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FEBRUARY 2017

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KELOWNA Young Professionals Collective Focused on Developing Regional Awareness

Thompson/Okanagan WWW.BUSINESSEXAMINER.CA



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KELOWNA

The annual Canadian Home Builders’ Association Central Okanagan event recognizes excellence in home design and construction

NAI Commercial Okanagan Opens New Office



2017 Tommie Awards Gold Gala Celebrates 25 years of the Best in the Okanagan Building Industry

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INDEX News Update

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TOTA 3 Vernon 4 Customer Service

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Kelowna 5 Green Sheet

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Summerland 12 Kamloops 14 Salmon Arm

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Movers and Shakers 16 Opinion 18 Heath and Wellness 23 Penticton 24 Sales 25 Contact us: 1-866-758-2684

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E L OW N A— O n Ja n ua r y 28 t h , t he Canadian Home Builders’ Association Central Okanagan hosted their 25th Anniversary edition of the Tommie Awards at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort. The annual event, recognizing excellence in the Okanagan building industry, was a sold out affair with 600 in attendance. Big winners included  Vineyard Developments,  VanMar Constructors, Turner Custom Homes, Big Valley Homes and Renovations, Wilson and Company, Keith Dahlen Construction, and Weninger Construction and Design—all of whom took home multiple awards. Turner Custom Home’s Waterfront Estate received the “Grand Tommie: Home of the Year”.

“In 2016, we saw the quality and craftsmanship of our industry. We know our award winners will be setting the trends for the year ahead.” SHERRI PAIEMENT EXECUTIVE OFFICER, CANADIAN HOME BUILDERS’ ASSOCIATION CENTRAL OKANAGAN

According to Sherri Paiement, Executive Officer of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, SEE TOMMIE AWARDS |  PAGE 11

Kevin Edgecombe of Edgecombe Enterprises with his award for Single Family Home Builder of the Year

Community Futures Launches Annual Entrepreneurial Contest 2017 Enterprize Challenge Coming To Okanagan College In April

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ERNON – Registration is underway for participation in the 2017 edition of the Enterprize Challenge, a unique form of entrepreneurial competition being organized by Community Futures North Okanagan. Bei ng staged for the third consecutive year, the Community Futures Enterprize

Challenge is presented by VantageOne Credit Union. “We organize this event every year as an economic development initiative. One of the pillars of economic development is supporting the entrepreneurial spirit, which is a big part of what we do here at Community Futures,” explained Leigha

Horsfield, Manager of the Business Department at Community Futures North Okanagan. Operated in a similar manner to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s (CBC) Dragon’s Den television program, the Enterprize Challenge will see participants deliver a presentation on their individual business

concept to a panel of qualified judges who in turn rule if the presented idea is viable. The three top participants are eligible to win prizes valued at more than $35,000. Registration for this year’s event will run from January 3 SEE ENTERPRIZE CHALLENGE |  PAGE 15


2 KELOWNA City Approves New Visitor Centre Kelowna City Council has approved the re-zoning application for a visitor centre at the dow ntow n Queensway Jetty location. The vote followed a public hearing and community consu ltation period that spanned nearly a year. “The tourism industry in Kelowna represents over $140 million in tax revenue each year and provides over 8,300 local jobs,” said Tourism Kelowna President and CEO Nancy Cameron. “A new visitor centre will help enhance visitor experiences, unlock additional spending, and provide a safe and animated space for residents to meet.” In the two weeks before the public hearing, Council received 91 letters of support for the project, with upwards of 150 letters of support submitted overall including many representing multiple businesses and staff. At a wel l-at tended p ubl ic hearing on January 24, 2017, many demonstrated support for the project and 25 residents and individuals representing business and industry groups made presentations to explain why the Queensway Jetty location was the best place to create economic opportunities for local businesses and enhance the waterfront walkway for visitors and residents.  Si nce the project was fi rst presented in the spring of 2016, Tourism Kelowna changed the project plan based on community feedback including removing the organization’s offices, which resulted in a 40 per cent reduction in square footage, and moving the building entirely off Sawmill Community Trust lands, often referred to as the Simpson Covenant. The new visitor centre building, which will be constructed mainly of glass and B.C. wood products, is estimated to cost $2.8 million and construction costs will be covered entirely by Tourism Kelowna. The small parcel of land that the centre will be built on will be provided to Tourism Kelowna in a 29-year lease. The building will be set back from the water’s edge by 10 metres on the north and south sides and 15 metres on the west allowing for enhanced public green space. The City of Kelowna will retain ownership of the land, and following the lease it will be returned to the City.

KELOWNA Airport Increases Traffic by 140,000 Passengers T he nu mbers a re i n a nd they’re even better than expected! Kelowna International

NEWS UPDATE Airport (YLW) served 1,732,113 passengers in 2016, an increase of 8.7 per cent since last year. That represents nearly 140,000 additional travellers! December proved to be YLW’s busiest month ever, with 166,537 passengers, surpassing the record-breaking month of August. “This is great news not only for Y LW, but also the entire region,” said Sam Samaddar, Airport Director. “The increase in passenger traffic means an increase in tourism, a boost to the regional economy and additional support for our local businesses.” Nearly every month in 2016 saw tremendous growth, ranging from 4-17 per cent. “The reason for the increase is in large part due to the launch of new routes and airlines, along with increased capacity on current popular destinations,” said Samaddar. “The Okanagan’s status as a four-season destination doesn’t hurt either, with world-class skiing, wineries and agri-tourism drawing travellers to the region, especially with the weakened Canadian dollar.” The growth is expected to continue this year by about 3%, as highlighted in YLW’s Master Plan 2045.

CANADA Millennials Support Natural Resource Development The Manning Centre recently released poll results that show the vast majority of Canadian millennials support expanding the development of our nation’s natural resource sector. Specifically, participants were asked – “How much do you support or oppose expanding development of natural resource sector?” The results showed: • 30% strongly support expanding development of the natural resource sector • 51% somewhat support expanding development of the natural resource sector • 16% somewhat oppose expanding development of the natural resource sector • 4% strongly oppose expanding development of the natural resource sector The results released today are part of a larger poll commissioned by the Manning Centre that examines the opinions of millennials towards politics and various areas of public policy. The full poll, conducted by Mission Research, will be discussed at t he upcom i ng Manning Centre Conference during the “Millennial Mindset” breakout session (Feb 23-25 in Ottawa). T h i s pol l i ng resea rch wa s conducted October 11-19, 2016 via online interviews using a random sample of 2,000 Canadians aged 15-34 years. A corresponding random sample of

the population would yield results accurate to within ± 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

KAMLOOPS Airport Sees Traffic Decline Kamloops Airport announces the traveler numbers for the month of December as compared to the same period in the previous year. 2015 2016 Change Monthly travelers decreased by 10.1% from 32,221 to 29,256, while year to date travelers decreased by .5% from 324,042 to 322,339. In December travelers were down due to a later ski season start at Sun Peaks and a continuing fall off in the Northern Alberta market. The traffic for Sun Peaks is expected to strengthen with excellent ski conditions and a low Canadian dollar. For t he pa st yea r a st rong start to the year has helped to maintain annual traveler numbers to be on par with 2015. For the coming year, there is evidence that with Alberta economy recovering, the Kamloops air service market may see an improvement as the commuting workers return. Larger capital improvements in the coming year include roadwork to improve the entrance and drive into the airport campus and the completion of the apron rehabilitation. This work will be dependent on the progress of the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion to take advantage of a single project.

VERNON VantageOne Opens Applications for Community Giveaway VantageOne Credit Union is calling for applications for the VantageOne Great Community Giveaway, which will donate $100,000 to community organizations. One organization will be granted $50,000, while the remaining $50,000 will be granted in smaller amounts. Criteria for applications from non‐profit organizations have been created by the board of directors and employees will be involved in the decision of the main recipients. The application deadline is 4pm, January 31, 2017 and the application form is available on the VantageOne Credit Union website at www. vantageone.net. “We only have a few weeks left to accept applications and we want to make sure that no one misses this opportunity,” says Glenn Benischek, CEO of VantageOne. “We’ve had a positive response from the community so

FEBRUARY 2017

far and we are looking forward to receiving the final applications over the next few weeks. “We’ve always supported the communities we serve and we’re excited that this year, we are able to contribute in a way that we feel will make a significant impact on the families, individuals and organizations in our communities.”

SUMMERLAND Chamber Announces Changes to Business and Community Excellence Awards The Summerland Chamber of Commerce will present the 79th Annual Business and Community Excellence Awards on Saturday, March 11th to celebrate its members’ entrepreneurial spirit, leadership, and contribution to the economy and to the community. Due to the growth in the event the Chamber has made several changes to the awards and ceremony for 2017. Along with the existing eleven awards that the Chamber presents an additional three awards have been developed to recognize excellence in customer service, agribusiness, and the arts. The Chamber will still celebrate all our nominees in a reception to be held in February but will no longer use a selection committee to decide the finalists. Instead the voting will be opened up so that all nominees are eligible. In order to meet the demand for tickets for the award ceremony, and to make the evening more affordable, they are moving away from a traditional sit down dinner. This year the Awards Gala evening will be a fun, Oscar style party held at Centre Stage with live entertainment, a signature cocktail and beverages along with several food stations providing delicious small bites.

VERNON ‘Place-Making’ Project to Develop Public Spaces Downtown Vernon will become a little more vibrant and safe thanks to a governmentfunded Job Creation Partnerships “Place-Making” project, which will aid in the planning, design and engagement of public spaces. The project, which has been underway since October, will see the Downtown Vernon Association provide work experience to two people as they develop a guide and operations manual for businesses to manage street safety and security. The finished products will be provided to key stakeholders and community partners.

The Downtown Vernon Association is receiving nearly $25,000 from the Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation’s Community and Employer Partnerships fund. In-kind funding from the City of Vernon, Interior Health, and Downtown Kelowna amounts to an additional $78,251. The project is providing two people with 40 weeks of work experience in publicity and social marketing, computer applications, data research and analysis, survey development, preparation of reports, conducting interviews and production of other written materials and visual aids. At the end of the project, they will be in a strong position to find opportunities for sustainable employment.

WESTBANK WFN Celebrates Opening of $5.5M Youth Centre Westbank First Nation opened their new $5.5 Million Youth Cent re at 1880 Q u a i l L a ne, Westbank, today. The general contractor for the project, WIBCO Construction, ensured the project was completed on time and on budget. The new two-storey, 13,000 sq. ft. Youth Centre replaces the previous 2,100 sq. ft. building purchased second-hand and moved to Quail Lane nineteen years ago. Since 1998, the Central Okanagan’s population has increased approximately 30 per cent. Over the same period, WFN’s population nearly doubled from 5,500 residents to over 10,000 today. WFN’s Membership population also grew over 50 per cent during that period. The present-day Youth Centre will be equipped with several unique and sustainable features, including: passive ventilation, outdo or k itchen a nd cl a ssroom, amphitheatre and learning garden, wood from WFN‘s Community Forest, and green screens and branch screens. As well, there will be ten offices, a space for W FN’s A fter-School P rog ra m, Yout h P rog ra m m i ng, E a rly Yea rs, multi-use areas, and a space for Elders to gather and interact with youth. Benefits include the promotion of active and healthy living, mentorship, engagement and leadership opportunities for youth, as well as safety and pride in the newly lit tree-lined boulevards and pathways connecting to the greater community. Phase Two of the Youth Centre will include an outdoor recreation area, which is scheduled for construction this summer. For more information or to become involved, please visit www.wfn.ca/youthcentre. htm. NEWS UPDATE |  PAGE 3


TOTA

FEBRUARY 2017

NEWS UPDATE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2

KELOWNA Okanagan College Business Students Triumph in Competition Students f rom Okanagan College’s School of Business notched three podium finishes – including a first-place and two runner-up finishes – at Canada’s oldest and most prestigious case competition. For fourth-year Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) student Madison Blancher, the path to competing at the InterCollegiate Business Competition (I.C.B.C.) at Queen’s University became clear when she and her teammate Adrianna Knuth advanced through a challenging preliminary round in November. The duo from Okanagan College, coached by Dr. Robert Groves and Roger Wheeler of t he OC School of B u si ness, took first place in the Human Resources category, besting fi na l ists from Simon Fraser University, Concordia University, McGill University, Saint Mary’s University and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Blancher and Knuth weren’t the only ones celebrating as Okanagan College recorded one of its best ever showings in the

competition. The Accounting team comprised of BBA students Kyla Bernardo and Kirsten Pitzoff placed second (coached by Adrian Fontenla and Randy Newton), as did the Management of Information Systems (MIS) duo of Jared Hubner and Anthony Peterson (coached by Dr. Glen Coulthard). The Debate team (coached by David Cram and Devin Rubadeau) also put in a strong effort, although they failed to crack the top three. T he Inter-Collegiate Business Competition (I.C.B.C.) is Canada’s oldest and longestrunning undergraduate business case competition, featuring eight different categories in which students can compete, including Accounting, Business Policy, Ethics, Debating, Finance, Human Resources, Marketing, and Management of Information Systems. Held annually in Kingston, the event hosts more than 100 competitors from leading business schools across Canada and around the world. T he pa i r h a s b een i nv ited to pa rticipate i n H RC West, Western Canada’s top HR Case Competition, in Vancouver in early March. Both students will graduate this year, Blancher with a BBA with a specialty in Human Resources and Knuth with a BBA Honours degree, specializing in Human Resources (which she is on track to complete in just three years).

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‘HOLLYWOOD NORTH’ DRAWS BIG NAMES TO REGION

THOMPSON OKANAGAN TOURISM

The movie industry has the ability to drive strong economic benefits to our region outside of typical peak periods and can continue to build and drive visitor interest in the region.

