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SPECTATOR

The

Western Nebraska Community College

May 1, 2013

Volume 60, Issue 10

ENTERTAINMENT: Science and Math Club allows students to both learn and have fun, pg. 4 SPORTS: Baseball team advances to regional playoffs, pg. 4 BACKPAGE: There’s lots to explore in Senegal, pg. 10

Student SPOTLIGHT: Brittney Mitchell

‘Taking it apart and putting it back together’ Automotive technology major developed passion for working on cars at an early age By JOY ANITEYE Spectator Reporter

Manka never lost his passion for cars. After graduating from Minatare High School, he decided to begin his college education at WNCC in August of 2010. He said deciding to go to WNCC was easy since he wanted to stay close to home. He was also attracted to the small class sizes at WNCC. “You can learn more. There’s more hands-on [activities], and the teachers are able to teach more,” he said.

R Photo by Lenzie Cole/Spectator

yan Manka, an automotive technology major at WNCC, developed his interest in cars during his childhood. “I was really young. I remember my mom telling me this story about when I was really little. I went outside and was working underneath a car. I was probably like five or six years old, and I had a car jacked up and was underneath it,” he recalled.

By LENZIE COLE Spectator Reporter Brittney Mitchell, a sophomore at WNCC, is pursuing a degree in music education. She loves to sing and always has a smile on her face. Q: What brought you to WNCC? A: I was looking for a close-tohome college that had an awesome music program. Q: What made you interested in music? A: When I was four years old, “The Little Mermaid” came out, and I loved to swim. Then I decided it would be cool to sing under water. I would be the one who would swim around the pool. I loved to sing under the water; thus, since then I was the little mermaid. Q: What is your dream job? A: One of my dream jobs would be playing Ariel in “The Little Mermaid” on Broadway, and I would love to perform. After I perform, I would like to start my own school for music and voice [and] be able to teach young people, especially the small community how to get out there and follow their dreams. Q: Who inspires you? A: My mom. She was diagnosed with throat and tongue cancer my junior year of high school. My mom has never finished college because she had me at a young age. She is now in remission, and now she is learning to become a florist. She is going to school to learn how to be a florist. Q: Are you involved in any programs? A: I’m currently a student ambassador here, and next year I will be a resident assistant, and [involved in] music. Q: Your favorite saying? A: I love this saying; I don’t remember the singer that said it: “If you use life as an acronym, it stands for ‘love in full effect.’” I choose that as my motto to live my life – that our life needs love in full effect; that we need to love, accept, and enjoy everyone around us.

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Photo by Joy Aniteye/Spectator

WNCC student Ryan Manka stands next to his VW Bug that he is restoring. Manka will graduate on May 11.

COVER STORY

Making a difference

Taking a stand against underage drinking Law enforcement, school administrators working together to help educate students about the consequences of underage drinking

Longtime WNCC English professor Loren Bell enjoys helping students “communicate clearly in written form.” Bell started teaching at WNCC in 1967 after teaching for a year at North Platte. Bell is originally from Omaha.

By HEIDI HANCOCK Spectator Assistant Sports Editor

Q: When did you decide to become a teacher? A: That was late. I took a BA in Liberal Arts, English major, [and] strong history minor. I had my BA and kind of thought maybe I should go into business; I didn’t know what I was going to do. One of my profes-

There are many social issues that impact the college community. One of them is underage drinking. One of the keys to curbing underage drinking, local law enforcement and school officials say, is educating students. “Education starts with the parents talking to them and being open about it,” Nebraska State Trooper Courtney Horak said. “It is important for kids to know that if they make a bad decision, their parents will still come get them. A lot of times it’s out of fear of getting in trouble with their parents that leads them to engage in risky behavior like getting in their vehicle and driving home.” Law enforcement officials aren’t the only ones trying to teach stuCourtney dents about the problems or dangers of underage Horak drinking. Colleges around the area try to implement an alcohol prevention program into their curriculum.

See Bell, page 2

See Drinking, page 3

Photo by Joy Aniteye/ Spectator

Longtime WNCC English professor Loren Bell enjoys helping students ‘communicate clearly in written form’ By JOY ANITEYE Spectator Reporter

Loren Bell started teaching at WNCC in 1967 after teaching for a year at North Platte College. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and a Master of Arts degree in English at Adams State College in Alamosa, Colo. Bell, originally from

Omaha, Neb., has found his niche in teaching college students, especially at WNCC, where the focus is on “teaching rather than research,” he says. Bell teaches Comp I, Comp II, and American Literature.  

Theater West looking to treat spectators with three exciting plays this summer By ALEXANDRIA MOREE Fashion Editor Since 1990, Theater West has provided the Scottsbluff/ Gering with summer plays and musicals, showcasing local talent and adding a cultural spark to the Valley. Now a staple on the social events calendar of Scottsbluff, the Little Theater, located at Western Nebraska Community College, will be the stage for this season’s selections, including Harvey, Spamalot, and Beauty and the Beast. Judy Chaloupka, who has been the heart and soul of The-

ater West since 1998, has spent the last several years expanding the company involved in the plays and also pushing the limits of comfort for the audience by introducing internationally acclaimed and, at the same time, controversial plays. Will Thomas, a favorite local performer who regularly graces the Theater West stage and will appear in Spamalot this coming summer, said this about the last few seasons: “The pushing of the envelope of the musicals of the last few years like Rent and Cabaret has been positive in a couple of ways. One, it challeng-

See Theater, page 3

Congratulations!

Spectator Photo

WNCC students have been receiving honors with two weeks of school left. Brianne Mize receives the Supplemental Instruction Leader of the Year Award on Honors Night in Scottsbluff on Thursday, April 25. WNCC-Alliance and WNCC-Sidney also handed out awards. A complete list of awards is on page 8.


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Students Bernard Yego Kapsabet, Kenya

Major: Nursing Honors/awards/ activities: Dean’s list Favorite TV show: “Tonight Show” with Jay Leno Hobbies: Reading, running Favorite book: “Think Big” by Ben Carson; “Live Everyday Like it’s Friday” by Joel Osteen Favorite quote: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” - Nelson Mandela Favorite class: Anatomy and Physiology Who is your role model and why: “Jesus Christ because he died on the cross so that our sins could be forgiven.” What is your motto?: The sky is the limit. If you had one piece of advice to share with everyone, what would it be?: Never give up Where do you see yourself in five years? Helping people somewhere around here or in Kenya.

Brianne Mize Scottsbluff Major: Health Science Honors/awards/ activities: Dean’s list, Phi Theta Kappa, National Society of Leadership and Success, Math and Science Club, SI leader for Introductory Algebra Favorite TV show: “The Mindy Project” Hobbies: D.I.Y. projects, reading, movies, socializing Favorite song: “Leave a light on” by Duran Duran Favorite quote: “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing it is stupid.” – Albert Einstein Favorite class: Microbiology Who is your role model and why?: “My parents. They’re so supportive and strong. They are the ones who taught me it’s important to work hard for what I want. I hope to be like them when I become a parent.” What is your motto?: “Life is too short to match your socks.” If you had one piece of advice to share with everyone, what would it be?: “Even if life seems hard right now, it’s not impossible to get through. Work hard for what you want and bask in the glory for what you’ve earned because you deserve it. God doesn’t give you anything you can’t handle.” Where do you see yourself in five years?: “Hopefully, working in a hospital or clinic working as a Physician Assistant.”

May 1, 2013 — Page 2

Pencil skirts gaining in popularity By ALEXANDRIA MOREE Fashion Editor For the past few decades, the “A-line” skirt has reaped praise for its versatility and flattering fit on a vast array of body types; however, in the past five years the pencil skirt has reemerged onto the scene with a ferocious vengeance on the “A-Line.” Previously relegated to the world of business wear for women after its introduction by French designer Christian Dior in the late 1940s, the pencil skirt was introduced as a trendy modern staple in the early 2000s, and its success sparked the rediscovery of the pencil skirt. From its original jet black to an array of colors, prints, and patterns, the pencil skirt is no longer confined to the business world. Changes for the pencil skirt began with the famous faded green silk version that Grace Kelley wore in Rear Window when she stared opposite James Stewart. Striking a demand for a reinvented and colorful edition of the classic, Channel and

Dior began to produce colored versions of the revamped staple. A spinoff of the preWorld War One hobble skirt, the pencil skirt is fitted, high-waisted, and tappers in at the hem, which lands, generally, just at or below the knees. Malorie Winberg, a sophomore at Western Nebraska Community College, is a longtime fan of the timeless skirt, saying, “Pencil skirts are an adult woman’s necessity.” Considered a staple by television fashion gurus Clinton Kelley and Stacy London of TLC’s What Not to Wear, the pencil skirt flatters almost any body type, from pear shape to hourglass. The pencil skirt and its “H-line” cut can hide unruly curves or accentuate perfectly situated hip bones. “They are flattering, professional, but can be worn casually as well,” Winberg added. Originally designed to be worn with kitten heels or pumps, the 21st Century has introduced and promoted the ever-versatile flat, which the pencil skirt quickly adapted

to. Neon pink or yellow fabrics have become the go-to choice for the casual pencil, pairing perfectly with ballerina flats and a skinny belt. This weekend casual chic look is an easy substitute to the tired look of shorts and sandals. While the recent popularization of the famous spring floral print has been a huge success in the world of pencil skirts, the classic flat lace-up Oxford is a match made in heaven for a trendy, yet sophisticated, look. Although the pencil skirt has gone through some very recent identity changes, from fabric and color changes to new shoe pairings, the core identity of the skirt will ever be at the forefront of its popularity. “With the right pair of heels, it is a knockout look for a night out on the town,” elaborates Winberg. The slimming and sleek timeless look of a pencil skirt with pumps and a tucked in, fitted collared shirt prove to be one of the most timeless and classic looks that will endure through time.

Nearly 45 people participate in walking event By LENZIE COLE Spectator Reporter WNCC held a walk-a-thon Wednesday, April 24. Participants walked to Frank Park and back. WNCC has been involved in the national event for two years. Suzan Verbeck is a committee member of Cougar Stride Committee. She said the walk helps to promote the importance of health and wellness. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Nebraska donated $20 to the Nebraska Game and Parks Foundation for every organization that participated. The money will be used for maintaining and expanding some of the state’s 1,236 miles of trails. The Cougar Stride Committee encourages people to walk. The group has a calendar for the staff to see how much they walk a year. Students can do this as well; all they have to do is go to WNCC’s website and click on Cougar Strides to access the monthly newsletter. This year’s WNCC walk had about 45 participants. Most people completed the walk within about an hour and fifteen minutes.  Participants put their name in to a drawing for prizes.

