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EDITORIAL: Marquette has not lived up to promises of transparency – Viewpoints, page 6

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Volume 96, Number 22

MU under investigation Federal dept. looking at handling of sexual assault cases By Katie Doherty kathleen.doherty@marquette.edu

The Department of Education confirmed it is reviewing Marquette under the Clery Act, investigating the procedures followed by the university after allegations of sexual assault against several student athletes surfaced last semester. “As it has in other cases involving reports of sexual violence on college campuses, the U.S. Department of Education is conducting a paper program review of Marquette University relative to reporting required under the Clery Act,” said Kate Venne, director of university communication. Jane Glickman, a spokeswoman for the Department of Education, confirmed the federal agency has opened a program review

but declined to discuss details as media event raises certain conit is an ongoing investigation. cerns, the school’s independent Two separate instances of audit identifies serious non comsexual assault were reported to pliance or through a review selecDepartment of Public Safety on tion process that may also coinOct. 31, 2010 and Feb. 27, 2011. cide with state reviews performed The Chicago Tribune headlined a by the FBI’s Criminal Justice story on the instances this sum- Information Service (CJIS) Audit mer and followed up with another Unit,” the site said. article with one Provost John of the female “We never know what to expect Pauly said the accusers this university reuntil we find the final review.We’ve fall. ceived a letter The Clery tried very hard to be in compliance.” informing them Act is “a fedProvost John Pauly of the review in eral statute Marquette University early October. requiring all Students did not colleges and hear about it ununiversities participating in fed- til news broke last week. eral student aid programs to Pauly said the university was publish an annual security report not trying to withhold informathat accurately discloses campus tion from the students, but the recrime statistics and security infor- view wasn’t a public event to anmation,” the federal student aid nounce. He compared the review website said. to a type of “internal audit.” The site said the Department of “They (the Department of EduEducation may conduct reviews cation) don’t announce that they to assess compliance to the Clery are investigating a school,” Pauly Act. said. “A review may be initiated See Investigation, page 5 when a complaint is received, a

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Robbery crime scene turns deadly

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Robbery suspect Shante D. Alford, 34, was shot and killed Friday fleeing from police officers after robbing Guarantee Bank in Grand Avenue Mall. He had robbed this same bank 10 years ago. See brief, page 2.

Jaywalkers watch for cars, MPD Frontier braces for MPD ticketing bumpy business jaywalkers to the possibility of danger on the streets. The Department of Public Safety released a news brief Monday alerting students to the increased enforcement. The brief warned students of possible fines ranging from $63 to $76 for violations, which include jaywalking and speeding. Director of University Communication Kate Venne advised students to comply with the officers, citing a concern for safety on the road and on crosswalks. “We want students to stay safe and that they follow all

pedestrian and traffic laws,” Venne said. MPD approached DPS last week, informing them that officers would be on campus to increase awareness of traffic safety. DPS Lieutenant Paul Mascari said that the plan is not unusual, especially considering the worsening conditions students will face in the coming month. “With the winter weather coming, (MPD) focuses on traffic safety,” Mascari said. He speculated that Marquette

Jaywalkers on campus face fines from $63 to $76 from the Milwaukee Police Department beginning this week.

Milwaukee operation.” Kowalchuk said although about 120 layoff notices were sent, it is possible that Frontier will not have to involuntarily lay off all those employees. “It is possible that some emBy Olivia Morrissey ployees will take voluntary layolivia.morrissey@marquette.edu offs and that other positions will be reduced by attrition,” he said. In 2009, Republic Airways Frontier Airlines announced up to 120 jobs will be cut at Mil- Holdings bought Frontier — waukee’s Mitchell International which had filed for Chapter 11 Airport in an effort to bring the bankruptcy — with a bid of $108.75 million, according to a airlines out of a financial slump. Known as the airline with furry 2009 Frontier Airlines press release. The Indianawoodland creatures based Republic owns adorning the tails of four airlines and serits planes, Frontier “The schedule vices approximately Airlines lost $102.4 changes were made million last year, ac- to reduce the unprof- 1,500 flights daily to 129 cities in 41 states, cording to the Re- itable Canada, Costa Rica public Airways 2010 flying from and Mexico, accordAnnual Financial ReMilwaukee...” ing to its website. port. Peter Kowalchuk Although it is “The reductions Frontier Airlines owned by Republic, are being made to Denver-based Fronbalance our staffing needs with our Milwaukee flight tier must find passengers to fill its schedule which has been reduced, planes and maintain its finances effective in January,” said Peter while also competing with larger Kowalchuk of Frontier Airlines airlines like Southwest Airlines media relations. “The schedule and United Airlines who have changes were made to reduce a large presence at the Denver the unprofitable flying from MilSee Frontier, page 5 waukee and to strengthen our

INDEX

NEWS

VIEWPOINTS

SPORTS

Lockout

GAMBLE

GRESKA

increase traffic safety By Matt Gozun benjaminmatthew.gozun@marquette.edu

Milwaukee police officers will be on the Marquette campus in the coming days to increase enforcement of pedestrian and traffic laws, in an effort to increase awareness of the law before winter weather increases

See Jaywalkers, page 5

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquete.edu

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS........................6 CLOSER LOOK....................8

STUDY BREAK....................10 SPORTS..........................12 CLASSIFIEDS..................14

Milwaukee businesses brace for likely cancellation See, PAGE 4

Airline prepares to cut jobs in wake of financial woes

Lessons from the casino go beyond the blackjack table See PAGE 7

In the big picture, sports are not as important as we think. See PAGE 12


NEWS

2 Tribune

Hunger can ‘Beat It’

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

DPS Reports Nov. 9 At 7:40 a.m. two people not affiliated with Marquette trespassed outside Mashuda Hall. MPD was contacted and cited one of the suspects. Between 4 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. unknown person(s) removed a student’s unsecured unattended property estimated at $1,225 from a business in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. MPD will be contacted. At 7:01 p.m. a vehicle driven by an unidentified driver struck a student walking in a crosswalk in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. and fled the scene. The student was not injured. MPD was contacted. Nov. 10 At 4:17 a.m. unknown person(s) vandalized university property causing an estimated $25 in damage in Campus Town East. Facilities Services contacted. Nov. 11 At 10:06 p.m. MPD cited a student for underage drinking in the 700 block of N. 16th St.

At 10:45 p.m. a student acted in a disorderly manner in Carpenter Tower. Nov. 12 At 2:40 a.m. a student reported being battered by an alumnus in a business in the 800 block of N. 16th St. MPD was contacted. Medical assistance was declined. At 8:22 p.m. a student was in possession of a controlled substance in McCormick Hall and was taken into custody by MPD. Nov. 13 At 2:20 a.m. two students were in possession of alcohol in Schroeder Hall. At 8:22 p.m. a student was in possession of a controlled substance in Straz Tower Hall and was taken into custody by MPD. Nov. 14 At 1:09 a.m. a student was in possession of a controlled substance in the 400 block of N. 16th St. and was taken into custody by MPD.

Events Calendar NOVEMBER 2011

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Students helped plan The Hunger Task Force’s flah mob which was held before the first men’s basketball game.

Participants danced to raise awareness for poverty and hunger By Simone Smith simone.smith@marquette.edu

With the holiday season just around the corner, philanthropic organizations are getting creative to garner donations for those in need. Such was the case last Friday night when the Hunger Task Force — an organization that combats hunger in Wisconsin through food banks — performed a flash mob to the Michael Jackson song, “Beat It.” The dance served to launch the Hunger Task Force’s larger “Text Out Hunger” initiative. Dominic Mertens-Pellitteri, a senior in the College of Communication, helped organize the flash mob. He is an intern at Jigsaw, a creative advertising company in downtown Milwaukee. The interns at Jigsaw make up an internled group called Orangeaid, where they lend creativity to various projects. Mertens-Pellitteri said the purpose of Friday’s flash mob was to raise awareness, as well as to help the Hunger Task Force get higher involvement from college students. “As we went along (with planning) we realized that some

of the areas they (Hunger Task Pelliterri, who has experience with Force) were struggling with was Marquette’s Hype dance group. getting college students as do- He was responsible for assigning nors and their ‘text-to-donate’ roles to the other performers, cremethod of donation,” he said. “We ating tutorial dance videos and actkind of took those two things and ing as the lead dancer — Michael said, ‘Let’s solve a problem with Jackson. them.’” “Some of my friends had MiMertens-Pelliterri said the group chael Jackson costume pieces, so I wanted to help an organization got that hook up and just had some that would benefit locally from the fun with it,” he said. event. The Hunger Task Force fit Those involved in the flash mob that criteria, because it serves the thought it was well-received. Milwaukee area. Kristin Scalzo, a junior in the He also said the project provided College of Arts & Sciences and opportunities to learn one of the permore about the extent “Once we found that formers, beof hunger issues in everyone knew hunger lieved it was a Milwaukee. great show for was an issue, it really “Once we found both the dancers that everyone knew empowered the entire and spectators. hunger was an issue, project.” “I definitely it really empowered thought it was the entire project,” Dominic Mertens-Pellitteri fun and would Flash mob organizer do it again,” she Mertens-Pelliterri said. said. “To get There was a lot of work that people to know what your cause is went into planning the flash mob, (makes it) worth it.” and the organization did not know Sallie Stacker, a senior in the what to expect. College of Communication and The organization had to oversee intern with Jigsaw, appreciated the the time and location of the perfor- opportunity to work with the Hunmance. The group chose the 6:30 ger Task Force. p.m. time of the flash mob because “It added legitimacy to our projit did not want it to be too close ect, instead of us just asking for to 7 p.m. and thus interfere with money,” she said. “Fifty percent of student and visitor concerns to get Milwaukee kids live in poverty … into the first Marquette men’s bas- It would go a long way if we were ketball game of the season. able to get lots of donations.” The flash mob was performed To Donate to Hunger Task to Michael Jackson’s “Beat It” Force, text FOOD to 52000. and choreographed by Mertens-

Robbery suspect shot dead Milwaukee Police shot and killed a robbery suspect Friday in a parking lot behind a George Webb restaurant on Old World 3rd St. after the suspect robbed the Guarantee Bank in Grand Avenue Mall. According to Anne Schwartz, spokeswoman for the Milwaukee Police Department, Shante D. Alford, 34, was shot and killed instantly by a member of MPD after firing at pursuing of-

ficers. Alford, who was on parole for robbing the same bank 10 years ago, robbed the bank at gunpoint and began to walk down 3rd St. When police surrounded the area and confronted Alford, he fled. Officers pursued Alford on foot and called for him to stop. Alford then turned and fired at officers, who returned fire. Police had been on alert for

activity from Alford after he was suspected in a robbery of the M&I Bank at 7501 W. North Ave. in Wauwatosa on Sept. 28 and the U.S. Bank at 2303 N. Farwell Ave. on Wednesday, Nov. 9. The incident is being investigated by the Criminal Investigation Bureau and the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, following standard procedure.

