licks have gone through several changes over their four decades of existence, but Hicks still finds

himself comfortable on stage with the group, making music. “I’ve played with a bunch of different people, and the new people become not so new after a while,” Hicks said. “The two girls singing with me now have been with me probably longer than the original Hot Licks lasted.” In addition to the Hot Licks, the jazz/folk legend has recorded and worked with several other famous artists, including Jimmy Buffett, Willie Nelson and Bette Midler. According to Hicks, each performer and recording experience is different. Sometimes, as in the case of Bette Midler, they can be “a little pushy,” and other times, the collaborators never even see each other. “I’ve never even met Willie,” Hicks explained. “That was all done with a sent MP3 or something, whatever that was.” Clearly, Hicks hasn’t jumped on every technological and modern fad. Though he has a website and

speaks highly of new recording technology, Hicks admits that he himself doesn’t own a computer. “I guess I like to do stuff the old-fashioned way, like telephone calls and putting stuff in the mail,” Hicks said. While other artists have jumped on new media to gain audiences and fame, Hicks has managed to find niche success without having to jump through pop cultural hoops. In many cases, according to Hicks, that’s actually been a benefit. “I’m kind of in my own space. I’m not exactly out there in the competitive world,” Hicks said. “Trends don’t really affect me too much. It’s a constant thing; there aren’t a lot of ups and downs, like being on Leno one week and next week, no one’s heard of us.” After forty years of success in a fierce industry, it appears Dan Hicks’ laidback persona and strategies have paid off for him and his listeners.

Photo courtesy of Clare Wesserman

Dan Hicks has survived in an industry characterized by rapid turnover.


MARQUEE

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Tribune 13

Rival FM more about creation than competition Riverwest show hopes to join music lovers across MKE By Vanessa Harris vanessa.harris@marquette.edu

Adam DeMarie and Mark Zbikowski work together at a technology field for a company downtown. By day, they sit in offices like thousands of other adults in Milwaukee. At night, they tend to Rival FM, a songwriting and recording competition. “I’ve been into two things much of my life: computers and music,” Zbikowski said. This Sunday, April 1, the duo will introduce Rival FM to Milwaukee at the Riverwest Public House, offering an exciting new twist to the battle of the bands model and a chance for participants to find a fresh community of musicians and music enthusiasts. The basic premise of Rival FM is based on an idea from two other Wisconsin natives – Dan Harmon, the Milwaukee-born creator and executive producer for the NBC television comedy series “Community,” and Rob Schrab, the Mayville-native known for writing the comic book series “Scud: The Disposable Assassin” and co-writing the feature film “Monster House.” Harmon and Schrab created Channel 101, a monthly film festival in Los Angeles and New York City. Filmmakers submit five-minute shorts for a panel of previously submitted participants, who then choose which films a live audience gets to see and vote on. Replace film with music, and you have the basic premise for Rival FM. “We wanted to do something similar to that,” Zbikowski said. “We wanted to meet more people interested in music.” For the first performance, Zbikowski and DeMarie choose the singles that audiences will hear on Sunday. Artists submit their original music to the Rival FM website before the set deadline each month (extended to Saturday, March 31 for the upcoming show). After the first performance, the fan favorites choose their top five picks to continue on to next month and become the selection panel. The winning artists submit five songs, as well as select five new songs for next month’s competition. The favorites are also posted on Rival FM’s website for more fans to discover. “We want it to serve as a motivation for people to produce music,” DeMarie said. “We’re hoping communities of artists come from this.” There’s no cash prize or

A FOOL THINKS HIMSELF TO BE

WISE, BUT A WISE MAN

KNOWS HIMSELF TO BE A

FOOL.”

-WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

extravagant exposure that comes members. Keeping things free, with entering Rival FM’s month- Zbikowski and DeMarie said, is ly competitions, but Zbikowski designed to create a welcoming and DeMarie hope people come culture and responsive atmofor the bigger picture. sphere for fans and artists alike. “The reward “We wanted is really playto stay pure,” ing the music,” DeMarie said. Zbikowski “It’s all about said. “If monthe idea of ey entered the people getWhat: Rival FM situation, it ting together to would make share ideas and When: Sunday, April 1 things more experience new at 7 p.m. competitive things.” but not in a With any new Where: Riverwest friendly way.” concept, the Rival FM’s first go-around Public House goal is to encan be unpreCost: Free courage credictable. No ativity and matter how the To learn more or to constructive upcoming April submit an entry, go to feedback for 1 show goes, serious and Zbikowski and www.rival.fm occasional DeMarie are musicians. optimistic about The few rules the potential of open it up for artists of any Rival FM. age, genre and skill level – the “This is a new idea, so we’re intent is for the event to be as open to input and suggestions,” inclusive as possible. DeMarie said. “There are things There is no entry fee to submit that might not go well, but we music to Rival FM, nor is there want to create something that an admission cost for audience people will like.”

RSVP

Photo courtesy of Mark Zbikowski

Rival FM’s first event is Sunday, April 1 at the Riverwest Public House.


Study Break

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 14

Thursday, March 29, 2012

cross word LOADING AN AIR RIFLE By Mark Hooper ACROSS   1 Arrogant person   5 Best suited 11 Cries of excitement 14 ___ and terminer 15 In an ear-piercing way 16 Almond or pecan 17 Emulating a surgeon, pre-operation 19 “To ___ is human ...” 20 Words rarely uttered by toadies 21 Religious hermit 23 Comparatively coy 26 Checkup sounds 28 Woes, as of the world 29 Show watchers 31 Butcher-shop machines 33 Number before “Liftoff!” 34 Printed mistake 36 Be verbally incoherent 41 Sail support part 42 Note traded for bills 44 Dry creek 47 Accelerator 50 Bridle attachment 51 ___ and haw 52 Hard to get a reaction out of 53 Rub the right way?

56 Chinese river or dynasty 57 Make an inquiry 58 Astound 64 Warren female 65 Television antenna 66 Voice amplifier 67 “... ___ a bottle of rum” 68 Snappy answer to a stupid question 69 During the course of DOWN   1 Coast Guard alert   2 The Big Apple, briefly   3 “ ___ the ramparts ...”   4 Sultanate on Borneo’s coast   5 Clerical robes   6 Maui finger food   7 252 wine gallons   8 Neatens, as a lawn   9 Say “Offisher, I am shober,” e.g. 10 Begin on the home keys 11 Ed of “Married ... With Children” 12 Fling with great force 13 Cause of worry lines 18 Yawninducing speaker 22 South Beach locale 23 “Paulo” lead-in

24 Seek prey 25 It’s symbolized by a light bulb 26 Bitter-tasting 27 Succulent vegetation 30 Black, in Barcelona 31 Botanical supporters 32 Dirty dog 35 Sarai’s husband 37 City on the Saone and Rhone 38 Mary ___ of cosmetics 39 Up-down connector 40 Frost coating 43 Utmost (Abbr.) 44 Assemblage of warships 45 Logician’s need 46 Took chances 48 Boardwalk structure 49 Challenging riddle 51 Valentine’s Day symbol 54 A good way off 55 “... as they shouted out with ___” (“Rudolph” lyric) 56 Flogging memento 59 Who’s who piece, for short 60 Place to get smashed 61 “Fire!” preceder 62 Aspen runner 63 Williams the baseball legend

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 16

Thursday, March 29, 2012

women’s soccer

Spring gives team a chance to adjust lineup Brown, Hishmeh expected to take on leadership roles

