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MARCH 2015

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LAKE COUNTRY MS Budd Construction inspires trust in their customers

Thompson/Okanagan PAGE 24

commercial.remax-western.ca

UBCO’s U-One development means more rental units in Kelowna BY EZRA MACDONALD

KELOWNA Troika Developments takes home two gold Tommie Awards

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INDEX News Update

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Salmon Arm

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West Kelowna

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ELOW NA - I f you pay close at tent ion to t he economy, you can pick up on some big opportunities. Mission Group Enterprises is doing just that. M i s s ion G ro up i s n e a r i n g completion of their U-One project and is set to complete their U-Two project i n m id-2016. With a rental home vacancy rate sitting at one per cent in Kelowna, a rental housing shortage is likely, especially in high demand areas like the University of British Columbia Okanagan (UBCO) campus. Both developments are near to the UBCO campus, and are designed with students in mind, since rental accommodations nearing the campus are rapidly decreasing in availability.

From left, Mission Group Homes president Randy Shier, director of sales JoAnne Adamson and development manager Micheal Bacon.

Kelowna

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SEE UBCO’S U-ONE DEVELOPMENT | PAGE 5

Summerland

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Vernon

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Okanagan wins big at BC Small Business Awards

Kamloops

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Movers and Shakers 28 Opinion

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Sales

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ELOWNA – Kelowna and Enderby companies won big at this year’s BC Small Business Awards. The province-wide competition draws nominations under ten different categories, where entrepreneurs and small business owners compete to have their company named as BC’s best business. This year over 460 nominations were received from 70 communities across the province. Among the winners were three local Okanagan companies. Kelowna’s Soil Mate was hailed the winner under the Best Concept Category. Soil Mate is an interactive web platform that connects consumers with the origins of local produce. It shows consumers what’s in season, tells you if a

product is certified organic, and doesn’t show anything that isn’t available. Soil Mate connects with communities with the hope of further educating and fostering connection between consumers and their local farmers, producers and raisers. The goal of the company is fostering self-sustainability in communities, to reconnect people with local food options. Float Space, a Kelowna company that allows you to de-stress by floating in a saltwater isolation tank, came in first for Best Emerging Entrepreneur. The award targets a young professional contributing to the cultural, social and economic well being of their SEE OKANAGAN WINS | PAGE 10

Alan Healey (left) and Dustin Erickson stand beside one of their float chambers


NEWS UPDATE

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with Meyers Norris Penny (MNP). He previously served as the firm’s regional tax leader. Mason became a CA in 1979 while articling with Thorne Riddell. He later beca me a ta x pa r tner w ith Thorne Ernst and Whinney and then Peat Marwick Thorne before joining Snowsell Jennens & Carter (a predecessor of MNP) in 1991. Over the past four decades, Mason has been a teacher, mentor, and role model for countless young CAs, both at his firm and in the Central Okanagan region. He has also contributed to the accounting profession as a n i nstructor for the ICA BC profession a l development prog ra m and as a seminar leader for the CICA. M a son’s profession a l excel lence i s matched by his commitment to community service. He has served on the boards of numerous not-for-profit organizations in the Kelowna and Central Okanagan region, including the Central Okanagan United Way and the Central Okanagan Foundation. Today, he serves as director and chair of the fi na nce com m ittee for the Kelowna General Hospital Foundation, which is currently undertaking a campaign to raise $12 million for a new cardiology and surgical centre.

KELOWNA

George Mason of MNP

MNP CA Honoured with Fellowship K e l o w n a c h a r t e r e d a c c o u n ta nt, G eorge Mason, CPA , FCA , h a s been honou red w ith a fellowsh ip by the Institute of Chartered Accounta nts of Br it i sh Colu mbi a ( IC A B C). T he fellowship (FCA) designation is awa rded to ch a r tered accou nta nts for thei r contributions to the community and service to the profession. G e o rge M a s o n , C PA , FC A i s a pa r t ner, bu si ness adv i se r, a n d i n c o m e t a x s p e c i a l i s t

KELOWNA CWMM Consulting wins engineering award CWMM Consulting Engineers Ltd. of Kelowna took the top award for Design and Contract Preparation – Structures at the 11th annual Deputy Minister’s Consulting Engineers Awards, for its

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MARCH 2015

exceptiona l work on the H ig hway 2 Tupper Creek to 192nd Road project. CW MM Consulting Engineers Ltd. was awarded a $1.2 million contract to create a design and tender package for constr ucti ng two new fou r la ne bridges and widening the existing Tupper Creek Bridge from two to four lanes. The firm delivered high quality designs for three structures in less than three months, allowing the project to be accelerated with an early tender. Their designs accommodated traffic on existing structures until two lanes were completed on the new structures, which eliminated a separate detour and minimized overall project costs. T hese str uctu res were a key piece in the 5.3-kilometre-long expansion project that is part of the ministry’s long-term commitment to four-lane the highway from the Alberta border to Fort St. John. Construction of this $8-million project located approximately 35 kilometres south of Dawson Creek was completed in fall 2014. Finalists in this category were Herold Engineering Ltd. of Nanaimo for the Rogers Creek Bridge in Port A lberni and McElhanney Consulting Services Ltd. of Victoria for the Malakwa Bridge replacement east of Sicamous. T he Deputy M in ister’s Consu lting Engineers Awards recognize technical excellence in consulting engineer services that improve transportation infrastructure in B.C.

KELOWNA Kelowna’s Former Club Penguin Founder Has Created a New Hit Game A video game made by the former Club Penguin founder has amassed a hugely passionate fanbase. Hy per H ippo Ga mes, a K elow n a company, is launching its “unusually addicting” video game, AdVenture Capitalist, on both iOS and Android. This game has been getting lots of rave reviews and in just a few months, it’s racked up 75 million plays across multiple game platforms. AdVenture Capitalist won 2014 Game of the Year on Miniclip.com and cracked Kongregate’s Top 10 Most Played Games of All Time in less than a year. Not only that, but the app is featured as a Best New Game App on iOS. The game is deceptively simple, working as an “idle” game where you get to be an investor building up your empire. With a l l the prog ress ba rs, revenue generations buttons, and a catchy tune, players work to get “i nvest ments”, which create profit that they can reinvest later. Since it’s an idle game, it continues to go on even when you leave, mean ing you get a ton of cash when you return later. As a result, players can go on the game as little as a couple minutes every day and still grow their fortunes to become ridiculously rich sexagintillionaires, meaning that their bank account has a solid 183 zeroes in it. Lance Priebe, former founder of Club Penguin and the CEO and Creative Guy of Hyper Hippo, is passionate about the company’s ability to make fun, memorable experiences. “My plan worked,” Priebe says. “I’ve spent more hou rs pl ay i ng AdVentu re Capita l i st t h a n anything else I’ve ever produced. I’m addicted to my own game.”

T he game’s success rocketed up on Kongregate, a source for free online ga mes. T he CEO a nd co-fou nder of Kongregate, Emily Greer, calls Adventure Capitalist “wildly addicting” and says the compa ny is th rilled to a lso publish the mobile version.

PENTICTON Despite Low Oil Prices Confidence is High for Penticton Housing Market In the wake of plunging oil prices, one Okanagan housing industry ex pert is confident that positive fa c tors w i l l of fse t ne g at ive i n f luences to Penticton’s housing market. “We’re seeing 20% Alberta buyers compared to 80% from B.C., investing in Skaha Hills. The majority of our buyers are baby boomers and empty nesters that have been looking forward to buying a new property in Penticton for a long time. They are not as reliant on high oil prices to make this transition in life,” says Curt Jansen, vice president sales and marketing, Skaha Hills. Accord ing to the BC Real Estate Association (BCREA), baby boomers motivated by a lifestyle change hoping to retire in Penticton are financially insulated and better equipped to resist an economic downturn. Its Housing Forecast Update forecasts residential sales in B.C. to rise 2.4 per cent to 86,050 u n its th is yea r a nd a f u rther 3.9 per cent to 89,400 u n its i n 2016 a nd reports, “Ma ny A lberta ns near retirement may choose to cash out now and move to popular BC communities like Parksville and Penticton.” Inventory levels have been particularly low for new product in Penticton. Traditionally land locked by hills and lakes, Penticton has been unable to cater to buyers of lifestyle-oriented properties. The new 550-acre Skaha Hills development site will satisfy a pent up dema nd for homebuyers wa nti ng to enjoy the lifestyle Penticton has to offer, with a 600-home master-planned resort-style residential community. In 2014, Ska ha H i l ls exceeded sa les expectations with an unprecedented sell out of its first phase comprising of 47 homes. One of the Okanagan’s most trusted and successful builders, Greyback Developments, pa rtnered w ith the Penticton Indian Band, to develop Skaha Hills, and the $250 million master-planned community is showing no sign of slowing down as it prepares to launch its next phase in Spring of 2015.

KELOWNA Province of B.C. and Westbank First Nation reach tentative agreement A tentative land-exchange agreement has been reached between the Government of BC and Westbank First Nation. As part of an agreement in 2009, Westbank First Nation gave reserve land to the Province to construct the Westside Rd. I ntercha nge. T he M i n istry of Transportation and Infrastructure agreed to provide replacement lands and has been working closely with the First Nation to identify suitable lands. The package of lands and cash being


NEWS UPDATE

MARCH 2015

considered i ncludes fou r pa rcels of Crown or private land and $1.5 million in cash to be used for mutually agreedupon, future land purchases. Parcels of land in the proposed exchange include: Two private agricultural properties within the City of Kelowna on Spiers Rd. and Hereron Rd. One private property on the eastern shores of Lower Arrow Lake near Fauquier on Starlite Rd. One Crown land parcel located east of Kelowna along McCulloch Rd., adjacent to lands held by Westbank First Nation at Medicine Hill. T he Westside I ntercha nge project was part of an agreement the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and Westbank First Nation entered into in 2005, to work together to facilitate Highway 97 upgrade projects through Westbank First Nation reserves. Projects completed under the agreement include the William R. Bennett Bridge, the Ca mpbel l Rd. a nd Westside Rd. interchanges and the Sneena Overpass.

KAMLOOPS Lafarge looks to alternative fuels Lafarge Canada’s cement pl a nt i n Kamloops, has recently begun using sp ent Keurig K-Cups a s pa r t of t he company’s push to move from fossil to alternative fuels. The single-serve coffee pods are not recyclable because they are a mixture of materia ls. T he idea beh i nd usi ng the pods as fuel for the cement plant started with Lafarge’s workers at the

plant, who drink Keurig beverages at work. Coffee service provider, Van Houtte, h a s beg u n br i ng i ng t he spent pod s in large bins to the Lafarge plant for processing. Lafarge is now expanding their collections of the used cups to i nclude locations in the lower mainland and Alberta. Once Van Houtte delivers the pods, Lafarge uses waste heat from its kiln to dry the spent products, which are then put through a shredder and processed. Once processed, the ash from the KCups becomes part of the cement.

KAMLOOPS WestJet Encore expands Kamloops service WestJet launched a new, non-stop service between Edmonton and Kamloops, on board its f leet of Canadian-made Bombardier Q400 NextGen aircraft. The inaugural flight departs from Edmonton International Airport at 3:30 p.m. mountain time. “This is a prime example of the strategic advantage of WestJet Encore,” said Ferio Pugliese, Executive ViceP resident, WestJet, a nd P resident, WestJet Encore. “One of the original purposes of our regional airline was to enhance frequencies in smaller Canadian communities which, until WestJet Encore came along, were challenged by the capacity of our 737s. We are very pleased to offer service between Edmonton and Kamloops on our 78-seat Bombardier Q400s, and look forward

RICOH CANADA OPENS UP SHOP IN SALMON ARM

SALMON ARM CORRYN GRAYSTON

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hat started as a way to cut down the cost of nail care has now unfolded into a sensation, and Salmon Arm now has a local representative. Rhonda Henry is thrilled to now be able to provide the Jamberry Nails line to our community as an independent consultant. Jamberry Nails is a new way to bring art to your nails while also cutting down the cost and time associated with nail salons. Rhonda invites you to contact her to find out more about this exciting new product by

visiting her website www. rhondav.jamberrynails.net or call (250) 832-0158. Ricoh Canada Inc. is expa nd i ng thei r territory and regional manager Lara Olivier invites you to contact her to discover how she can make information work for you. Ricoh Canada Inc. is a $23 billion technology company with a strong history of manufacturing innovative products for the printing, imaging and document management industry. In today’s world of work, they deliver solutions and services that help their customers mobilize information to achieve an efficient, high-performance workplace environment. For more i n for m at ion, please contact Lara at (250) 860-4779 or visit www. ricoh.ca. H a v i n g j u s t re c e n t l y move d to Sa l mon A r m from Ontario, owners LeeAnn and Andrew Gummer of Gummer & Sons Stoneworks are looking forward to helping Shuswap and Okanagan residents create thei r la ndscape design, indoor and outdoor stonework, and outdoor kitchen projects. Providing

to welcoming both business and leisure travellers on board beginning today.” WestJet serves 28 cities on a non-stop basis from Ed monton I nternationa l A i rport a nd i n 2014, operated more t h a n 19,000 d epa r t u re s f rom E I A . Between 2005 and 2015, WestJet has i ncreased its da i ly depa rtu res from Edmonton by more than 110 per cent. “Kamloops is a great getaway destination with skiing, golfing, wineries, and more; and for Kamloops, Edmonton is a big draw for business, shopping and festivals, and it’s a key connection for workers commuting to northern Alberta and northern Canada,” said Tom Ruth, President and CEO of Edmonton International Airport. “WestJet has been a great partner for EIA. They have invested significantly in Edmonton, and this flight will help drive our region’s economy by bringing more visitors and business here.”

BC More international visitors come to BC in 2014 British Columbia posted a 5.3% inc re a s e i n i n te r n a t i o n a l o v e r n i g h t visitors for 2014, surpassing the 3.2% i ncrea se i n a r r iva l s to Ca n ad a a s a whole. This was the third straight year of increased visitation to BC. Figures released by Statistics Canada show an increase in international overnight visitors across all key markets, including those identified by Destination British Columbia as potential growth markets in its new three-year strategy.

China led the way with a 26.2% increase, add i ng a n add itiona l 53,217 visitors to BC in 2014. Visitors from Japan also grew by 12.2%, partly due to increased air access. A new flight by All Nippon Airways was introduced at the end of March 2014. T h e Un i te d S t a te s a n d A u s t ra l i a were also up, 3.3% and 5.3% respectively. T he g row t h f rom t he Un ited S t a te s, B C’s l a rge s t i n te r n a t io n a l m a rke t, i s p a r t ly du e to e c onom ic growth in the USA and strengthening of t he US dol l a r. From Eu rop e, t he United Kingdom and Germany posted 1.4% and 2.2% increases respectively. The numbers reported by Statistics Canada include international visitors who cross Ca n a d a C u s tom s i n B C. Actual numbers of visitors to BC are h ig her, a s p eople crossi ng i nto t he province from elsewhere in the country are not included in these figures. Dest i n at ion Br it i sh Colu mbi a‘s I nternationa l Visitor A rriva ls publ ication su m ma rizes customs entry data to B.C. and Canada from select markets of origin. The International Visitor Arrivals include information for b ot h t he pa r t ic u l a r mont h a nd t he ye a r to-d ate, a nd i nclud e p ercentage changes for the same period over the previous year. It is available on the Destination British Columbia website. Tourism is a one of the eight pillars of the BC Jobs Plan. In 2013, the tourism industry generated $13.9 billion in revenue, an increase of 3.6% from 2012 and a 44% increase since 2003. The industry contributed $7.3 billion i n GDP a nd employed over 132,200 people in 2013.

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE exceptional customer service along with impeccable workmanship are qualities LeeAnn and Andrew value as part of their complete service package. Please call (250) 833-0082 to learn more about their services, or visit their website at www.gummerandsons.com to view their photo gallery of projects. Coming up in April is the Salmon Arm Spring Home Show, which provides a unique opportunity to meet one-on-one with local builders and contractors within our region to discuss future building and renovation plans. This event takes place April 18th & 19th and showcases a variety of companies that offer services ranging from landscaping, decorating, house-related products and services and more. For more information, please visit the B.C. Home Show’s website at www.bchomeshows. com or call (250) 377-8380. Corryn Grayston is the General Manager at the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at (250) 8326247 or admin@sachamber. bc.ca

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The Adams Lake Indian Band is a stable, growing organization in Central B.C. situated midway between Kamloops and Salmon Arm. We offer a great Senior Management position in a small town in a beautiful valley with a fantastic climate, affordable housing and shopping. SCOPE OF WORK: The Director of Finance will be responsible for the overall accounting and financial processes and systems, financial software programs, internal control and data security systems for the Band and all its related companies. S/he will provide leadership and direction to the Band and its related companies to ensure their financial well-being and success. S/he will provide inspiration and training to accounting personnel in an effort to ensure internal successors and continuity to the finance department. S/he will assist department managers to better understand and manage their department’s finances. S/he must have a good understanding of the government funding provided to Indian Bands and the associated reporting requirements of agencies such as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, Health Canada, First Nations Health Authority, First Nations Education Steering Committee, and other federal and provincial agencies. The Director of Finance will provide leadership to the Band in all areas of accounting, fiscal management, business evaluation & management, corporate structures and joint ventures, budgeting, auditing and reporting. The Director of Finance, under the direction and supervision of the Band Manager, will report to, and assist, the Chief and Council in all aspects of business and financial matters. The Director of Finance will be responsible to hire, supervise and coordinate the efforts and actions of all finance personnel to ensure the accuracy, timeliness and appropriateness of all financial transactions and reports.

CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2015 ADAMS LAKE INDIAN BAND Salary Range $65-$85K. Required Abilities and additional information on how to apply at www.adamslakeband.org under ALIB Job Opportunities Only candidates selected for interview will be contacted. Preference will be given to First Nations applicants.


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WEST KELOWNA

MARCH 2015

WESTSIDE CHAMBER CELEBRATES HERITAGE WEEK

WEST KELOWNA

“The council has received a huge amount of positive feedback, both from within and outside the First Nation community. The arts council is very inclusive.”

(From the left) Rebekah Wilkinson, Julia Trops, Jason Woodford, Tracy Satin, Ralph Carlson, Kimberleigh Trops, Matthew Brown, Pat Huber, Melissa Brown

KAREN BEAUBIER

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he Greater Westside Board of Trade celebrated Heritage Week and BC Chamber Week with a luncheon at The Cove Lakeside Resort, February 18th. Amongst a crowd of local artists, Westbank First Nation and West Kelowna community and business members was the perfect setting for the launch of the Suk’ʷtəmsqilxʷ West Kelowna Arts Council, affectionately known as SWAC. Suk’ʷtəmsqilxʷ (Sook tem skayl hoo) is the nsyilxcen word meaning “indigenous and non-indigenous” and is truly what this new arts council represents. SWAC is unique in that this new arts council connects, through

arts and culture, the people of two distinct government jurisdictions living together and represents not only the connection, acknowledgment and respect between the aboriginal and non-aboriginal worlds but also the creative and business communities alike. Artist Julia Trops, Chair of SWAC says, “Visually, we liken it to the aboriginal medicine wheel, with the four sections being the District of West Kelowna, Westbank First Nation, creative’s and businesses working together, with the arts council in the centre.” Tracy Satin, Vice Chair and Heritage Officer at Sncəwips

Heritage Museum, says, “The cou nci l has received a huge amount of positive feedback, both from within and outside the First Nation community. The arts council is very inclusive.” The District of West Kelowna and Westbank First Nation coexist on approximately 130 square kilometers of land on the westside of Okanagan Lake and approximately 32,000 residents in the area. The Thompson Okanagan region is host to over 3.5 million visitors each year and $ 1.5 billion to the regional economy, and a $5 billion industry that creates jobs and generates taxes.

SWAC’s business plan focuses on arts and cultural events that will create a vibrant tie to t h i s i ndu st r y. E conom ic development, cultural commerce, attracting and retaining visitors who want to stay and live in the community because of quality of life starts with a partnership between the businesses and cultural creators! SWAC has put together a fundraising model that relies more on community involvement than government funding. While it is recognized that government funding sets the overall tone and attitude towards the culture of

As a business owner, you never shut down. Even when you’re off the clock, there’s really no such thing as quitting time. From managing daily priorities to envisioning the future of your business, our Private Enterprise professionals know that every minute of your day is precious and every choice you make counts. Our performance improvement strategies are designed specifically to optimize private enterprise by eliminating obstacles and maximizing opportunities – allowing you to seize opportunities, no matter when they emerge.

It’s business. And it’s personal. PRIVATE ENTERPRISE SERVICES Contact Karen Christiansen, CPA, FCA, Business Advisor, Private Enterprise at 250.979.1735 or karen.christiansen@mnp.ca

the community, the goal is to empower artists and other cultural entities by way of creative commerce as well as recognizing the importance of businesses in the development of their community identity. “Building a stronger westside community means collaboration from both Westbank First Nation and West Kelowna communities, as what is good for each community makes it better for the entire Westside community. From the Board of Trade’s perspective, certainly economic sustainability is a primary objective of ours and with the addition of the new arts council, this opens a whole new realm of economic opportunity for the Westside,” explains Norm LeCavalier, Chair of the Greater Westside Board of Trade. SWAC came about after the highly successful 2014 Westside Culture Days weekend.  Participants and administrators came together from the District of West Kelowna and Westbank First Nation to discuss the feasibility and formation of an arts council for the westside and the rest is history!  Karen Beaubier is the Executive Director for the Westside Board of Trade. She can be reached at 250-768-3378 or admin@ gwboardoftrade.com


OFF THE COVER

MARCH 2015

UBCO’S U-ONE DEVELOPMENT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“U-Two is designed with the students i n m i nd so we designed the homes for student occupancy, whether a parent is looking to purchase for their student or you’re looking for a safe household investment,” says JoAnne Adamson, Director of Sales for the Mission Group project. Award-winning Meiklejohn A rch itects wa s re s p on si ble for the design of the 66-home project. Bot h developments h ave a m o d e r n fe e l to t h e m , w i t h walkways and links to nearby hiking and biking trails.

The projects are both designed with students in mind, as rental accommodations nearing the campus are rapidly decreasing in availability.

APRIL AN EXCITING MONTH AT SANDLER TRAINING Customer Care and The Sales Driven Organization – two keys to success

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pril promises to be a busy month at Sandler Training in Kelowna with two programs: the start of Customer Care and a sales workshop for business owners The Customer Care Program begins April 8 in Kelowna and continues over six weeks in April and May with remote access available via the Internet. The Sales Driven Organization is a one-day workshop that takes place April 17. Company president John Glennon said that the Customer Care Program is ideal for project managers, technicians and inside sales people. “Our belief is that that’s the front line; they have a huge impact on the bottom line but they rarely get training on how to be an inside sales or customer care professional.” He added that business owners know that everyone who works for the organization is essentially in sales because they represent the company – but still the training is missing. A tradesperson or a technician is likely highly skilled at his craft but he has never learned a system and a process for customer care. “Entrepreneurs may have one or two people in their company and they just want a system and a process for best in class customer care,” Glennon said - and that is what the six-week program provides. Eligible organizations and employees might receive up to two thirds of the training via the BC Job Grant. On April 17, The Sales Driven Organization workshop takes place. This workshop is for business owners and general managers who are running a company that typically has more than 10

“For over 45 years, Sandler Training is proud to say that we get results. We know what it takes.” JOHN GLENNON OWNER, SANDLER TRAINING

The developments present a boost in real estate availability in the area that has been virtually at a standstill since 2007. The December Rental Market Survey report released by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s (CMHC) indicated a tightening in all rental stock availability in Kelowna. The current one per cent vacancy rate is a step down from 1.8 per cent the previous year. Mission Group has a strong reputation in the Okanagan. The development of this contemporary home project follows t hei r success w it h t he Ve r v e , M o d e a n d B r i g h to n communities. “Mission Group is a

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comprehensive builder. We design, build, and sell all of our projects,” says Adamson. The U-One development offers one, two and three bedro o m s u i t e s s t a r t i n g f ro m $199,900, and one and three bedroom suites are still available. U-Two offers one, two and three bedrooms with their pricing starting at $189,900. Both projects are within walking distance of UBCO. www.missiongroup.ca

We Get Results. Find Out How.

Introductory Workshop

The Sales Driven Organization Date: Time:

employees. “It’s a workshop where we are exploring what it takes to be the best in class as a sales driven organization,” Glennon said. “For over 45 years, Sandler Training is proud to say that we get results. We know what it takes.” He added that it is a collaborative workshop that explores strategy, structure, staff and skills. He pointed out that just like owners and managers, he is interested in improving the top, middle and bottom lines of the company. “Those are the three lines I’m obsessed with: top line: revenue improvement, market share, business development; middle line: gross profit, more profitable deals, improving the gross profit; bottom line: net income.” “I f somebody k nows wh at those three lines are, they should probably come,” Glennon said. To register and for more information on Customer Care and The Sales Driven Organization workshop: www.glennon.sandler.com

Investment: Location: Details and t o R eg is t e r :

April 17th, 2015 10:00-12:00 (Presentation) 12:00-1:00 (Lunch and Networking) $49.00 Sandler Training Centre, Kelowna, BC www.glennon.sandler.com* 866.645.2047

The Workshop includes the “Sandler Rules: Forty-Nine Timeless Selling Principles…and How to Apply Them” book, lunch as well as a session workbook to all the participants.

®

Suite 109B-3677 Highway 97 N Kelowna, BC V1X 5C3 email: jglennon@sandler *Unfortunately seating is limited, you must pre-register and pre qualify to attend.


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MARCH 2015

MAPLE REINDERS ENJOYS PHENOMENAL SUCCESS SPOTLIGHT

Kelowna is the branch recipient of a prestigious industry award

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ELOWNA - Maple Reinders Inc. in Kelowna continues to experience phenomenal success year after year. Most recently, the national general contracting company was the recipient of the 2013 Canadian Construction Association (CCA) Environmental Achievement Award for its work on the Harvest Energy Garden project

in Richmond, BC. Maple Reinders is also a past recipient of two Environmental Achievement awards. The Harvest Energy Garden in Richmond, owned by Harvest Power, is the first of its kind of that size in Canada; it is able to convert organic waste into electricity. Using commercial and residential kitchen scraps and yard waste the facility will generate enough energy to power 900 homes and also provide high-quality compost for local farms and gardens. It utilizes an innovative High Solids Anaerobic Digestion (HSAD) technology to process solid waste material first

Congratulations Maple Reinders For your Canadian Construction Award It is a pleasure to work with you.

www.Daryl-Evans.com 250-765-3555 • Kelowna

“When we take a project on, it’s not only the money we look at. We also look at the environmental aspects. If it will have a negative environmental impact, we probably won’t bid on it.” PROJECT DIRECTOR, MAPLE REINDERS INC.

Bert ter Horst notes that Maple Reinders cares about the environment and the future

into biogas, and subsequently into electricity generation (energy outputs of up to 20Mwh per day), and finally as high quality compost. The economic, social and environmental benefits of the Energy Garden are enormous. Annually, the facility will continue to reduce carbon emissions of approximately 23,000 tonnes of C02 while generating both reusable products and renewable energy for local markets; it will process more than 30,000 tonnes of food scraps and yard trimmings diverted from British Columbia landfill sites. “We were involved with the whole process of getting the design optimized,” said district manager Bodo Papke. “We are

obviously very happy with the outcome of the project.” And there have been more honours coming Maple Reinders’ way. For four years in a row, the company has been named one of Canada’s best managed companies by Deloitte. “It’s all about how you treat your employees,” said project director Bert ter Horst, noting that the company helps them with education and makes sure they get excellent benefits. Papke added that the awards reflect the ethics of the company. Maple Reinders donates 10 per cent of its profits to worthy causes in the community and cares deeply about the wellbeing of communities for future

BERT TER HORST

The most trusted name for commercial building envelope services.

Congratulations on the CCA Award See our new Projects Gallery online. BC Interior’s Industry Leader 250.765.8122 | tomtar.ca

At the Sechelt wastewater treatment plant, plants are being used to treat wastewater A Local Business Partner of

Fabricate, Manufacture, Machine CWB certified steel 47.1 & aluminum 47.2

Congratulations Maple Reinders on the

Canadian Construction Association Award

www.command.bc.ca Wishing you continued success

generations. “It’s not who is right but what is right,” he said. “It’s treating everybody with respect and treating everybody right and making sure that everybody has goals and a career path.” Maple Reinders in Kelowna is part of the Reinders Group, with offices in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia. In Ontario Maple Reinders Constructors Ltd. operates under the Reinders Group umbrella. The Reinders Group recently expanded by opening an office in Vancouver. Maple Reinders opened in Kelowna in 1993 where it is known for two main areas of focus. The heavy civil division is involved in building water treatment plants, waste water treatment plants, pump stations and other heavy civil infrastructure work. The company’s second area of focus is its building division that covers commercial, institutional and industrial construction. The Kelowna branch employs about 30 full time staff and as many hourly staff depending on the number and size of current projects. Nationally, Maple Reinders is growing and is approaching $400 million in construction. The Kelowna office this year is forecast to do about $60 million in construction. Talking about the company’s success, Papke said, “We’re involved in all aspects of construction – a little bit of heavy civil, water waste and water treatment projects, industrial projects, work for BC Hydro and institutional projects – for us, the growth is related to having the whole spectrum of projects that we work on. And, as well, we have a very strong core of project managers, operations managers and staff; most of our project managers are engineers, technologists or surveyors, so a high percentage of our staff are trained professionals.” Ter Horst noted that Maple Reinders also enjoys success because it is a “one-stop fro many people. In addition to design and building, the company assists clients with land acquisition, building layout and design, and free

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MARCH 2015

Bodo Papke says he is very happy with the outcome of the Harvest Garden Project

The RCMP station in Prince George was built to LEED gold standards and we think about the future. We have a responsibility to participate in the community as well.” That participation has included causes like Relay for Life, ALS and the local food banks. Maple Reinders also hires co-op students from the university. “Most of the students love it here,” ter Horst said. “They like working for Maple Reinders and they like coming back after they graduate.”

Safety is also a primary concern at Maple Reinders. People who work for the company are well trained, Papke said, and it is the goal of everyone in charge of a project to make sure that each worker goes home at night. Nationwide and in Kelowna, Maple Reinders is still growing. Each year the company meets its projections and ups the ante for the coming year. “We do projects all over BC,” Papke said. “We’re looking at bigger projects so we’re very optimistic about the future. We’re also focusing on the Kelowna area in a 200 – 300 kilometre radius. When we can, we want to keep our workers closer to home. Maple Reinders Inc. is at 225 Lougheed Road in Kelowna. www.maple.ca

Maple Reinders is recipient of the 2013 Canadian Construction Association (CCA) Environmental Achievement Award for its work on the Harvest Energy Garden project in Richmond, BC. pre-construction services. Currently, Maple Reinders is working on a great variety of projects including another “first of its kind” at Sechelt where it is completing a wastewater treatment plant. The technology is imported from Europe and uses plants growing in greenhouses, utilizing the plant roots as media for treatment. “It’s very environmentally friendly,” Papke said. “And it’s definitely the very first one of its kind in Canada. The process, called Organica, has been used in Europe. The treatment plant has a smaller footprint and instead of using artificial media, we’re using plant roots. We expect that this project will perform extremely well. The early results show that it is performing as expected or better.” Other projects Maple Reinders is currently engaged in include a BC Hydro substation in Surrey, a wastewater treatment plant in Langley, a water pump station in Maple Ridge, and a water treatment plant in Golden. Another notable project is St. Paul’s church in Kelowna that is combining a new, modern church with both

commercial and residential units. Another recent project is the new Prince George RCMP station, built to LEED Gold standards and using geothermal energy for cooling. The system extracts ground water from a supply well, brings it to a heat exchanger in the mechanical room, then routes it back to the aquifer through an injection well. Environmental awareness is a theme that clearly runs through

everything Maple Reinders is involved in. “When we take a project on, it’s not only the money we look at,” ter Horst said. “We also look at the environmental aspects. If it will have a negative environmental impact, we probably won’t bid on it.” Papke said that stewardship is essential. “We all have a responsibility in life. Our time on this earth is limited. We have children and grandchildren to think about,