GLENN MANDZIUK

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ights.. Camera....... Action! In previous years our region may not have liked being referenced as “Napa North” but I don’t think anyone is upset at the prospect of quickly becoming known as “Hollywood North”. More a nd more t he mov ie world is finding their way to the Thompson Okanagan thanks to the hard work of our Regional Film Commissioners including Jon Summerland, Victoria Weller and Robyn Cyr. Over the years we have played host to many big stars and feature films including the likes of Steve Martin, Anthony Hopkins, Jack Nicolson, Dakota Fanning, Jack Black, Emily Blunt, Owen Wilson, Robin Wright, Benicio del

Toro, Elizabeth Berkley, Matthew Modine, Dylan O’Brien and the list goes on and on..... Most recently Nicolas Cage wrapped filming in Osoyoos on a feature film, Humanity Bureau and scheduled to be released on March 3rd is Tomato Red with Julia Garner and Jake Weary filmed last year in Ashcroft, Merritt and Kamloops. The movie industry has the ability to drive strong economic benefits to our region outside of typical peak periods and can continue to build and drive visitor interest in the region. In expanding the opportunity for film making we are seeing entrepreneurs and investors such as Tim Bieber who recently transformed 50,000 sq ft

of what was a clothing factory into a filmstudio with multiple sound stages and just 2 days ago Kelowna announced that Eagle Creek Studio with a parent company in Burnaby is ready to break ground for another  new sound stage which will be ready in 2017. The film industry is knocking....... let’s all be sure we are ready to open the door to this immense opportunity and become the best region in British Columbia to lay claim to the title of “Hollywood North”. Glenn Mandziuk is President and Chief Executive Officer of Thompson Okanagan Tourism Region. He can be reached at ceo@totabc.com.

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VERNON

FEBRUARY 2017

EDUCATION MAKES BIG IMPACT ON LOCAL ECONOMY

VERNON DAN ROGERS

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hen you think about what drives the economy seldom do you think about the impact of postsecondary education but a recent presentation from two of the Okanagan’s educational leaders shed some light on the actual numbers. Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton and UBCOkanagan Deputy Vice Chancellor Deborah Buszard were guests at a Chamber Breakfast Briefing in Vernon and among other advised the gathering that the combined operations of the college and university generates over $2 billion dollars in economic activity in the province with Okanagan College`s impact in the region at close to $600 million. The student population at both institutions has grown substantially at both institutions over

The operation of Okanagan College and UBC-Okanagan has a significant economic impact on the Okanagan region. (Photo Credit: Vernon Chamber of Commerce) the last decade and now tops 18,000. That`s an increase of 50% since 2005. That growth is also expected to continue in the years to come assisted in part by new capital investments such as the new Vernon campus trades building. Opening 2018, the $6.21 million facility will cover close to 14,000 square feet and provide additional training space for 150 students. It also became pretty clear to those attending the breakfast

that the importance of postsecondary educational institutions such as UBC-Okanagan and Okanagan College is likely to increase in the years to come and they will play a critical role in enabling businesses in the region to grow and prosper. ••• T he of f ici a l cou ntdow n i s underway for the 2017 Business Excellence Awards, an event that showcases Greater Vernon`s premier businesses and community

leaders. This year`s theme is Birthdays, Balloons and Black Ties and builds off the excitement from last year`s gala. The initiative recognizes the achievements of the past year in business but will also provide an opportunity to celebrate Canada’s 150 th anniversary of Confederation, the City of Vernon’s 125th birthday and the Chamber’s 120th birthday. “We’re really excited about the plans for the Gala and know it will be another fantastic evening of celebration as we recognize a variety of businesses, organizations and individuals for their outstanding achievements,” says Dauna Kennedy Grant, president of the Greater Vernon Chamber. The Chamber is pleased to have Valley First - A Division of First West Credit Union back as the presenting sponsor of the long running awards program. The Excellence Awards Gala is scheduled for Friday March 10, 2017 at the Vernon Lodge and will feature 13 different awards ranging from Tourism Excellence to Community Leader of the Year. A panel of independent business leaders will review all nominations and announce the three finalists in each category at the Nominee’s Luncheon with the winners revealed at the Awards Gala. Tickets for the Gala, which

is a near sell out each year, are now on sale. ••• Congrats to Vernon Tech and Learn, a local business that is making a name for itself on the provincial front. The former winner of the Small Business of the Year Award at the Vernon Chamber Business Excellence Awards (2012) is among the top five finalists for the Best Company award, as part of the Small Business BC Awards. The awards recognize the outstanding achievements of BC businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Vernon Teach and Learn will find out if it earned top honours when the winners in ten different award categories are announced near the end February in Vancouver. ••• Finally, the Greater Vernon Chamber is pleased to welcome a number of new members including Michael McLaughlin Consulting, Gwen Miller Skin Care, and New School Sales Consulting. Welcome to the Chamber network, the most influential business association in the country! Dan Rogers is the General Manager at the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and can be reached at manager@vernonchamber.ca.

WHY THE LITTLE THINGS MATTER If we’ve experienced really good customer service, that can become our expectation with a

CUSTOMER SERVICE

particular business, or even an entire industry

LUCY GLENNON

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hat do you look at as great customer service? Most likely it’s not something huge, but some set of little things. Or it may even be just one little thing. Why are those little things so important? When you look at your little things that matter, they really all have to do with expectations. And when it comes down to it,that has to do with past experiences. Whenever we have experiences, we keep a mental recording of them. And from that point forward, we’re always comparing against similar situations.

That’s how we come up with our expectations. I f we’ve ex p er ienced really good customer service, that can become our expectation with a particular business, or even an entire industry. And if we have a really bad experience, we may avoid the place altogether because our expectation is that it could easily happen again. Depending on what you do, your clients may or may not have any past experiences to compare you to. But does that mean they won’t have expectations? Of course not. They’ll still be based on experiences.

But they’ll either be based on experience of others, or their own experiences with something they believe is similar. You may have been out to eat at a restaurant for the first time, and you were absolutely blown away by the service. What were you comparing it to? If you go to a high-end steak house, you are probably expecting a different level of service than you would at a fast food restaurant. But if you go to a restaurant with similar prices to the high-end steak house, you probably do expect the same level of service. Most of the time, that’s not even a conscious thing! But if you pay attention to what your clients say and how they act, and you ask them questions about those things, you can change some of the small things that will make a huge difference to them. Lucy Glennon specializes in customer service training and recruitment and hiring. She can be reached at 866-6452047 or lucyg@hireguru.com. www.hireguru.ca.


KELOWNA

FEBRUARY 2017

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SPRING ROUND-UP FOR KELOWNA COMMERCE After the break, it seems everyone was so recharged that getting onto a work schedule

KELOWNA TOM DYAS

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anuary started off its usual way for our local business community – busy! After the break, it seems everyone was so recharged that getting onto a work schedule happened in the first week of the year. At the Chamber, it was no different. There’s so much going on, I’ll just hit some of our early 2017 highlights. January saw our first Okanagan College luncheon series of the New Year: ‘Women of Wine’. We took a closer look at the myriad of women now working in the wine industry. About 50% of university grads in wine programs are now female, although the female winemaker quotient in North America is lower: 10-15%. (James Lawrence Wine News January 2017). We hosted the award-winning Sandra Oldfield, CEO at Tinhorn; Elaine Triggs, COO at Culmina, and Ann Sperling, Winemaker/ Owner at Sperling and Southbrook. Wine writer and expert John Shreiner moderated the sold-out luncheon, wine tasting and book signing at the Kelowna Yacht Club who hosted the soldout lunch and wine tasting with perfect food and service. We also partnered with the Conference Board of Canada in presenting Western Business Outlook: Kelowna, with an especial emphasis on agrarian issues, including wineries and tree fruit. It was a stellar half-day, packed with information from this first visit of the Board to our city. We got an in-depth look at the economic conditions of Canada, B.C. and Kelowna, how they interact with the global economy, and where business is headed in 2017. In February, we host the Mayor of Kelowna, Colin Basran. It will be another sold out event, as the Mayor speaks to “The State of the City”. Which, of course, as the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission describes Kelowna on its home page is ‘Canada’s Fastest Growing Metro Area.’ No wonder we are staying busy at the Chamber. In other news, the housing industry pumped almost a half billion dollars into the local economy in 2016 wages. The Canadian Home Builders Association, Kelowna chapter, compiled the figures: 7,000 on – and offsite jobs meant a wage packet totalling $400 million plus. Another bonus is the

happened in the first week of the year. At the Chamber, it was no different

investment value added to the city’s infrastructure: $800 million new dollars. Overall, we enjoyed a 72 per cent leap in housing starts year over year, a figure unlikely to be repeated in 2017 according to the Association, because it was such a big leap. While I’m talking about labour, I couldn’t help but note the December stats for net job growth: 10,700 net jobs added in Canada in November, which dropped the unemployment rate down to 6.8 per cent. Winter generally sees a slide in job numbers, so the January stats likely won’t be at that level; we’ll have to see. Statistics Canada is always my go-source for this monthly check-up. The Bank of Canada is holding steady on its benchmark interest rate (0.5 per cent) released mid-January. The central bank remains bullish on Canada economic growth predictions, last released in October prior to the US federal election. But the Bank is wary of looming US protectionist policies, as are hundreds of our members locally. While GDP is still predicted to grow nationally this year, some slowdowns in BC’s rate, due to tightening real estate sales, are on the calendar. With a provincial election on May 9, some local market incentives seem probable. We saw the new ‘First Time Buyers’ interest-free loan program roll out which should be a modest shot in the arm for developers and real estate, a key economic indicator locally. Another local driver is technology. The Okanagan Young Professionals Collective continues to ramp up its efforts to attract youthful high-tech workers to Kelowna. The Collective works closely with many organizations locally: the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission, and Accelerate Okanagan, to name two. The OYP Collective has just published a ‘lure’ piece touting our region’s distinctive qualities. AO’s CEO, Raghwa Gopal is

outspoken in his predictions for tech: he believes it will outstrip real estate and retail to become the biggest economic driver in the next ten years. Numbers from the OYP Collective prove that the Okanagan is a tech hub of 633 companies and 7,000 employees, generating an annual economic money mountain totalling $1.3 billion. Teaching techies who live and work elsewhere that they want to move to Kelowna to live and work is job one for AO, the OYP Collective, and city promoters. “The tech industry itself is a sleeping giant,” says Gopal. Last but not least is the new coop grant announced by SIDIT (Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust) with The University of BC Okanagan. SIDIT announced a $50,000 grant in January, which gives regional companies access and financial support to UBC’s best and brightest co-op students. The program offers $5,000 grants to businesses through supporting regional recruitment efforts. The program has grown from 25 students in year one to 80 students in year two (2017). Preference is given to small- to medium-sized enterprises, and has a particular focus on agriculture, forestry, pine beetle recovery, transportation, tourism,

mining, small business, economic development and energy. Sounds perfect for the Okanagan valley. There is a ton of information and application forms online through either www.coop. ok.ubc.ca or www.sidit.ca. We look forward to seeing our members and meeting non-members at our upcoming events this month. Tom Dyas is the President of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce. To find out more information about the organization please visit www. kelownachamber.org.

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FEBRUARY 2017

Okanagan Young Professionals Collective Launches Tools to Attract Young Professionals to Region The Collective is working on behalf of the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission to attract and retain young professionals, especially to the tech sector.

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ELOWNA—The Okanangan Young Professionals Collective (OYP) has launched new tools to promote the Central Okanagan to young professionals. These tools include an infographic targeting tech sector professionals and a short video series called “Chair Chats”. “W hat we’ve discovered in our official surveys and conversations w ith professionals is that they’re particularly interested in balancing career opportunities with quality of life considerations,” says Drew Vincent, OYP Collective Officer of the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission (COEDC). The OYP operates under the COEDC umbrella with a mandate to attract and retain young professiona ls to the reg ion. To t h at end, t hese recent ly launched tools are targeted towards a younger demographic. “Chair Chats” is a series of short videos focusing on the experience of young professionals

OYP Collective Officer Drew Vincent

All smiles at a OYP hosted block party bringing young Okanagan professionals together i n t he Ok a n a ga n . T he f i rs t “Chair Chat” features Jenna Stasuk, a UBCO student and Accelerate Okanagan’s program coordinator. T he i n fog raph ic, ent it le d “How does the Okanagan compare?”, provides relevant

information for professionals, especially from the tech sector, who might be considering relocation. It’s a visually rich fact sheet covering everything from tech sector infrastructure to the local craft beer scene. The end result is a snapshot

that effectively captures what’s so compelling about living and working in the Okanagan right now. It’s the fasting growing tech hub in BC, yet still manages to be a place where commutes are short, housing prices are competitive, and outdoor recreation opportunities abound. “The original inspiration was a cost of living comparison,” says Vincent. “Sometimes people look at the Okanagan, realize they may see a change in wages compared to major cities, and

they stop their investigation prematurely. “What they don’t realize is that the cost of living here is quite often less, so they will, in fact, likely come out ahead if they relocate. So we’re helping professionals to make more educated decisions.” Although the infographic is targeted towards tech professionals, Vincent emphasizes that it is a useful tool for many individuals and organizations. He hopes anybody who is engaged in promoting the region or recruiting talent will utilize and share it. According to Vincent, it is an exciting time to be a young professional in the Central Okanagan—and a great time to be leading a group like the OYP. “We exist to promote and foster a community of collective success,” he says. “We promote connections because we know young people are much more likely to succeed when they are plugged into a strong network.” oypcollective.com

Success Adds Up

Success is the result of perseverance, hard work and the ability to capitalize on opportunities. MNP proudly congratulates Spencer Naito, Theresa Witt, Mike Daigle and Allison Engel on successfully completing the 2016 Common Final Exam (CFE). As a leading national accounting and business consulting firm, here are four more ways we can help your business succeed. Contact Contact Trina Warren, CPA, CA, Regional Managing Partner, Thompson-Okanagan Region 250.979.1749 or trina.warren@mnp.ca Left to right: Spencer Naito, Theresa Witt, Mike Daigle, Allison Engel

MNP.ca


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FEBRUARY 2017

TALENT POOL MAKING INROADS IN WORKPLACE ATTITUDES TOWARDS DIVERSABILITIES Ready Willing and Able Sources Job Seekers With Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder to Meet Employers And Labourforce Needs