WNCC students and staff participate in a National Walk at Lunch Day on April 24. Participants walked from WNCC to Frank Park and then back to WNCC. The route is about 2 miles.

Bell Continued from page 1 graduate work? You can get a stipend if you’re a teaching assistant.” And so we talked, and I thought about it. We talked more about it, and I thought, “I could see myself doing this because I like school.” So, I kind of stumbled into it. Q: What’s your favorite part about teaching at WNCC? A: The teaching. My strength is face to face. With new technology, I use the new term face to face. Classes with people, this is where I am best. I like to have people in front of me. I know some of my students like to have that face-to-face contact with their peers as well as teachers. They can learn online, and they can learn through distance, and there are good alternatives, but I have had students tell me that they really like to have real people. My idea of a good class is a class of traditional students who just got out of high school, bright kids who like to learn, and are smart and really participate. And in that mix are some of those nontraditional people. I like nontraditional students who have the ability, might be a little unsure of themselves, but they bring life experiences that as an 18 year old I didn’t have. That makes an exciting class; that’s what I like best. Q: What were your college years like? A:  Well, the 1960s were kind of exciting. Alamosa is a bathwater, so whatever was cool or the latest thing to do in Denver in the clubs, you couldn’t do in Adams State. It was old fashioned, more like the 50s, I suppose; we still had a lot of dances. So, you go to Denver to the bars, and you could do the twist and all that cool stuff. So, I learned that a person could drink underage. It was an introduction to the world at large. We began to realize about Nam, which had been going on but secret. It was a time when you were a young man and you had a selective service card, and they were talking about drafting folks. You hoped you could keep your student deferment.

Q: How long do you think you are going to teach? A: As long as my brain works and my body keeps up with it. I used to say when the pope retires, but he has, so that changes my line. I guess I have to say when the Supreme Court justices [retire], because they’re for-life appointment. The older I get, the more I value the experience and the more I know for sure from first-hand experience that just because you get older doesn’t mean you get stupid. The learning curve slows down, but if the brain works okay, you’re still learning. Q: What do you think is the most important skill that students take away from English classes in college? A: In the straight Comp class, I hope it’s the ability to think clearly, to put together an essay or whatever written device that brings readers in, present their ideas clearly so the readers understand what they have to say, and if they’re lucky, agree with them. Or if they don’t agree with them, at least pay them respect and make them say, “You know, you made me rethink my position.” I guess c om mu n i c at e clearly in written form – that’s the biggest thing. Q: How do you keep students interested in stories that have been written a long, long time ago? A: Sometimes it’s presentation. I think people still like to hear the stories. I think that’s hu-

man. We like to tell stories, and we like to listen to stories. Movies are another great way. I perceive that students today don’t seem to read quite as much as they used to. I’m pretty sure they watch movies. So if we’re talking about some literary topic, we’re talking about some literary device. If it applies, I’ll say, “What about this film?” Chances are, they’ve seen the film, so we can go back and forth. Or some devices you can find in short stories like foreshadowing. People who watch movies know a lot about foreshadowing. Q: What are some goals that you would still like to accomplish? Anything you haven’t done yet? A: I’d like to do a little writing. I have published two or three little articles over the years in journals, nothing big. That’s kind of fun, working up some essay on a literary topic and seeing your name in print and that sort of stuff. When I’m retired and not too decrepit, I might look into volunteering – something to pay back to the community.

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May 1, 2013 — Page 3

Goodbye, Spectator, from this gamer forever

Voice

One question, many answers! What’s your favorite memory at WNCC? “Not failing any classes” — Bethany Gross, Mitchell, Neb.

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or nearly five years, I’ve written story after story for all of you about one of my favorite things in the world that I think is evolving into the most brilliant form of expression and storytelling in human civilization. And, hopefully for gamers and non-gamers alike, I’ve done all right in explaining why one might think so. You see, when visionaries are able to create a fleshed-out world that’s not bound by any limits or concept of reality — and when that world is allowed to become personable, aware of your interaction with it and what kind of player and therefore person you are — therein lies the making of a medium that is more alive than any other form of art we can experience today. Never-ending stories. No separation between the person and the fictional world. Not just a blank canvas but a blank realm to submerge a person’s mind in. An endless number of possible personable experiences. And an infinite number of creative interactive possibilities! That’s what a video game is. Video games could even be the future of storytelling (Star Trek’s Holodeck?), but at the very least I

know they are masters of immersion and escape from reality that take advantage of how our ape-like brains aren’t used to interactive fictional worlds and how they can affect us in the way real world scenarios would. And it is that potential and that potency that has inspired me to write about the possibilities. Johnny Titles “Krr’ej” like Okami have Escamilla beautifully demonstrated how games can create worlds that are so abstracted that they’re metaphorical, as we play a Shinto god performing miracles by using the controller as a brush to paint on a human world personified as a painting. Games like LIMBO have shown us that games don’t even need words or more than shadows to tell a baffling thought-provoking story, only emotional sound design that’s cued with what we see. Games like Thomas alone allowed us to interact with

worlds that defy all ideas of what another reality could be like — the forms of life that could exist in it — and how they could be consciously aware of our own reality. The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword not only demonstrated the constantly evolving art of immersion that games excel at with its motioncapture but also demonstrated how a series can continually reimagine itself after twenty-five years and still feel like a new experience. Bioshock Infinite proved to us that even a first-person shooter could ride on a very human journey while delving into profound themes inspired by our best literature. While fighting games like Soul Calibur V and PlayStation All Stars have showed us how mentally-taxing challenging games could be when veteran players spend years competing and refining their skills to be more cunning, fast and strategic than the next. Slender, Dead Space 3 and Lone Survivor showed us that horror games are not only the most frightening experiences ever created, they can use psychological mind games to make players feel genuine impeding doom, mania, intense loneliness,

anxiety, and vulnerability. While Journey showed everyone how a game could take us through a personally revealing, deep and profound spiritual experience colored by the type of person we are and how we played it. While we saw Heavy Rain become the first fusion of a game and a film, showing us that games have evolved to the point where they can match the emotional impact of film while also making us form relationships with fictional characters we interact with, as we involve ourselves with their lives first-hand. While The Unfinished Swan expressed emotional sensibilities we never would acquaint with a game that were so gentle they brought feelings and memories from our childhood back into our life. Honestly — games can provide us with so many new experiences like never before possible that I could write about them for a long time and never run out of ways they can. And these are among the best games I’ve written about in the last five years that have done just that: challenge the definition of what a video game could be, as I have always continually asked all of you to challenge yours.

to expand the diversity and the range, in both acting and vocals, that have made the Theater West plays as successful as they have been. Bill Groth, although generally an on-stage presence, will return this summer in a different role – director. “Bill says that he doesn’t sing,” says Chaloupka, with a smirk. That being established, Groth did agree to return and share his unending theater knowledge and talent with the Valley yet again by directing the first play of the season, Harvey. In a nutshell, Harvey is the tale of one Elwood Dowd and his imaginary 6-and-a-half-foot imaginary friend, Harvey, a rabbit. Throughout the play the audience is taken on a roller coaster ride with

mental institutions, doctors, and mysteriously opening doors. This classic comedy by Mary Chase, originally on Broadway, was later made into a movie starring the immortal Jimmy Stewart. The second production of the season, Spamalot, is a classic Monty Python musical. “We wanted to do Spamalot two years ago; however, by the time we were ready to announce the plays, they had decided to tour with Spamalot, so the rights were no longer available,” says Chaloupka on the choosing of Spamalot. Eager to involve more of the community, Chaloupka stated, “In this cast not all of the characters can be college students; we needed actors and actresses in their 40s or 50s

to play these characters.” There are several local names, including Jessica Schluter of Scottsbluff, playing Lady of the Lake, and Will Thomas, appearing in three different roles and two different genders, as Sir Bedevere the Strangly Flatulent, Dennis’s Mother, and Conrad. “We are still looking for two Laker Girls and two Knights for Spamalot,” says Chaloupka, saying that the roles are not very large, but critical to the play. “Anyone interested can contact me at 308-635-6794.” Whether as a family outing for Beauty and the Beast or for a comedy filled evening with Harvey and Spamalot, the 2013 Theater West season offers something for everyone in the community.

Theater Continued from page 1 “Hanging out with friends” —Ellen Haley, Fort Morgan, Colo.

“When I cooked minute rice in 59 seconds.” — Joe Huck, Scottsbluff

“The experience of the classes” — Eric Darbin, Scottsbluff

“Playing soccer at WNCC” — Mason Nab, Gering

es the company, the actors and the directors with new material. The second and more practical positive is the attracting of new audiences. We have a stable audience demographic that may be getting a little bit older, but to replenish that and to keep a constant stream of new and younger audience members interested and coming back, we need to continue to introduce newer productions.” While the past two Theater West seasons have been successful, there have been no childfriendly productions, hence the decision of the final production to be Beauty and the Beast. “Beauty and the Beast really comes from the fact that every so often we want to, and need to, put on a show that involves as many children as we can. Those kind of plays are becoming increasingly harder to find because we have done most of them. So, there are not a lot of plays available until more are written. Beauty and the Beast just seemed like the perfect next choice for a childfriendly show,” Chaloupka said about Beauty and the Beast. In addition to the local talent that has been instrumental in the success of Theater West, more and more the company has included out-of-town talent, including Bill Groth and Andy Brown, who returned last summer to help produce the successful 2012 season. Seasoned professionals along with several college students, recruited by Chaloupka, have helped

Manka Continued from page 1

“Being a student ambassador with Kimmie Widick because she’s the coolest.” — Taylor Severyn, Mitchell, NE

“Kale Bowman’s microbiology class” — Heather K. Golden, Mitchell, Neb.