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8

MARCH2015

COMMUNITY IN

BOATING AND MARINE

Marine Industry is sailing strong

Whether on lakes or the ocean, boating is big in British Columbia

F

ew areas in the province are better known for boating and all things water-related than the Okanagan Valley. With its lakes, beaches and a multitude of resorts and marinas, the Okanagan is a mecca for those who want to spend time on the water. However, Vern Nielsen, president and CEO of Dockside Marine Centre in West Kelowna, said that the marine industry has had its challenges in the past few years. “T he marine business took a huge hit in 2009,” he said. “We’ve been starting to get out of it the last three years.” Dockside Marine Centre has been serving western Canadian boaters since 1975. It boasts four seasonal operations, three on Okanagan Lake and one in Lake Country as well as its main operation where it sells and services all kinds of boats from inflatables up to the larger fishing boats suitable for large lake and ocean fishing, from sport boats up to the big open bow and sport cruisers. Nielsen said that although the marine industry thrives in the summer, it’s a year-round economic activity. “There are cycles but the service business is super busy in the spring and in the fall when people are getting their boats summarized or winterized. We close down for two weeks around Christmas and we encourage our techs to take their holidays in the December/January period, but other than that, we’re busy.” He added that as the business has picked up in the last couple of years, the plunging Canadian dollar has added another challenge to marine sales. In the United States, the early results from the boat shows indicate that bookings or orders for boats are up about 200 per cent over the previous year. And while Dockside Marine also has bookings from several months ago, the lower dollar means higher prices for boats. “We don’t know what effect the exchange rate is going to have,” Nielsen said, adding that, at the same time, predictions are that tourism numbers will be up and that could have a very beneficial effect on boat rentals this summer. “The early indications are that the tourism business is going to be excellent this year,” he said, adding that, in addition, because

Vern Nielsen says the Marine industry is heavily dependent on the economy

“If the economy is good, people love their toys and the ultimate toy is a nice boat.” VERN NIELSEN PRESIDENT AND CEO, DOCKSIDE MARINE CENTRE

gas prices are so much lower, people are feeling more encouraged than every to get out on the water. W hen it comes to sales and rentals there are two strong trends in the industry. The first is pontoon boats. “We’ve had the biggest growth in the last two years with pontoon boats,” Nielsen said. The new pontoon boats can do pretty much everything other than what requires a wake.” The other big trend is surf boats. “Very few people waterski anymore. People went from waterskiing to wakeboarding, which is still big, to the hottest new thing, which is surfing.” Surfing requires a special boat that kicks up a huge wave, often even with a curl that allows a surfer to follow behind the boat without a

Surf boats are one of today’s big trends in water sports tow rope, surfing the wave. Nielsen said that Dockside Marine Centre recently brought in the Pavati, which is expected to be the ultimate surf boat. Nielsen said he is “very optimistic” for the future of the marine industry in British Columbia, with the caveat that it is dependent on the economy. “If the economy is good, people love their toys and the ultimate toy is a nice boat. The two hot categories are the surf boats and the pontoon boats and it’s interesting how they keep stepping up those pontoon boats. Five years ago they were $10,000 – now the most popular ones we sell are $50,000 plus.” At Ocean Pacific Marine Store and Boatyard in Campbell River, business is stable across all sectors. Ocean Pacific provides marine supplies to pleasure craft as well as the commercial industry including fishing boats and fish farms. It also repairs boats up to 100 tons. Company president Bruce Kempling noted that lower fuel costs are already making a difference. “It’s going to help in all areas – people cruising who are coming into BC and also for tow boaters, tugboats, water taxis – it’s a huge impact and it’s going to put more money into the pockets of all the operators.” Along with that, comes a lower Canadian dollar, which, as far as Kempling is concerned, is also good news. “In the past, whenever we’ve had a lower dollar and low fuel prices, it has usually meant that we get a lot more traffic from the US in terms of cruising.” He added that shipbuilding is on the verge of an upswing and that will

have a spin-off effect on all the related industries. If there is any challenge the marine industry faces, it is a shortage of skilled labour. Happily, that is being addressed. BCIT has just started a new trade program, Marine Mechanical Technician, with its first group currently training. “That’s been worked on for qu ite some t i me by va r iou s people in the industry,” Kempling said. “It has now come to fruition, so that’s good. We have all had problems with people moving to other parts of Canada for work but it’s nice to see a new trade starting that’s really specific to the industry.” For the Oak Bay Marine Group with five marinas on Vancouver island and Quadra Island, business is good. Martin Paish, vice president of marinas and attractions, said there is a changing landscape in the business, particularly as it applies to moorage. He noted that not too many years ago, few people would consider trailering 26 or 28-foot boats. But now, as more people drive trucks, that is no longer an obstacle. Larger boats still demand year-round moorage, especially 40 plus foot sailboats and yachts that take advantage of the Oak Bay Marine Group’s reputation for world class boathouses. But smaller craft often look for moorage for a month or weeks at a time. Paish also said that the combination of the lower Canadian dollar and cheaper gas prices are having a positive effect on boating that will be felt most strongly this summer. “I noticed at the Vancouver Boat Show some optimism in


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marinas like Canoe Cove and Westport Marina will reap the benefits. Perhaps most si g n i f ic a nt ly t he lower dollar will see more Americans cruising north this summer. “It’s an incentive for them to visit our Southern Gulf I sl a nd s a nd ou r I n side Passage,” Paish said. “If they’ve been waiting for a good year to do that, this is

likely going to be an excellent year to do it.” For the longer term future, Paish said that the Oak Bay Marine Group’s strategy is to excel in customer service, make sure that the coast’s ma ri ne env i ron ment is maintained and to diversify its products and services to include things like kayak and rowboat storage and rentals.

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9


OFF THE COVER/KELOWNA

10

MARCH 2015

OIL PRICES, BUSINESS REACTIONS, DOLLAR DOWN… IS THE WOLF AT THE DOOR?

KELOWNA CAROLINE GROVER

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his month I am again relying on a great source of economic analysis, the wise Hendrik Brakel of the Canadian

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Chamber of Commerce (he’s the Senior Director, Economic, Financial & Tax Policy). As well, our Board of Directors has been conducting some personalized calls and visits with a good handful of our small business Chamber members, to get their input and reaction to some of the swings in economic change that we’ve seen since November. Key concerns? Maintaining core, productive staff, i.e., maintaining the current payroll in the midst of economic swings. This is a really valid concern, and we don’t have a magic wand for that. Orders and inventory: how does a business place future orders, and predict “right sized inventory” given economic fluctuations, changed buying profiles of customers, and changeability in the dollar? Again, we don’t have the answer for the concern, but it is real and it is now. Oil prices: a lot of ink has been spilled since late 2014 on this subject. Again, the crystal ball may be hazy on this issue, but some recent decisions around approval of buying from the oil sands, and the Keystone decision in the US are adding a bit of clarity to the issue. Oil prices seem to be firming up (this week); but is it a trend? Only time (this spring/summer) will give us more of the hard data we need. Finally, interest rates. As Hendrik Brakel posed the question at the end of January, “How many times have Canadians been warned that interest rates will increase eventually? What a surprise, then, when the Bank of Canada lowered the rate to 0.75%, a move that no economist had predicted.” Since my column this month seems to be made up more of questions than answers – answers being that elusive magic wand – again, the question from diving interest rates is what do they augur for Canadian business? Well, of course, the first and most immediate effect was to weaken our dollar, which fell 1.5 cents following the Bank’s announcement,

to $0.81. And, it’s gone lower still in the weeks immediately following the cut. Going forward, we’ll see even more pressure on the loonie, since the market expects the US Federal Reserve to start raising interest rates sometime in the second quarter of 2015. That’s not going to happen in Canada, and in fact, there is a slim chance that our rates could go even lower. As a result, investors will move out of Canadian securities towards the U.S., weakening the loonie even further. That’s the professional economic forecast. In terms of the actual cost of business loans, we are unlikely to see much change. In normal times, the Bank of Canada’s official overnight rate provides a basis for the private sector banks’ prime rate. But when official rates get really low, this relationship breaks down. There is even talk this week (the third week of February) of deflation. Banks have to cover their cost of funds—the amount they pay to borrow plus their administrative costs— which is higher than 0.75%. Banks like to see all the costs in that monthly “basket of goods” rise slightly every month. Oil usually makes that happen, if nothing else. That’s not happening right now. Since banks have to cover the cost of their borrowing plus admin, most banks probably won’t lower their prime rate; most will keep it at 3%. In the U.S., the prime rate is 3.25% even though the Fed’s official rate is near zero. What about longer-term bonds? Those yields edged downwards, but these have been headed lower for a very long time. Again, this points to incipient deflation. Bond rates have been trending downward for the past 15 years right across the developed world. Why? One reason is that emerging markets like China have accumulated huge amounts of reserves. Then, they keep buying rich country bonds, and so, rates are held down. Riskier assets aren’t moving very quickly;

and the net effect is that there is little demand from borrowers competing for funds. The IMF believes that long-term interest rates will eventually return to the 3-4% range but not much higher. January’s Canadian rate cut speaks volumes about the Canadian economy. Will lower oil prices help keep Canada in balance if the negative impact on oil producers is offset by stronger manufacturing in Ontario and Quebec? Here I am asking questions again! The Bank of Canada says “no”. Governor Poloz called low oil prices “unambiguously bad” for Canada. In fact, a lower loonie is good for some manufacturers, but the beneficial effects could take time to materialize, especially if consumers don’t rush out and spend the money they save filling their tanks. Let me end with a raft of questions: Will oil prices get back to the $60-$70 range by year-end? Will an accelerating US economy – combined with an 80-cent dollar – eventually boost our exports? And, is stronger economic growth ahead, even if 2015 is a rough ride? And will interest rates rise eventually? Is the wolf at the door? He’s always lurking. But best economic forecasts in this spring of 2015 show him not taking a large bite out of our economy until the second quarter of 2016. And by then, we have a whole new set of questions to ponder. This isn’t meant to be negative, just transparent questions that ALL our Chamber businesses are asking. While we don’t have all the answers, we DO have business tools, and the strength of member-to-member relations and connections to help lessen the economic blows. Caroline Grover is the CEO of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached by email at caroline@kelownachamber.org

Lake Country aquatic life becomes world-wide business

A

ptly titled “the curator’s choice”, Piscine Energetics’ (PE) aquatic nutrition products have become industry leaders since the company’s inception. PE’s success has come through the sale of its popular Mysis shrimp product, a high quality and sustainable nutrition supplement primarily used for ornamental aquaculture and aquariums. PE’s products are used by over 90% of public aquarium in North America, and are promoted throughout the global aquaculture industry, with organizations like the Florida Aquarium, Cairns Marine in Australia, Toledo Zoo, Quebec Aquarium and the Ocean Institute of California all advocating use of the product. The business of harvesting and selling the Mysis shrimp was born out of an initiative by the

Province of British Columbia’s Ministry of Environment in the late 1990s, aimed at a targeted removal of the shrimp. The Mysis had become an invasive species that was negatively affecting the growth of Kokanee salmon and trout fisheries in Lake Okanagan. Initially it had been introduced to the lake intentionally, in order to increase the productivity of the aquaculture after several successful tests in other lakes, however, after an initial increase in productivity, the plan backfired with the shrimp overpopulating and have the opposite desired effect. Current owner Nuri Fisher purchased the company in 2005 from John Lee Granberg, who in 1998, developed and patented a system for harvesting and freezing the shrimp live, through a no ‘by-catch’ system, meaning that

OKANAGAN WINS

known to reduce pain, foster creativity, optimize performance and improve overall happiness. Enderby’s own Mel’s Mainstreet Pizza and Pasta, was awarded first place, for Best Workplace. Mel’s Mainstreet Pizza is a local pizzeria located at 605 Cliff Avenue.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

community. Flotation, or Restricted Environmental Stimuli Technique (REST), is a powerful tool for relaxation, stress relief and personal enhancement. Floating has been

Piscine Energetics Team no other non-targeted species were harvested. PE is the only company licensed to harvest the Mysis at night, when they are closest to the surface. PE Mysis products come in three different delivery options:

blister packs, small grade and flat packs, depending on user needs. The next step for PE is the launch of its PE Pellet and PE Flake products, which are expected to be available this spring. For more information, visit Mysis.com.

To qualify as a finalist for the BC Small Business Awards, companies had to gain public votes to be shortlisted to the Top 10. As a Top 10 finalist, companies are given one month to provide judges with a detailed application outlining why they deserve to win the award.

Following the selection from the Top 10, the Top 5 contestants for each category have to make a ten minute pitch explaining why their company should be the winner. This year’s awards were announced at the Pan Pacific Vancouver on February 26, 2015.


11

MARCH 2015

EXCELLENT EXTERIORS SPOTLIGHT

Nicholson Exteriors wins Tommie Gold

K

ELOWNA - Daniel Cooper, owner of Nicholson Exteriors in Kelowna came away a winner at the recent Tommie Awards in the Okanagan Valley. Having entered in three categories, under the auspices of the builder, Nicholson Exteriors won three Silver Awards and two Gold. The Gold winners were in the categories: Excellence in single family detached home $1 - $1.5 million for the Guarducci Residence. Excellence in single family detached home $2 - $3 million for the Huber Residence. Both homes were built by Frame Custom Homes. Cooper, who had never entered the awards previously, said it was a thrill to receive the acknowledgement. “It felt very good,” he said. “It’s good to attend the event with all the other builders.” Nicholson Exteriors is known for high-end custom exteriors of all sorts, particularly using wood and wood products. The Huber Residence had wood details, even on the interior ceilings. The Guarducci Residence presented a very new challenge for the company. The owners wanted to use a product from Holland, called Trespa – a kind of wood laminate guaranteed to last 80 years. Trespa is also known for its range

“On custom homes people often make changes and want special things done. Unexpected things come up – and really, we’re willing to do anything. DANIEL COOPER OWNER, NICHOLSON EXTERIORS

of colours and for its handsome eye-catching appearance. Nicholson Exteriors ordered it and had it shipped to Kelowna. Cooper said that right from the beginning, given the materials, which included the Trespa, board and batten and cedar siding, as well as the design, this home would be worthy of an award. However, he and his crew also had a learning curve. They had never previously worked with Trespa. “It’s different from anything else in Kelowna,” he said. “There may be a nother com mercia l building somewhere that has used Trespa, but there’s no other house like it.” Before getting to work and cutting the large panels that were freighted over, Cooper and his men did an online training course and a conference call. They asked every question they could think of, got well educated, and were

Daniel Cooper recently took home two Gold Tommies still apprehensive before making their first cut. “It’s a very expensive product,” Cooper said. “It took a lot of cutting and prepping of each piece and pre-drilling all the holes to screw it on. It was a lot of layout work but it’s a great product. I would certainly recommend it to people.” It may have been the company’s first venture into working with Trespa but the men pulled it off without a hitch. Nicholson Exteriors is known for its high quality work throughout the Okanagan Valley. It also has a reputation for having a skilled crew that is pleasant to work with. “My employees are all friendly and easy to get along with,” Cooper said. “That makes it nice for our clients and our client’s clients. On custom homes people

Nicholson Exteriors installed Trespa on the award-winning Guarducci Residence

Nicholson Exteriors did extensive work on the Huber Residence often make changes and want special things done. Unexpected things come up – and really, we’re willing to do anything. If something comes up and it involves wood, my clients know that we can do it. – we can always help them out.” He added that Nicholson Exteriors also works with other specialty materials on exteriors like aluminum panels and Hardi-Plank. Chiefly, the company caters to custom homes. Nicholson Enterprises was founded in 2005 by Bob Nicholson. Cooper worked for Nicholson for three years before taking over the company in 2012 and changing the name to Nicholson Exteriors. He also changed the direction of the company and made it a tremendous success. “Every year has been better than the last,” Cooper said. “Last year was amazing and this year has started off good and I know there’s a ton of stuff coming up. This year and even into next year, it’s looking very good.” He credits the company’s success to high quality work and the friendly, skilled crew. If there’s extra work to do, the company takes care of it immediately. Nicholson Exteriors has always done a certain amount of deck and fencing work as well – and pergolas. In fact, the demand for pergolas grew so much that recently Cooper founded a new company, Kelowna Custom

Pergolas. In the first five days of placing an ad for the new company, the phone almost rang off the hook, Cooper said. As he sees it, the new company offers new opportunities. Along with that, he plans to continue operating Nicholson Exteriors with a crew of about 10 people. Although he could possibly grow in the busy summer months, Cooper said he is happy to keep the company at the size it is so that he can keep his focus on the highest quality work for fine custom home builders in the Okanagan Valley. Nicholson Exteriors is at 365 Patterson Road in Kelowna. Happy to be working with an exceptional team like Nicholson Exteriors

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12

MARCH 2015

TROIKA DEVELOPMENTS TAKES HOME TWO GOLD TOMMIE AWARDS SPOTLIGHT

Company is acknowledged for master planned community, West Harbour

K

ELOWNA - Troika Developments Inc. builds single family, multi family, commercial and institutional projects – but far beyond all that, Troika Developments builds communities. This year, Troika won two Gold Tommie awards for Excellence in Marketing (along with Fortune Marketing) and Large Volume Single Family Home Builder. A closer look at those awards will reveal that they were all about building communities. One of the company’s crowning achievements in the past year was West Harbour, a master planned community situated on 45 acres of sloping lakefront land opposite downtown Kelowna. The community offers 500-feet of lakefront, a marina, a pool and walking trails. Most importantly, it offers beautiful high quality homes and a neighbourhood people want to call home. The original plans for the community were completed in 2007 and called for about 1500 units. Shortly after that, the economic downturn made itself felt and

Troika Developments is known for high quality finishings Troika Developments re-drew the plans from higher density to primarily single-family homes, which will total 225 when the project is complete. Currently

60 homes have been completed while construction continues on dozens more. “What we love about it the most is just the community that has

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sprung up there,” said company partner Brad Klassen. “We’re about building sustainable communities and this is really an example of that. When you talk to people who live here, they talk about the lake and the boat slip they have, but most of all they talk about what it feels like to live there – at the West Harbour community.” Although marketing for the community won a Gold Tommie, Klassen noted that it wasn’t hard to do. The community’s tag line is, “Kelowna’s Most Extraordinary Lakefront Community.” “It’s a gorgeous site,” he said. “Any time you’re photographing the Okanagan and you’re photographing Okanagan Lake, that’s what sets Kelowna apart – that’s what we are. We are on the lake, we have a gorgeous pool overlooking the lake. We have homes that are on the lake or overlooking the lake. That’s what sets us

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“When you talk to people who live here, they talk about the lake and the boat slip they have, but most of all they talk about what it feels like to live there – at the West Harbour community.” BRAD KLASSEN PARTNER, TROIKA DEVELOPMENTS INC.