By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

The spring season for the Marquette women’s soccer team has always been a time for the team to sharpen its skills and work with new players who might not have a lot of prior experience playing together. That’s certainly the case this spring as the Golden Eagles will have to replace departed seniors Natalie Kulla, Kerry McBride and Lindsey Page from a team that won a third consecutive Big East American Division Championship and went to the second round of the NCAA Tournament last season. While official statistics aren’t accumulated during the spring, coach Markus Roeders and company will play a total of eight matches, hosting only one at Valley Fields. Roeders is happy with the team’s progress so far this spring and is looking forward to a challenging spring slate. “We’ve been working on team training for the past five, six weeks now, three days a week,” Roeders said. “I like what we’ve been doing, and they’ve been working really hard. “We don’t necessarily see the benefits every day, but I think as we move forward they’ll have a nice foundation going into the summer,” he said. Some nagging injuries have left the team shorthanded so far, including what Roeders deemed some “longer term” injuries to players like senior forward Rachael Sloan, sophomore midfielder Kate Reigle and others who won’t be available until the fall season begins in August. Sloan missed nearly all of last

season with a knee injury but redshirted, preserving another year of eligibility. Junior forward Rachel Brown is in her final spring season in a Golden Eagle uniform and has tried to embrace a leadership role both on the field and off. “We all kind of prepared ourselves for losing the seniors, but I think that we can recover, and the most you can do is move forward,” Brown said. “We do have a lot of talent even though we

have some younger players.” Sophomore defender Katie Hishmeh, along with junior defender Ally Miller, now has the most experience on the Golden Eagles’ vaunted back line after the departures of McBride and Kulla. Hishmeh knows she has to become a more vocal leader to make sure everyone is where they are supposed to be. “It’s a good learning experience, and it’s good to get new people out there,” Hishmeh said. “I feel like

now more than ever I’m able to help the new players and give them the pointers from what I’ve learned in the past.” The Golden Eagles went 1-1 last weekend, beating Loyola (Illinois) 5-2 before falling to Illinois State, an NCAA Tournament team last season, 4-2. Just 20 minutes after the win against Loyola, the Golden Eagles took on a rested Illinois State team and appeared a bit fatigued, according to Roeders.

“The hard part last weekend was playing back to back,” Roeders said. “Illinois State was better than Loyola, and, as the game wore on, we made more mistakes.” There’s no rest for the weary this weekend, as Marquette travels to Champaign, Ill. Saturday to take on Illinois at noon, before making the three-hour drive to Evanston, Ill. to take on Northwestern for a 6 p.m. tilt.

Photo Courtesy of Marquette Images

Sophomore defender Katie Hishmeh, along with junior Ally Miller now have the most experience on the Golden Eagles’ last line of defense.

COLUMN

men’s Basketball

Don’t take Buzz Wilson joins cousin at MU Sophomore Jamil rumors personally Wilson tells Duane

Matt Trebby Prior to a press release on Tuesday night from Marquette’s athletic department, there had been much speculation regarding Buzz Williams’ future as head coach of the men’s basketball team. To sum up the statements of Buzz and Director of Athletics Larry Williams: Buzz isn’t going anywhere, and they’re excited about the program’s future. Before this reassurance, some fans considered Buzz leaving as a realistic possibility. There were rumors of a rift between the coach and the school’s administration, including Wil-

liams and University President the Rev. Scott Pilarz. The last year or so hasn’t been the smoothest off the court for Marquette, including bar fights and six players being cited for being in a club underage. One would think Williams and Pilarz would want to fix the image of the program and the school. But, they’ve dealt with those issues, and they are now are a thing of the past. The opinions of those who already think little of the program won’t change anytime soon. I’m not saying just throw it under the rug and say it never happened, but there is no changing any of it now. What Buzz, Pilarz and Williams must do now is make sure events like those never happen again. Everyone knows Marquette makes a lot of money because of its men’s basketball team. Because of the source of the See Rumors, page 17

to hit the books By Mark Strotman mark.strotman@marquette.edu

A year ago, high school junior Duane Wilson Jr. thought it was different that the Marquette coaching staff spoke to him about everything but basketball during his recruitment. Welcome to Buzz Williams’ world. The Whitefish Bay (Wis.) Dominican High School point guard announced his commitment to the Golden Eagles last week, giving Marquette its second recruit for the 2013 class. Marquette was the first school to offer Wilson a scholarship and stayed in close contact with the then-sophomore. Williams and associate head coach Tony Benford often took the short, 15-minute ride to Dominican to watch Wilson at open gyms, practices and games. That commitment spoke volumes to