“Playing nerf football in the hallway with new friends and teammates!” — Kayla Romey, Gering

— Compiled by Danielle Hearn, Spectator

Picking a major was also easy for Manka. The 21-year-old spends most of his free time working on cars, which has allowed him to focus on more details in the shop because of his previous knowledge. He said much of his knowledge about cars was taught to him by his father. Manka, who has been on the President’s List with an outstanding GPA a couple of times, advises students who want to study automotive technology to “pay attention to the teachers, keep up on the homework and stay in the shop as long as you’re supposed to.” Manka said he enjoyed rebuilding cars as part of his coursework, especially engine rebuilding. “Taking it apart and putting it back together” is his favorite part about being in the shop. Now that Manka is graduating this semester with a degree in automotive technology, he is looking forward to “having his degree and having something to show” after excelling in and outside of the classroom. He is now considering pursuing degrees in welding and auto body so he could expand his knowledge about cars even more. Someday he hopes to open his own shop, where he would like to restore old cars.


News

May 1, 2013 — Page 4

Lots of reasons to join Math and Science Club

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ani Vesper was introduced to Mu Alpha Sigma Chi, a math and science club at WNCC, by her friends. Her major is psychology, and she loves science. “Joining a club is definitely a good way to meet people,” said Vesper. The Math and Science Club just started last semester, and things have been going well for the club’s members. Right now, the club has about 15 participants. The president of the Math and Science Club is Scout Wilson, and he has many activities lined up. “We have a visit to the Scotts Bluff National Monument, where we take a hike up to the Monument, and one of the rangers is going to show us the geographical information, like rocks, soil, and other stuff,” said Wilson. The club also plans to look into the physics of a gun. They’ll actually do some trap shooting, and the physics teacher is

going to show some equations about how the bullet travels. The club also plans to make a trip to Elitch Gardens in Denver this summer. “There’s a physics day and a science day. They have some different activities that people can go and do there. They have displays and other things that you can do,” said Amy Winters, a WNCC instructor who helps with the math and science club. The club also takes part in Pi Day, a day that celebrates the math number 3.14. It is Lenzie Cole a number that goes on Science forever and does not Columnist repeat. Also worth mentioning is that the club recently had a fundraiser, and it was also used as an alcohol and drug

awareness event. March 14 was Pi Day. Members made and sold pies, and they also handed out brochures for alcohol and drug awareness. The club doesn’t have a specific time that it meets yet. For now, the club meets once a month. Anyone who would like to join can talk to Wilson or Winters. The club is already making plans for next school year. The group wants to go to the atomic clock in Colorado; there are only a few atomic clocks in the world. The club would also like to visit the Nature and Science Museum in Denver, and it also wants to visit a wind farm that’s located between Kimball and the Colorado border. “Anybody is welcome; it does not have to be students who are good in math and science. It’s for anyone who likes math and/or science, any part of it,” said Winters.

Graduation ceremony set for May 11 By DANIELLE HEARN Spectator Reporter The 81st annual Commencement at Western Nebraska Community College will be Saturday, May 11. The ceremony will take place in Cougar Palace at 4 p.m. The graduation speaker will be Caren Houlton Dean of the Skilz Group out of Omaha. On May 11, students’ family and friends are invited to the graduation ceremony. For those who need special arrangements on graduation day, such as a wheel chair or sign language, let the registration office know as soon as possible. A special addition to the graduation ceremony is Jolesch Photography, which will take photos of all graduates when they walk across the stage to receive their diploma from the President of Western Nebraska Community College.    To see the graduation announcement, go online to www.cbgradfour.com or call 800-433-0296.  Students will receive their diploma after Spring Semester 2013 grades are finalized. Diplomas can be either picked up in person or mailed by May 24.  For more questions about the ceremony, please contact Jennifer Araujo at 308-348-6013. 

Drinking Continued from page 1 “It is a very important and vital area for the success of students at any college,” WNCC Residence Life Director Mario Chavez said. “Underage drinking contributes to many factors that may cause a student to fail or to succeed. Students who are underage and consume alcohol need to be aware of not only the legal ramifications of their actions but also the damage they can cause to their body, academics and integrity.”  Underage drinking, officials stress, can affect students’ long-term aspirations.   Horak said she tries to explain to students “the consequences such as fines and the legal ramifications that would happen if they get caught drinking underage and how it would go on their record and possibly keep them from qualifying for scholarships.” Horak said not all students

completely understand the consequences of underage drinking, making it even more important for law enforcement officials to try to educate students. “Underage drinking can injure the development of their brains and run the risk of becoming addicted as well,” Horak stated. “There have been studies done that show that the younger you are when you start drinking alcohol the more chances you have of falling into alcoholism and alcohol addiction. The brain does not stop growing until the early to mid 20s, so the earlier you start consuming alcohol the greater the amount of damage is done to it. This damage cannot be reversed.” There are many programs available and even laws that exist to help curb underage drinking as well as drinking and driving. At WNCC, there are programs in the residence

halls that provide information to students about the consequences involved with underage drinking. “We provide alcohol prevention programming in the residence hall. We do a specific safe spring break alcohol prevention program for all students,” Chavez said. “Examples of this in the past years have been bringing in speakers to talk about the effects of alcohol for underage drinkers or bringing in a driving simulator to let students experience impaired driving and the dangers that are associated with drinking and driving.” WNCC has made a strong stance against underage drinking. For example, the school expects many organizations around campus to promote alcohol prevention as well. “Throughout the year all recognized student organizations are also required to incorporate some type of alcohol prevention education in

their programming, which could be as simple as handing out fliers or setting up a booth to inform students on the risks and dangers associated with teen drinking,” Chavez said. Law enforcement officials hope strict state laws also help reduce the number of instances involving underage drinking and driving. “There is the zero tolerance law, which says that if you are behind the wheel of a vehicle, the legal limit for any person under the age of 21 is .02. The legal limit for of age adults is .08,” Horak said. “That helps us crack down, but obviously we cannot go forward with a DUI for them because they are still under the legal limit. But if they are over .02 and underage they are over the legal limit for a minor and that helps us enforce drinking and driving violations in teenagers more harshly.” Chavez believes that colleges

and universities of all sizes experience issues with teen drinking. “I believe that teen drinking is a problem at any college at any level. We experience the same issues with drinking that any state or university college system encounters,” Chavez added. “At our level we do deal with less alcohol related offenses due to our size and number of students who live on campus.” From Horak’s standpoint, witnessing the horrific effects of underage drinking, including fatalities, hopefully prevents underage drinking from becoming a bigger problem. “Seeing pictures of people who have been ejected from vehicles because they were not wearing their seatbelts and [were] drinking and driving might open their eyes and make them realize how dangerous drinking and driving really is,” Horak said. “Education is the key.”


Sports Learning to love the game of baseball

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y opinion of sports has changed a lot in the last few years. I can honestly say that a few years ago I could have cared less which sports season it was. I find it interesting how quickly things have changed. It is officially spring, and that means my favorite sports season is under way or looming very closely in my future. Yes, I admit it, I love baseball. There, I said it! Baseball holds a special place in my heart. Even when I was never very interested in sports, for some reason baseball always interested me. When Heidi I was introduced Hancock to sports at the Commentary high school and college levels, I automatically was attracted to the baseball side of things. I will admit, though, that I struggle with the weather as we proceed into the season. I come prepared to each game with my blankets and hot chocolate. I cuddle with my scorebook and let the game unfold. Unlike most baseball fans, I cannot just sit idly by and watch the game. I have found that the best way to follow the game is to keep track of it in an official scorebook. Now, do not get me wrong, the first few times I tried to keep the book, I botched it more than I am proud to admit. I still struggle with certain aspects of the game, but I love it nonetheless. Most people look at the field and see the pitcher, catcher, infielders, and outfielders. I, however, see numbers. Each position holds a number from one through nine. It’s confusing at first, but once you get the hang of it, it is as natural as breathing. If you cannot tell by now, I love digging deeper and finding out how the game actually works. I love knowing why each play happens and how it will unfold. I never imagined that I would have such a passion for a sport. I have to attribute my love of baseball to a couple people. My dad was the person who got me started. I loved sitting down and watching the Rockies play. He was the first person to take me to a Major League Baseball game. The next person that I give credit to is my fiancé, Dave Brunz. I am pretty sure he eats, drinks and sleeps baseball. He has taught me all the ins and outs of the game. I have not actually gotten to sit at an actual baseball game yet this season, but I have taken in a couple of softball games. I do have to say I am learning to appreciate softball just as much as baseball. I think a lot of the appeal of the game has to do with the time of year. I love spring and summer and baseball makes this time of the year so much better. Heidi Hancock is the assistant sports editor of the Spectator.

INSIDE: WNCC sophomore athletes to continue their college careers at four-year schools, Page 6 May 1, 2013 —Page 5

Leader on the field Sophomore utility player helps Cougar baseball team qualify for regional tournament

By HEIDI HANCOCK Spectator Assistant Sports Editor

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NCC utility player Pablo Garcia is in his final season with the Cougars. Garcia was drawn to WNCC because of the baseball program. He found his way to Scottsbluff thanks to local player Ulysses Roque. “I lived in Miami and went to a tryout, and Ulysses Roque took me to the basePablo Garcia ball tryouts and told me that it was better if I came here,” Garcia said. Coming to WNCC and the Nebraska Panhandle was a change for Garcia. “Scottsbluff was different – nice, but different,” Garcia stated. “The weather is really different, and I don’t like the cold. It was cold when I first got here, Photo by Heidi Hancock/Spectator especially the first spring. There WNCC sophomore Pablo Garcia follows through on a swing during a was a lot of snow, but I like it.” game against NJC on Monday at Cleveland Field in Scottsbluff. Garcia Garcia has had a solid season is a utility player for the Cougars, who are 20-32. this year; however, a game from last year stands out most in his ball has been a big part of Gar- start baseball in the morning mind. cia’s life since he was young. and go to school in the after“My most memorable “In the Dominican Repub- noon. We go to school from 6 games were last year when we lic, that is what we do,” Garcia to 9 or 2 to 5.” played against Otero,” Garcia stated. “Here, when a kid is When Garcia and his said. “Our season was going bored, you give him a football friends were on the diamond pretty bad, and it was the end of or a basketball. In my country, and not in school, they emulatthe season, the last two games. I you are handed a baseball and a ed their favorite players. Garcia think those were the best games glove. Everything is baseball.” looked up to one certain player, of my life. I played the best in Growing up in the Domini- Bengie Molina of the St. Louis those games.” can Republic, Garcia placed Cardinals. Garcia, like Molina, Garcia spent most of his life a great deal of importance on is a catcher. in the Dominican Republic. playing baseball. “I loved everything about He moved to the United States “[Playing baseball] is really being a catcher,” Garcia added. when he was 16. Playing base- important,” Garcia said. “We “I wanted to be in every play of

the game. I am also a first and third baseman” Even though Garcia looks up to the major league catcher, he attributes his own success to his parents. “My mom and dad are the people that I play for,” Garcia said. Baseball is Garcia’s passion, but he is also focused on his education and plans to continue with school even if he does not continue to play baseball after he leaves WNCC. “My goal for the next five years is to keep playing baseball if I can. If not, I will keep going in school,” Garcia added. “I want to be a pilot and have my degree in business.” Garcia does not have a clear plan for next year, but he is looking at Friends University in Kansas and a school in Oklahoma. Playing college baseball has been an adventure for Garcia, and he’s enjoyed every minute of it. “College baseball is more real because it is quicker and the game goes by faster than in high school,” Garcia said. “It is stricter than it is in high school where you just play your game and have fun. Here, it is more about listening to the coach and watching for signals and plays. In high school it’s more about just playing the game.” Being a leader is very important to Garcia. He takes his role seriously. “The freshmen and other players follow what you do,” Garcia said. “If you are doing it, they think they can do it as well. If you do something bad, then they think it is OK to do it. Being a leader is very important.”