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Tuesday 15 Million Dollar Quarter, Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m. Song Man Dance Man, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, 108 E. Wells St., 7:30 p.m.

Carol & Craig open jam, Mamie’s, 3300 W. National Ave., 8 p.m.

Wednesday 16 John Mellencamp, The Riverside Theater, 6:30 p.m. Wine tasting for Milwaukee RiverKeeper, 106 W. Seeboth St., 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. “A Kodachrome Christmas,” starring John McGivern, Marcus Center Vogel Hall, 929 N. Water St., 7 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections In the Closer Look “New School Year = New Student Orgs” published Nov. 8, the Nonviolence Study Group was incorrectly referred to as the Nonviolent Study Group, and the Marquette Student Chapter of the Milwaukee Water Council (commonly called the Marquette Water Council) was referred to as the Water Conservation Club. The Tribune regrets these errors. The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-7246 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Brooke Goodman Assistant Editors Dominic Tortorice, Andrew Phillips Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Assistant Closer Look Editor Leah Todd Investigative Reporter Erica Breunlin Administration Katie Doherty Campus Community Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Patrick Simonaitis Crime/DPS Matt Gozun Metro Olivia Morrissey MUSG/Online Elise Angelopulos Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson General Assignment Allison Kruschke COPY DESK (414) 288-5198 Copy Chief Marissa Evans Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Sarah Butler VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-6969 Viewpoints Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Editorial Writer Maria Tsikalas Columnists Bridget Gamble, Kelly White, Ian Yakob MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Matthew Mueller Reporters Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Mike Nelson Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editor Michael LoCicero, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Michael LoCicero, A. Wesley Herndon Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Erik Schmidt

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The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 288-3998. E-mail: editor@marquettetribune.org

TURKEYTURKEYTURKEYTURKEYDAY


NEWS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

‘Major’ job crisis awaits MU grads NOT GETTING PAID

GETTING PAID

Top 5 majors with highest unemployment rates.

Six majors with unemployment rates of zero percent Actuarial Science Astronomy & Astrophysics

Clinical psychology: 19.5%

Pharmacology

Miscellaneous fine arts: 16.2%

Geological and Geophysical Engineering

U.S. History: 15.1% Library Science: 15% Educational psychology: 10.9%

Source: 2010 U.S. Census

School student counseling Educational administration and supervision Graphic by Zach Hubbard/ zachary.hubbard@marquette.edu

Marquette with unemployment rates more than 10 percent include history and performing arts. Environmental engineering and nursing majors should be confident in their ability to land a job after graduation, with both majors By Sarah Hauer boasting only a 2.2 percent unemsarah.hauer@marquette.edu ployment rate. Kristen Meehan, a sophomore For the almost 600 Marquette environmental engineering mastudents who are undecided upon jor in the College of Engineering, a major, recent reports from the chose her course of study so she 2010 U.S. Census data on un- can ultimately work with water employment rates could provide purification in third world couninformation to help them reach a tries. Meehan said she thinks the unfinal decision. Six majors on the list have zero employment rate for environmenpercent unemployment, while 10 tal engineers is low because of the majors have an unemployment push to “go green.” “I think the unemployment rate rate more than 10 percent. According to the Census data, will stay low because the econopsychology majors have particu- my is shifting toward being more eco-friendly and environmental larly high unemployment rates. Industrial and organizational engineers will only be more in depsychology (the study of em- mand,” Meehan said. Environmental engineering reployees, workplaces and organizations), educational psychology cently became its own major at (the study of how humans learn Marquette, separating from civil in educational settings), clinical engineering. Only 40 students are psychology and miscellaneous enrolled in the program, making it psychology majors all have un- one of the smallest programs in the employment rates more than 10 college. If students have percent. a hard time finding Clinical psychology employment after was the highest on the “I refuse to let (the graduation, they list with a 19.5 percent unemployment rate) can always seek interfere with allowing unemployment rate. assistance from CaMarquette only of- me to do something fers one cover-all that I’m very passionate reer Services. Matthew Myers, psychology major, a career counselor which, with 300 stu- about.” dents studying the McKenzie Richardson in the Career Serfield, makes it one of Junior College of Arts & Sciences vices Center, said he does not want the larger majors on students to worry campus. McKenzie Richardson, a junior about being unemployed. “Each student at Marquette psychology major in the College of Arts & Sciences, chose the area has the capability to become emof study because of its real world ployed,” he said. “It comes down application and ability to contrib- to getting experience while you are a student and applying yourute to a body of knowledge. She acknowledges job prospects self to find the right opportunity might be dim but says she does not to you.” He said a Marquette degree will let that impact her decision. “Everyone would love to gradu- always help a student’s chances ate and be flooded with job oppor- of employment, but it is only one tunities, but that just doesn’t hap- step in the process. “Each student has to take it upon pen,” Richardson said. “I refuse to let (the unemployment rate) themselves to take charge of their interfere with allowing me to do own job search and sell their skills something that I’m very passion- and experiences effectively,” Myers said. “We at career services are ate about.” Although it may be harder to happy to be able to help students find a job, being happy in one’s learn those skills, but ultimately, field is all that really matters, she they have to be the ones to impress their prospective employers.” said. Other majors offered at

Engineering and nursing have low unemployment

PLAY LIKE A CHAMPION

Tribune 3

West Hollywood bans fur First ban on clothes and accessories in U.S. upsets designers By Andrea Anderson andrea.anderson@marquette.edu

Animal rights activists are 1-0 against high-end retailers in West Hollywood after the city council voted 3 to 1 to pass the United States’ first ban on the sale of fur. Last Tuesday’s vote prohibits the sale of accessories and clothing from the pelt or skin of animals with wool, fur and hair. However, the law exempts leather and fur used in furniture. The ban on fur was first approved unanimously in September 2011 but needed modifications before a final vote. Previous votes were held during two separate council meetings, but after the approval in September, community businesses expressed opposition. Councilman John D’Amico introduced the ban and said few businesses would be affected. But a report by the Fur InformaPhoto by Amanda Frank/amanda.frank@marquette.edu tion Council of America (FICA), based in Hollywood, showing the West Hollywood banned the sale of clothes and accessories made with affected number of fur-loving the fur or pelts of animals in a 3 to 1 council vote last week. businesses said otherwise. sophomore in the college of Arts there was adequate information Keith Kaplan, executive direc- & Sciences from Orange County, about how the ban would impact tor of FICA, spoke on behalf of Calif., said the ban is a bad idea. businesses that sell fur clothing retailers like Oscar de la Renta “I don’t think it is OK for gov- and apparel. He asked the city to and Marc Jacobs, who threatened ernment, at any level, to dictate to conduct its own economic impact to move their companies if the the people what they are allowed study, adding that he did not trust ban passed. to sell, especially since fur is not the one by FICA. FICA represents fur retailers even illegal,” Sexton said. Ben Cundiff, a sophomore in and manufacturers Sexton also be- the College of Arts & Sciences across the U.S. who “I don’t think it is lieves the ban will from Sacramento, Calif., said he as a whole account OK for government have a negative effect personally doesn’t wear fur, but for more than 80 per- to dictate to the on West Hollywood. neither do the majority of the cent of the country’s “The economy people who live in California. fur sales. FICA has people what they are in California is re- He does not think the ban will be 35 board members allowed to sell.” ally struggling, and suspended unless there is a strong Mary Kate Sexton this ban looks like it backlash. including CEOs of large fur retailers and Sophomore Colege of Arts & will cause a loss of “In the past, West Hollywood’s Sciences manufacturers as well revenue for the busi- banned other things — cheap as experts in wildlife nesses,” Sexton said. handgun sales, certain types of management and agriculture. “I’m not sure if stores will leave. pet stores … that seem somewhat According to FICA, 91 of the Hhowever, the stores will most absurd to ban,” Cundiff said. 209 clothing businesses in West likely make their feelings known “And these bans are all still in efHollywood (46 percent), sell and do the best they can to repeal fect.” clothing and/or accessories with the ban.” The ordinance goes into effect some type of animal fur. West Hollywood Mayor John Sept. 21, 2013. Mary Kate Sexton, a Duran said he does not believe

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4 Tribune

NEWS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Bucks absence felt downtown Reaccreditation Ongoing NBA the focus at MUSG lockout the source of finanancial pains By Pat Simonaitis patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu

Monday, the NBA Player’s Association rejected the league’s latest offer and began the process to decertify their union, the clearest indication yet that the 2011-12 NBA season appears on the brink of cancellation. This may seem bad for fans, but it is a nightmare scenario for Milwaukee businesses that rely on the Bucks to draw Photo by Amanda Frank/amanda.frank@marquette.edu thousands downtown during the With the current NBA season cancelled through November and on the long NBA season. verge of being scrapped altogether, downtown business are hurting. The Bucks, as of Tuesday, have missed three games at the Bradley Grill at 1118 N. Fourth St., one NBA team a significant asset for the bar. Center and will miss five more of those busi“We’re cerbefore Nov. 30. If the season is nesses, stands “Right now, we remain optimistic tainly hoping completely cancelled, the Bucks to lose around they can work will miss 41 regular season home 50 percent of its about the return of NBA basketball something out ... and are hoping to see a substantial games and a potential playoff run, winter business and get some a scenario Bradley Center Presi- if the season is part of this season.” games going, dent and CEO Steve Costello is cancelled altothe games are gether, estimathoping the league can avoid. S teve Costello always great for “Right now, we remain opti- ed owner Brian Bradley Center President and CEO business,” he mistic about the return of NBA James. said. “It hurts,” basketball … and are hoping to The lockout, which has been see a substantial part of this sea- James said. “It’s only been three games so it hasn’t had a huge im- framed by many as a shoving son,” Costello said Monday. Though Costello declined to pact so far, but if the lockout con- match between the millionaire speculate about the impact an tinues there’s no way we could players and the billionaire owners, has drawn little sympathy entire season cancellation would replace (the lost business).” James said he thought an agree- from those who depend on the have on the arena, he said the Bucks generally account for 40 ment would have been reached Bucks to earn their paycheck. Ryan Colbourn, a freshman in percent of the Bradley Center’s between the league and the players by now. The lockout began the College of Arts & Sciences, gross revenue each year. “That number does illustrate July 1 at midnight when the last said he is supposed to have a job the importance of the Bucks to collective bargaining agreement ushering at Milwaukee Bucks home games, but the lockout has the (Bradley Center),” Costello expired. Major Goolsby’s, located at prevented him from working the said. Costello also said hundreds of 341 W. Kilbourn Ave., a block job he needs to help supplement people rely on the Bucks for ei- away from the Bradley Center, his job as an ambassador at Marther work or donations. He said has also seen a loss on nights quette games. Colbourn said employees for both the employees and nonprofit when the Bucks were slated for a the Bucks were told in an email organizations that rely on Bucks home game. “We have for sure taken a hit they cannot talk about the lockout games to raise on those nights to the media. cash have been A spokesperson for the Bucks when there left empty- “We have for sure taken a hit on declined to comment, citing NBA should’ve been handed thus far, those nights when there should’ve which will con- been games.The Bucks are obviously games,” Marty guidelines forbidding teams to Petricca, assis- comment on personnel issues tinue at least one of our bigger draws. tant manager during the lockout. into December. Costello said the Bradley Cenof the bar, said. Costello also Marty Petricca “The Bucks are ter will continue to explore all said the neighAssistant Manager Major Goolsby’s obviously one possibilities for programming on borhood surof our bigger foregone Bucks game nights, but rounding the currently they are just waiting to Bradley Center relies on the 15 draws.” Petricca said Marquette also see how the negotiations unfold. to 20 thousand people the games “A cancellation of the season bring downtown and will suffer provides large crowds before and after games, but that the sheer would be very unfortunate for all as long as the lockout endures. The Center Court Pub and number of Bucks games make the those involved,” he said.

The accreditors will judge the university on five major criteria and will ensure that academic integrity and discipline is upheld on campus. The last time accreditors visited campus, in 2003 and 2004, Meyer said they identified areas of conBy Elise Angelpulos elise.angelpulos@marquette.edu cern regarding the university’s educational system, including Marquette University Student a noticeable lack in diversity on Government welcomed guest campus and exceptional issues respeaker Gary Meyer, vice pro- garding educational assessment. vost for undergraduate programs Meyer said assessment problems and teaching, to its weekly meet- were so serious that the accrediing Thursday to discuss the re- tors returned to Marquette in accreditation initiative Marquette 2009 to ensure the problem was improved. will undergo in 2013 and 2014. While Meyer said the universiUniversity reaccreditation is a voluntary process occuring ev- ty has fixed assessment problems, ery 10 years. However, Meyer other goals for the initiative instressed that if Marquette is not clude a motto, “reflective, affirmreaccredited, students would then ing and inspiring,” encompassing be denied Title IV financial aid all aspirations to continue the accreditation process in good form. from the government. “The idea is very Jesuit, as Meyer said the reaccreditation it asks us to take a process is peer-based deeper look at who and conducted by fac- “Accreditation is we are,” Meyer said. ulty, professors and important because Meyer said he has members of higher we willingly suject worked with various education throughout ourselves to peer committees on camthe country. pus in preparation for University Presi- review.” dent the Rev. Scott The Rev. Scott Pilarz the accreditors’ visit University President in ensuring Marquette Pilarz has discussed will have enough rethe importance of the reaccreditation process in video sources to operate and that the interviews that Meyer said will university is compliant with federal educational regulations. appear online in the near future. Meyer said he hopes when the “Accreditation is important because we willingly subject our- accreditors arrive at the universiselves to peer review,” Pilarz said ty two years from now, Marquette in one video interview shown students will be aware of their during the meeting. “The process presence, ready to answer queswill encourage us and will direct tions regarding the university. “You sell this university in ways us to where we’ll be 10 years that no one else can,” Meyer said from now.” Meyer echoed Pilarz’s thoughts to students. Following the presentation, about preparing for the future. He said Marquette has been accred- President Joey Ciccone, a senior ited for more than 95 years, but in the College of Arts & Sciences, because the process only occurs said he is hoping for increased once every decade, the stakes are student involvement and attendance at MUSG’s next diversity high. In anticipation of the accredi- roundtable discussions. Ciccone said MUSG is in the tors’ visit to Marquette, Meyer said the university has prepared a process of creating a new student 300-page document stating edu- outreach policy, but plans are still developing. cational goals and stances.

Vice Provost Meyer explains the peer review process

MUSG Notes –Allison Kruschke, a sophomore in the College of Communication and business and administration committee chair, said all desk receptionists in residence halls are responsible for reporting PrintWise issues. –Kruschke said her committee is working on providing proper winterization for Norris Park in the upcoming weeks. –Sterling Hardaway, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences and senator of Student Organizations, said his committee approved two new clubs, Young Americans for Freedom and the Vietnamese Student Association, at its meeting last week.

–Vice President Trent Carlson, a senior in the College of Business Administration, said the Senior Week survey is available online. He said it has so far received more than 200 responses and will be available for another few weeks. –MUSG is looking for a new financial vice president. Applications are due Nov. 22. –Next Monday is the deadline for student organizational funding allocations for second semester. –MUSG is looking for a new Public Relations representative. Applications are due Nov. 21.

“A MAN WHO ISN’T WILLING TO DIE FOR SOMETHING, ISN’T FIT TO LIVE.” - MLK JR


NEWS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Tribune 5

Continued from page 1:

Continued from page 1:

Jaywalkers: MPD to increase ticketing efforts

Frontier: Co. streamlining MKE flights

was targeted because of its loca- adults, should not be punished tion on a busy city avenue with for making their own decisions, many pedestrians. even if they do go against the Mascari advised students to rules. not walk against the light, say“I think it’s kind of unnecesing that ice-covered roads may sary,” Lemming said. “We are make it difficult for all college students, cars to stop sudand I feel we are able denly. He also noted “We are all college to cross the street that in addition to students, and I feel without being tickMarquette students we are able to cross eted. It’s not a big crossing the street, the street without enough deal to ticket motorists driving being ticketed.” us for it.” through the area will Mario Drago, a Gwen Lemming encounter increased fifth-year senior in College of Business Admin. enforcement as well. the College of EnDPS itself does not gineering, said he have the authority to issue cita- could understand the rationale tions and will not cite students behind MPD’s effort but still caught breaking pedestrian laws. found it inconvenient. Many students have expressed “I guess it’s legitimate,” Draopposition towards the increased go said, “considering how Maramount of enforcement, espe- quette students swarm the streets cially to the possibility that they all the time and create a hazard may be ticketed for jaywalking. for themselves and cars. But I Gwen Lemming, a junior in guess it’s tedious when you’re the College of Business Admin- trying to get to class.” istration, said that students, as

The Marquette Tribune*

s

Photo by Michael Golding/Associated Press

Frontier has lost millions in the last several years and is looking to streamline its flight schedule in Milwaukee.

International Airport. Frontier lost $4 million for the quarter, which ended Sept. 30, due in large part to the $10 million in expenses incurred from a hailstorm in Denver that damaged planes and cancelled hundreds of flights. The airline also lost $5 million in fuel hedges, or the attempt to lock in the cost of future fuel prices, and $4.3 million in expenses related to fleet changes, according to the Republic Airways Third Quarter 2011 Financial Results Report. Patricia Rowe, marketing and public relations manager at Mitchell International Airport, said that while it is never desirable to hear about reductions in air service, Frontier has said the

reductions are necessary to return the company to profitability. “There is continued strong demand for air travel in southeastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois, but Frontier has said it needs to adjust its service level in response to economic pressure,” she said. “There are many changes and mergers occurring in the airline industry as airlines cope with rising expenses and fuel costs while airfares remain as low as they were 40 years ago.” The changes and downsizes can be seen in larger airlines as well, such as American Airlines, based in Texas. “My dad has seen a lot of pilots retiring early, so they can get the most out of their retirement benefits,” said Benjamin Valle, a

sophomore at Franciscan University of Steubenville, Ohio, whose father, Capt. Charles Valle, has been a pilot with American Airlines for more than 30 years. Five years ago, when the failing economy made the future of American Airlines uncertain, Valle’s father sold insurance as a side job to increase his income. He has since returned to flying full-time, unlike many pilots of the younger generation. “My dad has said that airlines are having a difficult time getting new pilots to fly for them,” Valle said, “Many airlines now make it easier for pilots to get their licenses by reducing the number of flight hours needed.”