W

hen Rocky Mountain Printing (RMP) added a new paper delivery service to its product line, it needed to hire someone with a specific skill set. The successful applicant would need to be personable, reliable, able to operate light equipment and lift and carry 50 pound boxes of paper. “David fit the criteria well. He learned quickly and is getting positive comments from our customers,” said Stephen Wik, general manager of RMP. With a new report by the Conference Board of Canada claiming that BC does not have the skilled labour to replace its aging workforce, finding David provided a solution for a very real problem, one that could change the way businesses look for workers. A client of REALM (Realize Empowerment Access Life to the Maximum) in partnership with Ready, Willing and Able, David is a young man with an intellectual disability (ID) who is working two jobs. He takes the bus to work, has impressed his employers with his work ethic and gets along with his coworkers. In short, he does his job and he does it well. “Like any employee there is no guarantee,” Wik explained. “But having David here has positively impacted us all.” RMP isn’t the only company finding a workforce from a traditionally under represented talent pool. InclusionBC Director of Employment Initiatives, Gordon Ross, said that people with ID and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) bring a wide range of practical and specific skills. More than 93 per cent of respondents to an employer survey rated the RWA employees to be on par with or better than

the average employee in terms of: punctuality, attendance, use of sick days, turnover, attitudes towards work, getting along with coworkers and management, contributing to positive workplace morale and spirit, frequency of occupational health and safety problems, impact on workers’ compensation costs, and impact on employee benefits costs. “This talent pool meets tangible and intangible needs,” Ross said. “Not just by fulfilling operational requirements but by introducing a diverse culture into the workplace.” Ross explained that to date, the majority of RWA outcomes continue to be found in the sectors associated with employment initiatives, namely retail and food services. “The prevalence of hires within these two sectors continues to be influenced by the size and scope of some of our national partnerships, particularly Costco and Value Village. However, in-roads have been made to spread outcomes further afield with notable increases in hires in sectors such as manufacturing, warehousing, travel and tourism, professional services and public administration, and arts and culture, collectively representing 28-30 per cent of total outcomes.” Flexibility has emerged as the key strength of RWA, not only at the national level but also in the direct delivery of supports. “David needed to be partnered with another worker during deliveries and for training. RWA offset the employer’s costs by paying a portion of the employee’s salary,” explained Debra Preston business relations, REALMBC. “He also needed steel toe boots, RWA provided the funds for their purchase.” “The ability of the project to respond directly to the range of needs that individual job seekers, employees and employers have is a somewhat unique feature of RWA over traditional approaches to employment of people with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder. This is an employer-based demand model, customized to meet the employer

RWA’s employer engagement model is designed to be flexible and responsive CREDIT:READY, WILLING, ABLE

“This talent pool meets tangible and intangible needs. Not just by fulfilling operational requirements but by introducing a diverse culture into the workplace.” GORDON ROSS DIRECTOR OF EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVES READY WILLING AND ABLE, INCLUSION BC

Pacific Bolt Manufacturing, RWA’s initial employer partner, continues to benefit from diverse talent CREDIT:READY, WILLING, ABLE

needs,” said Ross. Ross added that the program is quick in responding, working at immediately implementing supports to ensure quality within the workplace. “The program’s nimbleness reflects the business process and model it is using, ensuring that there is a ready access point to source inclusive talent and that it responds quickly to specific employment requirements.” For R E A L M BC, t he key to matching its clients with the right employer is by a clear understanding of what is needed. The agency finds placements for a wide range

of disabilities and is one of over 65 employment agencies in 37 BC communities that Ready, Willing and Able has partnerships with. For RWA, the theme it sees emerging, concerning the impact RWA is having on the workplace, is on the attitudes, awareness and culture of working with persons with ID and ASD. “It’s important to give it a try,” said Wik. “With David we started with him lifting the boxes. We also have a machine called the stair climber that lifts the boxes up stairs. Most of the employees are extra cautious around the machine. David nailed its

operation.” Ross sa id t h at suppor t i ng businesses by meeting some of their labour force requirements through the hiring of inclusive talent is helping RWA contribute to the province’s goal of becoming the most progressive Province in Canada for people with disabilities by 2024. “There’s no risk in reaching out and no cost,” he said, adding that a client is hired not ‘because of’ but by answering the question, ‘what can they contribute’. Ready, Willing and Able Inclusion BC is at www.readywillingable.ca

High-performance organizations are

37% MORE LIKELY TO HIRE people with intellectual disabilities or Autism Spectrum Disorder

INCLUSIVE HIRING WORKS www.readywillingable.ca


8

FEBRUARY 2017

COMMUNITY IN

KAMLOOPS Kamloops Has Prospered Through Economic Diversification Resource Industries, Manufacturing, High Tech, Transportation, Tourism & More

The Ajax Project is an open pit copper and gold mine owned and operated by KGHM Mining Inc.

The old Kamloops Railway Station is a heritage building that helps honor the city’s long industrial history BY DAVID HOLMES

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SUPPORTIVE · RESOURCEFUL · CONNECTED

250-828-6818 www.venturekamloops.com

K

A M L O OPS – D iversity is the key to the economic success of the City of Kamloops. “One of the rea l strength of Kamloops is that the City has a very d i v e r s i f i e d e c o n o m y. The city started off as a primary resource driven com mu n ity, la rgely around mining and pulp and paper,” explained Colin O’Leary, the Manager o f Ve nt u re K a m lo o p s , a n at a rm’s leng th, not for profit economic development organization wholly funded by the City

of Kamloops. “What happened is that over time a fairly robust manufacturing sector developed to support those primary industries. Then a strong transportation and logistics sector grew up to support those areas, as the City is situated on a junction of three highways and is on a railroad. Then the service sector g r e w, t h e n e d u c a t i o n through our college (now T hompson R ivers Un iversity), then tou rism, t hen h i g h te c h i ndu stries until today we have a very broad and diverse economy.”

Wit h a p opu l at ion of nearly 90,000, but acting as the primary service center for the ThompsonNicola Regional District, the City of K a m loops was first founded as a fur trading post in 1811, being incorporated as a community in 1893. Nature has seemingly destined the City for greatness as it is located at the confluence of two branches of the Thompson River, has one of the sunniest a nd wa r me s t cl i m ate s i n Ca n ad a a nd i s st rategically located at the SEE KAMLOOPS |  PAGE 9


KAMLOOPS

FEBRUARY 2017

9

The City of Kamloops is the main service center for the entire Thompson-Nicola Regional District New Gold Inc.’s New Afton Mine is a gold, silver and copper mine located just west of the City of Kamloops

KAMLOOPS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

mid-point between Calgary and Vancouver.; “We’ve never forgotten our pri ma ry resou rce roots, the Domtar Pulp Mill is still a major employer and we have three m i nes w ith i n 45 m i nutes of downtown, but now there has been a major shift into areas such as tech and sciences, away from blue collar into while collar jobs,” O’Leary explained. Echoing Venture Kamloops’ assessment, Deb McClelland the

Executive Director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce explained that the higher paying resource and tech jobs help to power the region’s economic engine. “Obviously the higher paying jobs help to drive the economy. We still rely on the larger scale industries (mining and pulp and paper) to carry us through but we certainly have an emerging service and tourism economy,” she said. “Due to diversification in our economy we’ve been able to weather economic downturns better than in other areas of

the province which has been a huge part of the City’s ongoing success. I think diversification has always been part of the plan, you don’t want to rely on any one industry to survive, as changing tastes or markets can have a very severe impact.” T he Ka m loops Cha mber of Commerce currently has more than 750 members and is a key enabler and motivator for the local business community. The Chamber works in concert with va r ious loca l orga n i zat ions such a s Ventu re K a m loops, Community Futures, the

K a m loops Centra l Busi ness Improvement Association and others. “We are very fortune to have busi ness orga n izations that work together, we have worked to clarify all of our mandates so that we’re not necessarily dupl icati ng but a re actua l ly enhancing each other’s work. There is even a Memorandum of Understanding between some of us because that’s our desire,” McClelland explained. “I truly believe that when you set aside ego and the push to be best and just work together that’s what improves the situation for everybody.” SEE KAMLOOPS |  PAGE 10

Graham A. Kay MSW, LLB

Lawyer Barrister and Solicitor 710 - 175 Second Avenue Kamloops, BC V2C 5W1

P 250.851.9323 F 250.851.9324

graham@kaylawofce.com

“Great things are never done by one person, they’re done by a team of people.” - Steve Jobs

Welcome new partners Sandra Blair, Shawn Birkenhead, and Kevin Cooper. Norman Daley, FCPA, FCA

Sandra Blair, CPA, CA

Paul Mumford, CPA, CA

Michael Parker, CPA, CA

Shawn Birkenhead, CPA, CA

Maureen McCurdy, CPA, CA

Kevin Cooper, CPA, CA

Daley & Company CPA LLP is the largest independent accounting and business advisory firm in Kamloops, BC. We specialize in tax services, business advisory and consultation, retirement and estate planning, First Nations services, accounting and auditing.


KAMLOOPS

10

FEBRUARY 2017

KAMLOOPS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

For many economic development professionals the Interior Lifestyle, having access to not merely employment but also recreation, culture, climate, entertainment, education and other assets is another key to the success of the region. “You want to do more than look for that perfect job. You also want to lo ok for t h at g re at pl ace that your family will feel comfortable with and enjoy. This includes good schools, great recreat iona l oppor tu n it ies, the arts and more and I think Kamloops has that in spades,” she said.

Located at a confluence of two branches of the Thompson River, Kamloops has a population of about 90,000 For O’Leary Mother Nature herself has played a significant role in the community’s success. “Affordability of real estate and lifestyle go a long way in attracting business to t he com mu n ity. M a ny successful businesses in Kamloops began on the Lower Mainland but ended up saying ‘why am I spending two hours every day

in rush hour commuting when I could be on the beach?’ – typically in much better weather as we get a pile of sunshine, which is yet another thing Kamloops is known for,” he said. For the future he expects the City to continue along the path is has taken, that of fostering a very diverse economy and experiencing a slow but steady

Feel free to contact MCM Real Estate Ltd regarding our other properties or those listed

LAND FOR SALE 175 Kokanee Way

Lots ranging from 0.78 to 5.02 acres along the Trans Canada Highway. $250,000 - $1,200,000

1740 Kelly Douglas Road

5.98 acres, prime light industrial location. $2,475,000

FOR SALE 701 Tagish Road

Retail or light manufacturing with 1.24 acres and a large 12,100 sq ft building with a 7,580 sq ft mezzanine. Bring offers!

100 & 200 - 1383 McGill Road

Can be sold separately or combined for 8,382 sq ft of bright office space with onsite parking. 200 - $650,000 100 - $675,000

101 - 945 Lorne Street

Updated 1,454 sq ft with 6 offices, suitable for various professions. $469,000

FOR LEASE 103 - 1211 Summit Drive

Prime retail, approximately 2,501.1 sq ft. Lease rate $25 sf net

415 Dene Drive - new building

2 bays, 2,400 sq ft each, can be combined, overhead door, light industrial. Lease rate $12 - $14 sf net

546 St. Paul Street

Professional offices, 248 - 1,465 sq ft. Lease rate $14 sf net

1794 Kelly Douglas Road

Offices, storage, or warehouse, bay doors and loading docks. Lease rate $3,750 - $10,000 gross

781 Notre Dame Drive

Approximately 2,700 sq ft of retail or service space with a back bay door. Lease rate $12 sf net

1281 Mission Flats Road

0.74 acres of level ground close to town. Landlord will build to suit light industrial, 10 - 20,000 sq ft.

Mona M. Murray Dip. ULE, RI(BC), CPM

www.mcmrealestate.ca

Tanya Cokran REALTOR®

250-372-2277

ra te of g ro w t h . “ Fo r m a n y year’s we’ve had a very consistent, solid growth happening because we’re so diversified. T h a t ’s t h e k e y, t h a t ’s t h e strength that we intend to continue to support and enhance.” I n M c C l e l l a n d’s o p i n i o n , thanks to a number of factors the City and the entire region has a bright future ahead of it.

“Our population is growing, our amenities are growing so it all combines to make Kamloops the best place to live and work in my humble opinion.” To l e a r n m o r e a b o u t t h e Ve n t u r e K a m l o o p s v i sit: w w w.vent u rek a m lo op s. com, to learn more about the Kam loops Chamber v isit: www.kamloopschamber.ca.

LONG STANDING RELATIONSHIPS IMPORTANT FOR GETTING RIGHT COMMERCIAL REALTOR Commerical and industrial leasing and sales are unique requiring a special understanding of the industry and business

K

AMLOOPS – MCM Real Estate is a small business with a big past. With a focus on commercial sales and leasing, its owner Mona Murray, Dip. ULE RI(BC) CPM has a long-standing history in the industry and it all got started when Murray came to Kamloops to manage a local hotel in 1979. “I fell in love with the city and decided to stay,” she said. “When the job at the hotel finished, I decided to get into real estate.” At that point, Murray earned her Urban Land Economics diploma and then applied for her real estate license. She also has her Certified Property Management designation and is a member of the Real Estate Institute of British Columbia. In 1983, she and her husband Chris, founded Sheridan Property Management Limited, building it into the largest property management firm in Kamloops. In 2006 they sold the company to a national firm. “I stayed with them for a year and in 2007 decided to create MCM Real

“We often represent both parties, (Landlord,& Tenant, Buyer & Seller), ensuring they get the right property for their needs.” MONA MURRAY DIP. ULE RI(BC) CPM, OWNER MCM REAL ESTATE

Estate and focus on a highly specialized market. “Commercial and industrial leasing and sales is unique with financial implications for both the tenant and owner. We often represent both parties, (Landlord,& Tenant, Buyer & Seller), ensuring they get the right property for their needs.” With its depth of knowledge in the industry and by using the right commercial realtor MCM has built longstanding relationships with a loyal clientele. She added that MCM is a fullservice company for commercial and industrial real estate. It’s found a strong niche with clientele who are interested in buying or selling, leasing or needing consulting services to maximize their real estate investment. MCM Real Estate is at 315-546 St. Paul Street in Kamloops. www.mcmrealestate.ca


ment

n to poser to lone last

11

TOMMIE AWARDS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“The trend we see in home buying is that people are really swayed one way or another by a master bedroom’s en suite.” Hence, Destination Custom Home’s Sheperd Residence—which took the award for “Excellence in Master Suite Design”, should be of special interest to fans of home design. Attendees of the Tommies were treated to a glamorous evening out at the Delta Grand. In addition to a champagne reception and dinner, the evening included a screening of a special video documenting 25 years of building history in the region. “The video showcased where we’ve come from a nd where we are today,” says Paiement. “From industry icons likeLambert Schmalz to the current year, where we’ve had a record number of building starts.” The video can be seen on the chbaco.com website. Paiment notes that her Association works closely with targeted magazines and media outlets to publicize the Tommies and its nominees and winners. Build, Boulevard Magazine, Daily Courier, Bell Media and Castanet are regular media partners providing coverage. “The value of being a Tommie nominee or winner is high,” says Paiement. “Beyond the media exposure they achieve, they become industry trend-setters.