IN the HUDDLE: Mariah Shepherd By DANIELLE HEARN Spectator Sports Editor Mariah Shepherd is a sophomore from Grantville, Utah, and is a two-year starter for the Cougars. Shepherd has been a steady performer for the Cougars this season. She’s batting .354 this season with 47 runs scored, 51 RBIs, 24 doubles, and seven home runs. She is just five doubles from breaking the school record. Shepherd and the rest of the team finished off the regular season with a 52-8 record. They’re now preparing to play in the postseason. It is only the third time in school history that the Cougars have notched 50-plus wins, and the team needs just three more wins to set the all-time school record. Q: What position do you play? A: First base, catcher, outfield Q: How long have you been playing softball? A: Seven years Q: What do you miss most about your hometown? A: Family and friends and riding horses Q: As a sophomore, what was your favorite memory at WNCC? A: All the crazy things that are said happen on the bus. Q: What was your most embarrassing moment? A: When coach said I had room to catch a ball, and I didn’t see the fence and ran into it.

Spectator photo

WNCC sophomore Mariah Shepherd, from Grantsville, Utah, hits the ball in a game against Dawson C.C. on March 14. WNCC won 6-0 and 12-4.

Q: If you could talk and hang out with any famous person, who would it be? Why? A: Eminem. He has been my favorite since I was little.

See Mariah, Page 6


Sports Mariah Continued from page 5 Q: What is your favorite thing about playing softball? A: It’s an escape from life. Q: If you could give advice to incoming freshmen softball players, what would it be? A: Have a good attitude; it makes everything a million times better. Q: What do you want to be after you graduate from college? A: A dental hygienist and a mom. Q: If you could play for any softball team at the next level, what team would it be? A: University of Florida Q: How do you prepare yourself before every game? A: Try to get pumped up via music and dancing. Q: If you could explain yourself in one word, what would it be? A: Moody Q: Do you have anyone you look up to? A: My dad and people who go through really hard things in life but still stay happy. Q: What’s one thing you want people to know about you? A: I love cosmetology

MVC

WHERE ARE THEY HEADED? Many WNCC athletes to continue their college careers at four-year schools By DANIELLE HEARN Spectator Sports Editor Many players come to Western Nebraska Community College to get an education and to play a sport. Some then get a chance, after leaving WNCC, to keep playing at a four-year school. Here is the list of WNCC sophomores and their plans for next school year. Volleyball  Megan Johnson, undecided  Alex Rivera will attend Southern Illinois University  Taylor VanderWerff will attend Southwest Oklahoma State University in Oklahoma.  Kat Agson will attend Southern Illinois University.  Tasha Meyer, undecided  Danika Youngblood is attending Cal State-Bakersville Men’s Basketball  Tahir Little, undecided  Charles Ward, undecided  Sebastian Suarez, undecided  Cody Johnson will attend Laloya Chicago University in Illinois.  Chad Calcaterra will attend the University of North Dakota in North Dakota. Baseball

Juggling act WNCC’s Kyle Shoutta concentrates as he juggles between innings during a game against NJC on April 29.

Baseball Schedule

Sport: Softball Grade: Sophomore Position: Third base, shortstop Hobbies/Interests: “Playing sports, being outdoors, and going camping.” Favorite Carter”

Movie:

“Coach

Nickname: Cash What do you like best about going to WNCC?: “Being involved in the community and how small it is and getting along with all the sports teams and how they just blend well together.” Biggest motivation in your sport: “The biggest motivator is probably my brother. I have always looked up to him, and I just want to do good and never let him down.” Reason for choosing WNCC: “To play for Coach [Maria] Winn-Ratliff.” — By Heidi Hancock

 Grant Rimington, undecided  Zach Ostergard, undecided  Ernesto Punales, undecided  Ozzie Gonzalez, undecided  Challis Wright will attend Colorado Christian University in Colorado.  Anthony Delgado, undecided  Keeton Krause, undecided Pablo Garcia, undecided Nick Vanthillo, undecided  Alex Michaud, undecided  Richard Hernandez, undecided Justin Smith, undecided Grant Piccoli, undecided Men’s Soccer  Joseph Rasnic will attend Dort College in Sioux Center, Iowa.  Mason Nab will attend Dort College in Sioux Center, Iowa.  Harry Bueno, undecided  Kyle Gonzalez, undecided  Jacob Santos, undecided  Adhmar Lino, undecided  Cody Thompson, undecided  Mark Hubbard, undecided  Juan Carlos Fernandez, undecided  Matt Lee, undecided Women’s soccer  Kortney Mitchell, undecided  Ashley Baker will attend Kansas Wesleyan University in Salina, Kan.  Ariana Herrera, undecided  Kelsey Newby, undecided  Bailey Wenz will attend University of Mary in North Dakota.  Laura James plans to play at Ferris State University. Women’s Basketball  Kelsey Doddridge will at-

tend the University of Northern Colorado.  Gritt Ryder will attend Colorado State University.  Idil Ozbayrak will attend the University of Wisconsin/Madison.  Jessica Aratani, undecided Softball  Bianca Duran will attend Louisiana Tech University. She will major in buisness. Kasey Cash, undecided  Mariah Shepherd, undecided  Danielle Hearn will attend Culver Stockton College in Missouri. She plans to study psychology.  Madison Spencer will attend Friends University in Wichita, Kan. She will study health science.  Kayla Romey will attend Friends University in Wichita, Kan. She will study graphic de-

sign. Melanie Rowson will attend Friends University in Wichita, Kan. She will study health science. Kimberly Widick, undecided

Cougar Scoreboard

Most Valuable Cougar

Kasey Cash

May 1, 2013 — Page 6

2/7-8 McCook C.C., home Lost 11-0 — McCook C.C. Lost 7-1 — McCook C.C. Won 5-1 — McCook C.C. Lost 13-5 — McCook C.C. Lost 15-0 — @ Odessa College Lost 9-2 — @ Odessa College Won 12-2 — @ Odessa College Lost 3-1 — @ Odessa College Won 6-5 — Northeastern JC Lost 7-2 — Northeastern JC 3/1 @ Lamar C.C. Lost 6-2 — Lamar C.C. 3/2-3 @ Trinidad State College Lost 5-0 — Trinidad State College Lost 5-1 — Trinidad State College Won 9-2 — Trinidad State College Won 7-5 — Trinidad State College 3/7 Lamar C.C., home Lost 11-1 — Lamar C.C. Lost 13-1 — Lamar C.C. 3/8 Otero J.C., home Lost 5-2 — Otero J.C. Won 4-3 — Otero J.C. 3/13-14 @ Iowa Western C.C. Lost 8-5 — Iowa Western C.C. Lost 2-1 —Iowa Western C.C. 3/17 @ Canada All-Star Team Won 9-7 — Canada All-star Team 3/18 @ Glendale C.C. Lost 9-8 — Glendale C.C. 3/19 @ Seminole State C.C. Lost 8-6 — Seminole State C.C. 3/20 @ Yavapai College

Lost 8-6 — Yavapai College Lost 15-6 — Yavapai College 3/21-22 @ Seminole State C.C. Lost 14-2 — Seminole State C.C. Won 11-9 — Seminole State C.C. 3/29 Trinidad State, home Won 5-3 — Trinidad State Won 2-1 — Trinidad State 3/30 Trinidad State, home Won 15-5 — Trinidad State Lost 7-5 — Trinidad State 4/3 McCook C.C., home Lost 14-6 — McCook C.C. 4/6-7 @ Otero J.C. Lost 4-3 —Otero J.C. Lost 6-5 — Otero J.C. Lost 1-0 — Otero J.C. Won 10-0 — Otero J.C. 4/13-14 Northeastern J.C. Lost 2-1 — Northeastern J.C. Lost 11-1 — Northeastern J.C. Lost 18-6 — Northeastern J.C. Won 8-3 — Northeastern J.C. 4/20-21 @ Lamar C.C. Won 5-4 — Lamar C.C. Lost 8-2 — Lamar C.C. Lost 10-1 — Lamar C.C. Lost 12-3 — Lamar C.C. 4/25 McCook C.C., home Won 7-4 — McCook C.C. 4/27 @ McCook C.C. Won 11-5 — McCook C.C. Won 10-2 — McCook C.C. 4/28 @ McCook C.C. Won 14-3 — McCook C.C.