Wilson and his family when he decided on Marquette last week. “Even if we weren’t playing a good team, or it wasn’t a big game, (Benford) would show up,” Wilson said. “He was really good to me and my family.” Wilson was invited to a handful of practices and games and said Marquette’s passion for basketball attracted him. The Golden Eagles’ style of play

“Duane (Wilson) kind of brings the whole package together as far as being able to score in transition, score in the half court, get to the basket and defend.” Paul Wollersheim Dominican coach

was also a fit Wilson said he wanted to play in. “He just loves his guards, and all three of his guards can bring the ball up,” Wilson said. “They’re combo guards.” During the recruiting process, Benford sent Wilson a highlight reel of NBA stars Derrick Rose and Kyrie Irving. Wilson said he watches the tape twice

a week. He studies the players’ moves and then works on them in the gym. He said he models his game toward Chris Paul and many have likened him to Jrue Holiday. “Duane (Wilson) kind of brings the whole package together as far as being able to score in transition, score in the half court, get to the basket and defend,” said Dominican coach Paul Wollersheim. The 6-foot-3 guard averaged 18.8 points, 4.8 rebounds and 5.6 assists for the Knights, who went 27-1 and won the Division IV state championship two weeks ago. Wilson shot 52 percent from the field, 43 percent from beyond the arc and 82 percent from the free throw line for the season. His 84 steals are also the single season record at Dominican, something he prides himself in every time he steps on the court, regardless of opponent. “I need to put everything together,” Wilson said. “I’ve been working on every part of my game.” See Wilson, page 17


SPORTS

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Tribune 17 TRIBUNE Player of the Week

Sports Calendar

Saturday 31

Friday 30

Women’s Soccer at Illinois – 6 p.m.

Thu.

29

Women’s Volleyball vs. Milwaukee - 7 p.m.

Sat. Track & Field Oliver Nikoloff Invitational

Fri.

30

Sun.

1

31

Sun.

Women’s Tennis vs. Louisville - 10 a.m.

Rumors: Williams staying

I understand where all these people are coming from, but if some school isn’t rumored to be ready to offer Buzz a boatload of money to go and coach at their school, then he is not doing his job. Every year he is probably going to have to come out with a statement saying he’s not leaving because he will have gotten so many emails from fans asking for him to stay and saying how much he means to them. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar once said, “One man can be a crucial ingredient on a team, but one man cannot make a team,” and it’s the same thing in this situation: if Buzz left, it wouldn’t be the end of the world. Marquette basketball is bigger than any one coach or player. With some of the most obsessive and passionate fans in the country, there will be some who will overreact every time. But, for those of us who truly get it, it’s about the program itself. It’s about how we truly are Marquette and no one coach leaving can change that. In the meantime, let’s look to the future and get excited for the next couple years of Marquette basketball, which are set to be some of the best in the program’s history. matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Continued from page 16:

Wilson: Second ’13 recruit

Wilson is also a first cousin of current Marquette forward Jamil Wilson. Duane said the two text back and forth and speak to each other at least once a week. “He’s always telling me to hit the books and stay out of trouble,” Duane said. “He told me Buzz (Williams) makes you work hard and that his players get after it.” Wilson said his mother, Lashonda Lever, was interested in what Marquette offered off the court. “Mom was focused on the academics,” Lever said at her son’s announcement. “That was the biggest thing.” Wilson got to see that hard work up close when he took an unofficial visit in February. He met with Ernest Eugene and Todd Smith and was able to see the players in study hall on an

Sat. Women’s Soccer at Northwestern - 6 p.m.