Congratulations to Troika Developments on another successful project.

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13

MARCH 2015

Wide laneways are a defining feature of the homes at Green Square apart. We have the opportunity to present something that is visually stunning.” He noted that every estate home comes with a boat slip – and marketing that aspect is also an enormous opportunity. The smaller villas also have an opportunity to purchase a boat slip. Troika’s Large Volume Builder award also refers to West Harbour where 35 more homes are currently under construction. Potential purchasers usually arrive at the sales centre where a member of the team takes them on a tour of the homes and the neighbourhood. They choose their lot and from one of the almost dozen plans available. On several plans, they have the opportunity to fully customize the plan – move a wall, add an extra patio and so on. Depending on the amount of customization, designing and building the

home can take up to 10 months or more. Troika works with Corwest Builders. Its close relationship with the construction company makes for quality work. “They partner with Troika,” Klassen explained. “They are a separate company but share the same vision and values. It makes a huge difference to really be invested with the people who are building these homes – it’s a very critical part of the equation.” All the homes are built to very high quality standards. Finishings include hardwood floors, granite or quartz counters, concrete tile roofs and stucco exteriors. All the homes have top Energuide ratings while some owners have even opted for geothermal heating. “Our construction quality is very high,” Klassen said. “That’s something we’ve always done – we’ve always used quality

exteriors. It costs us more but I think it shows that this is a quality product and a quality community.” He added that people who live in the community love their homes. In fact, Klassen and his wife are building their new home at West Harbour. The Fortune Marketing president has a home in the community as does the sales manager for West Harbour. “The best marketing is when the sales manager can say, ‘That’s my house right over there,’” Klassen said. Troika Developments has been building communities for quite some time. The company was founded in 1998 by Renee Wasylyk as a property management company. It quickly grew into land development and then formed Corwest. The company has won multiple awards for the work it has done but the emphasis has always been on community. The first project the company created

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was a professional building called Ambrosi Place with offices on the ground floor and five high quality residential units above. Its next project was a 36-unit townhouse project in Rutland called

Citybrook. It was with that project that the company’s passion for community really took centre stage. SEE TROIKA DEVELOPMENTS | PAGE 14

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Congratulations Troika Developments Inc. on winning the Large Volume Home Builder of the Year #201- 1583 Ellis Street, kelowna 250-861-8440


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MARCH 2015

The Gate in Kelowna is a desirable community

TROIKA DEVELOPMENTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Troika has also recently completed Upper Avenue, a 30,000 sq. ft. office building in Kelowna. It is also building townhomes at Greensquare in the Pandosy area of Kelowna. “There’s an example of high end finishing,” Klassen said. “With hardwood and granite and central air – that really brings value to the people buying there. We have built 40 homes and sales continue to be strong and we continue to build there.” Troika is also finishing up The Gate in Kelowna. Farther afield, the company has a large 95-acre project in Edmonton called Stewart

Greens. In Kelowna, Diamond Mountain, a 200-acre project near the University of BC Okanagan is currently in the planning stages. Asked about the company’s formula for success, Klassen said, “I think it goes back to building communities. It’s looking at every project and asking, how can we best put this together so that people will want to live here and they will fell they have moved into a community where they are valued and where they feel like they belong?” He added that on their site plans, they rarely if ever take advantage of optimal density. They prefer to build large laneways and to leave space between buildings. A sense of space

is essential, he said, as is value. “We’re building beautiful homes and I think that people understand the value they’re getting when they look at how they’re priced and what they are actually getting. It’s really quite remarkable. We have a long-term perspective on land and where our community is growing. We don’t sacrifice quality and value. We try to incorporate as much of that as we can into something that’s attainable for people. It’s all about community building and giving value to the people who are buying from us.” Troika Developments Inc. is at 114 – 1856 Ambrosi Road in Kelowna. www.troikadevelopments.com

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MARCH 2015

TOUGH GUYS FINISH LAST While a positive 12 Surefire Ways to Resolve Workplace Conflict

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et’s face it. With conflict being the nu mber one c a u s e of a b s e nte e i s m , turnover and lost productivity, we could all stand to be a little happier in our workplace. Conflict is inevitable, normal and natural in any workplace that employs a group of people, arising out of unmet expectations and differences in values, opinions and ideas around what needs to be done and how it gets done. And well, some people are just plain easier to get along with than others. Unfortunately, there is a tendency by too many owners and managers to stick their head in the sand, letting others ‘work things out’, or simply waiting for the passage of time to ease hurt feelings. This results in employees burying wounds, nu r tu r i ng u ndea lt w it h resentments, wh ich resu lts i n highly toxic passive-aggressive behavior. W hile a positive resolution is always the ultimate goal in resolving conf lict, it doesn’t

resolution is always the ultimate goal in resolving conflict, it doesn’t always happen as quickly as we’d like it to.

Barbara Ashton of Ashton & Associates

always happen as quickly as we’d like it to. Having a structured conflict prevention and resolution program in place will go a long ways towards putting your workplace madness to bed, once and for all. How to Quickly Resolve Your Workplace Conflict

The outfall of conflict-driven stress resulting in resignations, absenteeism and reduced productivity leads the list of causes for failed business. This makes con f l ict ma nagement absolutely critical. Use these tips to move your conflict towards successful closure. D on’t P ro c ra s t i n ate. R esolving conflicts often means meeting them head on and not letting sore feelings linger. Remember Stat ion W I F M.  It is the world’s most popular radio station for very good reason. Tell the other person why you want to resolve the conflict and give them reasons

that demonstrate there is clear benefit for them to work things out with you. Stand in Your Shoes. Clearly articulate your understanding of the causes of the conflict and then admit your part in it. Eat a Little Crow.  Although t he ver y prospect of it m ay f reeze you i n you r t racks, studies have proven that being humble and showing vulnerability actually doesn’t kill you. A c c ep t Yo u r D i f ferenc e s.  Relationships break down in the workplace primarily due to unmet expectations, generally caused by miscommunication. Accept that there really is no right or wrong, just different. Don’t Assume.  Propose ideas and outline behavioural changes that you would like to see to resolve the conflict. Define what you feel are acceptable behaviours. Don’t Hit Send. Deal with the other person face to face or, if not possible, on the phone. Email and other forms of written communication fall prey to having tone be dangerously misinterpreted. Stick to the Issues. Big ears and a small mouth will help you to stay on task and resist bringing in outside issues, especially when emotions a re r u n n i ng high.

Look for the Cause. – Often u n a c c ep t a ble b eh av iou rs chronic tardiness, absenteeism, inattention and errors- are sy mptoms of a n u nderly i ng chronic issues (addiction) or personal issue (jealousy around favoritism). Empathy and sincerity go a long way here. Choose the Hill You Want to Die On. Stop and think things through before storming you’re your colleag ue’s office. Is it really that important? Ca l l a T i me Out.  Emotions often interfere with arriving at a pro du c t ive re solut ion . If things are heating up, call a ti me-out a nd set a date to resume. See Conflict as Opportunity. I learn so much talking with candidates about how they handle con f l ict i n thei r workplace. When conflict is poorly handled it can tear down a relationship, but when handled with respect and integrity, conflict provides an opportunity to strengthen the bond between two people. Barbara Ashton is the founder and CEO of Ashton & Associates, one of BC’s leading executive search and recruitment firms exclusively serving the unique hiring needs of Thompson Okanagan employers.

A FRESH WAY TO SLICE IT Freshlice Pizza is coming to the Okanagan

I

t’s fresh: a fresh idea, a fresh franchise and fresh food: Freshslice Pizza has everyth i ng goi ng for it. T hat was certainly area developer Dave Martyn’s opinion when he first came across the franchise in Vancouver – and Martyn is a person whose opinion is based on solid experience. He began his career in the franchise business in 1996 with Domino’s Pizza. In 2003 he and his family, including his parents, were involved in Extreme Pita, owning four franchises. From owner, he moved on to area developer. W hen the company was sold, he looked at other opportunities. “What I found was that the franchisees were doing a lot of the work,” he said. “The head offices were making a lot more of the profits – and this was industry-wide. I would say that 99 per cent of the companies have the same business model where every dollar a franchisee sells, the head office collects 12 per cent of that dollar. What I was looking for was a company that did things differently.” He found

that in Freshslice, a well-known name in Vancouver and one of the biggest companies in that city. Martyn researched it and was impressed by the new model of doing business. Freshslice has 0 per cent royalty fees, 0 per cent advertising fees and 0 per cent markup on food items. “Things that everybody else was doing – they were not doing that,” Martyn said. “Within the system they have some patented dough distribution methods – and that is where they generate their income. That allows the franchisees to run the franchise with all the advantages of being in a franchise system like business coaches and construction help, but they don’t pay any fees once they have actually opened the business.” That means that the odds of profitably and success are high. In fact, Freshslice is doing so well that three franchises are set to open in the Okanagan: two in Kelowna and one in Vernon. Martyn said he expects 12 new franchises to open on Vancouver Island and in the Okanagan this year. W hy is Freshslice doing so well? Its focus is unique, Martyn said. Freshslice focuses on selling by the slice. Most pizza stores depend on delivery orders. Freshslice’s traffic tends to be people walking in and mixing and matching what they want.

Pizzas are constantly baked fresh throughout the day with six to eight ready to go at any time. Customers can walk away with as many as eight different pizza slices in one box. And the 16-inch pizzas, slices are big. Prices of the pizzas are highly competitive while the quality is top notch. Martyn stressed that ingredients are very high quality He noted that franchise owners have been doing very well, not only because they keep far more of their profits, but also due to the quality of the product. In Vancouver, Freshslice has been voted best pizza in Vancouver three times and best pizza by the slice in 2014. Some franchisees are earning six figure incomes with a single store. “There’s a growing customer base,” Martyn said. “This i s somet h i ng u n ique i n t he marketplace. This model is really changing it for the franchisee. I always try to look at it by how I would have felt if I was the franchisee. If we can make others successful, then we have done our job. I think the model is in place to empower other people to build a strong financial future for themselves.” Freshslice Pizza is opening at 227 Bernard Avenue in Kelowna, at Banks Road in Kelowna and in Vernon. www.freshslice.com

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For more information visit Freshslice.com or contact Dave Martyn: 250-307-5805 • David@freshslice.com


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MARCH 2015

CHATHAM HOMES IS NOW A SELECT BUILDER AT WILDEN SPOTLIGHT

New show home is bound to be a head turner

K

ELOWNA - You have to be an exceptional builder to be named one of only four Select Builders at Wilden, arguably the finest new home project in Kelowna. In December, Chatham Homes Ltd. received that honour and began plans for its show home on the 2,000-acre m aster pla n ned community, the largest of its kind between Vancouver and Calgary. That show home is set to wow visitors when it opens its doors this September. W i l d e n’s o w n e r, G e rh a rd Blenk, began developing the property in 2003 with a unique vision. “Their idea is to do as little disturbing of the surrounding a rea as possible,” sa id M i ke Chatham, co-owner and project manager of Chatham Homes. “T hey want to keep as much natural landscape and trees as they can. It’s quite beautiful up there and there are lots of walking trails. Their focus is to keep it natural. Wilden’s slogan is ‘Nature Inspired Living.’” He added that being named a select builder was fantastic. “We were ecstatic. My father, Dave, has been building homes fo r 25 ye a rs. I go t i n to t h e family business more recently after working as a journeyman electrician for five years. The plan has always been for me to learn the ropes and take over the company and when we had the opportunity to go into Wilden, it paved the way for a lot of security. This project is long term: 20 - 30 years.” He said that he expects to build upwards of 10 houses a year in Wilden as the project proceeds through its phases. Those homes will include entry-level homes and hom e s w it h m i l l ion-d ol l a r views. “It’s why we would choose to work with Wilden over any other master-planned community.

“We have the reputation of building quality. From there, once we met with the owners and managers of Wilden, they got a feel for who we are and they felt that we were the right fit.” MIKE CHATHAM CO-OWNER AND PROJECT MANAGER, CHATHAM HOMES LTD.

Chatham Homes new show home is prairie/modern hybrid

They cater to a huge market, including first time home buyers” Asked why Chatham Homes was selected from a short-list of exceptional builders in the area, Mike said, “We have the reputation of building quality. From there, once we met with the owners and managers of Wilden, they got a feel for who we are and they felt that we were the right fit.” He noted that his father built quite a few homes in Glenmore, just below the Wilden development. Over the years he had become well

Chatham Homes’ show home is situated in Wilden, a notable master planned community k now n for bu i ld i ng qua l ity, both in high-volume spec homes and in lakefront and lake view custom dream homes. But no matter the price range, every

Chatham Homes house is finished to the highest possible standards. S om e of t h e s ele c t b u i lders erect spec homes on their

lots; more usually, builders are chosen from the list by the clients who purchase lots. Often customers will approach all four builders before selecting the one

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MARCH 2015

they “click” with best. Chatham Homes is already excepting contracts with clients in the Wilden development. A lot of people have clicked with Chatham Homes over the years. Dave Chatham began his career in the building trade in 1974 when he started work in a door and window shop as a foreman. Even while he was working there, he looked for other entrepreneurial opportunities. An honour role student in carpentry in high school, Dave was ambitious and deeply passionate about his work. After more than 12 years, when t he ow ners of t he compa ny couldn’t see their way to taking Dave on as a partner, he took the risk of going out on his own. His first project was the conversion of an old museum in the village of Midway, to a health centre. “It was a matter of wanting to do well for my family and supporting them,” he said, adding that his client was so happy with the work he did that they gave him another job: building a new museum to lock-up stage. “I’m extremely fussy and I probably drive half the world crazy, but my motto in the company is, ‘We do it right or we don’t do it,’” Dave said. “And that propelled us forward.” He started building spec homes and when people saw how well they were built, they began to ask him to build custom homes. Quality is half the magic formula for the company’s success. The other half is service. “We really take care of the client,” Dave said. “We work pretty much seven days a week. If you call us and we don’t answer t he phone r ig ht away, we’l l get back to you pretty darn quick, We’re not afraid to work on a weekend and meet with clients who are only free at night or on weekends. We work really hard to give them what they want.” He said that just as much quality goes into a starter home as into a dream home – no matter what size or style, that home is the owner’s castle and Chatham Homes cares equally about both. Chatham Homes works closely with clients to make sure they

SUMMERLAND – A CONNECTED COMMUNITY In Summerland, chamber members vote electronically for the award winners and voter participation was excellent.

SUMMERLAND CHRISTINE PETKAU

Mike and Dave Chatham are known for building quality homes get what they want and need, from the design of the home right down to the bathroom and lighting fixtures. Dave and Mike are mindful of the budget and give their customers choices that fit within their budget, always keeping quality in mind. Sometimes they work on a costplus basis if that is the wish of the client. Above all, Chatham Homes is a compa ny people have learned to trust. “We keep people informed,” Dave said. “We do everything we c a n to m a ke it work for p eople. We’ve worked w it h people from Europe and Australia and email constantly. We communicate with them very well.” In fact the trust level is so h ig h on Chat ha m Homes jobs that many customers have become good friends. Ma ny clients have come to Chatham Homes on the recommendation of previous customers. And, although the company has never entered any of the local award programs, in 2010, a customer nominated it for the Okanagan Home Magazine awards where it was named number two builder and number two renovator in the valley. Now that Mike has joined the company, the capacity of Chatham Homes has grown. Starting from the ground up three years ago, M ike has learned every nuance of the building business.