ment

ny

OFF THE COVER/GREEN SHEET

FEBRUARY 2017

SIMONE SUNDERLAND

A peek at Destination Custom Homes’ award-winning en suite design “People look at pictures from Tommie Award-winning homes and say, ‘I want that.’” The Canadian Home Builders’ Association Central Okanagan has been holding the Tommie Awards for 25 years. Since its inception, the reach and reputation

GREEN SHEET BUILDING BRIEFS

of the event has grown steadily, and now includes nominees from Osoyoos to Salmon Arm. According to Paiement, the inspiration for the event came from Randy Werger, Associate Dean of Trades Okanagan College and Gord Wilson of Team

Construction. The first Tommie sponsor was Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. “These forward-looking individuals thought it would be valuable for the industry to have an event where builders could say, ‘Look what I built!’” says

Pa iement. “A nd then others could say, ‘Well, I could build that better!’ “The Tommie Awards have always been a healthy source of competition and inspiration in our industry.” www.chbaco.com

KELOWNA

PROJECT TYPE Institutional Addition/Alteration

PROJECT STATUS Rezoning application and OCP amendment submitted

LOCATION

Frost Rd, Upper Mission Area - New Upper Mission Middle School PROJECT TYPE SIMONE SUNDERLAND Institutional New

15

PROJECT Phase 1 Expansion and renovation to Johnston Bentley Memorial Aquatic Centre (JBMAC) - approx 3,000 sf - new administrative and programming space, new offices, workstations, meeting and lunch rooms enlarge fitness and weight room additional storage space - multipurpose rooms - future planning items include pool expansion

PROJECT New middle school for the Upper PROJECT Mission area of Kelowna to New water treatment facility accommodate - the dis600 students - 2 trict is currently testing several methstoreys - 24 classrooms - approxLOCATION LOCATION PROJECT STATUS ods including membrane technology LOCATION imate site size 4.3 ha 1655 1659 Cary Rd - New Storage 238 Queensway Ave - Visitor Budget for architectural drawPROJECT STATUS 175 Kokanee Way Ramada Hotel Warehouse - Valley Pool and Spa Centre Tourism Kelowna PROJECT STATUS ings approved - public tender to Design underway - Tender call for definition consulting PROJECT TYPE Project take place in 2017 PROJECT TYPE PROJECT STATUS General Contractor anticipated services report anticipated to be commercial new Industrial Addition/Alteration Institutional New OWNER July/14 - construction completion completed spring/17 PROJECT City of West Kelowna - 2760 PROJECT PROJECT anticipated late 2015 CONSULTANT LOCATION Cameron Rd, West Kelowna V1Z NewRamada storage Hotel warehouse Visitor Centre 1 New in thefor Campbell New Kelowna CONSULTANT 2241 Springfield Matrix Architecture & Planning Rd - Mission 2T6 778-797-1000 Valleyindustrial Pool and park Spa --14storey - storey and mezzanine - approx Creek storeys Dayton Knightalumi- 255 1715 CrossingSt,Westside - 400 2695 Granville appoxsm 6,400 - metal cladding - pool 3,309 Opus sf - steel structure, 3,780 - 80 sf rooms - restaurant Dickson Ave, V1Y 9G6 250-868-4925 Vancouver V6H 3H4 604-688exterior - pre engineered wall with clear glazwith waterslide - elevatorsmetal - concretenum curtain PROJECT TYPE 0333 roof glulam beam - metal OWNER construction - roof articulation with ing, curved commercial new porte cochere - asphalt shingles - 98 roof District of Sicamous - 1214 OWNER PROJECT STATUS PROJECT LOCATION surface parking stalls Redesign underway PROJECT STATUS Ave, Sicamous V0ESchool Riverside 2V0 District 23 Central NewUnderhill commercial urban13610 lifestyle Rezoning application, developBanks Cres - Okanagan Okanagan 1940 St, 250-836-2477 PROJECT STATUS APPLICANT centre 6 buildings 2 to 7 storeys ment permit application, and Vistas and Shaughnessy Greens Kelowna V1X 5X7 250-860-8888 Valley Pool and Spa Inc 1659 PROJECT MANAGER Construction start anticipated late OCP amendment - retail commercial at ground level submitted Cary Rd, Kelowna V1X 2C1 250TYPE 2014 MHPM - 550 555 W 12th Ave, with office units abovePROJECT - underground 860-2266 APPLICANT Seniors Housing Vancouver V5Z 3X7 604-714-0988 parkade - 80 above ground short ARCHITECT Tourism Kelowna Society - 214 DESIGNER term parking stalls PROJECT 1626 Richter St, Kelowna V1Y DF Architecture Inc - 1205 4871 Cornerstone Contract Services - Shell 2M3 250-861-1515 PROJECT STATUS New seniors housing developRd, Richmond V6XDr,3Z6 604-284-5194 3422 Camelback Kelowna V1X ment - complex care, assisted 8A8 250-491-4090 ARCHITECT LOCATION Development permit application and independent living - 5 strucDEVELOPER submitted Meiklejohn Architects Inc - 233 3737 Old Okanagan Hwy tures - 380 units - recreation, GENERAL CONTRACTOR LOCATION Prism Ventures Inc - 3571 Barmond Bernard Ave, Kelowna V1Y 6N2 ARCHITECT Johnston Bentley Memorial health, personal and wellness MSCRichmond Metal Structures 1460 Ave, V7E 1A4- 200 604-338-4656 250-762-3004 To Be Determined - Ice Facility Aquatic Centre Expansion Phase - child care facilities Pandosy St, Kelowna V1Y 1P3 Ekistics Town Planningservices - 1925 Main OWNER PROJECT TYPE 778-760-2882 1 room St, Vancouver V5T 3C1dining 604-739-7526

KELOWNA KAMLOOPS

KELOWNA

CENTRAL OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT

SUMMERLAND

VERNON

Prism Hotels and Resorts - 800 14800 Landmark Blvd, Dallas Texas 75254 214-987-9300

institutional add/alter

PROJECT

WEST KELOWNA

DEVELOPER R366 Enterprises Ltd - 4870B Chute,

ARCHITECT Derek Crawford Architect - 2203 115 Fulford-Ganges Rd, Salt Spring Island V8K 2T9 604-6888370 DEVELOPER Lark Group - 1500 13737 96 Ave, Surrey V3V 0C6 604-576-2935

PENTICTON LOCATION 284 Brunswick St - Affordable Housing Complex PROJECT TYPE Multi-Family New PROJECT New affordable housing complex - 67 units - wheelchair accessible PROJECT STATUS Design underway - submission of development permit application anticipated spring/17 ARCHITECT VIA Architecture Inc - 270 601 W Cordova St, Vancouver V6B 1G1 604-683-1024 CONSTRUCTION MANAGER Greyback Construction Ltd - 402 E Warren Ave, Penticton V2A 3M2 250-493-7972


12

SUMMERLAND

FEBRUARY 2017

STRATEGIC “FINE-TUNING” SHAPES DIRECTION FOR 2017

SUMMERLAND CHRISTINE PETKAU

L

ate in 2016 the Summerland Chamber Board undertook a strategic planning exercise to fine tune our services to our members and our key partners. In

addition to our core work, we will work to enhance communications in the coming year. The Chamber continues to be active in three key areas: Member Services, Tourism and Business Retention and Attraction. Within the area of Member Services the Chamber provides business advocacy on behalf of its membership and offers educational opportunities. Members receive promotional benefits through avenues such as the Annual Awards Gala, the Summerland Phone Directory, Business after Business events, monthly newsletters and articles in various

publications. In 2016 the Chamber participated in regional forums on labour market development. We also held two business walks in April and October. In 2017 the Chamber will be working on an enhanced communications strategy to connect with our large membership and community partners. Within the area of Tourism the Chamber operates the visitor centre, welcoming approximately 12,000 visitors each season. Along with coordinating the photography and managing content for the annual visitor guide, and promoting the community as a

tourism destination, the Chamber also organizes Summerland’s Festival of Lights. In 2016 the Chamber worked with neighbouring communities to create a regional cycle festival called Chain of Events. We also launched a downtown visitor kiosk that operates 5 days per week. 2017 special projects include new tourism videos showcasing our growing cycling and hiking opportunities as well as a tourism blog. In the area of Business Retention and Attraction the Chamber coordinates sector networking, the development of key partnerships and the promotion of Summerland

as a place to do business. In 2016 the Chamber worked with Summerland company ET2media to produce a creative series of videos with a social media campaign called #discoverhome to highlight the ease and impact of shopping locally. Christine Petkau is Executive Director of the Summerland Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Summerland. The Chamber is also responsible for business retention, expansion and attraction (economic development services) on behalf of the District of Summerland. She can be reached at cpetkau@summerlandchamber.com.

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F5_170 WCF AD Dec 2017_V3.indd 1

2016-11-30 9:58 AM

#105-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna |

#105-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna | naiokanagan.ca

Realizing Potential, De Realizing Potential, Delivering Results.

117 Kalamalka Lake Road, Vernon 117 Kalamalka Lake Road, Vernon ‚ 3.56 acre holding property ‚ 3.56 acre holding property ‚ R5 zoning (Fourplex Housing Residential) ‚ Located close to Vernon Golf Country (Fourplex Housing Residential) ‚ R5& zoning Club and Kalamalka Lake’s Kal Beach ‚ Located close to Penticton Vernon Golf Motels & Country ‚ Topography provides valley and golf 68-Room Hotel Club and Kalamalka Lake’s Kal Beach course views ‚ Downtown location close to Okanagan For Sale Asking: $356,000 ‚ Topography provides valley and golf Lake 68-Room Hotel 844–852 Crowley Avenue, Kelowna course views 9415 & 9419 Spartan Drive, Osoyoos Asking: $5,900,000 For Sale ‚ Downtown loc ‚ 5,240 sf office/shop with newer 1,815 sf ‚ Rare 730 feet of prime development Asking: $356,000 46-Room Hotel with Many Upgrades residential suite (4 bedrooms) above Lake lakeshore on Osoyoos Lake 557 & 567 Clement Avenue 844–852 ‚ Downtown location close to Okanagan ‚ I-4 Industrial Zoning Crowley Avenue, ‚Kelowna 9415parcels & 9419 Spartan Drive, Osoyoos & 1215 St. Paul Street, Kelowna 1.913 acres over 3 individual Asking: $5,90 Lake ‚ 3 legal lots with large fenced yard storage ‚ 5,240 sf office/shop with newer 1,815 sf available‚ Rare 730 feet of prime ‚ 3 lot land assembly in Kelowna’s ‚ Sewer and water development Asking: $4,500,000 and secure vehicle gate 46-Room Hotel Downtown residential suite (4 bedrooms) ‚ Townabove of Osoyoos supportive of lakeshore on Osoyoos Lake 557 & 567 Clement Avenue Asking: $1,190,0000 26-Room Hotel (11 with Kitchens) ‚ Total lot area 16,590 sf comprehensive development for low ‚ Downtown loc ‚ I-4 Industrial Zoning &‚ C7 1215 St. Paul Street, Kelowna individual parcels density phased projects ‚ 1.913 acres over 3‚ Seller may finance & open to trades zoning allows for 21,972 sf mixed8259 & 8280 Wallace Road, Vernon Lake ‚ 3 legal lots with large fenced yard$2,950,000 storage development Asking: ‚use 3 lot land assembly in Kelowna’s ‚ Sewer and water Asking: available$1,300,000 ‚ Two 40-acre parcels Asking: $4,50 and secure vehicle gate ‚ Close to Kelowna Arts and Downtown ‚ Subdivision potential into 5-acre parcels 3369 & 3373 Old Okanagan Hwy, West Harrop-Proctor Road, Proctor ‚ Town of Osoyoos6331 supportive of Entertainment area Asking: $1,190,0000 Kelowna 26-Room Hotel ‚ 10 minutes to Silver Star Mtn Resort and ‚ 10.62 acre property ‚ Total lot area 16,590 sf comprehensive development for lowzoned M Industrial City of Vernon ‚ 2.84 acres of leasehold land Asking: $2,295,000 ‚ Potential rail spur across property density phased projects ‚ Seller may fina ‚ C7 zoning allows for 21,972 sf mixed-‚ 8259 Wallace 8259 & 8280 Wallace Road, Vernon Rd backs onto BX Creek ‚ Multifamily Residential High Density ‚ Potential site for manufacturing or use development Mike Geddes* Asking: $2,950,000 Asking: $1,30 development site Two 40-acre ‚ 8280 Wallace‚ Rd offers valley &parcels lake views medical marijuana operation 250 878 6687 ‚ Close to Kelowna Arts and ‚ Holding income from house and small 8259 Wallace Rd: $799,000 ‚ 2 shops (60’ x 34’West & 40’ x 30’) ‚ Subdivision potential into 5-acre parcels 3369 & 3373 Old Okanagan Hwy, mike.geddes@naiokanagan.ca 6331 Harrop-Pro commercial shop Entertainment *Personal Real Estate area Corporation 8280 Wallace Rd: $999,000 Asking: $949,000 Kelowna

Penticton M

For Sale

For Sale

Asking: $2,295,000 Mike Geddes*

250 878 6687 mike.geddes@naiokanagan.ca *Personal Real Estate Corporation

‚ 10 minutes to Silver StarAsking: Mtn Resort and $1,069,000 City of Vernon 250 864 9140 ‚ 8259 Wallace Rd backs onto BX Creek tim.down@naiokanagan.ca ‚ 8280 Wallace Rd offers valley & lake views Tim Down

8259 Wallace Rd: $799,000 8280 Wallace Rd: $999,000

Tim Down

250 864 9140 tim.down@naiokanagan.ca

‚ 2.84 acres of leasehold land Philip Hare 778 214 2150 ‚ Multifamily Residential High Density philip.hare@naiokanagan.ca development site ‚ Holding income from house and small commercial shop

Asking: $1,069,000

‚ 10.62 acre pro ‚ Potential rail sp ‚ Potential site fo medical mariju ‚ 2 shops (60’ x

Asking: $949, Philip Hare

778 214 2150 philip.hare@naiok


13

FEBRUARY 2017

CHALLENGING CUSTOM HOME PROJECTS DRIVES SUCCESS OF LOCAL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Drawing from the four elements inspires unique designs of luxury residential homes