Continued from page 16: money, which is the team’s success, the university’s profile has been raised in a manner that would not have been possible without its successful teams of years past. We also are entering what could be a very unique period in the history of Marquette basketball. The team just finished a season where it won 14 games in the Big East and reached its second consecutive Sweet 16. With success like that coming so quickly for one of the country’s youngest and most enigmatic coaches, the demand for his services elsewhere is inevitable. Just because it was rumored Buzz may consider another job doesn’t mean Marquette fans should express their dislike for the prospect of their beloved coach leaving in as harsh a manner as some fans have. Through message board posts and tweets, fans have threatened to stop donating any money to the school if Buzz leaves. There also have been some who have went as far as to call for Williams’ job. I grew up in nearby Waukesha and have regularly attended Marquette games since I can remember. My father is an alum, and I sat by many other alumni during those years of exhilarating fandom.

Sophomore

Women’s Tennis vs. Cincinnati — 4 p.m.

Track & Field Oliver Nikoloff Invitational

31

Dan Mamalat

off-day. He also got a look at each player’s weekly schedule. “I got to see their weekly schedules and how Buzz knows when they all have class and where they are at all times,” Wilson said. “He’s more than a coach. He treats you like one of his sons.” Wilson will attempt to fill Junior Cadougan’s shoes when he arrives on campus next year and said he was impressed by what the fellow point guard had to say about his experience in Milwaukee. “Cadougan talked to me a lot and just told me how he was graduating next year and how he became a man at Marquette,” Wilson said. Wilson made his decision on that unofficial visit, but waited until Dominican’s season was over to announce it to the public.

GO MARQUETTE!

1

the facts Mamalat capped a perfect 3-0 weekend in singles play with a win over Idaho’s Abid Akbar (7-6, 6-3), which helped clinch a 4-3 victory over the Vandals at the Boise State Spring Classic last weekend. Mamalat also recorded singles victories over Ball State’s Dalton Albertin (6-4, 6-2) and Southern Miss’ Inaki Belloso (6-1, 7-6). The sophomore also teamed with senior Jonathan Schwerin for an 8-6 doubles victory over Idaho’s Marius Cirstea and Andrew Dobbs.

Men’s Tennis at USF - 11 a.m.

men’s Lacrosse

Nobile strong leader for MU Junior defenseman made tough choice to leave parents By Chris Chavez christopher.chavez@marquette.edu

Jerry Nobile is one of the older members of the men’s lacrosse team as a junior defenseman and will be bringing his experiences from Hofstra and head coach Joe Amplo to the up-and-coming program at Marquette. His speed on the field has people turning heads, but it is his work and dedication to his parents that makes him the man he is today. Nobile hails from the town of West Islip on Long Island, N.Y., where he said “people love lacrosse more than they like to eat and drink.” He played soccer more when he was younger but assimilated into the town’s culture by starting to play lacrosse as a sophomore in high school. He went on to be named to the all-league team his senior year,

Q&A

but few colleges were ready to offer him a spot on their team until Amplo reached out to him to play for Hofstra. When his coach moved to Marquette, Nobile followed, bringing his talents to Milwaukee. “Coach Amplo was the main reason I wanted to come. I think that speaks volumes about him,” Nobile said. “He’s very passionate about what he does, and I couldn’t see myself playing for anyone else but him.” Nobile stayed close to home for two years at Hofstra because his whole life he took care of his two deaf parents by making phone calls for them and setting appointments. As the man of the house, he was the key to communication for his family. “It hard to let go of that and have the strength to come to Marquette,” Nobile said. “All in all I’m happy, and my parents are proud of me.” Nobile’s goals for himself at Marquette are to get stronger and improve his defense. His days at Hofstra had him weighing in at 170 pounds. After about a year of working with strength and

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conditioning coach Todd Smith, he’s at 200 pounds with the Golden Eagles. He credits coach John Orsen, who also played under Amplo, as a big factor in understanding what to expect for on-ball defending. At the same time, Orsen likes the way Nobile stands out in his leadership around teammates. “He’s dealt with a lot off the field, and that translates to on the field,” Orsen said. “He’s a leader out there and communicates very well with the defense.” Amplo sees Nobile’s impact on the underclassmen not just on the field but in a classroom environment as well, just by selecting engineering as his major and challenging himself once again. “Jerry is a hard worker in the classroom,” Amplo said. “He really grinds each day and that sets an example for the younger guys. Here’s a guy that’s going to put school first and then show up to a weight lifting session or practice and work as hard or harder than anybody.”