Dave ad m itted that w ithout Mike’s presence he may not have competed to be a Wilden select builder. But together, they are more than prepared to take on that prestigious challenge. The new show home, a prairie/modern hybrid, will be a must-see for people buying lots at Wilden. “It’s trending a new look at Wilden,” Mike said. “We have the benefit of building the newest show home and it’s given us the ability to reflect the direction that Wilden is going.” T he Ch at h a m Home s Ltd . show home is at 125 Sky Court in Kelowna www.chathamhomesltd.com

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n February 28th the Summerland Chamber of Commerce celebrated the 77 th Annual Business and Community Excellence Awards. Held at the Summerland Waterfront Resort, the evening was a wonderful celebration of business excellence in Summerland. Guests were delighted with a champagne reception, a fabulous dinner catered by Local Lounge*Grille and beautiful tablescapes by Edgy Petals. Exciting live and silent auction options were also available. Returning emcee was Erick Thompson of ET2media who kept the evening running smoothly with his warm sense of humor and professionalism. I n S u m m erl a nd , c h a m b er members vote electronically for the award winners and voter participation was excellent. Many categories were very close; an indicator of the strength of the business community in Summerland. The awards were: Citizen/Volunteer of the Year sponsored by Nesters Market: awarded to Mr. Billy Boerboom. R isi ng Sta r/ New Busi ness sponsored by RBC Royal Bank: awarded to Main Street Fitness and Yoga Studio. Young Entrepreneur of the Year sponsored by Bottleneck Drive Winery Association: awarded to Dallas Bradner Jr. and Kim Kothlow- Summerland Rental Centre. Professional Services Excellence sponsored by Brown Benefits: awarded to Avery Law Office. Retail Excellence sponsored by The Summerland Review: awarded to IGA Summerland. T rade Ser v ices E xcel lence sponsored by Alder Street Auto Body: awarded to Canyon View Construction Ltd. Tourism & Hospitality Excellence sponsored by Sumac Ridge

Estate Winery: awarded to Zias Stonehouse Restaurant. Manufacturing/Industrial Excellence sponsored by Community Futures Okanagan Similkameen: awarded to Ripley Stainless Ltd. Sustainability Leader sponsored by SummerGate Winery: awarded to Swiss Solar Tech Ltd. Technology and Innovation Excellence sponsored by Accelerate Okanagan: a tie resulting in awards being given to two companies - Mazza Innovation and Okanagan Specialty Fruits. The Mayor’s Award of Excellence sponsored by the District of Summerland: awarded to Summerland’s Sister City Committee. Business of the Year sponsored by the Summerland Credit Union: awarded to True Grain Bread. ** The Summerland Chamber of Commerce will hold its Annual General Meeting on Tuesday, March 12, at 5:00 pm. The AGM will be held at Sumac Ridge Estate Winery, and will include a reception, annual reports and election of the 2015/2016 Board of Directors. Christine Petkau is Executive Director at the Summerland Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at cpetkau@ summerlandchamber.com.

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MARCH 2015

PRINTING

Print is alive and well The print industry has grown and evolved and continues to thrive

T

he point about printing, is that the average person really doesn’t know what a pri nter does. Derek Allan, owner and president of Fotoprint Ltd. in Victoria said that while corporate buyers of print products know exactly which printer to go to for their particular needs, many people do not. And the print business has changed. Today it is more diversified than ever before. Several years ago print was the fifth largest corporate employer in North America, encompassing everything from newspapers to magazines, books and pamphlets. That has changed, but print is still a significant contributor to the economy. “It’s actually a highly specialized industry,” Allan said. “There are printers who put a sign up that says ‘Printer’ and they may not do printing at all – they just broker it, and until the customer really understands and wants to know more about how the product is physically produced and where it’s produced, they don’t have a clue. We have lots of printers still, but not many who are a true printing company with in-house production equipment from a digital copier to a full printing plant including bindery equipment.” He added that after 40 years in business, he still spends a good deal of time educating people about t he n atu re of qu a l ity printed material. W hen Fotoprint opened its doors in 1975, the era of instant printing had just begun. The quality was not very good, Allan said, but the shops sprang up on every corner. The desire for getting print jobs done quickly has not changed – the difference is that today the quality is exceptionally high. Another difference today is that most files come to the shop as PDF files, ready for the printer. “We spend most of our time now making sure that the files that are supplied to us are perfect when they’re printed,” Allan said. “Once that is finalized we print right away – the same day or the next day.” If you asked Allan if print is dead, he would say, not by a long shot. While more companies are concentrating on a web presence, print is still important. Allan noted that not too many years ago, the company spent one week out of every month dedicated to printing SEE PRINT IS ALIVE | PAGE 20

Today, printers are diversified and can create a spectacular variety of printed materials.

“I think that people are starting to balance their marketing. You cannot exist just on your web page; you have to hit them from all sides.” DEREK ALLAN OWNER AND PRESIDENT, FOTOPRINT LTD.

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MARCH 2015

PRINT IS ALIVE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

newsletters for realtors, insurance agencies, financial advisors and non-profit groups. That number decreased in the last several years but lately it has been coming back up. “We’re seeing a resurgence,” he said. “I think that people are starting to balance their marketing. You cannot exist just on your web page; you have to hit them from all sides. And there are certain things that are hugely valuable with the physical touch. People generally don’t read their newsletters by PDF. They prefer a properly printed, well-designed newsletter in their hands.” He added that they also prefer a physical business card – nothing, he said, elicits as much attention or emotion as a business card. “Print will always be around,” he said. “When I talk to some young people, they have a tendency to believe that people just buy online. The best way for me to answer that is to show them a sample box of what we print in one week – when they see that box and they go through all the different stuff that we produce, they’re wide-eyed – hundreds of business cards, newsletters and marketing materials – everything from posters to booklets and reports. Print is still very alive and well.” Ten years ago, Brad McAuley, owner of Kwik Kopy Printing

Brad McAuley of KKP, assembling a sign, says that successful printing shops are offering diverse services (KKP) in Nanaimo, could not possibly have foreseen the state of the industry today. To predict what might happen in the next few years would require a crystal ball, he said. “T he printing industry has been str ugg l i ng for the last number of years; everybody is trying to find their own niche and certainly we’ve seen some sma l ler ones d isappea r. But some of those disappeared because they didn’t keep up. We’re still printing; we’re just doing it a little bit more efficiently.” However, he added that printing is not going away – far from it. He noted that Google, arguably the largest digital company today, regularly sends out

print postcards advertising its services. “We’re seeing people going back to print,” McAuley said. “I‘ve had clients come in and tell me that they get better response rates when something goes out in the mail.” It’s easy to hit delete in an inbox, he said, but a nicely produced newsletter, often merits a second or even a third look. Everybody still needs business cards and letterheads. Everybody also needs mailing services and design services – and that’s where print shops have stepped in. More and more printers are offering more services. In particular, print shops are taking on sign making. The two are an

excellent marriage, McAuley said. “We put a lot of investment earlier this year into large format. It’s a natu ra l for pri nt companies to offer that – we already have so much in place that it’s easy. We saw our sign business take off; people were asking us to do it more and more. I couldn’t have forecast what we did last year – we probably tripled what I expected.” He also noted that having professional designers on staff is another key to KKP’s success. More and more customers want and expect full services from their print company, including branding, design, printing, signage and mailing.

Sue R a nch ie, ow ner of CS Printmaster in Kelowna, agrees that a full offering of services is key to thriving in today’s printing business. CS Printmaster has been in operation for 30 years and Ranchie attributes its longevity and success to the fact that the shop has evolved with the times and meets every need including offset and digital printing. She also pointed out that offices and businesses of all kinds still have a great need for all the traditional printed products from letterheads to internal forms, folders and booklets. “T here is still a lot of work for us,” she said. “T hey said that the of f ice was goi ng to become paperless – I haven’t seen it.” She added that the printing industry is focusing more on service and specialty products. “People may be seeing a lot of shops folding up, but that’s if they haven’t brought their shop up to what’s happening with full colour. You have to be able to offer digital as well as offset – that’s what has kept us going.” As a matter of fact, she said that her customer base has been growing. New businesses still need all the traditional office papers and forms. She said that she expects CS Printmaster to continue to thrive into the future. “There’s a lot of stuff that’s still going to be on paper,” she said. “There’s just no question about it.”


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MARCH 2015

BRITECH HVAC: SOLID RELATIONSHIPS KEY TO COMPANY’S SUCCESS SPOTLIGHT

Okanagan firm’s results demonstrates the power of partnerships

K

ELOW NA – Great relationships often determine industry success. That’s what Blaine Carver and Blaine Michaud of Britech HVAC Ltd. know from a close working alliance that is focused on return business. Founding Partner Blaine Carver started the company in Penticton in 2005. Now based in Kelowna, the company also has technicians in Penticton, Vernon and Kamloops. “The HVAC industry in the Okanagan is very competitive. Especially when the market is busy, you may see increasing competition, but these businesses sometimes take a shorter term approach,â€? says owning partner Blaine Michaud. “The key to overcoming these problems in our market is again, relationships‌.not only with the customers but with fellow businesses. We try to help each other out.â€? The two Blaines met in 2004 working together as employees, which laid the groundwork for a partnership. “It was not planned by any means. We met at another company here in the Valley and all the pieces sort of fell together later down the road,â€? Michaud recalls. “The best thing is synergy. Having the same goals and ideals, we formed an alliance where we are honest in our approach to business.â€? Following in their father’s footsteps, Carver and Michaud found entrepreneurship via the trades to be second nature. “Blaine Carver’s trade background started in the pulp mill industry in Mackenzie. His father is an electrician who was well respected in the pulp mill industry. He contributed a lot to Blaine’s start in the refrigeration trade,â€? says Michaud.

“In the HVAC service industry we are continually called to provide critical thinking skills under pressure. People are saying ‘our system is broken down, and can you get it running? Oh and please do it quickly!� BLAINE MICHAUD OWNING PARTNER, BRITECH LTD.

The team at Britech has a close working relationship, which fosters excellence

“I joined the company in 2007 as an employee and bought into the company a year later. As a young teenager I worked with my father who owned an electrical contracting business in Dawson Creek. Again, he was well respected and he influenced my decision to pursue a career in the trades.� Michaud attended college for a year before it became clear that the trades would be where he started his working career. “After receiving my electrical Red Seal in 1997, there were stops in BC, Alberta and South America in the mining and oil and gas industries,� he recalls. “I was always ending up back in the Okanagan. This is where I really wanted to do business, in a strong market with challenges we felt we could tackle.� The technical nature of the HVAC industry increases the need for strong working relationships and free exchange of information, according to Michaud. “We find that the HVAC industry is always evolving. It is a la rgely tech n ica l sector with many committed people, none more important than the

&

A SSOCIATES I NC.

distributors that we partner with. They are some of the most highly educated people in the industry,� he says. “We enjoy the people. It is an exciting industry to be a part of especially when you can solve a problem that someone is having either in their own home, large office building or operating plant.� Britech serves the residential, commercial and industrial sectors of the HVAC industry “In the Okanagan our main focus is residential and commercial. We have industrial clients in the area but typically serve the mining and manufacturing market from BC to Manitoba,� says Michaud. “In the HVAC service industry we are continually called to provide critical thinking skills under pressure. People are saying ‘our system is broken down, and can you get it running? Oh and please do it quickly!’ We embrace that challenge.� Quality service from an established company adds value in the form of customer protection. “The customer is always the victim when a discount job is done poorly and the contractor disappears once issues arise. The key is again how we build relationships. Customers know we will always be around to help them,� Michaud states.

“We ca n suppor t a project and provide top of the market work. Recently a customer said we were not the cheapest, but they decided to go with us due to the positive initial consultation experience. The relationship building approach at Britech defines the company. “We have an excellent team of people working for us who we want to retain. Our view is that employees are working with us and not for us.� “We did some restructuring a couple of years ago which allowed us the owners to change ours roles within the business.

PROUD TO BE A SUPPLIER TO BRITECH

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We continually look for ways to maximize our effectiveness.� Giving back to the community is important to Britech as a further aspect of the relationship building priority. “We like to advertise in the community and focus on playing an active role with our community. We are involved in local sports tournaments and teams,� concludes Michaud. “We sponsor scholarships and work with local habitat for humanity initiatives. We want to be here in business for a long time.� Britech HVAC Ltd. is at #1, 2550 Acland Road in Kelowna www.britechhvac.com

Britech HVAC thanks our clients and partners for your incredible support over the years. Kelowna: (250) 765-4446 Vernon: (250) 260-1660 Penticton: (250) 490-1080 Kamloops: (778) 470-4822

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22

MARCH 2015

WEST VALLEY CONSTRUCTION MARKS 40TH YEAR IN BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

A company that works, lives and plays in their community

K

ELOWNA – Construction runs in the family with the LeGuillouxs. Father and son team Rob and Cory LeGuilloux own and operate West Valley Construction, and business is booming. West Valley Construction’s busi ness is i n custom home building, over the years they have managed to build up a significant portfolio. Rob joined his father’s business in 1975. “We came to Kelowna for a family holiday and fell in love with the Valley. It was an easy decision to join the family business,” Rob says. From that point, West Valley had assembled a small crew, building spec homes and specializing in the custom home business, where a lot of their current work comes from. T he company has managed to be pretty versatile over the years, working on renovations, commercial and industrial projects. Their experience includes pump house projects and sewage systems, where they specialize in concrete work. West Valley currently maintains lasting relationships with companies like Colliers International and Ledcor, where they have been called in for work in renovations, repair, concrete and carpentry. Getting the company to where it is today hasn’t been easy, but from Rob’s perspective their success has been contingent on consistency, quality, fair pricing and on-time delivery. Rob has over 40 years of exper ience i n const r uct ion “I went from being a pilot to joining my dad in the family business and learning all aspects of building and construction. P rog re s s i n g t h ro u g h t ho s e events to becoming a building contractor is a big part of what

Pictured from left, father and son Cory and Rob LeGuilloux

“I went from being a pilot to joining my dad in the family business and learning all aspects of building and construction.”

One of West Valley Construction’s recently completed custom home projects


VERNON

MARCH 2015

23

OKANAGAN SPIRITS EXPANDS INTO NEW DISTILLERY

VERNON DAN ROGERS

T

The interior of one of West Valley’s recently completed homes has allowed our company to get through some of the tough economic times that have hit.” West Valley has now brought Rob’s son Cory into the fold with the possibility of Cory’s son joining the business. W h i le g row i ng up i n t he family business Rob’s son Cory developed a passion for carpentry and joined West Valley 10 years ago. Cory is a journeyman carpenter and the construction foreman. In his spare time he builds unique custom furniture milled from raw logs. Currently, the company has a number of projects on the go. Among others, they are in the process of renovating an administration building for the Diocese of Nelson church. Their work on that building has led them to other projects for non-profit organizations. “We often have clients that call back a second or third time, they like our work and they like our pricing,” Rob notes. West Valley’s reputation has g iven t hem t he pr iv i lege of keeping a lot of their business local; “we don’t stray far from the Kelowna area because of our desire to service existing local customers”. L i k e s m a l l-m e d i u m s i z e d construction companies, their model relies a lot on word of mout h a nd reputat ion. Rob

hinted that this is where things start to get challenging, as general contracting requires reliance on the quality and delivery of sub-trades. “We h ave acqu i red a sol id s u b-t ra d e s y s te m t h a t h a s evolved over many years. Some are better and more efficient for smaller jobs and some are needed for more complex projects,” Rob says. Over the years West Valley has found solace in their ability to first provide square and thorough concrete and carpentry work for their sub-trades. Rob stressed the healthy and fun relationships they have with their long-standing suppliers, which dates back to the company’s conception 40 years ago. “ We h a ve b u i lt u p s t ro n g relationsh ips w ith loca l designers, architects and engineers, a nd have tr usti ng a nd healthy working relationships w it h I n spect ion a nd Sa fety Authorities”. T he K elow n a-ba se d c ompany’s presence in the community often carries over into a volunteering capacity. “We work, live and play in our community and try to give back in volunteering in service work and minor sports coaching to pass on our knowledge to the next generation,” Rob said. This year marks West Valley’s

40th year in business, a landmark that is seldom reached by companies, let alone in the competitive construction industry. Rob made it clear that their years of success are a result of hard work, fair pricing, honesty and building an efficient team. Rob’s belief is that West Va l ley Constr uction’s competence, work ethic and dedication will consistently result in customer satisfaction. More i n formation on West Va l ley Con st r uct ion ca n be found on their website at westvalleyconstruction.ca.