Won 6-3 — McCook C.C. 4/29 @ Northeastern J.C. Lost 11-1 — Northeastern J.C. Win 12-11 — Northeastern J.C. 5/3-5 — Playoffs @ NJC 5/10-12 Region IX Champs 5/16-19 West Districts 5/23-28 College World Series

Softball Schedule

2/9-10 @ Colby C.C. Won 9-0 — Colby C.C. Lost 7-5 — Colby C.C. Won 8-1 — Colby C.C. Won 9-7 — Colby C.C. 2/15-17 @ Midland College Torney Won 6-3 — Seminole State College Won 11-3 — Luna C.C. Won 13-0 — University of Chihauhua Won 10-7 —Odessa College Lost 3-2 — Lubbock Christian J.V. Won 6-3 — Midland College Won 5-3 — Midland College 3/1 @ Lamar C.C. Won 10-0 — Lamar C.C. Won 8-0 — Lamar C.C. 3/2 @ Frank Phillips College Won 9-0 — Frank Phillips College Won 10-1 — Frank Phillips College 3/3 @ Western Texas College Lost 2-0 —Western Texas College Won 13-0 — Western Texas College 3/6 @ North Platte C.C. Won 16-2 — North Platte C.C. Won 13-5 — North Platte C.C. 3/9 @ Otero J.C. Won 5-2 — Otero J.C. Lost 5-0 — Otero J.C. 3/13 McCook C.C., home Won 10-4 — McCook C.C. Won 11-1 — McCook C.C. 3/14 Dawson C.C., home Won 6-0 — Dawson C.C. Won 12-4 — Dawson C.C. 3/16 @ Trinidad State College Won 3-2 — Trinidad State College Lost 11-3 — Trinidad State College 3/17 @ Luna C.C. Won 11-3 — Luna C.C.

Lost 8-2 — Luna C.C. 3/18 @ Adams State College JV Lost 13-1 — Adams State College Won 3-1 — Adams State College 3/20 North Platte C.C., home Won 3-2 — North Platte C.C. Won 11-2 — North Platte C.C. 3/27 Northeaster J.C.. home Won 6-2 — NE Colorado Won 15-11 — NE Colorado 3/29 Lamar C.C., home Won 8-0 — Lamar C.C. Won11-4 — Lamar C.C. 4/3 @ North Platte C.C. Won 11-3 — North Platte C.C. Won 11-1 — North Platte C.C. 4/5 Otero J.C., home Won 5-4 — Otero J.C. Won 1-0 — Otero J.C. 4/6 Trinidad State College, home Won 14-4 — Trinidad State College Won 8-0 — Trinidad State College 4/12 @ McCook C.C. Won 9-1 — McCook C.C Won 15-4 — McCook C.C 4/13 @ Colby Tourney Won 13-1 — Seward County C.C. Won 2-0 — Barton C.C. Lost 14-0 — Butler C.C. 4/20 @ Beatrice, Ne Won 10-3 — Southeast C.C. Won 9-6 — Southeast C.C. 4/21 @ Salina, KS Won 7-3 Kansas Wesleyan Won 10-0 Friends College 4/24 @ Northeastern J.C. Won 8-0 — Northeastern J.C. Won 10-0 — Northeastern J.C. 4/25 North Platte C.C., home Won 8-0 — North Platte C.C. Won 23-0 — North Platte C.C. 4/27-28 Garden City C.C., home Won 3-0 — Garden City C.C Won 4-3 — Garden City C.C Won 9-2 — Garden City C.C Won 10-1 — Garden City C.C 5/2-4 Region XI Tournament 5/5-6 Region XI Playoff (2-of-3) 5/9-10 District Playoff (2-of-3) 5/ NJCAA National Tournament

Softball sophomores honored WNCC’s nine softball sophomores were recognized at their last home softball game on April 28.


News

May 1, 2013 — Page 7

2013 WNCC Prospective Graduates Alliance Campus

Adonis, Deandra K.................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Anderson, Cale L. ..................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Ash, Jerry Allen ................ Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Bewley, Bradley S. ............ Associate of Occupational Studies ...............Scottsbluff, NE Brown, Taylor S. ............... Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Campos, Crista C. .................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Campos, Rita Jolynn ....................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Charambira, Sara J. ................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Collins, Devan M. ..................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Duncan, Janna Lea ............................... Certificate ......................................Alliance, NE Dunovsky, Michele K. ...........................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Gallagher, Jessie ............... Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Garett, Julie Ann ............................. Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Hinton, Tanner A. .............. Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Hinton, Trevan T. .............. Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Hoffman, Jared F. .............. Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Jensen, Erin Nicole ...............................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Johnson, Albert ................ Associate of Occupational Studies ...............Scottsbluff, NE Jourdan, Adam P.....................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Loomis, Amanda Charlene.............. Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Maddox, Kash W....................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Magnuson, Lacey Dyan .................. Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Mathis, Christina A. ...............................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE McKimmey, Shawn M. ................... Associate of Arts.................................... Ashby, NE Monahan, Shantel M. .............................Diploma ....................................... Hyannis, NE Penaluna, Ryan P. ...................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Petering, Maisie K. ................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Sage, Justin L. ........................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Sample, Jenni Lyn ........................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Sandsness, Ada M. .................................Diploma .......................................Chadron, NE Schmidt, Ty R. .................. Associate of Occupational Studies ..................... Upton, WY Smith, Eli W. ................................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Unrein, Colton Levi ...............................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Woodward, Ashley Morgan ...................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Yockey, Andrew D. ................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Youman, Brent D. ............. Associate of Occupational Studies ...................Alliance, NE Brackney, Dylan C. .................Associate of Occup Studies ...................... Quilcene, WA Wilcox, Chad D............................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Best, Bridget Jean ........................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Cotton, Amanda S. .......................... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE

Scottsbluff Campus Agson, Kathryn Elizabeth ............... Associate of Arts.................................Houston, TX Ahlers, Christian Anthony .............. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Ahlers, Jessica Marie ...................... Associate of Arts................................. Gillette, WY Amaya, Angelica Marie .................. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Andrews, Jessica L.................................Diploma .................................. Torrington, WY Aniteye, Joy B.............................. Associate of Science ...................Hamburg, Germany Aratani, Jessica Lynn ...................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Bairn, Dylan J. ................................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Baker, Ashley Nicole ...................... Associate of Arts...................................Aurora, CO Ballard, Grace A.......................Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Barraza, Karen ............................... Associate of Arts.............................. Lexington, NE Barrios, Cerelia BA......................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Bauer, Jeffrey P. ................ Associate of Occupational Studies ............... Rapid City, SD Beahr, Carolyn M. ........................ Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Beason, Matthew Aaron .... Associate of Occupational Studies ...............Scottsbluff, NE Bell, Keaton Robert ..................... Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Betzold, Joseph Robert ......... Associate of Applied Science ...................Scottsbluff, NE Blackwell, Jodi L. ................. Associate of Applied Science .................. Adairsville, GA Bonner, Stephanie D. ...................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Borges, Jonathon Matthew.... Associate of Applied Science .......................Mitchell, NE Brannan, Alexandria Nicole ............ Associate of Arts.................................Mitchell, NE Branon, Cammie D. ...............................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Broderick, MacKenzie Marie.......... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Brush, Kayla J. .........................Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Bucheroni, Rafael Lanzoni ............. Associate of Arts..........Santana de Pamaiba, Brazil Burt, Phillip Allen ........................ Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Burton, Michelle M................................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Calcaterra, Chad Edward ................ Associate of Arts.................................Cloquet, MN Camacho, Christopher Aaron ...Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Carranza, Darwin ........................... Associate of Arts...................... Santa Cruz, Bolivia Carrillo, Rosa Esther ............. Associate of Applied Science .......................Mitchell, NE Cash, Kasey Lynn ........................... Associate of Arts.............................Wellington, CO Charron, Candie S. .......................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Cole, Katherine ................................... Certificate ................................. Torrington, WY Collins, Corliss ..................... Associate of Applied Science ............. Lawrenceville, GA Conn, Tessa Lynn ......................... Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Coronado Skubbe, Christian OvidioAssociate of Arts ............................Santa Cruz, NE Craven Packard, Serena Dee ................ Certificate ..................................Scottsbluff, NE Crisman, Christopher ..............Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Gering, NE Diaz, Elysha R. ............................ Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Didier, Kelsey Rae .................................Diploma ...................................... Harrison, NE Doddridge, Kelsey Marie ................ Associate of Arts.................................Windsor, CO Doremus, Melynda Elaine .............. Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Downer, Howard Adam .................. Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Dudley, Melissa Sue........................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Duran, Bianca Rae .......................... Associate of Arts.......................... Westminster, CO Eich, Catherine Jill ....................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Empfield, Kelsey Jean..................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Escamilla, Johnny R........................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Everhart, Linda Y. ........................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Evert, Misty Lynn ..................................Diploma .......................................Alliance, NE Firman, Ronald M. .......................... Associate of Arts...................................Aurora, CO Flood, Kimberly M. .................Associate Degree Nursing ...........................Bayard, NE Garcia, Pablo Alberto ...................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Gasseling, Shawn Michael .............. Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Goeman, Laramie Jane................. Associate of Science .......................... Bridgeport, NE Goeman, Laramie Jane................. Associate of Science .......................... Bridgeport, NE Gonzales, Kyle Boone ................. Associate of Science ..............................Windsor, CO Gonzalez, Osvaldo Francisco.......... Associate of Arts.....................................Miami, FL Grant, Michelle L. ....................Associate Degree Nursing .........................Chadron, NE Griner, Rachel Anne ..................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Gurrola, Elise Marie........................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Gutierrez, Jennifer M. ............................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Hall, Cassandra Lynn ................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Hancock, Heidi M. .......................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Harnish, Nicol Ashleigh .................. Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Hearn, Danielle Marie ..................... Associate of Arts........................ Santa Monica, CA Henderson, Terra M. ................Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Hendricks, Stacy R....................... Associate of Science .............................. Billings, MT Hernandez III, Richard Joe .......... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Heuss, Caroline N. ....................... Associate of Science ................................Bayard, NE Hill, Michael A.......................................Diploma .................................. Torrington, WY Hoffmann, Cassidy A. ..............Associate Degree Nursing .........................Alliance, NE Hofstetter, Charlotte J. .......... Associate of Applied Science ................. North Platte, NE Holcomb, Emily Jean ................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Hubbard, Mark Thomas .................. Associate of Arts.................................. Franklin, ID