K

ELOWNA – The awardw i n n i ng Mu r ray residence in Naramata doesn’t’ just perch on a cliff overlooking the lake. Kim Larson, director of All Elements Design. Manage. Build, said that the home is integrated into the lot, blending with its surroundings and in harmony with the elemental forces of nature. “It was a challenging project,� she said. “The lot basically went from the street to a cliff.� L a rson desig n s her homes with an emphasis on the four elements of earth, water, fire and air. The Murray home was no exception. A bridge connects the house to the street, hidden drainage mitigates the risk of water damage, and, to allow the homeowners to enjoy their outdoor space in all weather conditions, a Zen garden was created under the bridge and a glass hallway leads to a protected outdoor living area. Winner of a Silver Tommie in the Excellence in New Home C o n s t r u c t i o n c a te go r y fo r homes $750,000 to $1 million, the house incorporates inventive design and feature elements to capture not only the dramatic and stunning panoramic views, but also a contemporary feel and clean look. “T he m i n i m a l i st ic desig n keeps things simple but functional, with built-in cabinets and hidden pantries for small appliances so countertops are free from clutter. We’ve mixed a variety of wood and painted elements to give it an esthetically homey feel.� Unique locations and challenging projects are what Larson said her company seems to thrive on. “We are attracting the difficult builds because we like sinking

The Laurino residence takes advantage of the panaromic lake and mountain views on a very challenging hilltop lot CREDIT:ALL ELEMENTS DESIGN. MANAGE. BUILD

our teeth into the jobs that need innovative design and a unique perspective. It’s also because, as a team, we excel at the challenge of the high end custom home.� L a r s o n a n d c o-fo u n d e r Stephan Ams have been working together since 2007, when they met while Larson was working at another construction firm. Ams, a journeymen carpenter with more than 24 years of experience building custom homes throughout the Okanagan Valley was hired by Larson as a subcontractor to frame a house the company was building. “It was the first project we worked together on and we immediately connected.�

Larson, who completed her degree in Architectural Technology in 1999 in California with an additional certificate in AutoCAD Technology and a minor in Interior Design, worked at different firms on the lower mainland and in Australia before returning to the Okanagan Valley. In 2005 she was head hunted by the construction company where she later met Ams. “I grew up in Penticton and since the age of 14 have been drawing homes,� she said. “My passion has always been in luxury residential. After Ams and I met and spent one year working together, we began making plans for creating All Elements.�

Home Hardware Building CentreCentre Penticton Home Hardware Building ProBuilders Builders Supply Supply Ltd. Pro Ltd. Proud Supplier to Kim Larson and the team at All Elements! Proud Supplier to Trevor and Scott! 250-493-1233 • 150 Fairview Place, Penticton B.C. V2A 6A5

250-493-1233 150 Springfield Fairview Place Penticton B.CV1Y V2A 6A5 250-860-4663 ••1650 Rd, Kelowna B.C. 5V4

In 2009, the pair opened the doors on the new business. Larson said that it wasn’t the perfect timing to start a business in the construction industry, especially with a recession well underway. But their determination and talent paid off. “We found a successful niche in luxury projects. People who could afford to, found that it was a great time to build, and that kept us busy. It helps that Stephan and I have a great working relationship. There is a balance between the two of us. When I have questions, he has answers and vice versa. That harmonious working relationship has created an enjoyable workplace and it’s reflected in the final product.� The Murray residence is also u p fo r t h e B u s i n e s s E x c e llence Award in kitchens under $65,000. But, it isn’t the only All Elements project selected as a 2016 Tommie finalist. “We are up for an Award of Excellence in showhomes as a trade partner for the showhome at McKinley Beach, and the Laurino residence which was selected for the $500,000 to $750,000 category as well as the under $65,000 category for Excellence in Kitchen Design. Also located in Naramata, the Laurino home incorporates All Elements combined skills in hill work, in listening to client

wants, and in its ability to create innovative solutions to complex challenges. “The client wanted the pool to be off the main floor. They didn’t want to have to go downstairs to get to access it because the lower floor is a rental suite and they wanted their living area to be separate,� she explained. “Privacy was important, so we built up, creating a concrete suspended slab platform for the pool. Underneath the slab is the maintenance access and hidden pool equipment.� She added that the residence was also on a very steep hill and required smart design and engineering because of the rapidly dropping bedrock. Larson emphasized that the streamlined process her company uses for designing, managing and building a home has allowed All Elements to create a special market for clients who live out of town. “The biggest win for our clients is that we do it all. They only have to speak with one person and not five different professionals. It makes for a smooth and cost effective process.� Although Larson’s plan is to focus on continuing to build her company’s presence in the Okanagan, she recently accepted a hard-to-resist project in Texas. All Elements Design, Manage, Build is at www.allelements.ca

Congratulations on another great project! ACCOUNTING & ASSURANCE • TAXATION ACCOUNTING & ASSURANCE • ACCOUNTING & BUSINESS SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY SERVICES BUSINESS PLANNING & FINANCING Nick CPA, CGA NickO’Coin, O’Coin, CPA, CGA 250.486.2253 or604.525.4686� 604.525.4686 250.486.2253 or 300– -500 500Sixth Sixth Avenue, Avenue, New 300 NewWestminster, Westminster,BC BCV3L V3L1V3 1V3 www.seymourgardner.com www.SeymourGardner.com

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R ELI A BILIT Y STA RTS AT THE TOP Serving Southern British Columbia Since 1976

Congratulations to the team at All Elements, on your Tommie Awards! 201-100 Front Street, Penticton BC Canada V2A 1H1 ph: +1 250 492 6100 | fx: +1 250 492 4877 www.boyleco.bc.ca

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KAMLOOPS

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FEBRUARY 2017

THE IMPORTANCE OF A PROPER HIRING PROCESS

KAMLOOPS DEB MCLELLAND

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mployee turnover – it’s an all too reoccurring experience within the world of

business. Yet its commonality and almost expectedness in the annual and sometimes monthly calendar of a business, it is not often prepared for. When the time comes and an employee gives their notice, many businesses, suddenly faced with their busy season and a vacant position, scramble to hire someone, anyone, to fill the gap. Unfortunately this often means that the new hire is not the right hire. Certainly they may have the basic level of skill needed to fulfill the position, but will they help

bring the business more success? Sometimes a hiring manager gets lucky and they bring someone on board who ends up an invaluable asset to the team, but most of the time, the new hire ends up being an employee that really does not much more than fill the job vacancy gap and sometimes, rather ineffectively. In business, we understand that lost time means lost money, but so does ineffectively used time. As business owners, you know that the right team can help you grow your company, excel within

In business, we understand that lost time means lost money, but so does ineffectively used time. As business owners, you know that the right team can help you grow your company, excel within your industry and build that always-critical company brand

Fleet van or personal sedan: You are responsible for employee safety. your industry and build that always-critical company brand. So why is it that all too often you end up feeling like you are swimming upstream, especially when it comes to your team? Likely because when it comes to hiring, you are reactive rather than proactive. At the Kamloops Chamber, we’ve been there. But in the process, we have discovered two key best practices that have helped us to experience success in building our team and we want to share them with you.

Whether your employees drive a company vehicle or their own, you are responsible for their safety when they drive for work. Learn more at RoadSafetyAtWork.ca.

Be a part of Road Safety At Work Week, March 6–10, 2017

Know who you want and who you need. You know you have a vacancy you need to fill and of course, you want to do it as soon as possible to minimize time lost. But who is it that you want to take on that role? What skillsets and capabilities would this person have? Is there a level of schooling that they require to do the job? Do they need to be an independent worker or self-starter? What qualities would the ideal candidate possess? Do they need to be creative? A big picture thinker? What would their character and temperament be? Do they need a sense of humour? Do they need to be calm or vivacious? What must they possess and what is trainable? When you start to ask these questions, be specific with your answers. For example, maybe you want a team player; but what does ‘team player’ mean for you and your organization or business? What would a team player be like, how would they function within the role? Being detailed in your list will help you to clarify

what is most important. Don’t be afraid that the person you may be creating on paper looks like Superman or Superwoman; the important thing is to dream about exactly who this candidate would be and what they would be able to bring to the team. Once you have brainstormed your list, sort the qualities and qualifications in order of importance and reference it when you begin thinking about who you may be able to hand-pick for the job or when you start your interview process after a general advertising of the position. Even if you end up with fifty or seventy-five percent of what you have listed, you will have an employee much better suited for the role and for your business than had you hired the first person who had an adequate level of skill and managed to present themselves well in the interview. TIP: If you are not handpicking someone for the role and are going through the application and interview process, we encourage you to employ the use of personality profiling resources (DISC, Colors etc.). These means help you truly see the candidate for who they are and not who they may be telling you they are in the interview process. Involve your team. We have found in brainstorming the ideal candidate, it is incredibly important to sit down with your team, or at least your management level staff and those working directly with the new employee to determine what this hire will look like. Every business and organization has a workplace culture, and your employees are the ones that drive it each and every day following your lead. Asking for, and valuing your existing employee’s opinions, will only help to strengthen your culture and your team environment, making the transition of the new hire not only easier and more welcoming for them, but also for your team. Using these practices, we have found great success in building our team and organizational culture and we trust they will do the same for you. Good luck with your new hire! ••• We have so many new events happen i ng at the K a m loops Ch a m b er: PowerPl ay, Coffee Mob, Lunch Mob, our Distinguished Speaker Series and more. Make sure to check out kamloopschamber.ca/events to avoid missing out on these great opportunities! Deb McClelland is the executive director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached email at deb@kamloopschamber.ca.


FEBRUARY 2017

OFF THE COVER/SALMON ARM

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ENTERPRIZE CHALLENGE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

to February 10. Community Futures will organize an orientation workshop for participants as wel l as prov ide access to mentors and presentation preparation guidance throughout February and March with the actual Awards Night and companion trade show taking place at Okanagan College on April 13. “The idea of an entrepreneursh ip comp et it ion c er t a i n ly isn’t new, but our hope is that through the Enterprize Challenge people who have never been exposed to entrepreneurship or business development of any kind will gain a greater understanding of it. As well, those who have existing businesses or have a really great idea for a business will be provided with information on how to set it up for success,” she said. Pa r ticipa nts ca n enter the contest either individually or as a team and will face two assigned tasks that must be completed to proceed to the awards presentation A competitor can be eliminated after the first task is completed. Last year 23 participants took part in the event and organizers are anticipating a similar turn out this year. “Last year we had 23 registrants and if we get to 25 we have to pre-screen as it’s not fair to the judges to have to assess that many. There is a lot of interest but we have to keep it to a manageable number,” she explained. Other local partners in the content include, KPMG, Nixon Wenger, Sproing Creative, The Morning Star, Sun FM, Futurpreneur Canada, W holesale Grafix, Accelerate Okanagan, City of Vernon, Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and Okanagan College. To learn more about the Ente r pr i ze Challe n ge v i sit t he Com mu n it y F ut u re s Nor t h Okanagan website at www.futuresbc.com

VantageOne CEO Glenn Benisheck (2nd from left) with last year’s winners Diane Kelm (left), Matt Parks and Jaye Coward

Last year’s winner Jaye Coward sharing information at her table during the 2016 Enterprize Challenge

A small trade shows will take place during the presentation of the Enterprize Challenge Awards in April

BUSINESS COMMUNITY PRESENTS ANNUAL REPORT FEB. 14TH

SALMON ARM CORRYN GRAYSTON

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he Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce will present its Annual Report to the City on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 to M ayor a nd Cou nci l at City Hall. We look forward to sharing the details of 2016

projects and accomplishments of the Chamber as well as tourism statistics and observations from the Salmon Arm Visitor Centre. A snapshot of 2017/2018 initiatives will also be presented at that time. ••• The Chamber is pleased to cohost a presentation by Shuswap MLA Greg Kyllo on the BC Budget - 2017. The presentation takes place on Friday, February 24 from 9:00 am – 11:00 am at the Comfort Inn. This is a complimentary presentation but seating is limited so contact the Chamber at (250) 832-6247 or admin@ sachamber.bc.ca before February 21, 2017 to reserve your seat. ••• Canoe Victory Hall is Salmon

Arm’s newest meeting space available for individuals, groups, community organizations and businesses. Owners Rae and Tor Cooper recently purchased the venue and have been enthusiastically refurbishing the premises for upcoming rental opportunities. The original Victory Hall was built in 1919 to commemorate the victory in World War 1 and remained the “heart” of the Canoe, BC community for almost 100 years. Canoe Victory Hall is a wonderful historic venue for dinners, dances, concerts, social events or any other type of gathering. Visit www.canoevictoryhall.wordpress.com or call Rae or Tor at (250) 515-2159. ••• Scott Duke and the team at

Welstand Group are excited to be expanding their professional services into Salmon Arm. Welstand Group helps business owners successfully sell their companies by coaching them on how to build transferable value into their organization. Their mission is to increase the success rate of business transition and succession in the interior of BC. The Welstand Group is proud to say their advantage is built on a 3-part foundation: Their Philosophy – We Care More, Their Knowledge – We Know More and Their Experience – We Do More. Check out their website www. welstandgroup.ca to learn more about the variety of impressive services offered by the team. •••

Sunny Dhaliwal is extremely pleased to an nou nce the recent open i ng of thei r bra nd new fu rn itu re store, Sit and Sleep Gallery. Located at 1701 – 10 Avenue SW, Sit and Sleep Gallery carries high-end brand n a me s i nclud i n g L a-Z-Boy, Décor Rest, CDI, LH Imports, Ser ta M att ress Ga l ler y a nd more. Su n ny i nv ites you to drop by the store and browse through all the beautiful furnishings they have available or call them at 778-489-5525. Corryn Grayston is the General Manager at the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at (250) 832-6247 or admin@sachamber.bc.ca.


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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

celebrates five-and-a-half years in business in Salmon Arm. The celebration was commemorated with a customer appreciation day, held on January 21st.