Continued from page 1:

Investigation: University notified in Oct. A timeline of what will happen in the review process

f *because it’s fun

Right now:

The Department of Education is looking at data on campus crimes, security reports and information given to local police.

Source: www.fafsa.ed.gov

aldo? W ’ s r e Whe

Finally:

Then:

Pauly said possible consequences if Marquette is found of wrongdoing in the review could range from changes in public safety and how alerts are handled to university fines. Pauly said the letter mentioned the Chicago Tribune’s coverage of the university’s response to the alleged instances of sexual abuse by members of Marquette’s men’s basketball team last year. Venne said the university has done everything to acknowledge and rectify its mistakes in handling the allegations. “Marquette has publicly

Department of Education will issue a Program Review Report that will give the university an opportunity to respond to any concerns that might be raised in the review.

After reviewing all information, the Department will issue a Final Program Review Determination letter, determining if a fine is appropriate and, if a fine is issued, the amount it will be.

Graphic by Haley Fry/haley.fry@marquette.edu

acknowledged mistakes made in dealing with reports of sexual assault involving student athletes on our campus,” Venne said. “The focus of our efforts moving forward is on protecting our students, providing support to sexual assault victims and working with our entire campus community and beyond to improve our education and procedures around this critical issue.” Pauly said Marquette is working with the Department of Education and has provided them with more than 6,000 pages of documentation. He said the

university is very careful about documenting and collecting data. “The federal requirements for reporting incidents on university campuses are outlined in the Clery Act,” Venne said. “Marquette fully complies with this law.” Pauly said the university will address any issues raised in the review. “We never know what to expect until we find the final review,” Pauly said. “We’ve tried very hard to be in compliance.”


Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 6

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Maria Tsikalas, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Brooke Goodman, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Mike Nelson, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Marissa Evans, Copy Chief Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Clery Act inquiry requires transparency from university On Nov. 9, 2011, the U.S. Department with the Sandusky case. We understand the investigation is ongoof Education announced it was launching an investigation at Penn State University ing and a determination letter has not been concerning the reporting methods, or lack issued, nor have on-campus interviews thereof, in the sexual assault cases involv- been requested. However, the university ing young athletes and former assistant should have kept the Marquette community football coach Jerry Sandusky. The USDE aware of this investigation. In the wake of the sexual assault cases has the power to investigate Penn State and all universities who are a part of the federal and its criticized handling, the administration promised financial aid program under more transparthe Clery Act and can potentially take away the university’s Failing to mention the ency and improved practices. Failing option to offer financial aid or levy fines up to $27,500 USDE’s investigation of how last to mention the year’s sexual assault cases were USDE’s investigaper violation. tion of how last Penn State’s Sandusky case handled seems pretty opaque. year’s sexual asis high-profile national news — sault cases were there’s no doubt about that. Evhandled seems eryone from CNN and ESPN to pretty opaque. Perez Hilton have weighed in. A wish for transparency is not a call When a university president and reigning for mass panic on campus or for stufootball coach get fired, it’s big news. So it’s no surprise that with the Penn dents to rise up and riot. But we must be State scandal exploding before us, the na- aware and make sure the administration tion is considering other universities that is still accountable for carrying out the have been or are being investigated by the reforms promised. We deserve, as a community, to be noUSDE for similar reasons, including Eastern Michigan, Arizona State, Dominican tified of such things. The Rev. Scott Pilarz has made it a focus of his presidency College and Notre Dame. And Marquette. To date, national and local news out- to work with the community and keep us lets such as the Journal Sentinel, the Chi- aware of what is going on with major camcago Tribune, ESPN, Sports Illustrated, pus issues, as his letters concerning sexual the Washington Post and even the New assault, the Big East and his most recent York Times have covered or mentioned summary of his first 100 days prove. So Marquette’s Clery Act inquiry with Penn why has this one point been pushed aside? There have been opportunities to menState’s. That seems to make our inquiry big tion the investigation, in News Briefs, the news as well. According to the Journal Sentinel and Big East letter and even last Thursday’s 100 Chicago Tribune, Marquette was notified days recap. Since there could possibly be by the USDE on Oct. 4 that a “paper inves- legal consequences or fines levied, this intigation” of the university’s procedures in vestigation should be treated as any of the other big news stories on campus the past year’s that have already been addressed. sexual assault We are all invested in this cases was underway, but We are all invested in this school, and no one enjoys seethe investiga- school, and no one enjoys seeing ing Marquette grouped with Penn tion was never Marquette grouped with Penn State. But that is the situation we face, and we must face it head-on, mentioned to like the great institution that we students at State. claim to be. that time. To This starts with sticking to our the best of our promises and not making the misknowledge, the first mention of this investigation came last take of choosing institutional convenience Thursday, when news outlets began report- over transparency. ing about the investigation in connection

Check out our Viewpoints Blog at blogs.marquettetribune.org!

Today, editorial writer Maria Tsikalas delves into the age-old problem of beauty, ugliness and perception.

TRIBUNE ROll call Thumbs Up:

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RT @MUDrew_Halunen We awarded a total of $235 in #MUCashCab tonight. Look for the cash cab again tomorrow night from 7-11pm. @MUSG @MarquetteU

You or your friends tweet something worth our printers’ ink? Retweet it to @MUTribune with the hashtag #TribTweets and your Twitter handle might be the latest to grace our Viewpoints section. Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.


VIEWPOINTS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 COLUMN

Letter to the editor

Bridget’s life skills: Tackling Potowatomi

Fed up with Walker

Bridget Gamble On 11/11/11, Las Vegas received triple the average number of marriage applications. For 11:11, everyone had an epic 60-second plan in place. One New York woman planned to walk into Diane von Furstenberg and ask for a job. Less ambitious women just wanted to kiss their boyfriends. The date was supposed to promise luck, and like everyone else under the spell of superstition, I wanted to reap the benefits. It only took me a few seconds to figure out where I needed to be: Potowatomi. My friend and fellow columnist, Ian — a self-described borderline gambling addict — agreed to show me the ropes. Having just turned 21 in July, and harboring a lifelong disinterest for poker prior to that, my experience with gambling has been limited to sliding crinkly singles into slot machines and never seeing them again. Help was needed — and appreciated. The first order of business was an ATM withdrawal. Per casino trip, this transaction should happen once and only once and should cost no more than $40. Trust me. Once on the casino floor, Ian rushed to a roulette table; apparently over the summer, he bet $100 in a game of roulette and doubled his money. That’s a pretty attractive outcome, especially when the only other possibility is a total loss. But the odds didn’t tempt me, so I just observed. In roulette, you bet on either black or red. Ian swears by betting exclusively on black, because it narrows his focus on “when to bet, not what to bet.” But the table he played at was on a red streak, so the table attendant advised him, to no avail, “play by the streak.” Ian lost. Lesson learned: Take the house advice. Next, I insisted on a round of slot machines. I picked the first machine that caught my eye, one named Kitty Glitter. I lost $8. End of that story. • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV • Watch MUTV •

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Blackjack is the game I was most interested in learning, because it seemed to promise better than 50-50 odds like in roulette, and it requires more skill than pressing a button. We hovered over a $10 table long enough for a casino employee to notice and open up a $5 table for us, dealt by Roger, a middle-aged Filipino man. It wasn’t long before every seat was taken. In a matter of minutes, Jean, an elderly woman, was setting her Pepsi down next to me and laying twenties on the table. “Oh, Roger,” she sighed after losing a hand. “You’re so goddamn lucky.” In blackjack, you’re essentially playing against the dealer. With each hand, you can bet however many chips you’d like to either double or lose, and whoever’s three cards add up to 21 first, wins. To no surprise, it’s usually the dealer. I asked Jean how long she’s been gambling. “Today, or altogether?” she asked. “Altogether,” I laughed. “For years,” she said. She’s been to Vegas 25 times. “My friends play the slots, but I don’t,” she told me. “Blackjack is more social.” I hadn’t thought about it, but Jean was right. There’s something sad about sitting alone at a slot machine and squinting at losing numbers flashing in front of you. There’s no human element or illusion of control. So if you must try the slot machines, sit at a nickel machine for no more than two minutes. After I broke even at the blackjack table, Ian and I decided to call it a day, leaving the smoky sphere of ding-ding-dings and dice behind the automatic doors. I was pretty dispirited with my lack of luck, I must admit. “You’ve just got to have a philosophy in place,” Ian told me. “Mine is that everything is in my control, that my decisions determine the game. That may not be true, but it’s nice to think.” You might be able to maintain that philosophy in ordinary places, but casinos are not ordinary places. They are worlds of their own where the only rule is to trust your gut and test your luck — a practice that, as suggested by the popularity of the Vegas wedding chapels on 11/11/11, might be valuable beyond your final fold at the blackjack table. bridget.gamble@marquette.edu

Dear Editor: Wisconsin has long been regarded as a progressive state. Wisconsinites were among the first to champion workers’ compensation, equal employment protections for minorities and collective bargaining for public employees. Even though progressive policies have reigned supreme for years, it is clear that they are under attack by Gov. Scott Walker and the Republican-controlled legislature. As students and Wisconsin residents, it is crucial we understand the impact that Gov. Walker’s policies will have on our day-to-day lives. Women are especially vulnerable to attack from Walker and his right-wing cronies. From slashing funding for cervical and breast cancer screenings, to forbidding insurance companies to cover birth control, Walker has waged war on the reproductive health of women and the men that love them. His cuts disproportionately discriminate against women, students, urban residents and people of color, and the Milwaukee area has been one of the hardest hit in the state throughout his terms as county executive and governor. Young adults are not immune from Gov.