Huffman, Elizabeth Hannah............ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Jackson, Christopher James ............ Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE James, Laura Ann ......................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Jensen, Tyler Dale ................. Associate of Applied Science ...................Scottsbluff, NE Johnson, Brittney Lynn ................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Johnson, Megan C. ...................... Associate of Science ..................................Sandy, UT Kearns, Euretta E. ..................................Diploma ......................................... Gering, NE Kindvall, Alex. .................. Associate of Occupational Studies ...............Scottsbluff, NE Klein, Michael T. ............................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Konopnicki, Samantha Marie ......... Associate of Arts................................ Minatare, NE Koob, TimothyJ............................... Associate of Arts.................................Mitchell, NE Kramer, Timothy M. ............................ Certificate ........................................Bayard, NE Krause, Keeton Kennedy ............. Associate of Science ............................ Loveland, CO Leal, Alexandria A. ................................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Lee, Matthew Willen .................... Associate of Science ...............................Greeley, CO Lehr, Monica Ann ..................................Diploma ......................................... Gering, NE Lino Cort‚z, Adhemar ..................... Associate of Arts...................... Santa Cruz, Bolivia Lopez, Julie K. .......................................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Luppen, Brian J. .............................. Associate of Arts................................. Kimball, NE Luppen, Spencer A. ........... Associate of Occupational Studies ................... Kimball, NE Maddox, Sara Ashley ...............Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Maldonado, Maurie ..................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Maloff, Caryn ........................................Diploma ..........................................Burns, WY Manka, Ryan Scott ............ Associate of Occupational Studies .................. Minatare, NE Marquez, Yvette .......................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Marshall, Marcus Lee ..................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE McKay, Samantha Tyhrie ............. Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE McLaughlin, Brytni M. ..........................Diploma ......................................... Gering, NE McMurtry, Nicholle Dawn .....................Diploma ................................... Victorville, CA McPhail, Richard Owen .................. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Mebane, Karyn ...................... Associate of Applied Science ......................Norcross, GA Meier-Hamm, Tremain Adam ......... Associate of Arts.................................Alliance, NE Meyer, Krista L. .......................Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Gering, NE Meyer, Tasha Ka’lhilani .................. Associate of Arts................................ Honolulu, HI Michaud, Alex Nathaniel ............. Associate of Science ................................. Olathe, KS Miller, Carol K. ..................... Associate of Applied Science ......................... Gering, NE Mitchell, Kourtney Renee ............ Associate of Science ......................................Silt, CO Moore, Kim E. .........................Associate Degree Nursing .................... Torrington, WY Moore, Mary Ann.....................Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Lyman, NE Moritz, Kaitlin Leigh ...................... Associate of Arts.................................. Kimball,NE Murrell, Chelsea F. ....................... Associate of Science ..............................Mitchell, NE Neal, Chantel L. ................................... Certificate ........................................ Gering, NE Neal, Colton William ...................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Neilan, Andrew Colt ....................... Associate of Arts................................. Kimball, NE Newby, Kelsey Leann .................. Associate of Science ..........................Centennial, CO Norman, Amanda Lee ..............Associate Degree Nursing ...........................Bayard, NE Orona, Gladys Ivette .................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Ozbayrak, Idil ............................. Associate of Science ..........................Ankara, Turkey Palomo, Irene J.........................Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Gering, NE Parmer, Joshua T. ......................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Paxton, Haley Rae........................ Associate of Science ...............................Greeley, CO Pengra, Brooke R. ....................Associate Degree Nursing ....................... Rushville, NE Pennetta, Melissa ....................Associate Degree Nursing .................... Torrington, WY Perez, Maria Teresa ..................Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Perez, Maria I. ................... Associate of Occupational Studies ..................... Gering, NE Pina, Charlena G. ............................ Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Quijas, DeNae Irene ..................... Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Radke, Pamela Rose........................ Associate of Arts........................... Big Springs, NE Rankin, Joshua L.................................. Certificate .................................. Lodgepole, NE Rasnic, Joseph Michael................ Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Reed, Jerred C. ..................... Associate of Applied Science ........................ Lincoln, NE Rice, Lacee Jaye.............................. Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Rico, Lacey J............................Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Gering, NE Rimington, Grant ............................ Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Rivera, Alexandra I. ........................ Associate of Arts...............................Vega Baja, PR Robbins, Ian Walter...................... Associate of Science ..............................Alliance, NE Robles, Brianna D. .......................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Rodriguez, Stephanie R. ..........Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Romey, Kayla Rae .......................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Ross, Blake E. .............................. Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Rowden, Barbara .................. Associate of Applied Science .......................... Salem, OR Rowson, Melanie Diane ............... Associate of Science ............................. “Surrey, BC” Ruiz, Kassandra N. ................................Diploma ...................................Scottsbluff, NE Russell, James A. ............................ Associate of Arts.................................Mitchell, NE Ryder, Gritt Langberg ..................... Associate of Arts............. Rungsted Kyst, Denmark Sanneh, Siaka ..........................Associate Degree Nursing .....................Scottsbluff, NE Sarnirand, Nicole Elaine ................. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Satur, Amber Lynn ....................... Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Scherbarth, Cathy Janell .............. Associate of Science ..............................Chadron, NE Schluter, Alexandria M. .................. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Schultz, Whitney Renae ............... Associate of Science ................................ Gering, NE Scott, Christina ........................Associate Degree Nursing ........................... Gering, NE Scott, Jessica B................................ Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Scribner, Samantha Jo .................. Associate of Science ..........................Scottsbluff, NE Sey, Ousman .................................. Associate of Arts..................... Banjul, The Gambia Shellito, Stephanie Lynn ................. Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Shepherd, Mariah Elizabeth ............ Associate of Arts.............................Grantsville, UT Sidebottom, Allison N..............Associate Degree Nursing ............................Sidney, NE Sparks, Patrick W. ................. Associate of Applied Science ................. Fort Collins, CO Spencer, Madison Kay .................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Spurgeon, Simonne Liana ............... Associate of Arts.................................. Angora, NE Starr, Shaina Nicole .................Associate Degree Nursing .................... Torrington, WY Stone, Chanrtius L. ......................... Associate of Arts.............................Scottsbluff, NE Suarez Garcia, Sebastian ................ Associate of Arts................................ Ancud, Chile Swanson, Stephanie Elise ............... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Tjaden, Edward D. .......................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Tompkins, Andrew R. ..................... Associate of Arts................................... Gering, NE Tompkins, Andrew R. ....... Associate of Occupational Studies ..................... Gering, NE Graduation List Continued on Page 8


News

May 1, 2013 — Page 8

WNCC Award Winners 2013 Alliance Campus Award Winners Who’s Who Among Students list ....................................................... .................................... DeAndra Adonis, Jerry Ash, Taylor Brown, ........................Laura Carlson, Sara Charambira, Samantha Hahn, .............................Tanner Hinton, Trevan Hinton, Jared Hoffman, .......................... Erin Jensen, Albert Johnson, Shawn McKimmey, .............................................Justin Sage, Jenni Sample, Ty Schmidt. Powerline Award..........................................................Taylor Brown Panhandle Encourager Award ............................Shantel Monahan Practical Nursing Award ............................................... Misty Evert Dean of Instruction Award ..................................... Tanner Hinton Non-traditional Student of the Year Award ................ Erin Jensen Vice President of Educational Services Award ................................ ......................................................................................Ada Sandsness Presidential Award ................................................Sara Charambira Board of Governors Award ......................................Trevan Hinton

(Left) Shantel Monahan receives the Alliance Campus Encourager Award on Friday, April 26. (Right) Kelsey Emfield receives the Dean of Student Services Organization of the Year Award on Thursday, April 25.

2013 Sidney Campus Award Winners Outstanding Aviation Student ................................Mark McClung Outstanding Business Student ................................... Carol Burton Outstanding Cosmetology Student ...............Stephanie Christensen Outstanding Nursing Student .................................. Chantel White Outstanding Math Student.............................................Alan Smith Outstanding Science Student .....................................Sarah Jenkins Outstanding Language and Arts Student ................Lupita Gutierrez Director Encourager Award ........................................... Sheila Laiti Dean of Instruction Award .....................................Mark McClung Dean of Student Services ............................................ Jason Benson Who’s Who Among Students ............................................................. ............................................................. Randy Bunner, Kurt Daniels, ............................................................ Beomhe Han, Lydia Hanson. All-State Nebraska Academic Team ............................... John Bahr, .................................................................................... Whitney Young VP of Student Services Student Leadership .......... Amanda Tafoya VP of Administrative Services Non-Traditional Student .............Jessica Sick VP of Educational Services Award ...............................Haylee Park Presidental Award ..................................................... Chantel White Board of Governors Award .................................... Whitney Young

2013 Scottsbluff Campus Award Winners Residence Hall Students of the Year — Conestoga ............................................Toria McGowan Residence Hall Student of the Year — Pioneer Hall ................................................ Kyle Shoutta Resident Assistant of the Year — Conestoga ...........................................................Haley Paxton Resident Assistant of the Year — Pioneer Hall ..........................................................Dylan Barin Highest GPA — Sophomore Female Athlete .....................................................Melanie Rowson Highest GPA — Sophomore Male Athlete ............................................................... Matthew Lee Highest GPA — Athletic Team ............................................................Women’s Basketball Team Student Ambassador Awards ....................................................Taylor Severyn, Kelsey Empfield Instrumental Music Performance Awards .................................................................. David Ford Theatre Performance Awards ..................................................................................... Doug Valade Vocal Music Performance Awards .....................................................................Malorie Winberg Publication Award ......................................................................................................... Joyce Koros Outstanding Peer Tutors of the Year .................................................................Anna Teghtmeyer Supplemental Instruction Leaders of the Year............................ Brianne Mize, Teresa Thomas TRIO Touchstone Award...................................................................................... Connie Dietrich ASCP Phlebotomy Scholarship Award .....................................................................Crystal Seiler ASCP National Student Honor Award......Sadie Dierking, Jessielle Ysazaga-Ross, Crystal Seiler Staying on Course Award .........................................................................................Ronda Hewett Division Award — Applied Technology .................................................................... Tim Kramer Division Award — Business Administration ........................................................Rudy Resendiz Division Award — Information Technology ........................................................Rudy Resendiz Division Award — Practical Nursing ................................................................... Rebecca Torres Division Award — ADN Program ............................................................................Siaha Sanneh Division Award — Language Arts................................................................................... Sara Zaro Division Award — Math..........................................................................................Sarah Peterson Division Award — Science .........................................................................................Scout Wilson Division Award — Social Science ........................................................................ Danielle Vesper All-USA Academic Team ...........................................................Danielle Vesper, Kelsey Emfield Outstanding Kappan of the Year ............................................................................. Rachel Griner Society of Leadership Excellence in Teaching ....................... Junior Alvarez, Jeanette Johnson Society of Leadership Excellence in Service to Students ........................................ Roger Hovey Fostering Community Award ....................................................................................Amy Winters Student Government Super Cougar Award ................................................................Joy Aniteye Cougar Award .................................................................................................................Joey Rasnic VP of Administrative Services ................................................................................. Dallas Schnell VP of Student Services Organization of the Year .......................Cirlce K Student Government Outstanding Student Leader ...............................................................................Malorie Winberg VP of Educational Services ........................................................................................Siaha Sanneh Presidential Award .................................................................................................... Rachel Griner Board of Governor’s Award ...................................................................................Kelsey Empfield Who’s Who List .................................Deandra Adonis, Joy Aniteye, Jessica Aratani, Jerry Ash, ....... Ashley Baker, Xina Balandran, Karen Barraza, Julie Bedell, Diane Bellamy, Keaton Bell, .............. Jodi Blackwell, Cammie Branon, Mackenzie Brodrick, Taylor Brown, Jessica Bruce, ....................Randall Bunner, Kjerstin Burtz, Laura Carlson, Dara Charambira, Kurt Daniels, ....Matthew Dehaven, Kelsey Doddridge, Shawn Gasseling, Samantha Hahn, Beomhee Han, ........................ Lydia Hanson, Tanner Hinton, Trevan Hinton, Jared Hoffman, Sarah Jenkins, ...Kali Johnson, Colton Keller, Younghwa Kim, Michael Klein, Timothy Kramer, Sheila Laiti ..... Keather Listermann, Taylor Littlejohn, Lauren Mcallister, Mark McClung, Samantha McKay, ...............................Brianne Mize, Rachel Moeser, Colton Neal, Kelsey Newby, Gladys Orona, ...........Idil Ozbayrak, Minho Park, Sarah Peterson, Teri Robinson, Kayla Romey, Carli Rose, ................ Melanie Rowson, Nicole Sarnirand, Ty Schmidy, Dallas Schnell, Jimmy Smallfoot, ...................... Deborah Stanton, Kelsey Sylvester, Andy Topkins, Danielle Vesper, Sara Vogel, .......... Chelsie Weidaman, Kimberly Widick, Scout Wilson, Shannon Woods, Jessiellee Ysazaga.