KELOWNA Kelowna’s Central Kitchen – Bar has been nominated for a Premier’s People’s Choice award, in addition to Best Employer and Best Company for the Small Business BC Awards. Other local nominees for the Premier’s People’s Choice award include Cryo Care, Eagle Eye Gifts (also nominated for Best Concept and Best Community Impact), Fermented Dining (also Best Concept), Kazuki Tomoda Photography, Mazu (also for Best Employer and Best Innovation), Mint Magazine, Okanagan Beauty Services, Okanagan Mobile Hearing (also for Best Community Impact), Peter Zegerman Street Food (also for Best Community Impact), Olympia Greek Tarvana, Salted Brick, Studio X Fitness, and Syilx Creations in Westbank. The winning businesses will be announced on February 23rd at the Small Business BC awards gala in Vancouver. Kelowna City Council has approved a rezoning request for a proposed Tourism Kelowna visitor center spanning 3,000-square-foot, located near the waterfront on Queensway Avenue. Council voted 7-1 in favor of rezoning and construction efforts are scheduled to begin next year. SomaLife Consulting, a nutraceutical health company based in BC, has raised a $1 million capital investment from Kelowna investors. The initiative was led by SomaLife Ventures VCC, a venture

FEBRUARY 2017

Salmon Arm has a new furniture store, Sit and Sleep Gallery, open at 1701-10th Avenue SW, near Buckerfields.

KAMLOOPS capital corporation which targets life science development growth. The funds raised will enable SomaLife to broaden their product line in Canada and in the US, in addition to marketing a new line of drinks and nutrient bars. The Kelowna Airport published their final annual passenger numbers for 2016, noting a record of 1,732,113 flying in and out of the airport last year. Airport director, Sam Samaddar, indicated that passenger counts are expected to increase by three per cent in 2017. Capri Insurance has merged with CMW Insurance, a company based in Burnaby. Capri will continue to operate under its current name, and their 13 offices and 300 workers will also remain the same. Merging with CMW will allow for better leverage in securing better terms, conditions and rates, and will increase their scale in the market. The 25th annual Tommie Awards, hosted by the Canadian Home Builders Association (CHBA) Central Okanagan, sold out this year and received a record

number of entries, with 200 finalists competing for 39 awards categories. These numbers are influenced by a wave of new home construction in Kelowna, which rose 72 per cent in 2016 from 2015. Awards were presented on January 28th, and the list of awards recipients can be viewed at www.tommieawards.com. A Ben Moss Jewellers location has reopened in Orchard Park Mall after changing ownership. After last year’s closure of all Ben Moss store locations, the company was acquired by Charm Diamond Centres in Halifax who decided to reopen 16 stores under the Ben Moss name. A Coast Capital Savings, Kelowna Branch has opened at 1544 Harvey Avenue on January 21st. This is Coast Capital’s first Okanagan branch and their most eastern location. CedarCreek Estate Winery celebrates their 30th year in business this year. To commemorate this occasion, they will offer free wine tastings and small bites on the 30th of each month this year.

LAKE COUNTRY

HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING - VENTILATION - FIREPLACES - PLUMBING

• Rooftop Units Units • Rooftop • Furnaces • Furnaces • Heat Pumps • Heat Pumps • Built Up Systems • Built Up Systems • Air Conditioning • Air Conditioning • Make Up Air Units • Make Up Air Units • Gas Fitting • Gas Fitting • Sheet Metal • Sheet Metal • New Equipment Installs • New Equipment Installs • Maintenance Contracts • Maintenance Contracts • Hot Water Tanks • Hot Water Tanks • Boilers Boilers • Fireplaces • Plumbing FireplacesServices

Finalists have been announced for the 2016 Lake Country Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards; the list of local businesses include: Odette’s Skin Laser Wellness Clinic, Tuff Industries – Innovative Business of the Year; Chantana Thai Food, Oyama Zipline, and Nor-Val Rentals – Customer Service Excellence; Dr. Sokolowski Dentist, Health First Chiropractic, and John Beales Accounting – Professional Service Provider of the Year; Teo’s Mexican Restaurant, Sole Revival, Sweet Legs, and Lake Country Ace Hardware – New Business of the Year; Alex Ambrozy IGA, Shannon Campbell L’Isola Bella – Employee of the Year; Oyama Zipline, Sip Happens Wine Tours, and Kangaroo Creek Farm – Tourism Enhancement Award; Nor-Val Rentals, Chantana’s Thai Restaurant, and Rooster’s Barber Shop – Small Business of the Year Award; Rose Family Orchard – Agricultural Innovator of the Year; Lake Country Health Planning, Save On Foods, and Connect Communities – Community Booster Award; Jim Clipperton (Nor-Val Rentals), Duane Thomson (Rail Trail), Shannon Paul-Jost (Health Planning), and Joy Haxton (Food Bank) – Gerry Morton Award. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on February 3rd.

SALMON ARM The Great Canadian Oil Change, owned by Wade and Heather Nicholson,

Be Inspired Events is a local nominee for the Small Business BC Awards Premier’s People’s Choice award. Other Kamloops nominees for the award include BJC HVAC Ltd (also nominated for Best Concept and Best Community Impact), Everything Organized, and Rainbow’s Roost. The City of Kamloops has issued an estimated $158-million in building permits as of the close of 2016, with permits issued largely to homebuilders constructing multi-family units. More growth is expected for 2017, particularly in industrial and commercial construction. The 2017 BC Care Awards, hosted by the BC Care Providers Association (BCCPA), recognized Tasia McLean Warren of H & H Total Care (representing the Kamloops-North Thompson region), as Care Provider of the Year (Residential) for her excellence in service as a care aide. Awards will be presented by provincial Health Minister, the Hon. Terry Lake, at a ceremony in Victoria on February 20th. The Kamloops Chamber of Commerce welcomes new team member, Jeremy Heighton, into his role as Member Relations Coordinator. Colin O’Leary, Manager, Business Retention & Expansion, for Venture Kamloops, has recently been named among North America’s Top 40 Under 40 Economic Development Rising Stars. Mr. O’Leary has recently acquired his Certified Economic Developer Designation and plays a key role with the city’s economic development organization. The team at Daley & Company CPA LLP have welcomed on three new members, Sandra Blair, Kevin Cooper, and Shawn Birkenhead, into their partnership.

PENTICTON Local business, Chic Mobile Boutique, has been nominated for the Small Business BC Awards Premier’s People’s Choice award, and for the Best Concept award this year. Other Penticton nominees for the award include Felts Photo Services, and Wine Crush Market (also nominated for Best Concept). The Naramata Inn in Naramata, BC, welcomes Ambrosia Restaurant and Lounge, an establishment that will be run by Chef Victor Bongo beginning this spring. Chef Bongo comes with many years of experience, and has most recently been cooking at Rooftop in Vancouver in a pop-up. There are three separate spaces to Ambrosia, featuring a restaurant on the main floor, a lounge on the lower floor, and a patio. White Kennedy LLP congratulates Mr.


Karan Bowyer moved on from the Summerland Community Arts Council (SCAC) on January 12 after serving six years on the SCAC board before her four years as office manager. Karan helped develop many new programs and managed the Arts Council through several transitions, including the

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Daniel Bibby, Chairman of Tourism Kelowna and board member of the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission (COEDC), has accepted a position as executive director of Spirit Ridge at NK’MIP Resort in Osoyoos. Mr. Bibby’s posting begins March 1st, and he plans to continue service with both Tourism Kelowna and the COEDC board amidst his other responsibilities.

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The Summerland Credit Union’s Comfort for a Cause initiative, where staff make a small donation to wear jeans to work on Fridays, raised $896.16 in their fourth quarter which they donated to the Summerland Community Arts Council. Continuing their support of local artists, the Credit Union is featuring work by Summerland photographer Elizabeth Wrobel until April 30th.

Above: Denys Lawrence, new President of CANSI

Chief Clarence Louie of the Osoyoos Indian Band has been appointed to the Order of Canada, one of 100 recent appointments named by Governor General David Johnston. Chief Louie was recognized for exceptional contributions to expanding economic opportunities for Indigenous groups.

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Several new businesses have opened their doors in the Summerland area, including Union Kitchen Inc., a casual restaurant serving locally sourced food, which opened on Tuesday, January 24th. Content Organic Digital Marketing offers online marketing and search engine optimization services to help businesses get discovered. Kingfisher Craft Company is a new online business that offers a variety of handmade unique items and gifts created by a local family. Phalanx Construction provides carpentry, siding and framing for residential and commercial buildings. Dagget Electrical is a new firm that performs work related to the design, installation, and maintenance of electrical systems. Reil Mechanical opened their business to offer plumbing and heating services. L.A. Beamish Janitorial is a recently-opened janitorial company providing residential and commercial cleaning services. Also new to Summerland - Tite Fine Finishing is a finishing carpentry company for projects such as installing crown molding, baseboards, windows, stairs and other features.

Okanagan Crush Pad has launched their new website, okanagancrushpad. com, which focuses on the wines and bringing the history and mission of the winery to the fore with a crisp design and beautiful images. This month, Vancouver Magazine included them in their list of The Okanagan’s 8 Most Stunning Wineries. The piece highlighted the architecture of wineries, and described Crush Pad as “…a triumph of utilitarian chic…”.

The Canadian Association of Nordic Ski Instructors (CANSI) has announced the appointment of Denys Lawrence as their new President. Lawrence is a resident of SilverStar Mountain and brings with him years of experience in coaching, instruction and operations in the sport of Nordic skiing.

OLIVER OSOYOOS

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The Summerland Chamber of Commerce invites nominations for their annual Business & Community Excellence Awards before the deadline on February 1st at 5pm. Three new awards categories have been added this year, celebrating excellence in agri-business, the arts, and in customer service. Nominations may be submitted through the Chamber’s website, and winners will be announced at an “Oscars style” awards gala at Center Stage on March 11th. A free Nominee’s Reception will be held on Friday, February 10th, from 5-7pm at the Arena Banquet Hall. The awards are always a great way to celebrate the businesses, individuals and organizations that make Summerland such a special place to live and work.

Glenn Benischek, CEO of VantageOne Credit Union, has announced a call for applications from community organizations seeking to benefit from VantageOne’s Great Community Giveaway program, which will see $100,000 in funds donated within the community. One community organization will receive $50,000, while the remaining $50,000 will be distributed in smaller amounts. Applications may be submitted online through VantageOne’s website until the deadline of 4pm on January 31st.

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Summerland business, Open Skies Media, has been received a nomination for the Small Business BC Awards Premier’s People’s Choice award. Reez’s Smoked Meat Diner was also nominated for the award.

On Feb 1, Sarah Nilson celebrated the first anniversary of her taking over Main St. Yoga. Main St. Yoga offers both indoor classes year-round and outdoor ones at wineries and on the dock during the summer. Sarah is also a yoga instructor, who owns and operates Golden Wrench Contracting with her husband, Brad.

Eatology Diner has been nominated for a Premier’s People’s Choice award through the Small Business BC Awards for this year. Vernon business, Pooch Partners, is also contending for the award title.

Vernon’s downtown core will soon benefit from the government-funded Job Creation Partnerships “Place-Making” project, which assists in the planning, design and management of public spaces. Through the project, two individuals will receive work experience from the Downtown Vernon Association, as they construct a guide and operations manual for businesses to use in managing street safety and security. Nearly $25,000 has been pledged from the Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation’s Community and Employer Partnerships fund, and $78,251 in funding has been provided by the City of Vernon, Downtown Kelowna, and Interior Health.

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Ogopogo Valley Tours recently achieved a Silver rating in environmental management and corporate social responsibility with Green Tourism Canada. The rating recognizes their actions that include donating services to local charities, launching the first hybrid tour vehicle in the Okanagan, and achieving carbon neutrality while protecting forests in Haida Gwaii & Africa. Owners and operators Adonica and Darren Sweet said “Sustainable Tourism is our driving force, while providing guests with personalized “Ogopogo-Style” service.”

VERNON

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Above: Mr. Andrew Nendick, new Partner at White Kennedy LLP

most recent move to Wharton Street. She will remain involved with several upcoming events including Corks and Canvas.  

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Andrew Nendick on his appointment as Partner in the firm. Mr. Nendick has practiced with White Kennedy since 2003 and has considerable experience in corporate and personal tax, corporate year ends and other professional accounting services. White Kennedy celebrates its 25th year in business this year.

MOVERS AND SHAKERS

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FEBRUARY 2017

Maple Roch, after moving into their new outlet and distribution space on Victoria Road, recently signed an agreement to export their products to Japan. One of only two maple syrup producers in Canada, the company also showcased its Saint Q line to an international audience of 25,000 at the International Fancy Food Show in San Francisco at the end of January. Neal Carter and Associates Ltd. are now operating as FarmSolutions.Net, providing agricultural fabrics and nets for protection from birds, rain, hail and sun - including custom nets, design and engineering services. Neal and Louisa Carter founded Okanagan Specialty Fruits, which they sold in April 2015 to an American company, although they are both still involved as President and CFO respectively. Okanagan Specialty Fruits will soon be test-marketing their non-browning Arctic™ Golden apple in slices in the US. In a profile on the growth of cideries in the Okanagan by the US-based Craft Cider Magazine, Dominion Cider Co. was featured as one of five highlighted ciders for their Ginger cider.