PROUD TO BE PARTNERS IN YOUR SUCCESS! Proud to meet the needs of Okanagan contractors. Congratulations Rob on 40+ years and still going strong!

Well done West Valley Construction, it's been great working with you!

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Kelowna, BC

here appears to be no slowing down for Okanagan Spirits i n Vernon. T he company won the Business of the Year award at the 2014 Business Excellence Awards hosted by the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and since then has been pushing forward on major expansion plans. Okanagan Spirits is excited about their new 16,000 square feet distillery in Vernon and so they should be after making a $3 million investment. Some of the key features will be a new 2000 and 1500 copper pots accompanied by a 24 foot high 50 plate distillation system (there are only a few of these in North America). The company also has reclaimed post and beams from the Vernon Fruit Union packing house and will showcase those beams in the theatre room and new tasting bar. Okanagan Spirits is Western Canada’s oldest craft distillery spanning over a decade in the production of award-winning B.C. spirits. Internationally acclaimed as North America’s only designated World Class Distillery, their portfolio includes a range of spirits from Vodka and Gin to Liqueurs and Brandies. Congratulations and kudos to the Vernon Winter Carnival Society who successfully hosted their 55th Annual Winter Carnival this past month. It is a remarkable achievement to have western Canada’s largest winter festival hosted right here in the Okanagan. The Winter Carnival continues to impress with its creativity each year and the more than eight months worth of preparation was well appreciated by thousands who took in some of the activities. S p e a k i n g a b o ut m u s t-s e e events, the Okanagan Military Tattoo is set to return to Vernon this July. Last year was a breakout year for the group of volunteers that are coordinating the event. What’s a tattoo you ask? A musical tattoo is a demonstration of military drumming, piping and skills. With 200 musicians, a 100 voice Tattoo Choir and various related competitions and demonstrations, the Okanagan Military Tattoo 2015 is shaping up to be a good one! Tickets for the event are now available through

Okanagan Spirits is Western Canada’s oldest craft distillery spanning over a decade in the production of awardwinning B.C. spirits. Internationally acclaimed as North America’s only designated World Class Distillery.

the organization’s website (okanagantattoo.ca). The final countdown is underway for the Chamber’s Annual Business Excellence Awards presented this year by Valley First and Kelowna International Airport (YLW). There were a record number of nominations in the eleven different categories and the judges had their work cut out for them as many of the nominees excelled locally and globally in 2014. We’ll have a complete list of the winners in our next column. Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce is looking to fill a seat on the board following the resignation of long-time director Ingrid Dilschneider, director of business development at Predator Ridge. The former chamber president has served on the board for a number of years but has had to step back to manager her increasing workload. “We want to thank Ingrid for her tireless efforts,” says Jaron Chasca, GVCC president. “Her energy and experience will be tough to replace but we know we can lean on her as issues arise as she is a true chamber champion.” Finally we want to welcome our newest members, Durning Directions and Services Ltd., Lakeside Printing, Ricoh Canada Inc., RealBenefits4U, T. Langner Bookkeeping, Rellish Transport Services, Home to the end Society, ChooseRightShoes Marketing, Soul Studio, and The Castle at Swan Lake by Pomeroy. Dan Rogers is the General Manager at the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and can be reached at manager@vernonchamber.ca


24

MARCH 2015

MS BUDD CONSTRUCTION NAMED RENOVATOR OF THE YEAR SPOTLIGHT

Company inspires trust in customers

L

A K E COU N T RY - For a first-time entrant in the Tommie awards, MS Budd Construction Ltd. has done very well indeed. The company received the coveted Renovator of the Year award as well as receiv i ng a gold Tom m ie for kitchen renovation under $65,000. Having entered in four categories, the company also garnered four silver awards: ■ Kitchen renovation under $65,000 ■ Renovat ion $75,000 - $150,000 ■ Renovation over $300,000 ■ Outdoor living space Company president Mike Budd said that the kitchen renovation is exactly the sort of project he loves doing. “It underwent such a transformation,” he said. “It was a typical bungalow style with a wall between the living room and kitchen, and the kitchen was sepa rated i nto a d i n i ng area and a nook; it had all these broken up l itt le spaces.” I n other words, it was the kind of challenge Budd likes best. He turned the cramped areas into one expansive open space. A f ter open i ng up t he room, he ref i n ished the ha rdwood floors, installed new cabinets and LED lighting and updated all the details to turn that once cramped interior into a modern house that works. “T h at’s one of my favou rite th ings to do – tra nsform spaces,” Budd sa id. “One of the things I’m really good at is helping people dream – helping them to take a space that they don’t k now what to do w ith and help them come up with someth i ng that ma kes a big difference in the function of their space.” The renovation under $150,000 turned a craftsman

“One of the things I’m really good at is helping people dream – helping them to take a space that they don’t know what to do with and help them come up with something that makes a big difference in the function of their space.” MIKE BUDD PRESIDENT, MS BUDD CONSTRUCTION LTD.

After, the yard is a big outdoor living space

style home w it h ver y sm a l l rooms into an airy space that better fits the fa m i ly’s l i fes t yle. T he awk wa rd d e si g n had a powder room right off the end of the kitchen island a nd a lau nd ry room tig ht to the kitchen as well. It also had severa l supporti ng colu m ns that broke up the space. B u d d o p e n e d u p t h e c e i lings and installed engineered beams that eliminated all but one of the columns. He moved the powder room and laundry, creating a big kitchen and dining area that made traffic flow easily. The renovation over $300,000 was extensive. The couple had bought a Tuscany style house w ith a pool on a beaut i f u l st reet. A nd wh i le they loved the location, the home didn’t suit their style. T hey fou nd it d a rk a nd to o rustic. “T he house just wasn’t

Before, the yard had a small patio Okanagan Hardwood Flooring

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25

MARCH 2015

The new kitchen is modern, bright and spacious them,” Budd said. “We basically reworked the whole house and started over.” Budd and his team turned the house into a West Coast style residence with an abundance of light and a wash of pale colours. T hey created ex tra bed rooms a nd bathrooms in the downstairs and opened up the main floor space. “We desig ned the house to suit their lifestyle,” Budd said. T he outdoor l iv i ng a rea i s at t a c he d to t he renovat ion under $150,000. T he owners had challenges with the yard, which had no secure space for a child. MS Budd Construction changed all that, taking a sma l l back porch a nd ya rd and completely transforming it by adding a pool and a large concrete patio with a kitchen wall that completely opens to create an enormous seasonal living space.

The kitchen was small and awkward before Budd said that he likes not h i n g b et ter t h a n se ei n g the happy faces of customers when the job is done – and he has been creating those smiles

for many years. He started his company 30 years ago while he was still living in Ontario. He began by building custom f u r n itu re. W hen customers

asked him to build kitchen cabinets for them that was an easy transition. T hen, when they mentioned that they were also going to renovate the kitchen, Budd asked, “Who is going to do that work for you?” When t h e y s a i d t h e y d i d n’t h a v e anyone in mind, he said that he could also do that. And so his career as a renovator was launched. In 1990 he moved to Kelowna and brought his considerable sk i l ls to bea r on la rge commercial projects before moving to Revelstoke to manage a woodworking business. T he entire time, in those days, he was teaching himself more and more. “When we were first married I’d sit down and read building code books,” he said. “And I’d read construction books and I asked a lot of questions. It was a passion of mine to build things

and I still love doing it.” I n 2000, he moved back to Kelowna and started his own renovat ion bu si ness a ga i n, largely inspired by his daughter, Katie, who asked him to teach her how to build. His son, Steve a lso ca me to work for him and for a number of years, they worked as a close family team. Along with working on his renovation projects, Budd is also a certified inspector for the Architectural Woodwork Manufacturer’s Association of Canada (AWMAC). Budd said that he still puts as much care into his work as when he first started. “I’m going to give you really good value for your money. I put a wealth of experience and knowledge into your project and I love a challenge. The more complicated a project is, the better we a re at completi ng it.” He added that one of his strengths is working with designers and bringing a practical approach to that aspect of the project. “I’m really confident that we ca n ha nd le a ny project,” he said. “You’ll feel that when you talk to me about your project. You’re going to know that I can do it.” With three large renovations currently underway or about to get started, Budd said he is doing exactly what he wants to do. “I want to specialize in larger renovations,” he said. “I find that they’re a lot more enjoyable and they use my skills better. It takes just as much work to run a small project as a big one. It’s all the same steps. We’re really good at those bigger challenges – those are our strong point.” He pointed out that he takes a different approach to renovations. His silver Tommies are proof that he does excellent quality work and that he stands behind the work he does. “My customers trust me,” he said. “”Customers tell us that the reason we got the job is because they trusted us, right from the start.” And that trust, he said, is never misplaced. MS Budd Construction Ltd. is at 13425 Talbot Road in Lake Country. www.msbudd.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

26

MARCH 2015

Women in business face unique challenges

A

fter working as a journalist for 15 years, Natalie Appleton decided to begin writing the next chapter of her story. A fter taking the Community Futures Self Employment Program in 2012, she learned to form a business plan and other business basics. Most importantly, she formed strategic relationships that gave her the confidence and connections she needed to strike out on her own. Based in Vernon, she launched Read Head Copywriting where she offers an array of services

from blog w riting, press releases to web content. “I was s u r pr i sed at t he s uccess of t he b u s i ne ss. Ever y mont h I got busier and busier,� said Appleton. She descr i b es hersel f a s a ‘brand journalist’ and has received the accolades of businesses as international as Kal T ire and as close to home as Vero Health Naturopathic Care and Okanagan College. She also manages clients in Ottawa. A key to her success was forming strategic relationships early on, especia l ly worki ng w ith

Caroline Radics, CHS

Independent Insurance Agent & Mutual Fund representative Chamber of Commerce, small business and professional nominee for the 2015 business awards

(250) 558-2943

complementary businesses and contractors. Transitioning to successful businesswoman with toddlers is the next chapter in her story. She describes the adjustments of feeling spread too thinly, a messy house and staying focused. There is “always something�, Natalie comments, but adds she enjoys the satisfaction of feeling in charge of her own career. The Women’s Enterprise Centre in Kelowna has been helping women succeed in business for 18 years. Funded primarily by the federal government, the non-profit organization assists women entrepreneurs who are just starting out as well as those who want to expand their businesses. CEO Laurel Douglas notes that the government established the organization because it recognized that women face challenges that men generally do not. “We do resea rch every few years to validate whether that’s true or not,� she said. “If we managed to change society so that it wouldn’t be true anymore, we wouldn’t need to be here. And we’re actually working towards the day when we don’t need to be here and we can just be an entrepreneurship centre that helps all small

Natalie Appleton of Read Head Copywriting business owners.� What makes women in business succeed? Douglas says it’s not very different from what ma kes men do wel l. Women need to believe in themselves, be optimistic, have good problem solving skills, good networking skills and functional knowledge – the latter is where the Women’s Enterprise Centre comes in. Douglas also points out that women tend to measure success differently than men. Men see money as a top

achievement indicator. Women care about flexibility and balancing their personal and professional lives. Douglas says that if women want to do well, then in addition to personal attributes, they need to have a good business idea and focus on their market research. “And one of the things that women do consistently – which is a problem for them – is that they undercapitalize their businesses. So they may not feel as confident as they should. We work a lot in that area because women actua l ly have a very high loan repayment rate.� For women in business in the Okanagan, the BC Women Lead will be holding a Big Steps, Big Vision conference being held March 26-27 in Kelowna at the Four Points Sheraton. “We’re really excited about this year’s l i n e-u p o f s p e a k e r s ,� s a i d founder Deb Leroux. “We have a few favourite’s returning from l a st yea r a nd new t h i s yea r we have a brand expert from Mountain Equipment Co-op and a financial expert. We will be asking the women to come prepared to take steps out of their comfort zone.� Last yea r’s i naug u ra l yea r for BCW L was a tremendous SEE WOMEN IN BUSINESS | PAGE 27

Call or your free financial review. *Mutual funds provided through Investia Financial Services Inc. Insurance products and other related services provided by Caroline Radics, CHS.

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KAMLOOPS

MARCH 2015

27

ROI MEDIA WORKS JOINS THE HOOTSUITE SOLUTION PARTNER PROGRAM “Clients can also take advantage of Hootsuite’s ability to invite multiple collaborators to access and manage social profiles securely�

KAMLOOPS DEB MCLELLAND

R

OI Media Works joins the Hootsuite Solution Partner Program and now offers Hootsuite’s social relationship platform for businesses and organizations to collaboratively manage social marketing, social customer service, and social selling. Hootsuite is used by over 744 of the Fortune 1000 companies, including global brands like NHL, Sony Music Entertainment, Adidas, eBay, AstraZeneca

WOMEN IN BUSINESS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

success with a full venue of attendees from all over the Okanagan. “The Buzz in the room at the end of the day was electric. The level of honesty and professional integrity that each woman brought to the event, was inspiring in and of itself. Great ideas were exchanged and new business alliances formed. We hope to build upon that.� Why have an event for women only? Leroux said, “We function, th i n k a nd excel i n ou r work in significantly different ways than men do. It’s not a ‘boys out’ club. I admire and work with a lot of really talented men and have a lot of really wonderful men in my work and personal life. Women take up i n formation, process it a nd manifest it in different ways. The temperature of the event is designed specially to make that magic happen.� Her advice to young women enteri ng the workforce is to ask questions and to believe in themselves. “I wou ld adv ise her to believe in herself, perhaps more than others around her will. She’s got to have a really fierce drive to succeed. T hat’s going to carry her farther than a certificate or a bank loan signature. It’s not going to go well all the time and it’s not going to go the way you think it will. Your business plan is a living object and it will morph and change before your eyes. If you listen carefully, your client will tell you who you are and what they need from you – and that’s the most important person to be listening to.�

US, Orange, Australia Post and more. With advanced tools and services available for security, collaboration, engagement and analytic measurement of social media strategy, Hootsuite is built to bring brands top social Return on Investment. ROI Media Works’ clients benefit with the ability to launch social media strategies, identify and grow new audiences, and distribute targeted messages through Hootsuite’s dashboard. This makes it easy to streamline team workflow by scheduling messages, use assignment tools, and reach new audiences with

geo-targeting functionality. Clients can also take advantage of Hootsuite’s ability to invite multiple collaborators to access and manage social profiles securely, as well as build custom reports using Hootsuite’s comprehensive social analytics tools for measurement. Hootsuite is a Certified Preferred Partner with Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+ Pages. In addition, users have the ability to access over 70 social networks and integrations offered through the Hootsuite App Directory, including Salesforce, Zendesk, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, and more. Healing begins with you! Owner Tracy Munson of Insight Natural healing is passionate about helping others heal themselves through achieving deep relaxation, reducing stress and anxiety, finding balance, and healing from within. While she is passionate about alternative healing and believes in the body’s natural self-healing abilities, she does not diagnose, prescribe, or change any medications. Tracy has been trained to sense the body, detect what may be out of balance

Get Social with Rocky Mountaineer! Come tour the trains and network with fellow members! Join us at Rocky Mountaineer for our March Social! ■ Wed nesd ay Ma rch 4 | 5:00PM-7:00PM ■ Rocky Mountaineer | 525 CN Road ■ FREE Members | $10 Future Members AGM’s don’t have to be boring! Annual General Meeting & Policy Session Let your voice be heard at t he K a m loops Ch a mb er of

Commerce 2015 Annual General Meeting AND hear from Naomi Yamamoto, Minister of State, Tourism & Small Business. AGM Proudly sponsored by KPMG. â– Thursday March 12 | Plaza Hotel â–  3:30 PM | Policy Session | Free to attend â–  5:00 PM | AGM | $65+tax Members | $85+tax Non Members Call the chamber today to register! 250.372.7722

and what may need attention. Her intention is to assist others to the best of her ability through natural healing methods. She will work with you to assist in finding the most effective natural healing plan for you on your journey to improved health and wellbeing. As a Natural Health Practitioner, Tracy has a variety of treatment options available. Aromatherapy,

Massage: Lymph Drainage, Swedish, Hot Stone, AromaTouch, Intuitive, & Chair, Ref lexology, Chakra Balance, Reiki, & Iridology. Deb McClelland is the executive director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached by email at deb@kamloopschamber.ca

Cooperative diversifies into development

I

nnovation and a mission focused on building a strong, healthy community have enabled the Kootenay Co-Operative to achieve the growth and success it has over its near forty-year history. Programs like the True Local initiative, and its support of regional, provincial and national organizations such as the Kootenay Local Agriculture Society, Food Secure Canada and the BC Food Systems Network, have enabled the co-op to progress to new challenges not typically tackled by businesses of its kind. Their consistent growth is also a reflection of community investment in the Co-op, including financial support from communitybased organizations like Community Futures, local credit unions and hundreds of its member owners (via member loans) This spring, the Kootenay Co-Op begins construction on its new location, which will be complimented by a mixed-use development titled Nelson Commons. In addition to the new retail space for cooperative shoppers, there will be fifty-four units of residential space, additional commercial units for local businesses, indoor and outdoor parking and public green space. The expanded retail outlet will feature a deli and cafÊ with indoor seating, additional cash lanes, wider aisles, an in-store teaching kitchen and an outdoor seating area. Property for the much-needed expansion was purchased in June 2013, at the east end of Nelson’s downtown core, and after deliberation as to how to proceed with the land, the decision was made to demolish the existing building. During November of last year the project began with the removal of hazardous material, with building demolition taking place during the

Rendering of Nelson Commons early winter months. Last month soil remediation and excavation was initiated, and continues as developer ITC Construction Group prepares to begin construction in the coming months, with completion and occupancy taking place sometime during the summer of 2016. The development will also have its own affordable housing focus, with three units made available at twenty-five per cent below market value to buyers who meet a certain financial criteria. Local professionals will also be involved in the project, with Steven Kaup of Studio 9 Architecture + Planning, David Dobie of David Dobie Design, Ron Little, CA, David Fisher of New Leaf

Landscaping, Spearhead Timberworks, Mark Harold (Rocky Point Engineering), Peter Ward (Civil Engineering) and a host of City of

Nelson professionals. For more information, please visit either kootenay.coop or nelsoncommons.ca.