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Peop l Nob e That In ile: “ spire ry with Jerry Nobile M of th g ou C eir sit y parent You ke Y C Fightin a s, be uatio they M F o U T c n t a h e a u i a a Top songs on your iPod? dece ve been nd how se r. Th Mov n s Last : “Warrio r-jerker.” Nobile: “I’m going against my ally, t-looking raising th trong e l a i e t b M r k No sa Long Island roots here and the m ichael Jo ids. Prof ee ie wa v o e r o s m d s st do a saying ‘Dirt Road Anthem’ by mina n. He’s b ionnt at Jason Aldean and Taylor hlete een Bucket List ever. Swift’s ‘Mean.’” ” e 1. Skydive ok-a-lik mother o L y it ’s 2. Visit the Great Wall of China Celebr irlfriend nn.” Celebrity Crush : “My g like Sean Pe 3. Backpack in Europe. Nobile k Nobile: “Rachel McAdams o lo aid I once s and Carly Rae Jaspen”

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Graphic by A. Martina Ibanez angela.ibanez-baldor@mu.edu

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SPORTS

18 Tribune

Thursday, March 29, 2012

men’s golf

Yet another struggle to find consistency Chester finishes in 20th place at eight over par By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

Marquette golf treaded water again at the C&F Bank Intercollegiate, finishing 21st in a field of 29 teams. The finish mirrored the

team’s previous tournaments this spring as the differential among the Golden Eagles’ scores kept them from rising in the rankings. Freshman Adam Chester again led Marquette individually, finishing in a tie for 20th place by shooting eight over par. He was the only Golden Eagle to put together a consistent performance in all three rounds. Coach Steve Bailey praised the team’s good performances

and the bright spots, calling to mind Chester’s continued improvement as an English golfer in America. “I’m happy for Adam and the progress he’s making,” Bailey said. “We see on a daily basis how talented he is. Once he tightens up his misses and converts on more birdie opportunities, he will make his way up the leaderboard.” Bailey found another silver

lining in Corey Konieczki’s last round, as the sophomore shot a 72 after shooting 78 in both of the first two rounds. “I’m proud of the way Corey (Konieczki) battled today,” Bailey said. “He only hit eight greens and managed to shoot one over. We talked last night about playing with toughness and persevering through tough stretches. Corey epitomized that today.” Konieczki said his strong finish came from good shooting combined with good putting, a rare occurrence for the Golden Eagles so far this spring. “The first few days were kind of rough,” Konieczki said. “I hit the ball decent, but my short game wasn’t where it needed to be. I missed a lot of putts and had a couple bad shifts the first two days. Luckily the last day it all came together, and I was able to hit the greens, and I was able to make birdies. When you have more than two birdies it really helps out your round.” Again Bailey had to talk about the team as a whole and how the same struggles with unity, consistency and the short game continued to plague Marquette. “Overall, a combination of our ball striking and short game hurt us this week,” Bailey said. “We only hit 51 percent of our greens and converted on 44 percent of our up and down opportunities. For us to compete, we must improve in both of those areas.”

Once again a player expressed his discontent with the team’s finish despite his own contributions providing a spark. “I wouldn’t want to say we got worse, but I still would have to say we need to get a lot better,” Konieczki said. “Unfortunately there was a lot of emotion on the golf course, and it got to people, and we didn’t play as well as we should have.” The ghosts of the USF Invitational and Bandon Dunes Championships returned to haunt the Golden Eagles, and as much as they try to break the mold every week, a pattern is developing. “The weather wasn’t a big issue, it was a little windy the second day but it was a walk in the park compared to Bandon Dunes,” Konieczki said. “Mentally we still weren’t prepared for what we needed to do.” The same problems called for the same expressed conclusion. “It really comes down to all of us putting up a good round. It’s going to take a lot of practice and getting our mental game together. Good players come back from one bad hole or come back from a bogey all the time, and we need to focus on doing that.” With another finish near the bottom of the ladder, the Golden Eagles appear stuck in a mental rut. The talent they keep saying is there has shown up in spurts, but hasn’t unified to produce an overall result worth celebrating.