2013 WNCC Prospective Graduates Torres, Rebecca Joe................................Diploma ...............................Scottsbluff, NE Torres, Tiarra .........................................Diploma ...............................Scottsbluff, NE Tresierra, Rae-Lee .......................... Associate of Arts................QuesneI BC, Canada Valade, Douglas M. ......................... Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Valles, Cynthia J.............................. Associate of Arts............................ Mitchell, NE VanderWerff, Taylor Jean............. Associate of Science .................. New Orleans, LA Vanthillo, Nick ................................ Associate of Arts...................... Ekeren, Belgium Vera, Kayla Michele..................... Associate of Science ........................... Bayard, NE Vesper, Danielle J. ........................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Wacker, Alanna D. .................................Diploma ............................ Hemingford, NE Weimer, Linsey Rae ...............................Diploma .....................................Gering, NE Wenz, Bailey Catherine................... Associate of Arts.............................Gillette, WY Wickham, Crystal L. ................Associate Degree Nursing .................... Alliance, NE Widick, Kimberly Rayanne............. Associate of Arts............................. Greeley, CO Williams, Shelley Kay .......... Associate of Applied Science ..................Cheshire, OR Wilson, Scout McKay .................. Associate of Science ......................Scottsbluff, NE Winberg, Malorie J.......................... Associate of Arts......................Fort Morgan, CO Wood, Shalea Amanda .................... Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Wright, Challis William .................. Associate of Arts.............................. Aurora, CO Zamarripa, Courtney L...........................Diploma ...............................Scottsbluff, NE Zaro, Sara L. ................................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Zitterkopf, Abigail Joy ................. Associate of Science .......................Lexington, NE Zitterkopf, Brian E. .............................. Certificate ..............................Scottsbluff, NE Adams, Michael S. .......................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Alvarado Estrada, Jesus ................. Associate of Arts................................Cozad, NE Atencio, Tonya M. .......................... Associate of Arts............................Laramie, WY Belgum, Heidi ................................ Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Brehm, Keri L. ................................ Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Cardwell, Cameron Scott ................ Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Carradine, Stephanie Joy ................ Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Carter, Ashley Michey ................. Associate of Science ......................Scottsbluff, NE Cole, Katherine ................................... Certificate .............................Torrington, WY Gaston, Brett Logan ........................ Associate of Arts............................Minatare, NE Huck, Joe D..................................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE LeMay, Lori Ann ............................. Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Moody, Candace Lynn ............Associate of Occup Studies ................Scottsbluff, NE Olsen, Whitney M ........................... Associate of Arts.........................Harrisburg, NE Plummer, Cole S. ......................... Associate of Science ......................Scottsbluff, NE Porter, Zak Evan ............................. Assoicate of Arts........Fort Erie Ontario, Canada Robles, LaCritia Maureen ............... Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Rutan, Jillian Marie...................... Associate of Science ........................... Bayard, NE Anderson, Holly J. ............ Associate of Occupational Studies ...........Scottsbluff, NE Avila, Brittney Dawn ................... Associate of Science ............................Gering, NE Bailey, Alyssa M. ................................. Certificate .................................... Sidney, NE Berry, Gerald L. .............................. Associate of Arts.............................. Bayard, NE Betzold, Joseph Robert ........................ Certificate ..............................Scottsbluff, NE Dillman, Ashley D. ......................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Fuller, Valarie Ann .......................... Associate of Arts............................ Mitchell, NE Gaub, Brittany Ann ......................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Gompert, Jenifer Kellsie ................. Associate of Arts.............................Kimball, NE Goodman, John Scott ..................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Hellyer, Courtney R. ......... Associate of Occupational Studies ...........Scottsbluff, NE Hessler, April M. .......................... Associate of Science ..................... Wellington, CO Holstein, Krista M................. Associate of Applied Science .................. Mitchell, NE Lofing, Nathan R............................. Associate of Arts............................Minatare, NE Lovelidge, Joseph I. ..................... Associate of Science ......................Scottsbluff, NE Lyttle, Fiona .......................... Associate of Applied Science ................ Lauderhill, FL

Marquez, Katrina ........................ Associate of Science ............................Pueblo, CO Molina, Adam James..............................Diploma .....................................Gering, NE Molina, KelseyJ. ................... Associate of Applied Science ...............Scottsbluff, NE Morse, Andrew W. .................................Diploma .................................. Alliance, NE Neill, Kala Rashell .......................... Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Rainey, Teresa M............................. Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Red Bear, Amber ................... Associate of Applied Science ...............Scottsbluff, NE Reichert, Katherine S. ..................... Associate of Arts............................Minatare, NE Schneider, Trevor James ................. Associate of Arts.............................. Morrill, NE Schrock, Ashley Marie ...... Associate of Occupational Studies ...........Scottsbluff, NE Shaffer, Jasmine Rene ..................... Associate of Arts............................Brighton, CO Skinner, Daniel Carlyle ................ Associate of Science ......................Scottsbluff, NE Tower, BreAnn Dawn .................. Associate of Science ......................... Mitchell, NE Valdez, Juan V. ................................ Associate of Arts...............................Gering, NE Vazquez, Araceli ............................. Associate of Arts.........................Scottsbluff, NE Sidney Campus Albus, Shari D................................. Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Benson, Jason M. .................. Associate of Applied Science ..................... Sidney, NE Bruce, Janet Ann ............................. Associate of Arts............................... Gurley, NE Burton, Carol J. ............................... Associate of Arts.................................Potter, NE Christensen, Stephanie R. . Associate of Occupational Studies ...........Bridgeport, NE Cox, Jari Rehmer .............. Associate of Occupational Studies ................. Sidney, NE Fernandez, Carla L. ......................... Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Franson, Sheila Anne ........................... Certificate ................................. Alliance, NE Haun, Johnathan A. ......................... Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Hays, Nicholas J.............................. Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Lukassen, Megan ...................................Diploma ...................................Kimball, NE Lunbery, Sarah J........................... Associate of Science ......................... Alliance, NE Mallya, Pavana............................. Associate of Science ................... Hemingford, NE McClung, Mark ......................................Diploma .............................. Big Springs,NE Olsen, Brittney .......................................Diploma ..................................... Sidney, NE Parker, Cassandra R. ..............................Diploma ..................................... Sidney, NE Reed, JenniferS. ................ Associate of Occupational Studies ...........Lodgepole, NE Rezac, Elise L. ................................ Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Sick, Jessica Joelle .................................Diploma ..................................... Sidney, NE Smith, Alan Leslie........................... Associate of Arts............................... Dalton, NE Smith, Jessica L. ....................................Diploma ..................................... Dalton, NE Tafolla, Amanda Crystal ...................... Certificate .................................... Sidney, NE Uhrig, Billy D. ..................................... Certificate .................................... Sidney, NE Valle, Guadalupe .................................. Certifacate..................................Kimball, NE White, Chantel T. ...................................Diploma ....................................... Peetz, CO Wood, Zachery Daniel ......................... Certificate ...................................... Peetz, CO Almanrode, Jacob P......................... Associate of Arts............................Chappell, NE Barnett, Stefanie D. ...................... Associate of Science .............................Sidney NE Sittner, Anne L. .......................Associate of Occup Studies .........................Ovid, CO Dunton, Jeffrey W. ......................... Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Fisher, Richard Alan ............. Associate of Applied Science ..................... Sidney, NE Grimm, Timothy W. .............. Associate of Applied Science ..................... Sidney, NE Guzman, Roberto ............................ Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Money, Kelly M. ............................. Associate of Arts............................... Dalton, NE Ochoa Sotelo, Nancy Nayeli ........... Associate of Arts................................. Yuma,CO Peters, Karen L................................ Associate of Arts............................... Dalton, NE Prater, Yavette R.............................. Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Williamson, Michael Lee ........Associate of Occup Studies ...................... Sidney, NE Yager, Patsy E. ................................ Associate of Arts............................... Sidney, NE Young, Whitney .............................. Associate of Arts..............................Sidney, -NE


online.nebraska.edu/bachelor More than 20 online bachelor degree completion programs, including:  t #VTJOFTT  t $SJNJOBM+VTUJDF  t &EVDBUJPO  t )FBMUI1SPGFTTJPOT  t *OGPSNBUJPO5FDIOPMPHZ  t 4DJFODF  t 4PDJBM4DJFODFT  t "OENPSF


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May 1, 2013 — Page 10

There’s lots to explore in Senegal

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enegal is situated in the western part of Africa and is the 85th largest country in the world. It’s comprised of just under 200,000 square kilometers and is home to more than 13 million people. Mouhamed Balde found his way from Dakar, the capitol of Senegal, to Western Nebraska Community College to continue his college education. The first advice Balde gave: “If you are white, don’t act like an African; we know that you’re not. Just be yourself. People in Senegal are very friendly. Even if you don’t speak the same language, you can still have a conversation with someone.”