Coming next month:

AGRICULTURE & AQUACULTURE Community in Focus: Summerland Toll free:1-866-758-2684 ext 12

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

28

MARCH 2015

Mountain Planning Group Inc. has moved its business to Rutland, and will now be located at 203-145 Asher Road.

KAMLOOPS

White Kennedy LLP has appointed Aaron Dodsworth and Jodi Hansen as its newest partners.

KamloopsBCNow, a local market digital media website platform, has been launched under the ownership of Rob Cupello and Kristen Rodrigue.

Michelle Nice is the new human resources manager for School District 23, while Michelle DesRochers is its new executive assistant to the assistant superintendent.

The Central Interior Canadian Home Builders’ Association is celebrating its 50th anniversary. No Limits Fitness, located at 9058th Street, is celebrating its second anniversary. Rivershore Ram congratulated Don Hays on achieving top sales for the month of January.

SALMON ARM Jeff Stacer of ReMax Shuswap Realty has been named the 2014 recipient of the REALTORS Care Award for the Shuswap Zone of the Okanagan Mainline Real Estate Board.

VERNON NAI Commercial of Vancouver has sold the Rise Golf Club in Vernon. The 18-hole, 144.5-acre golf course was bought through a court-ordered sale by Alberta investors. The foreclosed golf course was sold on behalf of the Business Development Bank of Canada. Jim Larsen is the new manager at Vernon’s London Drugs.

KELOWNA Kelowna chartered accountant George Mason, CPA, FCA, has been honoured with a fellowship by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia. The fellowship designation is awarded to chartered accountants for their contributions to the community and service to the profession. Quincy Vrecko & Associates has announced that it has formed a partnership with award winning ReMax Kelowna realtor, Chris Ward. The Canadian Revenue Agency has announced that businessman Gary Andrew Callaghan pleaded guilty in Kelowna Provincial Court on February 18, 2015 to three counts of failing to comply with court orders to file his 2007 to 2009 personal income tax returns and the 2006 to 2009 corporate income tax returns for both Antrim Homes Ltd. and Taynton Developments Inc. Callaghan has been fined $3,000, payable by December 31, 2015, and given a 21 day intermittent jail sentence.

Okanagan Cosmetology Institute celebrated its 6th anniversary on Feb. 28. Kelowna’s Float Space received the Best Emerging Entrepreneur Award at the 2015 Small Business BC Awards. W+A Bistro, owned and operated by Marni Manegre, has opened at 315 Lawrence Avenue. Dr. Dale Forsythe, of Forsythe Chiropractic & Laser Therapy, has moved his office in preparation for construction of a new four-storey building with ground floor commercial and three floors of UBCO/ OK College student housing for up to 84 students. MCC Thrift Store has moved to a new location at 153 Rutland Road South. The partners of Crowe MacKay LLP have announced additional partnerships to their firm effective Jan. 1. The Kelowna admissions include Mike Crowley to incorporated principal, and Nick Moffatt as an associate partner. After 42 years with Kelowna’s Scotiabank, Diane Feist, manager of the Lakeshore Centre branch, has retired.

The Greater Westside Board of Trade has a new executive for 2015: Norm LeCavalier, Chris Cruz, Noreen Redman, Gary Schlenker and Marek Buryska. The board directors at large are Jesse Bernhardt, Aaron Dodsworth, Holly Plante, Bill Raine, Elfriede Schmoll, Gene Stafford and Mickey Werstuik. Granite Transformations for Kitchen and Baths has welcomed Tami Weller as its new branch manager, and Lori Patterson as its new design consultant. Wok Box Fresh Asian Kitchen is now open at 2300 Baron Road. The Best Western Kelowna Hotel has welcomed the additions of two new restaurants to its premises: The Italian Table and Fleetwood Public House. Fred Steele from Kelowna will be returning as the B.C. Fruit Growers Association president after being re-elected at the 126th annual BCFGA convention. West Kelowna council has approved a plan to reduce development cost charges in Westbank Town Centre in a bid to kick start development there. The former location of The Keg restaurant in downtown Kelowna has been transformed into a the Black Bear Bar &

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

MARCH 2015

29

Grill, at 1580 Water Street. Chef Sean Hansen has relocated from the Delta Sun Peaks to join the Black Bear team.

Summerland Waterfront Resort has launched its newly refreshed website, www.summerlandresorthotel.com

Karin Milton is the new owner of Chef’s Edge at 2445 Highway 97 N.

Diane Owens of Beauty & the Brit has launched a new website for her business to go with her expanded premises on Victoria Street. www.beautyandthebrit.ca

The Central Okanagan Heritage Society has a new board of directors for the 2015 term. Members include: Don Knox, Cheryl Spelliscy, Birte Decloux, Judy Funnell, Dave Ellior, Ken Kitura, Wilma Schellenberger, Shona Harrison and John Pendray. Sandra Appleby and Darla-Rae Jenic have started U Pose Photobooth Okanagan. UBC history professor Doug Owram is chairing a national committee that is making a concentrated effort to keep up with the digital revolution. The Okanagan College Students’ Union has pledged $100,000 towards the Bright Horizons, Building for Skills fundraising campaign that supports the renovation and expansion of the trades training complex at Okanagan College. The Central Okanagan Board of Education has confirmed the appointment of Vianne Kintzinger as the school district’s new director of instruction for kindergarten to Grade 12. Gayanne Pacholzuk received top honours in the Emergency Services category of the Community Leaders Awards because of lifetime public service. Mar Jok Elementary school opened its doors in west Kelowna. Professor Wisdom Tettey, an internationally acclaimed scholar with extensive academic leadership experience, has been appointed Dean of the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences at the University of BC, Okanagan. Kelowna is the fastest growing city in BC according to Statistics Canada, and one of the fastest growing regions in the country. Interior Health has announced the appointment of Diane Jules and Deborah Cannon to its board of directors. After 21 seasons at the helm of the varsity women’s basketball program at UBC Okanagan, Heather Semeniuk has retired from her position. Serge Dosanj has opened Plates Restaurant in Kettle Valley. Lorraine Richardson is the new branch manager at Valley First Credit Union on Highway 33 in Rutland. Loic Jacquet is the new food and beverage manager at the Shannon Lake Golf Club restaurant. Lifemark Health Centre at 104-1634 Harvey Avenue has welcomed James Wheeler as its new registered massage therapist. With 14 years of experience in corporate and personal tax planning, Brian Posthumus has joined MNP LLP as its new regional tax leader for the Okanagan region. Trinity Baptist on Springfield Road, Kelowna’s biggest church, has announced plans to build a $6-million, 29,000-square foot addition to its 105,000-square-foot complex. The District of West Kelowna has announced that Jason Brolund will replace retiring Wayne Schnitzler as its new fire chief. Flight Centre Mission Park, located at 10-3151 Lakeshore Road in the Mission Park Shopping Centre.

Jubilee Fitness Club is giving their services a new platform with their new website, launched last month. www. jubileefitnessclub.com The United Way has welcomed Marianne Dahl as its new marketing and events coodinator, and Bonnie Hall as its new community campaign coordinator. Beadiful Arts, owned and operated by Kristin Butler, has moved to a new location at 1191 Sutherland Avenue.

PENTICTON The Canadian Sport School Hockey League has announced that the 2015 CSSHL Championships will take place March 12-15 in Penticton. The Okanagan Hockey Academy and Global Spectrum Facility Management L.P. will jointly run the event. The first of three pods of precast concrete prison cells are in place at the $200 million Okanagan Correctional Centre near Oliver. The 378-cell, high-security facility being constructed on Osoyoos Indian Band land is proceeding on budget and on time for the 2016 fall completion date. The Penticton and Wine Country Chamber of Commerce announced the winners of its 28th annual Business Excellence Awards. Winners included: Brodo Kitchen for the New Business Award, Penticton Farmer’s Market for Agriculture and Agri Business Excellence, Chic Clothing Company for Home Based Business Excellence, Zep Okanagan for Industrial and Manufacturing Excellence, Pathways Addiction Resource Centre for Professional Service Excellence, Teas & Weaves for Retail Excellence, Grape Escapes Wine Tours for Hospitality/Tourism Excellence, LocoLanding Adventure Park for Family Friendly Business Excellence, White Kennedy Chartered Accountants for Workplace Culture Excellence, The Bench Market for Sustainability Excellence, Marketplace IGA for Community Support Excellence, Burger 55 for Business of the Year, Mark Melissen of Wildstone Group of Companies for Business Leader of the Year.

Similkameen Medical Foundation, and is already attracting attention from participants around the Okanagan. Jubliee Dental Centre has launched a new membership program designed for those without an employer-sponsored insurance program, to make regular dental care more affordable. Okanagan Crush Pad has received another accolade, this time for its environmentally friendly practices. They were recently recommended by the Province Newspaper as one of five sustainable wineries to visit this year. The Selwood family announced this week that they have sold the The Market, their fruit stand located on Jones Flat Road. The fruit stand’s new owners are planning to rebrand the business in time for the 2015 growing season. Giants Head Auto Repair has a new permanent location at 15803 Logie Road. It’s double the size of its previous shop on Main Street, and the company has added new services including welding, headlight restoration and headlight aiming. Chamber members will have the opportunity to check out the new shop when the Giants Head Auto team hosts Business after Business later this spring.

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The Okanagan Fest-of-Ale is heading into its 20th year in Penticton.

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The Cannery Brewing Company is preparing to shift operations to its new location at 198 Ellis Street, with hopes of being in the building by the end of March.

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In January, Therese Jamieson-Harvey opened The Crazy Cat Bistro opened on Main Street, offering breakfast and lunches. August 22 will mark the inaugural Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race. Organized by the Summerland Yacht Club, the event is a fundraiser for the South Okanagan

47

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Summerlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Okanagan Specialty Fruits announced last week that the non-browning ArcticÂŽ Apple has been deregulated in the USA. Ken Oleshuk has retired as the General Manager of the Summerland Golf and Country Club and the Club has welcomed Jason Sweeney as its new Golf Operations Manager.

 

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OPINION

30

MARCH 2015 A division of Invest Northwest Publishing Ltd. Thompson Okanagan Office #210-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 8C7 Toll free: 1.866.758.2684 Fax: 1.778.441.3373 Email: info@businessexaminer.ca Website: www.businessexaminer.ca

PUBLISHER/EDITOR | Lise MacDonald, lise@businessexaminer.ca SALES | Josh Higgins – josh@businessexaminer.ca, Joanne Iormetti – joanne@businessexaminer.ca WRITERS | Goody Niosi, Julia MacDonald, Christopher Stephens, Ezra MacDonald

CORPORATE WELFARE: RISKY, WASTEFUL AND AN AWFUL PRECEDENT The reason that real, sustainable jobs are created and continue to exist, is because they create a product or service that meets a need AARON WUDRICK

in the marketplace

F

or decades, governments in Canada have funneled billions of dollars into the coffers of private, for-profit bu si nesses. It’s h a rd to pi n down an exact figure for this largesse, so numerous are the programs and forms: “grants,” “loans,” “investments” and so on. Some of the familiar names i nc lu d e s u c h d ow nt ro d d e n businesses as Pratt & Whitney, Bombardier and General Motors. Many of these programs have continued, virtually unc h a n ge d , re g a rd l e s s of t h e stripe of government in power. Today, even governments that otherwise are at odds with each

other on virtually every other issue – take the federal and Ontario governments – will find that one point of agreement is that there’s essentially no business too big or too small unworthy of taxpayer money. We’re of ten told about the “private sector jobs created” as a result of these “investments.” No one seems to stop and ask some obvious questions. If the only reason these jobs exist is because a government is transferring public money to a company so that they hire people, in what way are these pr ivate sector jobs? How i s this different than the government just hiring more people directly? If these investments are so sound, why are no private investors ta k i ng up the offer? Surely the prospect for a sure thing would have a lot of takers. A nd if the investment isn’t sound, why is the government of Canada risking taxpayer dollars on it? If politicians want to gamble, they should go to a casino, and use their own money. They shouldn’t be doing it with public funds. We a re a lso often told that Canadian governments “must

compete in the global economy.” Every other government is funneling ta x dollars into their own “strategic” industries. So surely Canada has to do the same? Except we don’t. There is no compelling reason why Canada needs to be in the business, for example, of manufacturing of airplane engines. And if other countries want to subsidize the production of goods that Canadians can then buy, so much the better: t hen a l l Ca n ad i a n s ca n benefit from their foolishness. Meanwhile, with freed up capital and resources, savvy Canadian entrepreneurs can look for new opportunities in new fields. T he very idea that governments should always rush to t he rescue of bu si nesses i n the name of saving jobs turns basic economic principles on t hei r head. T he reason t hat real, sustainable jobs are created and continue to exist, is because they create a product or service that meets a need in the marketplace. If we are going to start ignoring this very basic fact, we may as well have the government “create jobs”

by paying individuals $50 an hour to dig holes and then fill them back up again, because the waste of economic resources is little different. Worst of all, government subsidies send exactly the wrong message to businesses: that the way to succeed isn’t to compete in the market and win by offering higher quality and lower prices, but to come begging to the government for help – and to use the threat of pulling out jobs as a way to blackmail nervous governments into handing over public dollars. Sadly, the precedent for this madness was set long ago. Politicians love the photo-op and ribbon cutting opportunities. Too many businesses love the free money. Only the tax-paying public loses. Aaron Wudrick is a Federal Director with the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MAKING A POSITIVE FIRST IMPRESSION I noted that business people are busy, and when we get an audience with them it’s their responsibility and their right to make MARK MACDONALD

F

irst impressions last a long, long time. In fact, they can be indelible and irreversible, from both a positive and negative standpoint. Fair or not, that’s often the way it is, particularly in business, so every effort possible should be made to put our best foot forward the first time we meet someone. The following example is one I have often used with younger people wanting to get into business, or enhance their success. Years ago, I had a salesman working for me who was, shall we say, trying to make a bit of a fashion statement with his “contemporary” apparel. Rather than

quick observations and assessments create an official company dress code on the spot, I decided to take another route. I explained to them the importance of making a first impression, and how quickly people will judge us on what they see at the beginning of a relationship, and not change their opinion, no matter what. One of the points I raised was the often-shared idea that most job interviews are over within the first 45 seconds. In that short amount of time, the interviewer

has assessed the interviewee based on their initial handshake, greeting, clothing, deportment and body language. The general assumption is, that if the interviewer isn’t immediately impressed, then the average person wouldn’t be either. Conversely, if the initial impression is positive, others will feel the same. I noted that business people are busy, and when we get an audience with them it’s their responsibility and their right to make quick observations and assessments. Things like how we look, what we wear, and how we shake hands - all things that typically take place in less than a minute could open doors, or close them instantly. The young man gently protested, arguing that this wasn’t fair, that it was surface, and that most people aren’t like that. I replied that it might be the case, that people are willing to wait and look below the surface, but that the first glance, to many, is reality. I suggested that they could try to change that all by themselves, or they could work with the way it is, and move it to

their advantage. Nex t, I suggested they put themselves in the shoes of a prospective client, most likely a successful business person who has been through the school of hard knocks to some degree. If they’ve been at it for a while, the owner or manager has, in a sense, “seen it all”. They’ve heard the pitches, know many of the angles. . .they’re seasoned. Their senses have been honed to make quick judgments when necessary, and that being the case, the sale could effectively be over before the pitch is even made. I left it at that. Within days, the wardrobe change was made, and became permanent. Really, it wasn’t anything different than what we taught our children. I drilled them all about the importance of a good, solid handshake. Not a bone crusher that makes the recipient squint in pain in need of an X-ray, but a solid, firm shake and a square-in-the-eye look at the person you’re greeting. I explained that it’s a statement of confidence in who you are, and warmness. Looking at a person eye to eye presents honesty. All

of these are very important first impressions. All of our kids have done this, and received numerous compliments - as have we - about their handshakes. After all, is there anything worse than the infamous “dead fish” handshake, where someone reaches out their hand, sort of, and limply places it in yours, with no feeling whatsoever? It’s not just the handshake and facial expressions that count. We’ve all heard about being “dressed for success”, and it’s still true. Years ago I had lunch with a good friend and mentor, on a Friday. He had his usual suit, crisp shirt and tie. “It’s Casual Friday. Why are you dressed up?,” I asked. “I don’t do Casual Friday,” he replied, adding: “I always want it to look like I’m ready to do business.” I’ve never forgotten his response, and have tried to emulate his business decorum, and of course, his success, since. Making a first impression like that has long-lasting, positive results, no matter what business we’re in.