Walker’s draconian cuts, either. Those enrolled at state universities and technical colleges can expect their tuition bills to rise drastically as the resources these institutions have long enjoyed are eliminated. Additionally, these cuts will result in the overall quality of public higher education in Wisconsin suffering as high-quality professors leave for institutions with more competitive compensation. Finally, Walker and the legislature recently passed one of the nation’s most restrictive voter ID bills that threatens the voting rights of every Marquette student. Fed up? You should be. Wisconsin and its young people simply cannot afford to continue riding the runaway train that is Scott Walker’s administration. Please join me and hundreds of thousands of my fellow Wisconsinites in signing the petition to recall Scott Walker. The drive starts November 15. Together, we can make Wisconsin a state we can be proud of once again. Bill Neidhardt Member of Marquette University College Democrats Junior, College of Arts & Sciences

comes the sun. heerenjoy.

here comes the sun, here comes the sun, and i say itʼs all right. little darling, itʼs been a long cold lonely winter. little darling, it feel like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. little darling, the smiles returning to the faces. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. sun, sun, sun, here it comes...sun, sun, sun, here it comes...little darling, i feel that ice is slowly melting. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been clear. here comes the sun, friends theallmarquette here sincerely, comes the your sun, and i sayatitʼs right. itʼs tribune. all right

Life is short

! it r o f e k a w a y a t S


Closer Look

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Experiences Unite: Interdisciplinary Studies at Marquette Peace, Gender studies offer new academic majors

By Leah Todd

leah.todd@marquette.edu

There are 1,682 business majors at Marquette. There are 1161 undergraduate students enrolled in engineering programs, and the College of Communication’s undergraduate enrollment is currently at 947. But what if a student is searching for a program that is not one of the 210 academic majors established and offered at Marquette? Interdisciplinary majors target this crowd of self-motivated, creative individuals wanting to integrate a number of academic areas into their studies. Two relatively new interdisciplinary programs — Women’s and Gender Studies and Peace Studies — have recently graduated their first majors from the College of Arts & Sciences.

Women’s and Gender Studies: More than just feminism

Photo courtesy of Mike Ziegler

Mike Ziegler, 2010 Justice and Peace Studies alum, studied in Cape Town, South Africa, with Marquette’s Service Learning Program.

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Amelia Zurcher is the director of the Women’s and Gender Studies program, which graduated its first major in 2009.

Amelia Zurcher, associate professor of English and director of the Women’s and Gender Studies program, emphasizes that WGST has moved beyond mere feminism. “People automatically assume that WGST means eating disorders and sexual violence, but there are very few international issues that aren’t gendered in some way,” Zurcher said. WGST focuses not just on one idea of feminism, but many different feminisms, gender and a variety of disciplines and experiences uniting to examine and address this multi-faceted issue at play in our society, Zurcher said. “We are so far past feminism,” Zurcher said. “We are, like, 30 years past feminism.” As an interdisciplinary major, WGST stresses intersectionality — the intersection of different fields of study to understand our world. “Gender intersects with lots of different categories — religion, class, economic status, age,” Zurcher said. “Everyone has gender. It’s a basic way of understanding the world and our identity and of organizing our experiences. We can’t understand how power operates in our society unless we understand gender issues.”

Last Monday, College of Edu- women, but that it benefits men cation junior Natalie Campbell and other gender-questioning indipresented research she conducted viduals within our social context as for ten weeks this summer with well.” the Women’s and Gender StudA lot of universities are moving ies Fellowship in toward interUganda. disciplinary “We are so far past feminism... “I applied for studies, Zurchthe Women’s and like 30 years past feminism.” er said, and Gender Studies Amelia Zurcher Marquette is (WGST) FellowWGST Director no exception. ship because it “Gender was one of the rare studies is abopportunities available to under- solutely an interdisciplinary field,” graduates for research,” Campbell Zurcher said. “That’s where it’s alsaid. “I thought the WGST Fellow- ways been. It’s exciting. It’s bringship would help me to understand ing lots of things together at the some larger sociological issues same time.” that can be revealed by studying What is lacking for the WGST gender. For me, I did this through program, according to Zurcher, looking at females’ leadership roles is institutional support. While the in schools.” program is slowly gaining students Campbell, sponsored by the — it graduated two majors in 2010, WGST Fellowship although not five in 2011 and will have at least enrolled in the WGST program, five more graduates in May 2012 worked at a secondary school with — its faculty and curriculum are the Uganda Rural Fund. not likewise increasing. “Studying female leadership “We don’t have a feminist theoroles in the classroom was not ry class here,” Zurcher said. “We just about learning about women,” don’t have people with degrees in Campbell said. “Through focusing gender studies.” on female leadership … I was able As of now, WGST borrows facto delve into some of the larger so- ulty from other areas of study. cial, political and economic forces “We need a designated faculty that influence gender equality.” line for gender studies,” Zurcher Julia Novotny, a senior WGST said. “We need the money to hire major, said that her interdisciplin- them, to pay them benefits and ary studies have helped her become pension and ultimately to promise a well-rounded person. them tenure in order to create a tru“It really serves the critical ly sustainable program. Otherwise, thinking aspect, because you’re we’re running this in our spare approaching the subject from all time, out of love.” different angles — you’re not onesided about the issue,” Novotny said. There are challenges to being an interdisciplinary major, Novotny said, especially because the WGST program is all too often understood In about two weeks, Marquette’s to be the study of feminism alone. “You tell a man that you’re a Peace Studies program is expected WGST major and they think, to be given full approval by the ‘Here’s a raging feminist — great, University Academic Senate, makthat’s the last thing I need to deal ing it an interdisciplinary major in with right now,’” Novotny said. the same vein as the WGST pro“I’ve had some people who thought gram. Justice and Peace studies has it was the study of domestic housework. You’d never want to intro- been an available minor since 2005, duce it as just the study of femi- but program director Michael Dufnism, because in my experience fey said students have always been that right away puts off so many able to petition the university to people. I tell people it includes turn that minor into an independent topics of sociology, psychology, study major, a path taken by nearly anthropology, and that it’s not only 15 students in prior years. “Students already have found the study of rights and equality for

Peace Studies: Integrating theory and practice


CLOSER LOOK

Tuesday, November 15,2011

that they are motivated by social justice issues,” Duffey said. The Peace Studies major includes classes in communication, theology, economics and philosophy. An introductory course exposes students to theories, practices and important figures of peacemaking, and, in a senior capstone course, students summarize the importance of three areas of peace studies: peacebuilding theory and practice; power, justice and human rights; and social and economic development. Duffey, who was a member of the Peace Corps in Nepal and has taught in the subject area of peace and justice for 30 years, said almost every student in the program studies abroad. Marquette alumnus and 2010 peace studies major Mike Ziegler spent the spring 2009 semester in Cape Town, South Africa with Marquette’s Service Learning program. “(My peace studies major) was one of the reasons why I went to South Africa, just because South Africa has such a rich history in the actuality of peacemaking,” Ziegler said. “So it was interesting for me to go there — a place I had learned a lot theoretically about — and have the lived experience.” Ziegler completed his peace studies major with an emphasis in theology, taking about six theology classes, along with courses in economics and political science. “I had such a broad spectrum of interests, but I found the common thread to be what I understood to be acts of justice,” Ziegler said. “There wasn’t necessarily a certain major that addressed everything I was interested in.” So Ziegler worked with Duffey to draft a proposal for a peace studies major. “Dr. Duffey was always very supportive of me and did make sure I had thought out the courses I had chosen,” Ziegler said. An interdisciplinary major was custom-fit to not only Ziegler’s interests, he said, but to his whole person. The peace studies program gave Ziegler the flexibility and broad base of courses he would need “to seek a more creative career path.” “That’s how I came to be where I am now,” Ziegler said. After graduating, Ziegler worked for nine months at a Catholic Worker farm in Sheepranch, Calif. that was also a retreat center for people with HIV. Ziegler currently lives in

Detroit, and is collaborating with a peace studies graduate from Notre Dame and an anthropology major from University of Cincinnati to establish Henry Tula House, a daytime hospitality center for Detroit’s homeless. “After discussions of our personal passions and our backgrounds, (they) thought I’d be a good fit for their organization and asked if I wanted to come on as a founding member,” Ziegler said. “I really believe it was a lot of my peace studies that formed me as a person they were able to approach (for this project).” Ziegler said his peace studies major helped him realize that people were at the center of his personal workings for justice. “My peace studies major taught me how to work compassionately with other people,” Ziegler said. “And now I have the opportunity with Henry Tula to build relationships with beautiful people that will bring about a more peaceful environment.” Duffey speaks just as passionately about peaces studies, saying, “It’s in my blood.”

Changed for the better

Tribune 9

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Michael Duffey teaches the introductory course for the Justice and Peace Studies minor, offered at Marqutte since 2005. The Peace Studies major is expected to be approved this semester.

Like Duffey, Novotny was forever changed by her interdisciplinary Women’s and Gender Studies degree. “It challenged me in so many ways I would have never thought about,” Novotny said. “It exposed me to new and important information, and left me with a set of tools to approach things from a new perspective.” For students like Campbell, Novotny and Ziegler, and program directors like Zurcher and Duffey, interdisciplinary education is, by definition, for the whole person. “We’re recognizing the world needs interdisciplinary expertise,” Zurcher said. “Interdisciplinary studies are especially suited for a Jesuit mission. Social justice issues are extremely multifaceted, and we need lots of different perspectives all at once.” Caroline Campbell contributed to the reporting in this story.

Web Exclusive www.MARQUETTETRIBUNE.org

Check out the Tribune Web site for a slideshow with more information about Gender and Peace Studies.

This su m Photo Campb mer, WGST by Elis e Krivit R ell stud /elise.k ied lea esearch Fello rivit@m dership wship re arquett roles a e.edu c mong U ipient Natali e gandan adoles cents.