At one time a French settlement, Senegal’s official language is French. “Wolof is our national language. It is the language that everyone in Senegal speaks, but a lot of people

also speak French,” said Balde, continuing with, “there are more than 50 different languages spoken in Senegal because there are so many African languages.” Balde himself speaks four languages. While there are several famous dishes that are eaten and prepared in Senegal, Balde says that Thiou Jeun is the most popular. Comprised of cooed fish and rice, this simple dish is a favorite both in restaurants and in most households because of the access that most Senegalese have to fresh fish. “Go to the capital, Dakar. It is like every big city,” Balde said of where to visit when going to

International Country Spotlight: Senegal By Alexandria Moree Senegal. “We have good restaurants, clubs, shopping, [and] there is a lot to do in the city.” Located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula on the Atlantic coast, Dakar is the westernmost city in Senegal. Just off the coast of Senegal, not far from Dakar, is the island of Goree. Named a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site in 1978, the central part of the historical site is the Maison des Esclaves, the house of slaves. This was a port where slaves from Africa were put onto ships and taken to Europe

and America. A heartbreaking and abrasive tourism site, the slave house stands as a monument of sorts to the cruelty that was inflicted upon much of Senegal, and Africa as a whole, during the time of slave trade. Other popular attractions of Dakar include the Grand Mosque built in 1964 and the Musée de l’Institut Fondamental d’Afrique Noire or IFAN Museum of African Arts. Located just outside of Dakar is the Leopold Sedar Senghor International Airport, contracting with more than 25 different airlines, including Delta Airlines.

‘Bioshock Infinite’ ends first-person shooter stereotypes By JOHNNY ESCAMILLA Video Game Review

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ames aren’t just above and beyond all other storytelling mediums in the 21st Century. The best and most original stories also come straight from an industry that some still only associate with senseless violence or pixelated pong. But with or without those people, gamers every year experience dozens of worlds that tell stories so daringly new and profound that books and film just can’t compare in their minds. Games have changed since seven years ago. They’ve reached their renaissance. And Bioshock Infinite (developed by Irrational Games) isn’t just a testament to this; it’s a candidate for how even a genre like the first-person shooter is being forever changed as well. The original Bioshock was a first-person shooter inspired by one of Russia’s best authors, Ann Rand, well known for the Objectivist themes in her 1938 book “Anthem.” In the original Bioshock, the player played a man in 1959 who was led to a city at

the bottom of the ocean called Rapture. One that cut itself off from the rest of society, Rapture was a place where “the artists would not fear censor, where the scientists would not be bound by petty morality”— a libertarian’s dream or an Objectivists’ vision of a society where the pursuit of the individual’s self-interest was most valued, until the player found the city in nightmarish ruin overrun by mad people called ‘Splicers’. Now in Bioshock Infinite, the player is brought to the city of Columbia, a floating city above the clouds in 1912—as close to heaven as humans will get as the people would say, “with a history so distinguished, a people so patriotic, a society so pure and free from ‘undesirables’, and with a Godfearing faith so firm that they’re above all other societies.” American-styled Exceptionalism or Manifest Destiny at its best—until the player witnesses first-hand the gradual downfall of its racist and nationoalistic society. Bioshock is a game drenched in heavy political philosophy, woven into everything you see and hear (and like the first game—lots of early

19th century music!). But what is also woven into the game is an emotional bond you make with a girl you’re paid to take from the city named Elizabeth. A woman who’s been raised in a tower all her life, guarded by a frightening mechanical bird-like monstrosity named Songbird.Elizabeth plays a huge part in the game, accompanying you on-screen the whole time. Sharing so many moments and memories with you that you start to care about her and the role she comes to play in your life, unraveling the mystery behind her incarceration—and her impossible ability to tear holes in time and space. Bioshock has never had such an emotional air about it thanks to Elizabeth, making it the most personally meaningful and emotionally driven first-person shooter ever created. And while it’s not nearly as cinematic as when the game was first demonstrated (it’s almost identical to the original in that regard excluding Elizabeth), Bioshock Infinite has one of the most fleshed out and believable gaming worlds ever created. At times, I could walk into one of their stores

and window shop everything on their shelves or hear a conversation going on between every person walking in the streets. Nothing feels scripted. For the most part, the game play is very similar to the original with lots of different guns and special drinks called “Vigors” that give you the powers like the ability to command an angry swarm of crows or the power to suspend your opponents in mid-air, rendering them vulnerable. A third of the game, however, feels refreshingly and even thrillingly new because of rollercoaster like tracks called Skyline all over Columbia that allow you to fly through and around buildings during intense shootouts. And Elizabeth’s ability to open dimensional tears in certain places to expose pieces of

other universes is great, but it could have been used much more bizarrely (mainly the tears are just more cover or machine-gun turrets). And finally, there’s no way I could finish this review without telling you that no story-lover could ever see this game’s ending coming. In my book, it is the most unpredictable ending of any story I’ve ever experienced. Drowning you in so many thick layers of metaphor, symbolism, paradoxical thought, and metaphysical philosophy concerning the nature of existence, it might as well have been a Silent Hill game! It took me days to understand what happened and to piece together everything I had experienced. And that is the kind of story and these are the kinds of worlds that you non-gamers are missing out on! Grade: A

‘Dead Space 3’ ends the franchise in the best way it could

2012-13 Staff Members Alexandria Moree, Fashion Editor Danielle Hearn, Sports Editor Heidi Hancock, Assistant Sports Editor Johnny Escamilla, Entertainment Editor Joy Aniteye, Feature Editor Kayla Romey, Design Editor Lenzie Cole, Reporter Cierra Pedersen, Reporter Mark Rein, Production Jeff Fielder, Adviser

Miranda Nichols

Contact the newspaper at: The Spectator WNCC 1601 E. 27th street Scottsbluff, Nebraska 69361 Phone: (308) 635-6058 Email: spectator@wncc.edu

What do you think?

more disturbing—it just has a few fun tricks it pulls on the gamers that just makes it cooler, not creepier. If anything, though, the co-op gives this game more replay value after completing it than any of its predecessors. Co-op is a blast after a great isolated single-player experience. But what I never expected was how the game made me go from being rather disappointed to loving the series as a whole all the more in its last hour. When I realized that Visceral Games was intending to use EA’s demand for more action to build the story up to a point where it could reveal an underlying overarching purpose to the entire franchise’s history— ending it on a high note in a way that was shocking enough to wrap everything up perfectly but openended enough to make a sequel possible, even if only in the mind of its fans. And that’s the sign of a talented studio and a game that you can’t help but appreciate in its own way. Grade: B

Vaughn Fahrenbrick

Western Nebraska Community College

ning saw-blades, flame-throwers and ricocheting energy balls to the ability to slow down some enemies and grab objects telekinesis-style. But if you’re a true survival-horror fan like me, you won’t care about customizing your own “super-weapon.” You just want to run around scared spitless with weapons that hardly protect you. And on a side note, I also had a huge problem on harder modes with being boxed in by enemies that were unrealistically blocking my way. Most importantly, though, is the new option to cooperatively play with one other person online that changes the way the story progresses, which Visceral called “more disturbing.” But honestly, the fact that they made two stories as a lone survivor in one and as a member of a team in another is more of an innovation personally, for I’m a firm believer in the need for isolation for there to be fear. And after playing the game both ways, my final word is this: Play the game alone first, then again with a second player. The story isn’t

Brandon Health

theSpectator the Spectator

that has been replaced with shoot em’ up and blow em’ up action and you get Dead Space 3.... But while this may be sacrilegious for a series built on slow-paced tension-building atmosphere, DS3 certainly succeeds in never forgetting how horrific its world is. And best of all, ingeniously uses the heightened action in a way that made me love the series all the more at the very end (but more on that later). In the end, the action doesn’t ruin the series but gives DS3 its own distinct flavor. But as a result, the game loses its ability to build up tension and try new tricks and springs new scares on you. You become so used to loud noises, explosions and constant shooting that nothing gets to you, and that’s the biggest disappointment. You even sometimes swear that they simply ran out of ideas, but I doubt that was the case. Dead Space is still the same game it’s always been (maybe a little too much of the same), with two fully customizable weapons from spin-

Baldel-Touray

deep space—our species on the verge of extinction. And after one of them experiences a total communications blackout, you’re sent with two other repairmen and end up stranded on the ship of nightmares. The crew of a thousand, or what was left of their carcasses, mutated into Johnny life-after-death “Krr’ej” Escamilla monstrosities that’d make a Game Review zombie soil himself called Necromorphs. It’s claustrophobic enclosed spaces echoed with moans, wails and shrieks. The ship roared and rumbled with the sound of its engines. Metal and machines screeched, clanked and shuttered. Giant Necromorphs made of dozens of carcasses would suddenly come crashing down from the ceilings.... Now imagine that 80 percent of

Jauinaba

G

ames are no different from any other medium when greed wins out over artistic vision. Gamers also have to deal with publishers that become money-hungry or so focused on turning up a large profit that trendy game design is forced on a franchise for the sake of “reaching a wider audience” or making more money, which is a more honest way of putting it. But to be dead serious, studio Visceral Games couldn’t have tried harder in compromising with the third game in one of my favorite horror franchises. But on that note, this is also the last major survival horror franchise in the industry. For like so many before it, Dead Space’s publisher EA demanded that the third entry become a “top money-making action franchise” or lose its funding. But how Visceral handled this was nothing short of brilliant. In the world Dead Space, humankind has arrogantly used up all of Earth’s resources, forcing us to build ships to scavenge for resources in

What is your favorite number?

12

7

7

16

What is your favorite holiday?

Prayer Day (End of Ramadan)

Halloween

Christmas

Christmas

What is your favorite sea animal?

Whale

Sea horse

Blue marlin

Dolphin

What is your favorite constellation?

Orion belt

Cepheus

Big Dipper

Big Dipper

The Spectator -- May 1, 2013 Edition  

This is the May 1, 2013, edition of the Spectator

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