SUBCRIPTIONS | $45 PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $80 FOR 2 YEARS (24 ISSUES), SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: WWW.BUSINESSTO.CA. DISTRIBUTION: FOURTH WEEK OF EACH MONTH VIA CANADA POST AD MAIL. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Produced and published in British Columbia. All contents copyright Business Examiner Thompson Okanagan, 2014. Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240


2014

SALES/GREEN SHEET

MARCH 2015

IS ATHE SALESPERSON’S FAILURE ETTING COURSE A SALES MANAGEMENT FAILURE? When personal visions

and goals are in alignment When hiring, even the

with team visions andhiring most sophisticated thecompany world, goalsprocess as wellinas

ALES SALES

N GLENNON

gauging the possible visions and goals, a success of a salesperson

powerful synergy is

is an inexact science

created

Y C

JOHN GLENNON

ou m ay not re a l i z e it but, as a sa an les we asleader, sales managers take credit foras our salesyou must often serve people’s success? vigator. You set the course How about their your sales team orfailures? for yourGather a group of sales managers and the artment. You set ainevitably course turns to conversation ourself.their Youpeople; help your theirstaff A performers, mbers set their courses B performers, and inC performers. within Which group do you think dually and the team demands most of their conversatex t. You a re consta ntly tion? Typically the answer is the gating. lowest You map out terriperformers.  ‘C’ performes, charters steps to test occupy use moretake, resources, conditions, others more correct worry time in the mind of a salesoff manager, may even have strayed courseand and be considered a personal o reach the destinations de- failure by the manager.  mined for you, inhiring, large,even by the ofsothe vision and the attainment When the most pany. phisticated hiring process inofthe the goals. e courseworld, the company takes Establish a plan of action to gauging the possible success of a salesperson is an inexact rgely determined by its viachieve the vision. It is posscience.  Lowering the risk factors , just as the course we take in sible to move “what is” closer to by using good assessment tools as individuals is determined “what could be” – but not alone and interview skills is critical.  ur personal vision. When and not without a plan. The last Success in the past is indicative onal visions and in goals are inbut there step in visioning is to establish a of success the future, are always a few unknowns that of action. Develop the goals nment with team visions and plan affect that.visions s as wellcan as company that give life and action to the Things like problems in their goals, apersonal powerful synergy vision. Here is where leader and life can affect their efeated throughout the comfollower are joined in their comfectiveness, and that’s something y. Part ofwe what you have the to the vision.  can’t foresee.  We do themitment best job we can, involving all the techer to do as a manager is to Think about how your personal nology and expertise k to shape your vision, theavailable vision and goals fit with the viand we try to get an 80% match at on of those on your staff and sion and goals of your company. best.  The rest has to be cultivated fit or a forced fit? The vision ofand the company in a Is it a good grown. is providing the support, the best is when your visionthen co-it that gives to the Themeaning job of the sales manager is fitwork, and responsibility, to help bethe the salesperson.  they alescesmust with company’sIfvis you work to their set.  people be successful. mentoring, side-step don’t sion. When youresponsibility, achieving your ow yourCoaching, company’s vision.training and supervising are all part of show initiative, refuse to comsion is different from goals goals helps the company achieve the management role, and on- ply to the accountability and key its goals, synergy isindicators, created. Immission.boarding It expresses a view is a time demanding performance there agine what would happen the what could be. The vision, process.  The job is made easier, is little the manager canifdo but measures vision institute of each corrective team member co-for sharingand in the theoutcomes vision, made can better, the willingness, opennessalesced and the company. with your vision for the ivate andbyinspire us to reach eagerness of the salesperson to So, is a salesperson’s failure, goals. Determine your com- team? What if their goals led to ‘get it’, how hard they are will- a failure of sales management? of back yourtogoals?  y’s visioning and shareand that vi-able attainment to work, how they It comes the IF.  Success with your This out to make arestaff. to adapt andcreates change.  The If re-you inwere sales to is aset team effort. There sponsibility lies on both shoulareall responsibilities for both the ntext in which company some or of your visions be– the manager to provide andgoals the sales mancome asalesperson reality, what would s make ders personal sense to resources, and build the skills ager. IF there are too many failloyees, the which in turn is a you set to get there, in the real of the salesperson and the sales- ures the breadcrumbs may lead erful motivating dynamic.  world? back ■ to the sales manager. person to implement. volve everyone bet ca n be Cont iwho nuedmight suppor Copyright 2014 Sandler Trainprovided by the sales manager ing and Insight Sales Consulting cted. A leader with a vision through Inc. All is rights the reserved. owner of ds to share that setting vision expectations, with John Glennon long-term learning and through Insight Sales Consulting Inc., yone who will be affected accountability. This is achieved the authorized Sandler Training . The navigator informs the through pre-call planning and John Glennon is the owner of Insight forConsulting the Interior of authorized B.C. w. The crew knows theteachable des- licensee debriefing calls, mo- Sales Inc, the ments, goal and creating Sandler Licensee for the tion. Members ofsetting the crew Reach him at Training toll-free 1-866-645a culture that develops business Interior of British Columbia. He can then empowered with the 2047 or jglennon@sandler.com. people in sales.  However some- be reached at jglennon@sandler. acity to share in the pursuit Visit www.glennon.sandler.com. times, ‘you can lead a horse to water …’.  If the sales manager

com, toll free at 1-866-645-2047 or visit www.glennon.sandler.com

SIMONE SUNDERLAND

GREEN SHEET BUILDING BRIEFS

31 PROJECT STATUS

Site work underway – excavation anticipated to start March/15 – construction completion anticipated summer/16 ARCHITECT Gibbs Gage Architects – 505 237 8 SIMONE SUNDERLAND Ave SE, Calgary T2G 5C3 403-2332000

lots – expansion of the marina to 55 GENERAL CONTRACTOR PROJECT slips – hot tub – pedestrian underConstruction & Engineer Inc New water treatmenttofacility Graham - the dispass from upper development – 101 184 trict is currently testing several meth-Adams Rd, Kelowna V1X beach area LOCATION 7R2 250-765-6662 ods including membrane technology LOCATION 1555 Versatile Dr – Cascades Casino PROJECT STATUS PROJECT STATUS 175 Kokanee Way - Ramada Hotel Rezoning application approval OWNER PROJECT TYPE anticipated shortly – subdivision Design underway - Tender call for Kennedy – 1800 1055 Bentall PROJECT TYPE commercial new application submission to minisGeneral Contractor anticipated Dunsmuir St, Vancouver V7X 1B1 commercial new try of transportation anticipatedcompletion PROJECT July/14 - construction New full service casino – approx March/15 – construction antici- 604-661-5000 PROJECT anticipated latestart 2015 LOCATION 60,000 sf total – 2,250 sm gaming pated spring/15 New Ramada Hotel in the Campbell CONSULTANT floor, 600 slot machines, 20 gaming 2241 Springfield Rd - Missio Creek industrial park - 4 storeys - OWNER tables – three 150 seat restaurants – Opus Dayton Knight 255 1715 Crossing Westside 3,780 sm - 80 rooms - restaurant - pool Blind Bay Resort – 2698 Blind Bay outdoor theatre – 376 parking stalls Dickson Ave, 9G6 250-868-4925 Bay V0E 1H1V1Y 250-675with waterslide - elevators - concreteRd, Blind PROJECT TYPE PROJECT STATUS LOCATION commercial new construction - roof articulation with 2595 OWNER Building permit- application approv-- 98 porte cochere asphalt shingles – The Kelowna District of Sicamous - 1214 505 Doyle Ave PROJECT al anticipated shortly – demolition surface parking stalls Riverside Ave, Sicamous V0ECommunity 2V0 Health and Services work underway – construction start New commercial urban lifest 250-836-2477 PROJECT Centre anticipatedSTATUS March/15 centre - 6 buildings - 2 to 7 s

KAMLOOPS KAMLOOPS

CENTRAL OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT

OLIVER

NORTH PROJECT MANAGER Construction start anticipated late OKANAGAN PROJECT TYPE - retail commercial at ground ARCHITECT 2014 MHPM - 550 555 W 12th Ave,multi-family new with office units above - und REGIONAL Kasian Architecture – 350 1555 W Vancouver V5Z 3X7 604-714-0988 parkade - 80 above ground s ARCHITECT Pender, Vancouver V6G 2T1 604DISTRICT PROJECT term parking stalls 683-4145 DF Architecture Inc - 1205 4871 Shell

VERNON

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Rd, Richmond V6X 3Z6 604-284-5194 LOCATION

Plainsman Construction Ltd – 710

3570 Mill St, Armstrong – Expansion of the Armstrong-Spallumcheen Fire 250-372-1544 Prism Ventures Inc - 3571 Barmond Hall LOCATION

DEVELOPER 175 2nd Ave, Kamloops V2C 5W1

Ave, Richmond V7E 1A4 604-338-4656

SICAMOUS

ARCHITECT PROJECT STATUS Development permit application Ekistics Town Planning - 192 St, Vancouver approval anticipated March/15 V5T 3C1 604-7 – construction DEVELOPER start anticipated spring/15 R366 Enterprises Ltd - 4870

To Be Determined - Ice Facility

PROJECT TYPE PROJECT TYPE institutional add/alter

OWNER

New townhouses – 2 storey’s –9 PROJECT STATUS units – approx Development 1,536 sf each – wood permit applica frame construction submitted

Prism Hotels and Resorts - 800 institutional add/alter 14800 Landmark Blvd, Dallas TexasPROJECT PROJECT LOCATION Expansion of the Armstrong75254 214-987-9300 PROJECT ADDRESS Spallumcheen Hall – for 2 storey’s New iceFire facility the Greater Kelowna V1W 4M3 250-764DESIGNER 675 Old Town Rd – Resort with a hose tower – concrete blockthe aging Vernon area to replace GENERAL CONTRACTOR Westhome Planners – 250-493Community – Old Town Bay with rain screen – block beam seats over - may Civic Arena - 4,000 be Lambert and Paul Constructi door openings – aluminum windows 0942 an addition to Kal Tire Place or the PROJECT TYPE – SBS roofing with insulation – 300 2000 Spall Rd, Kelowna mixed-use dev Priest Valley Arena or construction OWNER of including additional space for bays, 250-860-2331 LOCATION a newand ice washrooms, facility class- Sherdil Construction – RR1 Site 48 locker rooms PROJECT 451 St - SD 83 North OkanaPROJECT STATUS NewShuswap resort community – approx room and office and work areas Comp 5, Oliver V0H 1T0 250-498gan Shuswap Administration 1,100 units total – 3 SFD subdivi-Building Feasibility study and cost analysis 2216 PROJECT STATUS sions withTYPE 55, 100 and 65 SFD PROJECT study start anticipated shortly - the Construction anticipated lots – 2 multi family institutional new sites with 472 Vernon Advisory Committee May/15Greater – construction completion units – future 4.5 storey multi famanticipated early 2016 will decide in June whether or not to PROJECT ily site which may be developed hold a referendum in November/14 as condominiums or a building hotel – may New administration on the ARCHITECT to fund a new ice facility include beach club and fitness cen- smBernd Arch – Box 1438 - location, old JL Jackson school site - 2,640 - Hermanski LOCATION preliminary design and estimated restaurant, pub and retail 40 Alexander St NE, Salmon Arm 2tre, storeys - 75 parking stallsand Hwy 97 and 74 Ave – SE cost to be determined commercial space V1E 4P6 250-832-7400

SALMON ARM

OKANAGAN SIMILKAME OSOYOOS REGIONAL DISTRICT

PROJECT STATUS

Meadowlark Planned Community LOCATION OWNER MANAGER CONSTRUCTION PROJECT TYPE Vintage Boulevard, Okanaga Redesign of the project underway LibertyCity Contract Management – Ave, of Vernon - 1900Inc48th ARCHITECT Vintage Views 204 19292 60 Avenue, Surrey V3S mixed-use development Vernon V1T 5E6 250-545-1361 OWNER 3M2 604-534-3412 MQN Architects 100 3313 32 Ave, PROJECT TYPE Old Bay Town Developments – 675 PROJECT Vernon V1T 2E1Sicamous 250-542-1199 Old Town Road, V0E 2V0 OWNER subdivisions New master planned residential OWNER 250-836-4330 City of Armstrong – 3570 Bridge St, PROJECT community – will include small lot School District 83 - North OkanaganArmstrong V0E 1B0 250-546-3023 New subdivision single family homes with optional - 30 SFD lot Shuswap - 220 Shuswap St NE, laneway carriage homes, small lot PROJECT STATUS Salmon Arm V1E 4N2 250-832-2157 two family homes, row housing with anticipate Construction start PROJECT MANAGER rear or shared parking, four-plexes June/14 Stantec - 400 1620 Dickson Ave, LOCATION LOCATION and low rise apartment OWNERblocks – Kelowna V1Y 9Y2 250-860-3225 505 Doyle AveOrlin – TheRd Kelowna 2425 - Addition to the final build out will have up to 300 Vintage View Developments Community Health and Services Village at Smith Creek housing units. Robert Milanovic 250-492-5 Centre PROJECT Site workSTATUS underway

DISTRICT OF WEST KELOWNA KELOWNA

COLUMBIA SHUSWAP REGIONAL DISTRICT

LOCATION SICAMOUS

2673 to 2704 Blind Bay Rd – Blind Bay Resort LOCATION PROJECT TYPE 524 Dabelldev St - Mara Lake Water mixed-use

Treatment Facility PROJECT

PROJECT TYPEof the Blind Bay Redevelopment

Resort – 19new recreational waterfront industrial

PROJECT TYPE

PROJECT STATUS Tender Call seeking a private develPROJECT oper to purchase and develop Phase PROJECT Addition to the Village at Smith 1 Creek New Interior Health Administration seniors housing facilityand Commercial Building – 5 sto- 1,810 sm - 4 OWNER unitsof-the 8 additional u/g rey’s –storeys 145,000-sf23 – part Town of Osoyoos – 8707 Main St, parking stalls to - fibre cement board building will be rented medical - 4th floor stepped back as V0H 1V0 250-495-6515 relatedexterior businesses Osoyoos PROJECT TYPE housing seniors institutional new

1-800-667-19

gables

7YLIPK

Jeff Bosch

PROJECT STATUS Construction underway - foundations

250-545-534

SUBDIVISION DEVELOP


Success stories start here.

David Gautier CPA, CA Associate Partner

Mike Crowley CPA, CMA Incorporated Principal

Nick Moffatt CPA, CA Associate Partner

Angela Bailey CPA, CA, CFP

Dan Basso CPA, CA

Mike Crowley CPA, CMA

David Gautier CPA, CA

Miles Laing CPA, CA

Ken Laloge CPA, CA

Nick Moffatt CPA, CA

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lana Rains CPA, CMA

Brian Sanders CPA, CA

Don Turri CPA, FCA

Chris White CPA, CA, CFP

Lynn Wong CPA, CA

The partners and principals of Crowe MacKay Kelowna congratulate Mike Crowley, David Gautier and Nick Moffatt on their recent promotions. Our business has grown to eight offices in Northern and Western Canada not only because we deliver consistently exceptional service, but because we attract partners who are passionate about their work. Success stories start here.

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Business Examiner Thompson/Okanagan - March 2015  

Featuring the latest business news and information from Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, Summerland and Penticton.

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