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OPINION

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FEBRUARY 2017 A division of Invest Northwest Publishing Ltd. Thompson Okanagan Office #210-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 8C7 Toll free: 1.866.758.2684  Fax: 1.778.441.3373 Email: info@businessexaminer.ca Website: www.businessexaminer.ca

PUBLISHER/EDITOR |  Lise MacDonald, lise@businessexaminer.ca SALES |  Joanne Iormetti – joanne@businessexaminer.ca, Thom Klos – thom@businessexaminer.ca, Josh Higgins – josh@businessexaminer.ca WRITERS |  Julia MacDonald, John MacDonald, Beth Hendry-Yim, David Holmes, Linda Wenger, Kristin van Vloten WEBSITE | John MacDonald

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TAKING AIM AT WALLETS OF BUSINESS OWNERS

MARK MACDONALD

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s e x p e c te d , when t he Fe d e r a l g o v e r n m e n t announced its spending intentions following their 2015 election victory, at one point or another, someone or some group was going to be expected to pay for those promises. Wit h t he prom i sed def icit alarmingly higher than what Justin Trudeau said it would be – w ith no bra kes i n sight – there are hints of where the extra revenue the government now claims it needs. T he Ca nad ia n Cha mb er of Commerce sent out a notice recently indicating the federal government is considering taxing employer-paid health and dental benefits. In its release, the Chamber states: “A lon g w it h add i n g hundreds or thousands of dollars to Canadians’ tax bills, this

proposal could cause many employers to stop offering coverage to employees.” B efore u rg i ng memb ers to contact the Minister of Finance or their local MP’s to protest s u c h a m o ve, t h e C h a m b e r noted when Quebec introduced a si m i la r ta x, 20 per cent of employers dropped health and dental benefits for employees. Studies suggest the removal of this tax benefit across the board could result in a decrease of 50 per cent of small firms that will be able to offer health benefits. So, it’s time to speak up. A t t h i s j u n c t u r e , i t’s n o t clear whether Trudeau’s tactics will be similar to those of former PM Paul Martin and his famous “trial balloons”, where he would float a high number in terms of a potential tax increase before crossing the country, “listening and gathering input” from everyone before announcing a lower hike. W hich resulted in congratulatory thanks when the final increase was less than expected, and somehow m ade u s feel better t h at we weren’t going to be paying that much more ta x – just a titch more. It was clever salesmanship, politically speaking. L etters of compl a i nt f rom constituents do register w ith pol iticia ns, a nd a re a n

important part of the process. If this is just a trial, then rest assured if few Canadian busin e s s e s c o m pl a i n a b o ut t h e benefit tax, the federal government will proceed. A statement made years ago by a local politician rings true at every level of public office: “We will tax until we find opposition”. If there is no push back, the government considers this path of least resistance the best route to take, and proceeds undaunted. There were more than a few hints that the feds were also going to increase Employment Insurance premiums for companies – perhaps as much as $1,000 per worker. Nothing has materialized on that front yet. Other suggestions were increasi ng the GST a poi nt or two, or even d raw i ng f u nds from currently healthy Canada Pension. Whichever pockets the federal government decides to pick for its pet projects has yet to be determined, but rest assured they’ll be aiming at business in some way, shape or form. It remains, therefore, for business to somehow offset those increased costs to the market – if the market can indeed bear it. It’s not as if Canada’s economy is exactly robust. While we

did extremely well to weather the recent globa l crisis better than most, indicators are show i ng that clouds may be gathering on the not so distant horizon. Nationa l econom ic growth has slowed to 0.7 per cent. Canada’s economy needs to be around 3 per cent growth in order to be considered growing, or healthy. T r u d e a u’s L i b e r a l s c a mpaigned on investing in infrastructure, which was palatable to voters. The country needs upgrades on its highways, water and sewer lines, for example, that haven’t been updated for decades. Public buildings like schools and hospitals – shared responsibilities with the provinces but nevertheless a federal concern via transfer payments from Ottawa – and other projects were what many would have anticipated. Ye t v i r t u a l ly not h i n g h a s b een a n nou nced a s yet, a lthough the Liberals have been pou r i ng m i l l ion s i nto t hei r priorities – including sending bucket loads of cash overseas to various foreign governments, which doesn’t help Canadian taxpayers. Canada became very tax competitive internationally under the previous government, and new U. S. P re sid ent Dona ld

Trump has already announced moves to bring America back towards reason with corporate tax rates. It might not make sense to non-business people that lowering corporate income ta x act u a l ly st i mu l ates t he economy and ultimately gives the government more money in its coffers at the end of the day, but that is exactly what it does. Why? Because it provides that all-important component: Incentive. Where if an investor sees an opportunity to move forward and profit from their risk, they’re more likely to take it. If the potential reward is not greater than the risk, they hold back. It’s human nature. So it remains to be seen what the federa l Libera ls w i l l do. Will they revert back to former established Liberal patterns of h ig her ta xes to pay for gover n ment wh i m s a nd wants? Or will they leave tax rates where they are and seek to remain competitive with our neighbours to the south? Or will they keep current tax levels reasonable for investment and industry, and aim at increasing jobs and therefore the number of taxpaying employees who will contribute to the national purse? A s t he Ca nad ia n Cha mber urges, it’s time to speak up now.

BC FEDERATION OF LABOUR PRESIDENT MISSES THE POINT OF COMPARING GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE-SECTOR PAY

THE FRASER INSTITUTE CHARLES LAMMAM

I

n a letter  to the ed itor published by the Vancouv e r S u n , B C Fe d e r a t i o n of Labour president Irene L a n z i n ge r i n t e r p re t s a recent Fraser Institute study as demonstrating the benefits of joining a union. T his misses the main point of our study, wh ich i s t h at gover n ment

workers in BC receive higher wages than their private-sector counterparts, regardless of whether they are covered by a union agreement or not. Usi ng data f rom Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey, the study finds that government employees in BC (federal, provincial and local) receive, on average, 7.4 per cent higher wages than comparable workers in the private sector. This wage prem iu m accou nts for differences between individual workers in the two sectors such as age, gender, education, tenure, experience and type of work. And the wage premium is in addition to the more generous non-wage benefits—such as pensions, early retirement and job security–that the government sector also enjoys. Our analysis shows that even after accounting for unionization, there is still a wage premium for government workers (4.2 per cent). Put differently, gover n ment workers—even

those who are unionized—receive h ig her pay t h a n comparable private sector workers doing similar jobs. S o, w h a t’s t h e re a s o n fo r the disparity in pay between the govern ment a nd private sector? The reason is twofold. In the government sector, political factors largely determine the wage-setting process, while wages in the private sector are guided by productivity, market forces, and profit constraints. Employers in the private sector compensate their employees based on employee productiv ity, the va lue they add to the bottom line. If employers overpay, they risk going out of business. But if they pay too l ittle, they risk losi ng va luable staff. Government employers, on the other hand, do not face the same risks, as they have the ability to fund overly generous compensation through higher taxes. W hile raising taxes

entail political and economic costs, the budget constraints and economic realities in the government sector are much less stringent than in the private sector. These differences are amplified by the monopoly environment in which the government s e c to r o p e ra te s v e r s u s t h e competitive environment of the private sector. Most of the govern ment sector operates without the threat of compet it ion, me a n i ng con su mers ca n’t choose a n a lter n at ive provider of government services that may be cheaper or of higher quality. The monopoly on ser v ice prov ision mea n s that government workers can demand and in fact receive a wage premium without competitive discipline and fear of responses from other firms. Un l i ke f i r m s i n t he pr ivate sector, gover n ments do not have an incentive to balance the need to retain and attract workers with their ability to

compete aga i nst riva ls on price, quality, and cost. The fact is wages and benefits in the government sector are out of step with the private sector. Si nce compensation costs constitute a significant portion of govern ment program spending—about half in most provinces—governments cou ld f i nd substa nt i a l savi ngs by a l ig n i ng wa ges a nd benefits w ith private sector norms. T h is wou ld not on ly be the financial prudent thing to do, but it would also ensure fairness to the taxpayers in the private sector who ultimately foot the bill. Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre and Milagros Palacios are coauthors of the Fraser Institute study Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Canada.

SUBCRIPTIONS  |  $45 PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $80 FOR 2 YEARS (24 ISSUES), SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: WWW.BUSINESSEXAMINER.CA. DISTRIBUTION: FOURTH WEEK OF EACH MONTH VIA CANADA POST AD MAIL. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Produced and published in British Columbia. All contents copyright Business Examiner Thompson Okanagan, 2017. Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240


19

FEBRUARY 2017

WORKING PARTNERSHIPS CREATE AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN THE HEART OF KELOWNA The Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society partnered with BC Housing, Aboriginal Housing Management Association, the City of Kelowna and Van Mar Constructors to create I spa-us ki-low-na Heart of Kelowna

K

ELOWNA – I spa-us kilow-na Heart of Kelowna, a n a f ford able hou si ng project in downtown Kelowna created by the Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society in partnership with BC Housing, Aboriginal Housing Management Association, and the City of Kelowna, is a finalist for three Canadian Builders’ Association’s Tommie awards: Excellence in Public or Private Partnership, Excellence in Creating Affordable Housing, and Excellence in Creating a Low-Rise Multi-Family Development. “This is a project that brought several levels of government together,” said Project Manager Mike Denbok, Van Mar Constructors. “BC Housing with the Ki-low-na Friendship Society funded the development and the City of Kelowna donated the land.” With the Canadian Rental Index showing Kelowna as severe for affordable rental units, the new apartment complex offers relief, especially as it targets low to medium income adults, seniors and families. It offers 86 units from studio to three bedroom homes, units with an accessible bathroom and wheelchair ready kitchen, and a large amenities room with kitchen and direct, ground floor access to the courtyard and play area. “The biggest challenge with the site was reaching the desired density,” said Patrick McCusker, Patrick McCusker A rchitecture Inc. “The city had zoning on the property for 90 units. We wanted to make sure the units were liveable with adequate space that would fit the city’s and the

The I spa-us ki-low-na Heart of Kelowna affordable housing project was a partnership between BC Housing, Aboriginal Housing Management Association, The City of Kelowna and the Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society.

The high water table required innovative engineering solutions and a series of sumps and catch basins CREDIT:VAN MAR CONSTRUCTORS

CREDIT:VAN MAR CONSTRUCTORS

Society’s parameters.” He was pleased with the final result, adding that by incorporating innovative design the project successfully created eight bachelor suites, 34 one-bedroom units, 32 two-bedroom units, and eight three-bedroom units, all with non-standard nine foot ceilings. “The City of Kelowna has been very good to work with,” he said, “allowing the process to move along smoothly,” said Denbok. “It’s a breath of fresh air when there is cooperation from all levels with this kind of project. It also helps that there are good local trades to draw from as we like to support the local economy and work with individuals who know the region.” Although i spa-us ki-low-na is not a social housing project, but because the society is not looking to make a profit on the units, it can rent them at lower than market value. The bachelor suites will go for $639 per month and the twobedroom unit will cost $913 per month. “The finishings that were used are similar to installations in higher end condominiums,” McCusker said. “The quality and design is that of an entry level unit. Van Mar was very diligent and conscientious in keeping the project on time and on budget even with the higher quality products.” A unique feature of the facility is the suite to suite access with eight

“The finishings that were used are similar to installations in higher end condominiums.” PATRICK MCCUSKER ARCHITECT/OWNER, PATRICK MCCUSKER ARCHITECTURE INC

of the studio units connected with a larger apartment to help facilitate families. “For the elder family member or student who wants to live independently but close to family, there is a door connecting the two units, very much like you see in a hotel room, locking from both sides.” McCusker added. “It was a feature the Society felt would allow for aging in place.” For Denbok, one of the stand-out features was the courtyard. “The building is L-shaped to form a courtyard with a playground, shelter, plantings and other outdoor amenities. It’s a great space for families to enjoy the outdoors.” Debok explained that before construction began the high-water table in the Central Green location had to be considered and properly engineered. “It was a challenge because we had to lower the water table. We used a dewatering system in

strategic locations on site and a series of sumps and catch basins. The foundation for the parkade had to be kept dry. Basically, the foundation is wrapped like a swimming pool; no water is getting in there!” Built to LEED Silver standards, I spa-us ki-low-na was carefully designed to fit specific criteria to keep costs down and therefore keep rents reasonable. “It was a collaborative experience, with trades, consultants and the Society contributing to the success of the overall design and finished project,” said McCusker. “It has high efficiency mechanical and electrical systems, light fixtures, and low flow toilets,”

said Denbok. “The benefit to the owner is lower operating costs. Even the exterior materials were considered for durability and low maintenance.” Hardi Planks and bright accent colours combined with unique and eye catching exterior finishes, give the complex an attractive curb appeal and the simple xeriscaping adds a splash of green but requires little water and maintenance to keep it fresh and neat looking. For the City of Kelowna the project adds to the number of units for low to medium income and to the ongoing revitalization of downtown. I spa-us ki-low-na is at 1745 Chapman Road in Kelowna

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FEBRUARY 2017

UPGRADE TO LIFE DOWNTOWN “After improvements to the original design, our team agreed that The Stockwell Downtown is a place that we would be proud to call home”

Vacant lot gets new lease on life as Innocept Development takes existing plans and transforms them into contemporary 1 & 2 bedroom condos

K

MATT PASUTTO

ELOW NA – Downtown Kelowna is undergoing a transformation into a metropolitan destination complete with trendy patios, awardwinning boutiques and eclectic shops set amongst a backdrop of heritage brick buildings and t he pr i st i ne waters of L a ke Okanagan. Set on a major arter y border i ng t h i s v ibra nt dow ntow n core is the latest condominium development by Innocept Development & Real Estate Outsourcing, The Stockwell Downtown. The 32-unit building, managed by a team of professionals, including Innocept’s Dan MacKinnon, and Matt Pasutto. One of the only new multifamily residential projects in downtown Kelowna that will be ready for occupancy in 2017, the building features one and two bedroom homes with nine foot ceilings, open living areas with large exterior windows, and a variety of floor plans

DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, INNOCEPT DEVELOPMENT & REAL ESTATE OUTSOURCING

that offer tranquil mountain or pleasant city views. Situated on the corner of Stockwell Avenue and Richter Street, the location had been a vacant lot for almost ten years with multiple owners and pre-existing plans. “We took those plans for entry level rental units and transformed them into a fresh and contemporary look and feel condominium,” said Pasutto. With the city looking to create a more pedestrian friendly downtown core, the development fits a specific niche. “It’s a location and design for people wanting to spend less time getting somewhere and more time enjoying urban living,” said MacKinnon. With an impressive walking score of 90, the location lines up with the city’s vision of creating

The Stockwell Colour Palette is more indicative of the historic warehouses in the cultural district CREDIT:LIFANG

Living space is bright, airy and on the top floor boasts mountain views CREDIT:LIFANG

a walker’s paradise, reducing traffic in its core and organically increasing the quality of life. “Before developing any property we ask ourselves if this is somewhere we wou ld wa nt to live,” Pasutto said. “After improvements to the original design, our team agreed that The Stockwell Downtown is a place that we would be proud to call home.” The details have been carefully considered with the long-term objective of enhancing lives through location and access to nearby amenities. “W hen we took the project over we looked at every aspect of construction and what our customers would want as options. We integrated products and materials that fit with the idea of efficiency and sustainability wherever we could.” More than forty per cent of the parking spaces are electric vehicle ready, windows are argon filled for higher insulation value, the elevator has a system that uses one third of the power of conventional elevators, the rear yard space has been designed to reduce storm water runoff, and

Justin Pasutto is an integral part not only of the family-owned business, but in the building of the Stockwell as site supervisor CREDIT:INNOCEPT DEVELOPMENT

a community garden with raised beds is available for the homeowner to grow their own food. “We wanted the building to last a long time,” MacKinnon said. “We used exterior materials that are durable, and we chose a 60 mm TPO finish for the roof that will reduce the ‘urban heat island

effect’ and a lighter colour that will reflect light. This is Innocept’s first collaborative residential project and the team has put pride and care into its creation and many long hours into the consideration of every detail. E x te r i o r f i n i s h e s i n c l u d e