Illustration by Katherine Lau/katherine.lau@marquette.edu


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Tuesday, november 15, 2011 Edited by Timothy E. Parker November 23, 2011 CELEBRITY POSTCARDS By Donald Stubin ACROSS 1 Smallish quarrel 5 Banshee’s sounds 10 Freshwater duck 14 Spanish jar 15 Benedictine bigwig 16 Stereotypical freight-train hopper 17 Stealer of “pic-a-nic” baskets 18 His postcard says “My yacht’s in high gear” 20 Treeless plain 22 Pelts 23 Abandon detente 25 Certain keyboard key 26 Have an evening meal 29 They’ll take you places 32 1997 Demi Moore action film 34 Baba of folklore 35 Cute marsupial 37 Drench, as a fire 38 Tabula ___ (blank slate) 40 Ahead, barely 42 Played the trumpet 43 Main points 45 “Love Story” author Erich 47 Word with “spelling” or “quilting” 48 Lack of vitality 50 Lamp fuel 52 French possessive 53 It may have a nap on the floor 55 “___ Without a Cause” 56 Greek Z’s 58 Laugh-inducing Lily 61 Her postcard says “Looking for bargains” 65 Smidgen 66 Cries at the bullfight 67 Mountain range of Arkansas 68 One of two identical people 69 Brad of Hollywood 70 Catch up on one’s debt 71 Exxon’s former name DOWN 1 Versatile beans 2 Conspirator’s creation 3 His postcard says “Seeing some awful plays” 4 Taiwan’s capital 5 ABBA’s first hit 6 Blood type letters 7 Classic PCs 8 Actress Sondra of “The Gauntlet” 9 Cat’s cradle essential 10 With-ring link 11 Goddess of the dawn 12 Grandpa on “The Simpsons” 13 ___ Gatos, Calif. 19 Reversed 21 Do a pre-vacation chore 24 Financial resources 26 His postcard says “Read ‘Seize the Day,’ now!” 27 Invisible 28 Little kids’ sports league 29 Elizabeth of “20/20” 30 “Seinfeld” gal 31 Aerodynamically designed 33 Biblical symbol of patience 36 Boring tool 39 Where to get cash quickly 41 Mystery writer Sara 44 Temptress 46 Gray wolf 49 Talk show guest, often 51 Descendant of Shem 54 Wound dressing 56 Relish 57 Fastener 59 Gleason’s “How sweet ___!” 60 Prefix meaning one-billionth 61 Move like a rabbit 62 Actor Wallach 63 God’s first spoken word, in the Bible 64 La-la lead-in

STUDY BREAK

Tribune 11

CROSSWORD

LAST ISSUE’S ANSWERS

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JON HARRINGTON! I sure hope this is your REAL birthday......


Sports

The Marquette Tribune Tuesday, November 15, 2011

PAGE 12

Men’s basketball

Spartans’ three-point shooting no match for MU Jae Crowder leads team with 25 points, adding 10 rebounds By Mike Nelson michael.e.nelson@marquette.edu

The No. 19/21 Marquette Golden Eagles (2-0) forced 25 turnovers or more for the second straight game en route to a 99-68 victory over Norfolk State (0-1). “We’re guarding the ball first and then being in the right position if one of our men gets beat to the channel,” senior forward Jae Crowder said. “Just being in the right position and playing great team defense is helping us create a lot of turnovers.” The Golden Eagles were led by Crowder’s game-high 25 points and 10 rebounds – Marquette’s second game featuring

Blue’s renewed focus and confidence key to improved play

a player with a double-double (junior guard Junior Cadougan had 10 points and 10 assists in the opener). Marquette had 46 points in the paint for the game and Crowder was the producer of many of them. “As the game went on we knew that the middle and the paint would be open for our big guys and for us create some driving lanes and finish at the basket,” Crowder said. “We knew it was eventually going to happen so we wanted to execute it.” Not to be left out of the 20 point bracket, senior guard Darius Johnson-Odom added 24 of his own and was three rebounds shy of his preseason goal of five rebounds and assists per game. “He can score in a lot of different ways for us. A lot of things he See Crowder, page 15

By Mark Strotman mark.strotman@marquette.edu

Vander Blue understood the scrutiny surrounding him after a disappointing freshman campaign. But just two games into his sophomore campaign, it’s apparent that Blue is out to turn doubters into believers. A highly-touted recruit of of high school, Blue averaged just 5.0 points per game in 19 minutes as a freshman and was nearly invisible on the offensive end during the Big East season. His confidence lacked and Blue admitted his head wasn’t in the right spot during games. But Blue has shown a new focus Photo courtesy of Dylan Huebner

Senior forward Jae Crowder notched a double-double in the 31 point victory.

See Blue, page 15

Women’s Basketball

Forcing Badger errors key to Golden Eagle victory Will look to balance offense with inside and outside attack By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

The women’s half of the Wisconsin-Madison vs. Marquette basketball rivalry is set for tonight at the Al McGuire Center as the Golden Eagles (2-0) look to beat the Badgers (1-1) for the second consecutive year. “Coming in we know Wisconsin’s going to have a lot of extra intensity because we beat them last year,” junior forward Sarina Simmons said. “This is a big in-state rivalry game for bragging rights.” Wisconsin is reeling after an 80-63 loss to Oral Roberts in its home opener, while the Golden Eagles struggled to pull off a 69-61 win over Mississippi Valley State Saturday. Junior do-it-all guard Taylor Wurtz leads the Badgers in scoring and rebounding with a combined 32 points and 29 boards in Wisconsin’s

first two games, presenting a sizable challenge to an inexperienced Marquette backcourt. “She has big rebounding numbers as a guard, and they’ve outrebounded each of their opponents by double digits,” sophomore guard Gabi Minix said. “That makes her a big focus for us because we’re always looking to out-rebound our opponents with our size.” Against a Badger team that was outscored 32-20 in the paint against Oral Roberts, the Golden Eagles will once again hold an advantage in size under the basket. They will need to improve from their last performance, however, as Marquette scored 26 points in the paint but allowed a much smaller Devilettes team 42 rebounds to its 48. “One of our big focuses in this week’s practices was pushing back and bulking up on defensive rebounding,” sophomore forward Katherine Plouffe said. “We’re going to see teams that are taller than us or as tall as us in the Big East, and we’ve got to work on not giving up easy offensive boards before we get into conference play.” Minix and freshman guard Ar-

lesia Morse will get their opportunities to score as well, as the Badgers’ backcourt struggled defensively, giving up 49 total points against Oral Roberts. Morse is coming off a breakthrough performance after hitting three 3-pointers in Saturday’s game, while Minix dished out nine assists despite committing seven turnovers. “I feel like if we drive and kick we can play to our strengths,” Minix said. “This is a big game where you want to get into a groove to prepare yourself for a taste of the what the Big East will be like.” Another key will be Marquette’s ability to force the Badgers to make mistakes, as Oral Roberts was able to convert 38 points off 31 turnovers against Wisconsin. Marquette surrendered more turnovers than they forced against the Devilettes, which Plouffe described as a “slip-up,” but the Golden Eagles have worked to sharpen their play this week to take advantage of the occasionally sloppy Badgers. “Our defensive focus in general is to not let the offense get comfortable by cutting off passing lanes and pressuring the ball handler,”

Plouffe said. Overall, from an offensive standpoint, Plouffe said the team would take a balanced approach, starting first and foremost with getting the ball into the paint to open up perimeter shooting lanes. “We’re just going to run our plays

and see what they give us. If our shooters are feeling it we’ll definitely feed them,” Plouffe said. “We always have a focus to get those quick post feeds and paint touches so they can collapse on us and we can get good shots outside as well.”

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Sophomore forward Katherine Plouffe will look to keep pressure up on defense.

Column

Sometimes sports do more harm than good Andrei Greska Sports are everything to me. And nothing. I have been a fanatic of a multitude of teams in my life, living and dying by final scores since I was old enough to talk. Ask my mom about how I cried myself to sleep at age 4 when Mexico lost to the U.S. in penalty kicks during the quarterfinals of the 1995 Copa America. Ask me about the Cubs’ epic 8th inning collapse to the Florida Marlins in the infamous Alex Gonzalez game of 2003. Ask me about

Maxi Rodriguez’s wonder-volley from 40 yards out to eliminate Mexico from the 2006 World Cup in Germany. I like to think I live sports in a way that few do. Losses crush me to a pulp. Wins lift up my very core. It takes events like the ones that occurred last week in Pennsylvania to put things into perspective. When it comes down to it, sports don’t mean squat. I won’t go into the details of what is going down at Penn State. There are millions of tweets and thousands of stories out there to educate you on the details. There’s also one excruciatingly graphic 23-page grand jury testimony, if you so choose. This column is not about the details. It’s about sports. And how we sometimes make them more important than they should be.

Don’t get me wrong, that’s not to say we shouldn’t root for our favorite teams, or that sports are a waste of time. That’s not what I’m saying at all. What I am saying is that sports should never become larger than life, or we risk them becoming more important than at least eight children who were victims of former Penn State coach Gerald Sandusky’s heinous crimes. It sounds much easier than it actually is, though. Former Penn State coach Joe Paterno knew this better than anyone else. A statue of Paterno outside of Beaver Stadium reads: “They ask me what I’d like written about me when I’m gone. I hope they write I made Penn State a better place, not just that I was a good football coach.” He gave $4 million of his own earnings to the school over that

time and helped raise over $13 million for an expansion to the library that bears his name. He truly lived what he preached and made football just a part of the collegiate experience. A coach as clean as there has ever been, who had been a head coach for 45 years without a sniff of a major violation, made a decision to put sports ahead of the truth by not taking the Sandusky matter into his own hands. He’s gone now. And rightly so. Paterno is not a bad person. He broke no laws. He simply made a decision to protect the reputation of his program and his former coach. The wrong decision, and he will forever pay the price for it. There are a number of young men who will never get a chance to live a normal life because of the mistakes made at Penn State. Let this be a warning to the

Marquette athletic department, which has had its fair share of negative publicity both due to last year’s unsavory sexual assault allegations and the subsequent suggestion that the university mishandled the cases. There is no substitute for the truth. The university did a good job of acknowledging the mistakes it made and how it is working on fixing those errors. It must stay this way. As much as it pains me to say it, Marquette athletics are not the heart and soul of the university. They may be its best public asset, but this institution is and should continue to be a place for l earning, first and foremost. Sports are a great way to escape from reality, but they must always come second — both at this university and in life. andrei.greska@marquette.edu


SPORTS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Tribune 13 TRIBUNE Game of the Week

Sports Calendar

Tuesday 15

18

Fri.