The Tribune Won't Bite, I promise...

Photo Courtsey of Marquette Images

Sophomore Corey Konieczki shot a one over par 72 in the third round of the C&F Bank Intercollegiate.


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20 Tribune

SPORTS

Thursday, March 29, 2012

CATCHING UP

Bares, Beyer setting the bar for future recruits

If someone were to ask you which active NBA players graduated from Marquette, you could probably name all of them without thinking about it. However, if someone asked you to name current professional athletes from Marquette in other sports, few people could name more than one. The main reason for this discrepancy is that most of the opportunities for athletes, particularly female athletes, are overseas. However, that hasn’t stopped some very talented players from pursuing a professional career. Ashley Bares graduated in 2011 after leading the Golden Eagles to three consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances from 2008-’10. Bares is beginning her second season playing soccer for UMF Stjarnan in the top division Urvalsdedlid in Gardabaer, Iceland. Bares was twice named to an All-Big East team under coach Markus Roeders, including a first team selection as a senior. The Belgium, Wis. native ranks third all-time in game-winning goals with 10 and ranks in the top 10 in four other categories. Bares believes that roles for female athletes will continue to grow. “I think it is great to represent all sports and show the talent of all the great athletes that are out there,” Bares said. “It also gives youth athletes the opportunity to look up to great leaders and athletes, male or female.” Bares had an incredible first season in Iceland, scoring 21

goals in 18 matches, and was awarded the Golden Boot, which is given to the league leader in goals. Ashley Beyer played a big role in bringing the volleyball team to its first NCAA Tournament appearance in school history. Beyer played only three seasons at Marquette but ranks fourth in kills all-time at Marquette. The Bloomington, Ill. native realizes that the coaches for the women’s teams add to the success of all Marquette sports. “It means they are training them in the right way to prepare their bodies to perform at the best level,” Beyer said. “The coaches are doing a great job of recruiting elite athletes to come play for them, and overall it says that the department is really strong.” Beyer is in the midst of her first season with the Lindesberg Volley of the Swedish Elitserien, which is currently in the semifinals of its league playoffs. Most young athletes dream of continuing their playing career after college. Women’s volleyball coach Bond Shymansky knows that the success of Beyer and former players Nikki Klingsporn and Rabbecka Gonyo can help him land the best players. “It’s one thing to talk about, but to actually show them how it’s done, to have models and examples from our program of people that have gone on to play professionally, that makes my job a little easier,” Shymansky explained. “They understand that we can help them accomplish their goal.” Bares and Beyer knew when they arrived at Marquette that they wanted to continue to play after their career was finished in Milwaukee. The coaches and the atmosphere of each program helped them reach their dream, and neither player has an intention of ending their career anytime soon.

We've all been there. You are trying to settle into a new part of your life. A part where you can spread your wings and really fly. Alone. Dad, you're still here. Why are you still here? Helicopter parents are as natural as drinking Natty Light at a party. You don't really want them to be there, but its not like you can just say no. That is unless you're a professional tennis player. Australian Bernard Tomic was playing in the second round of the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami when he got a little peeved at his papi's negative reactions to the

points he was losing. So he did what any good son would do: He asked the chair umpire to kick his dad out. Say what? “I know he’s my father, but he’s annoying me. I want him to leave, but how is that possible?” As if that wasn't strange enough, did I tell you that Tomic' father is also his coach? You simply can't make this stuff up. So next time your parents are cramping your style, just call up DPS. I'm sure your parents will be thrilled at the open invitation to get lost. andrei.greska@marquette.edu

Former MU stars have taken talents internationally By Michael Wottreng michael.wottreng@marquette.edu

Tribune File Photo

Ashley Beyer is in the midst of her first season with the Lindesberg Volley of the Swedish Elitserien.

Just smile.

Mar. 29th, 2012 : The Marquette Tribune  

The student newspaper of Marquette University.

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