Women’s Volleyball vs. Steon Hall - 6 p.m.

Sat.

18 Men’s Basketball at Winthrop - 7:30 p.m.

19

NCAA Championship Second Round

Marquette Penn State 68...................Assists.....................79 17.7..........Shots Per Game..........17.2 4.................Yellow Cards................14 Women’s Soccer at Penn State - 4 p.m.

Women’s Basketball vs. Wisconsin - 7 p.m.

Fri.

Women’s Soccer at Penn State

Friday 18

Sat.

Women’s Volleyball Big East Championship - 3:30 p.m.

Sat.

19

Women’s Basketball vs. Georgia Tech - 1 p.m.

19 Men’s Basketball TBA

Sun.

20

the facts Marquette will travel to Winston-Salem, N.C., to take on the Big Ten Champions in Penn State in the Round of 32 of the NCAA Tournament. This game needs no more hyping up than that. It’s winner take all, loser go home. The Golden Eagles needed overtime to advance past Toledo in the first round while Penn State took down Army 1-0 in regulation last Friday. Marquette will have to contain Maya Hayes who has notched 62 points on the season if it wants to repeat last year’s Sweet 16 appearance.

Women’s Volleyball Big East Championship

Women’s VoLLEyball

Home wins give MU best ever Big East record Good enough for No. 3 seed in Big East Tournament By Erin Caughey erin.caughey@marquette.edu

The 2011-’12 Marquette women’s volleyball team has set new standards for classes to come, finishing the season with its bestever conference record, 12-2 in the Big East. “I think we looked at last year’s season and said, ‘We’re breaking all these records, we’re setting these standards for our program,’ and this year we’re meeting and beating those standards,” coach Bond Shymansky said. “That’s a great thing for our program and that’s the whole idea. You get better and better and better as you go. You elevate your program’s status and your standards.” The Golden Eagles downed Notre Dame (15-11, 8-6 Big East) in three straight sets on Friday and repeated the equation in Sunday’s match against DePaul (7-22, 3-11 Big East). The Fighting Irish, ranked No. 2 in blocking in the Big East, struggled with their de-

fensive net presence, tallying only five blocks compared to Marquette’s eight. “I think a big part of the blocking schemes for us is really trying to focus on the correct attacker,” Shymansky said. “They (Notre Dame) had a couple really dynamic hitters, and I thought our blockers did a good job of staying on task.” Senior outside hitter Ciara Jones finished the weekend with 32 kills. She had a career game against Notre Dame posting an unbelievable .739 hitting percentage, pummeling the Irish’s defense for 18 kills in 23 attempts. “I just have to keep swinging,” Jones said. “Refocusing, I guess, is just to keep swinging, keep getting after it and just hit as hard as possible.” Both Notre Dame and DePaul had drastically lower hitting percentages than the Golden Eagles. The Irish finished with a .125 attack percentage and the Blue Demons, even lower, with a .065 average. Marquette holds the No. 2 spot in the Big East for hitting percentage at .254 overall. Sunday, DePaul overcame that deficit slightly, using Marquette’s errors to its advantage. The Golden Eagles had a total of 11 serving

errors to the Blue Demons’ one. “The little lapses of focus, at times, they don’t really frustrate me,” Shymansky said. “I thought our attention and our interest in the match was still super high, even though our performance wasn’t flawless.” Looking ahead to the Big East Championship tournament, senior outside hitter Ashley Beyer and Shymansky agreed the team will look to continue the same mentality. “We know that it’s going to be tough. It’s a tournament, so we all know that we have to come out and give it our all,” Beyer said. “When we play our best and play as a team, then we are ridiculous.” Although Beyer and Jones were honored during Sunday’s senior day, it was not the final game the two will ever play at the Al McGuire Center, as Marquette hosts the tournament this weekend. “A simple way to say it is we’ve got our ‘mojo’ right now, and we intend to keep it as we go into Big East play,” Shymansky said. The Golden Eagles are the No. 3 seed and will host Seton Hall Friday at 6 p.m. to kick off the postseason.

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Senior outside hitter Ashley Beyer (5) goes up for a block against Depaul.

women’s soccer

Madigan’s overtime golden goal beats Toledo Will now take on Penn State next in the round of 32 By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Survive and advance. That is the mantra for any team, no matter who the opponent is come tournament time. That is exactly what the Marquette women’s soccer team (18-3-0) did Saturday night with its 1-0 overtime victory against Toledo (14-7-2). A golden goal from sophomore midfielder Taylor Madigan in the 97th minute sent the Golden Eagles to the second round of the NCAA Tournament, where they will play fourth-seeded Penn State in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Friday. “We’re happy, obviously, that we got the win, and I think on paper you always have to be cautious. But I think we knew how tough Toledo was based on the year that they had and know-

ing them and their personnel,” coach Markus Roeders said. “I thought they were quite efficient in what they were trying to do, but at the end of the day we came through when we needed it, and I think that shows the character of our team.” Marquette had a difficult time finding its groove in the first 45 minutes but came out energized in the second half. It had a few chances to end the game in regulation that were turned away by senior goalkeeper Vicki Traven. Roeders credited the offensive difficulties to a lack of game time. Marqutte has played three games in the last three and a half weeks. “As much as we practice, you can’t simulate game situations or how to do things in the game when you’re practicing,” Roeders said. “We had some decent chances, especially in the second half when we ramped it up a little more. “At the end of regulation, we had one of our best stretches because we settled down again and tried to connect, and out of our build-up came the throw-in that

ultimately led to the goal.” For Madigan, it was her second overtime game-winner this season, with the other coming in a 3-2 win over Notre Dame on Sept. 25. “We were all determined to score, and I just was there and finished it,” Madigan said. “We needed to score to win, and I had the best opportunity. I’m glad I could finish.” The game was reminiscent of the Golden Eagles’ 1-0 win over Central Michigan in the first round of the NCAA Tournament last season. Then-junior forward Rachael Sloan’s goal was the deciding factor in that game. Marquette dominated much of the game in the second half, firing six shots, including sophomore forward Maegan Kelly’s blast from the top of the 18yard box that was turned away by Traven. Madigan also had a chance from point-blank range later in the half but was again stonewalled by Traven. Eventually the Golden Eagles were able to break through, sending them into the second

round of the tournament for the second straight season. It is the sixth time that Marquette has advanced to the round of 32. “We’ve been here two times now (in overtime in the NCAA Tournament) so I was like ‘this is how it’s supposed to be,’” senior goalkeeper Natalie Kulla said. “I kind of knew we were going to score.”

“People have to understand that this is the NCAA Tournament, and you’re trying to survive and play your game and make it entertaining. But more than anything you’re trying to win and move on,” Roeders said. “The games aren’t going to get any easier, so if nothing else, I think this was a great test against a good team.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Sophomore midfielder Taylor Madigan slots the ball past Toledo’s defense for the victory in the first round of the NCCA Tournament Saturday night.


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Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Continued from page 12:

Blue: Cements starter role

in Marquette’s first two wins of the season, filling up the box score with averages of 12 points, three rebounds, five assists and two steals. Blue led the Golden Eagles with four steals in a Friday night win over Mount St. Mary’s, beautifully reading passing lanes and deflecting a handful of other passes. Monday night it was his offense that spoke volumes, as Blue filled the box score with 14 points and a career-high six assists. Blue was aggressive on the break, drove to the basket with his mind set on scoring and connected on his first three pointer since Dec. 7 of last year. Williams said this season feels difference because of his guard’s maturity level. “He’s really matured,” Williams said. “I think that as you grow as a human you grow as a player. And as you struggle as a human, you struggle as a player. I absolutely love [Vander]. I’ve spent an incredible amount of time with him during his tenure so far, and I think there are really bright days ahead of him.” Senior forward Jae Crowder said

Blue’s progression began this summer, beginning with a new focus. “He knew he had a lot to improve on, so he just got in the gym and worked on a lot of stuff,” Crowder said. “Confidence wise, I knew it was going to be a great time for him to show everyone what he’s really about. His work ethic has really helped him out confidence wise, so everything else is falling into place for him.” Blue has started the first two games as the third guard with Junior Cadougan and senior guard Darius Johnson-Odom. There were rumors of Blue seeing time at point guard, but Williams said that, regardless of position, Blue’s role will stay the same. Because of Marquette’s “switchable” offense, all players outside of point guards and centers move around enough where Williams said, the description of positions don’t matter. Williams described this by referring to a question he asked his starting five in Monday’s win, asking them what position they played. “But I say, ‘No, you’re just really good players,’” Williams said.

SPORTS “What position has nothing to do with that. Can Vander initiate offense? Yes, but does that make him a point guard? I don’t know.” Still, the combined 10 assists through two games show that Blue’s versatility is shining through. Cadougan has firmly planted himself as the starting point guard and freshman Derrick Wilson has played well defensively, meaning Blue should continue to see time on the wing. Regardless of position, Williams said Blue’s improved focus will continue to have an impact on the team. “He’s a hard playing dude whose competitive aura impacts our team,” Williams said. “And you can see it. When he’s hooked up, not when he’s making baskets, but when he’s hooked up, it impacts, and it ripples down to the rest of our group.” And there’s a big difference between being 17 and 18. Especially when during that year you experience playing at the highest level and for the best league for the country, in your home state, where everyone thought that if the collective bargaining agreement would’ve been different you would’ve went straight to the league.

Crowder: Norfolk State hangs tough kept the lead in single-digits until the 4:21 mark of the first half through 3-pointers, making 5-of11 (45.4 percent) in the first 14:51 of play. Norfolk State finished the game shooting 45.8 percent from three (11-of-24) and 6-of-10 (60 percent) in the second half. In the second half Marquette built as large as a 25-point lead

Photo courtesy of Dylan Huebner

Sophomore guard Vander Blue scored 14 points against Norfolk State last night.

Continued from page 12: does helps open up other things for us,” Crowder said. “It’s just Darius setting a good tone for us on the offensive end. It helps us out as a team.” It took Marquette 8:49 to build its first double-digit lead en route to its 91-37 victory over Mount St. Mary’s. But Monday, Norfolk State

Tribune 15

with 12:20 left in regulation but allowed Norfolk State to break that into a 12 point lead with 7:06 left in regulation. “I thought it got ragged. We made a run, and I probably should have subbed some guys out,” coach Buzz Williams said. “As hard as we play it’s hard to play a long period of time on both ends

of the floor and be able to execute. I should have called a timeout when I sensed it was ragged. “When we’re out of sync on either end of the floor it typically leads to whatever end we’re on, the other end is about to get out of sync too. I know that. That’s how we play. And that’s how we work.” The strong shooting from three prompted Norfolk State

players to periodically sport the “three goggles” Marquette made famous last season. “I think they were mocking us. They usually don’t do that,” Crowder said. “I joked around with the couple of the guys and was saying, ‘you got to hit enough threes to do that. So you shouldn’t do that. You shouldn’t disrespect us like that.’ Just jokingly.”

cross-country

Men exceed expectations on hill-ridden course Women finish two places behind team goal at Regionals By A. W. Herndon astead.herndon@marquette.edu

The Marquette men’s team surpassed its expectations and conquered a hill-ridden course en route to an eighth-place finish (out of 31) at the NCAA Great Lakes regional in Toledo, Ohio, its best finish since 2007. The men, who entered the race ranked 12th in the region, followed the leadership of seniors Blake Johnson (31:09.7), Peter Bolgert (31:12.6) and junior Jack Senefeld (31:30.8), who placed 37th, 38th and 51st overall, respectively. According to Senefeld, other teams came out running too hard with the extra excitement of a regional meet and he was proud that the Golden Eagles stayed within themselves. “Going into the race we all had the mindset that we needed to continue what we were doing all year,” he said. “Everyone kept calm and cool going into the race, and it worked out. We made sure we did the things that we wanted to do and paced ourselves well.” Coach Mike Nelson said the men’s team had isolated a few key teams that it wanted to beat, and achieved near perfection. Of the six teams it wanted to finish better than, Marquette bested four of them: Eastern Michigan, Michigan State, Purdue and Cincinnati. Butler and Central Michigan were the two that got away.

Nelson called it “the race within the race.” “Mentally, the men had the transition from 8k to 10k and it’s definitely a tougher challenge,” he said. “But we wanted to focus on the men’s side on running a smart, relaxed race … the teams that do well in racing, often times, are not those who pick it up, but those who just do not slow down.” Running focused and consistent was an even tougher challenge considering the conditions of the race. Although the weather was perfect, the uneven terrain

at Ottawa Park Golf Course presented a challenge for both the men’s and women’s races. Senior Carly Windt, who turned in a personal best of 22:11.9 for 79th place, believes that both teams did their best to compete. The women placed 17th in a field of 33 in a slightly more competitive field -- according to Nelson. “Some girls had their best races of the season, so we can’t blame it on the course,” Windt said. “But this was probably the hardest course we’ve had all year. It was hillier and that kind of

plays a bit of a factor.” This is the attitude Nelson has sought to instill in his runners — no excuses. “The course was hillier than I expected to be,” he said. “Combine that with the turns, and what we had all envisioned coming into the race wasn’t what we got. But that could only throw you off if you were weak-minded … we train on all kinds of different surfaces and areas around Milwaukee ... It’s all about competition.” Considering these factors, Nelson was adamant that he believes

that this weekend was the best performance for the women’s team, regardless of its finish. He said this remains the challenge in cross-country: you can run your best race and still have no control over your opponents. “Our goal was to finish in the top-15, but you cannot really control the other team,” Nelson said. “Even though we’re in a race with another team, all we can do is run our best race; and our women did that. We’re definitely on an upswing.”


SPORTS

16 Tribune

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

2011-2012 Basketball Player Bios

4 Arlesia Morse, 5-10 G: Strength: She was a scoring machine in high school (26.3 points per game). In her short time at Marquette she’s displayed a shooting confidence that mirrors that of former guard Courtney Weibel. Weakness: She’s got good touch from beyond the arc, but needs to work on scoring from other spots on the floor. She will also have to improve her decision-making to cut down on turnovers.

5 Katie Young, 5-11 G: Strength: Young is a shooter. That’s what she does. We didn’t get much of a glimpse last year as she suffered a season-ending knee injury in February and averaged only 8.2 minutes per game when healthy. Weakness: We won’t see her until sometime in December or January while she continues to recover from her knee injury. She’s one of four players with previous Division I experience who should play this season.

24 Gabi Minix, 5-9 G: Strength: Strong ballhandler who studied under Marquette great Angel Robinson. Showed the ability to command her team in the exhibition opener and create a position for herself offensively. Weakness: Inexperience is her biggest flaw. She only averaged around 5 minutes per game last season. We don’t know how she’ll handle the grind a full Big East season as a starter.

Get to know. . . Fave Video Game? NCAa Football 12

13 Courtney Thomas, 6-0 F: Strength: Length is Tomas’ hidden gem in the post. At 6 feet, Thomas has the length and athleticism to disrupt shots inside — similar to Simmons, but at a lesser level. Weakness: She will miss the entire season with a torn ACL. It is a big blow to an extremely young Marquette team. Her injury will thrust the freshmen into an even larger role.

32 Lauren Tibbs, 6-4 C: Strength: Does an amazing job of creating position inside and could provide a nice offensive touch. She averaged 24 points and 11 rebounds per game her senior year of high school. Weakness: Finishing and leaping need improvement. In the exhibition against Carthage College, Tibbs shot 2-of10 from the field with all of those attempts coming within the lane battling against shorter players.

35 Cristina Bigica, 5-10 G: Strength: Athletisim like hers is built through experience. Unlike the other freshmen, Bigica has experience beyond the high school level. She was a member of the 2011 U-20 Romanian National team and averaged 11.2 points and 5.0 rebounds. Weakness: Watching Bigica in the exhibition match, her game didn’t flow. That may just be part of the feeling out process and getting used to new teammates.

22 Margeaux Dupuy, 5-6 G: Strength: Speed paired with killer ball-handling skills propells her game. Dupuy will get looks to back up Minix at the point. She leading Marquette in the fast break. Weakness: Confidence, offensively. Dupuy has looked tentative on offense. This is something that should evolve over time as she grows in coach Terri Mitchell’s system.

42 Sarina Simmons, 6-1 F: Strength: Is the best athlete on this Marquette team. She can jump out of the gym and knows how to use that athleticism on the defensive end. She’s a strong rebounder who can play inside and out. Weakness: She’s the most talented Marquette player but she’s also the most inconsistent. She has games where she looks like a top player in the Big East and games where spectators are left scratching their heads.

Fave Movie? All About the benjamins

Fave Actress? Halle BErry

Fave Song? How to love

Fave NBA Team? Utah Jazz

Fave Artist? Lil Wayne

Fave NFL Team? Atlanta Falcons

Fave NBA Player? Corey Crowder (Father)

34 Chelsie Butler, 6-5 C: Strength: Much like Tibbs, she does an excellent job of creating position in the lane. She uses her 6-foot-4 frame to her advantage. Averaged 19.1 points and 10 rebounds per game as a senior in high school. Weakness: Needs to develop her offensive game more for Big East play. What we’ve seen so far is a very raw college talent with a great deal of potential.

21 Katherine Plouffe, 6-3 F: Strength: Can play inside and out, given her background as a guard before coming to Marquette. Is very long and uses that to make herself a talented rebounder. Weakness: Gets bullied underneath by bigger, more physical post players in the Big East. Like Simmons, Plouffe played in bursts last year. She needs to improve her consistency.

Jae Crowder

Fave Album? The Carter iv

Jay-Z or Wayne? Lil Wayne

20 Apiew Ojulu, 6-3 F: Strength: Very long and athletic big who can disrupt shots inside and battle with the best of them. Seems similar to what Sarina Simmons can do: not strictly a post player, but she can also wander outside of the lane to make plays. Weakness: Her free throw shooting has been inconsistent thus far and she has a tendency to foul when playing defense. Confidence and experience should remedy both.

By Tribune Staff Photos courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Baseball/Soccer? Baseball MJ or Lebron? Jordan

Nov. 17, 2001 At the beginning of the 2000-’01 Marquette basketball season, my dad told me about a benchwarmer from the previous season. He told me how good he was, and how he was like that season’s best player Brian Wardle (the present-day coach of Wisconsin-Green Bay), except he was much more athletic. That player was Dwyane Wade. On Nov. 17th, 2001, Wade put his name on the radar of every Marquette fan in his first game at Marquette against the Loyola-Illinois Ramblers. The Golden Eagles won

the game 80-70 that Saturday night in Milwaukee, and Wade had a great debut. The future NBA Finals MVP scored 21 points on 7-of-16 shooting, grabbing nine rebounds, dishing out five assists, while blocking two shots and capturing three steals on the defensive end. His four fouls and three turnovers were the only flaws in what was a great debut. At the time, Marquette fans thought he might be a nice player. Instead, he became one of the program’s best players ever. matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Think.

Nov. 15th, 2011 : The Marquette Tribune  

The student newspaper of Marquette University.

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