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FEBRUARY 2017

Dan MacKinnon said that finishes were chosen for The Stockwell Downtown to ensure durability and longevity

Matt Pasutto is one of a team of professionals working on creating The Stockwell Downtown

CREDIT:INNOCEPT DEVELOPMENT

CREDIT:INNOCEPT DEVELOPMENT

The kitchen design has clean lines and carefully considered storage CREDIT:LIFANG

In the construction of the building materials that are durable are used to keep maintenance costs low CREDIT:LIFANG

durable high-quality HardiePlank and a classic white brick façade details. Floor plans range in size from 671 square feet and onebedroom- one bathroom layouts, to 1025 square foot homes featuring two bedrooms and two bathrooms. Each of the eight homes on the first floor have

large private outdoor living areas, including spacious patios and fenced, grass backyards, while residents on the upper floors will enjoy a generous sized balcony. T he k itchens a re outfitted with the highest quality finishings, like quartz countertops, porcelain tile backsplash,

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contemporary wide plank laminate flooring, a choice of flat or modern shaker cabinetry with soft close hinges, contemporary hardware and Energy Star stainless steel Whirlpool appliances. Bathrooms are elegantly laid out with quartz countertops in all bathrooms, tile backsplash, and low flow toilets. Optional upgrades include porcelain tile f looring, glass surround showers, and a designer fixture package. Homeowners can select one of two palettes chosen by Interior Designer, Amy Daniels of Interics Design. The Richter Colour Palette, inspired by the bright energetic v ibe of Kelow na’s downtown; and the Stockwell Colour Palette, a selection in rich character, indicative of the historic warehouses in the cultural district. “Managed by Traine Construction, site work is well underway and with young professionals relocating to the Okanagan in search of both opportunity and lifestyle, The Stockwell Downtown offers them the location

Fortune Marketing’s Stockwell Property specialists, Samantha Van Buuren and Rebekah Danchuk CREDIT:FORTUNE MARKETING

as well as the cosmopolitan aesthetic they are looking for,” said Pasutto. The Stockwell also has an interesting connection to wellk now n Ca n a d i a n d e si g ner, blogger, and T V personality, Jillian Harris. Her fiancé, Justin Pasutto, is an integral part of Innocept Development & Real

Estate Outsourcing and acts as the developer representative for The Stockwell. Harris herself worked closely with the design team, going over the features and finishes, and has given the project her ‘stamp of approval’. The Stockwell Downtown is at 710 Stockwell Ave in Kelowna. www.stockwellkelowna.ca

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

22

FEBRUARY 2017

New year ushers in greater focus on workplace wellness Employers receive $4 to $5 savings for every one dollar invested in health promotion

Kari Bradley said the Chamber of Commerce benefits package allows business owners to get the coverage they want and need

Nicole Beach said that the Victoria Airport Authority is dedicated to a healthy and safe workplace

Randy Haw said pooled plans offer rates that are more stable, especially for small to medium sized businesses

John Yim, naturopathic doctor said that preventative healthcare in the workplace avoids interruptions in workflow

CREDIT:VICTORIA AIRPORT AUTHORITY

CREDIT:WESTLAND INSURANCE

CREDIT:DIRK HYDEMANN PHOTOGRAPHY

CREDIT:FRANK ALLEN FINANCIAL

BETH HENDRY-YIM

F

or small and medium sized businesses, the cost of reduced productivity and absenteeism due to illness is not always easy to absorb. Yet many employers assume that creating and maintaining a wellness program will be too expensive. Nicole Beach, human resources manager, Victoria Airport Authority (VAA) at

Victoria International Airport said that having healthy and engaged employees has multiple spinoff benefits, not least of all, workplace safety. “Safety is a heralded aspect of everything we do from a regulatory perspective, but we’ve also broadened our scope significantly by emphasizing individual health and wellness.” Recognized by Excellence Canada for five years in a row with Merit Awards

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Stacey Lee, airport fire captain staying physically fit CREDIT:VICTORIA AIRPORT AUTHORITY


FEBRUARY 2017

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

As part of Workplace Wellness Month the Victoria Airport Authority brought in a specialist on the raw food diet CREDIT:VICTORIA AIRPORT AUTHORITY

“Everyone’s perspective may be different in terms of where they look for information or treatment for a healthy lifestyle” NICOLE BEACH MANGER, HUMAN RESOURCES, VICTORIA AIRPORT AUTHORITY (VAA)

for the programing VAA puts together for staff during Workplace Wellness month, its events cover a variety of health issues, including showcasing the services already provided through extended benefits. “Our coverage through Great West Life is very generous, but not always used,” Beach said. “For workplace wellness we put the spotlight on benefits that are already paid for and require no extra expense. And it’s not just physical wellness we are promoting. This past year we put more focus on internal wellness and mental health.” Kari Bradley, employee benefits specialist with Frank Allen Financial in Nanaimo, said that if an employee is unable to get work done because of physical or mental issues, it costs the employer time and money. “Business owners and members of their local Chambers of Commerce can get on an extended benefits package with the coverage they want and need. Even the simplest plans meet the employee where they are in terms of their wellness even if they are in the worst of health.” Candace Mawdsley, administration and marketing coordinator, Kamloops Chamber of Commerce, said that wellness programs are a strong motivator for businesses becoming new members. “We have business owners joining the Chamber to take advantage of its Group Insurance Plan.” Beach pointed out that it’s important

for workplace wellness programs and benefits packages to be sensitive to d iffering ph ilosoph ies in treatment modalities. “Everyone’s perspective may be different in terms of where they look for information or treatment for a healthy lifestyle. Our plan covers alternative therapies as well as offering fully confidential counseling services through Shepell.” Randy Haw, financial advisor, Westland Insurance Group in Kamloops, said that because of pooled plans, rates are more stable, especially for the small to medium sized business. “The plan is flexible; some employers want more dental, while others look for more health. Each plan can be tailored for what the business owner and employees want.” According to Benefits Canada, studies demonstrate a $4 to $5 saving for every one dollar invested in health promotion. That’s a significant return on a business owners’ investment. Especially when preventable illness makes up approximately 70 per cent of the burden of illness and its associated costs. John Yim, naturopathic doctor and founder of Health and the Entrepreneur in Nanaimo, said that preventative healthcare, especially for business owners, helps avoid interruptions in workflow. “Stress can impact the immune system, sleep patterns, energy, mental health and the ability to do a job efficiently and productively. For the business owner, promoting healthy behaviours helps create a more positive and less stressful work environment.” He added that creating a wellness program doesn’t have to be complicated. It can be as simple as setting goals for number of steps, encouraging one day a week for healthy lunches, or utilizing the services provided by extended health plans. “Learning simple techniques to help

the body manage stress better are invaluable, not only for physical health but also for an individual’s sense of wellbeing, level of happiness and likelihood of staying on the job.”

23

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24

FEBRUARY 2017

NAI Commercial Okanagan Opens Office in Kelowna The full service commercial real estate brokerage firm sees opportunity to fill niche in Okanagan real estate market

K

ELOW NA—NAI Global has a new member in its i nternationa l network of owner operated commercial rea l estate brokerage fi rms: NA I Commercial Okanagan. T he brokerage firm recently launched its office in Kelowna and is open for business. “Why the Okanagan?” muses T im Dow n, Principal and Managing Broker. “This market is ready for a professional solut ion. O u r desi re wa s to bri ng i n a bra nd that a l lows us to operate independently, ta ke exceptiona l ca re of ou r clients, and also leverage the streng th of an international brand. “O u r of f i c e i s fo c u s e d o n com mercia l sa les, a nd leasing and property management services throughout the Okanagan Valley and BC Interior.” NAI Global is the largest real estate brokerage network of its kind in the world, with 375 member firms and over 6,700 loca l ma rket ex per ts. But i f NA I Com merci a l Ok a n aga n leverages a g loba l perspective, its founders’ sights are set firmly on serving the local community. A f ter a l l, the fou nders a re h ig h ly i nvested i n the Okanagan. The themes connecting t hese pa r t ners toget her a re yea rs of rea l estate ex p er ience, personal histories rooted in the Okanagan, and a high degree of trust in one another. “For many years I was with Colliers International where I worked with Tim—whom I’ve k n o w n p e rs o n a l ly fo r o v e r 30 years,” says Mike Geddes, P r i n c i p a l . “A n d I ’m a l s o a fourth generation Okanagan resident.”

From left to right: NAI Partners Mike Geddes, Tony Parmar, Philip Hare and Tim Down

In fact, Geddes’ family has b een pl ay i ng a l a rge role i n Okanagan real estate for over a c e n t u r y. H i s g re a t u n c l e W i l l i a m fo u n d e d t h e C e nt r a l O k a n a g a n L a n d & O rc h a r d C o m p a n y, G e d d e s & Co Rea l Estate wa s a pl ayer in the 1940s and 50s, and his father Gordon founded Geddes Construction. To ge t h e r, t h e s e p a r t n e r s (who also include Philip Hare a nd Tony Pa rma r) feel t hey have something unique to offer their community. “There h ave b een fa i rly d ra m at ic ch a n ge s i n t he c om merci a l rea l estate ma rket; restructuring related to buyouts and takeovers,” says Down. “ We se e t he gap s t h at a re opening up. We have deeper insights into market dynamics, and we want the Okanagan to benefit from that.” naiokanagan.ca

“Some diversity of commercial real estate brokerage solutions is overdue in Kelowna. The market is ready for a higher degree of professionalism.” MIKE GEDDES PRINCIPAL, NAI COMMERCIAL KELOWNA

A NAI featured property in Downtown Kelowna North

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP – A COMMUNITY WORTH SEEKING OUT

PENTICTON BRANDY MASLOWSKI

T

h e P e n t i c to n & W i n e Country Chamber of Com merce i s w i nd i ng up to celebrate its 110 th birthday this year during Chamber Week February 20th to 26th. We’ll kick off the week with

the Honourable Mayor Andrew Jakubeit’s proclamation on the steps of City Hall and celebrate with a Free Chamber 101 lunch for new members and a Business after Business Mixer at Canadian Family Financial. We’ll get a true taste of Penticton with Wine Crush Restau ra nt We ek br i n g i n g you exceptional deals on gourmet food all over town at a great price and finish up with a full d ay of Ch a mber Fa m i ly f u n at the Apex Mountain Mixer. With sponsors like New Country 100.7, Murray Buick GMC, B er r y & Sm ith a nd t he Gu n Barrel you know the food and drink will be amazing and there will be prizes galore. 1 10 y e a r s i s a n u m b e r w e

can really sink our teeth into and be proud of. Some might th i n k the Cha mber is a n old school orga n ization, hav ing been around for over a century, but chambers are often right on trend or ahead of the times to keep their members in the know about the latest benefits, news, business education and more. So what’s the real cost of being a Chamber member? Your Chamber membership can start as low as $250 per year and go up from there depend i ng on the size of your business and your marketing and networking needs. But the real cost has nothing to do with the price tag. T he moneta r y t ra nsact ion

seems minimal when you consider the link to the network of people, benef its, events, education, advocacy and most importantly business connections and mentors. The businesses in the community who have been Chamber members for 50, 60 a nd 70 yea rs feel they are paying a small price to be on the lead i ng edge of learning, building and mentoring a thriving local business community. The opportunities are so exciting when it comes to connecting, growing and building your business that within the first year, the penny per value seems like a no brainer. So before you invest in local radio advertising, newspaper ads,

gasol i ne, sh ippi ng, poi nt of sa le s y s tem s, pr i nt i n g, office supplies, legal fees and so much more, check out your local Chamber of Commerce to see what we have to offer. Many businesses get the price of membership back in the first few months just in the savings from promotions. You’ll be immersed in a culture that is rich with friends, connections and experiences you’ll never forget. Welcome to the Chamber – you’ll be glad you joined. Brandy Maslowski is the Executive Director of the Penticton & Wine Country Chamber of Commerce. To connect with her and her team go to www.penticton.org.


25

FEBRUARY 2017

WHAT DRIVES THE PURCHASE – PAIN OR PLEASURE? It’s difficult to determine which aspect of your product or service will

SALES

hold the most meaning

JOHN GLENNON

understand the prospect’s

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for the prospect until you

hen you first meet with a new prospect, how do you position your product or service? How do you characterize the value it delivers? How do you decide which elements will have the strongest appeal to the prospect? It’s d i f f icu lt to deter m i ne which aspect of your product or service will hold the most meaning for the prospect until you understand the prospect’s motivation for the potential purchase. Once you’ve discovered that, you can position your product or service as a best-fit from the prospect’s perspective. So—what motivates an individual prospect to buy from you? One prevalent theory is that people buy either to gain pleasure…or to avoid pain. In a broad sense, that’s correct. In fact, psychologists suggest that those are the two reasons that drive people to take any action! Can the answer really be that

motivation for the potential purchase

black and white? Consider this: the VP of Production at a manufacturing company has been wrestling with a production line problem for some time, and he has been unable to solve it. This problem is hindering production and negatively impacting profits. The pressure the VP is getting from his CFO is causing him considerable worry—worry that results in many sleepless nights. That’s pain, right? The VP engages a process engineering consultant to help him solve the problem. With the consultant’s analysis, input, and recommendations, the VP is able to solve the problem and bring production and profits back to

desired levels. The pain is gone. No more pressure from the CFO, and no more sleepless nights. The VP now feels relieved and ex periences a n overwhel ming sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. But, hold on! “R el ief,” “sen se of ac compl i sh ment,” a nd “sat i sfaction”—wouldn’t those feelings be characterized as pleasure? Of course! Here’s the big question: was the VP’s motivation to hire the consultant-driven by the desire to eliminate pain or the desire to gain pleasure? T he a nswer is … you don’t know. It could be either. Your job is to find out which of the two motivators is operating in the most dominant way in the prospect’s world. And to figure that out, you need to ask good questions. Think of pain and pleasure as opposite sides of the same “coin. ”One side of the coin represents the situation from a negative (or pain) perspective; the other side represents the situation from a positive (or pleasure) perspective. And here is the most important thing to remember: the prospect—NOT YOU—gets to choose which side faces up. The only reliable way to determine which side of the coin matters most to a particular individual is to ask the appropriate

EXPANSION OF ENGINEERING FIRM REACHES UNDERSERVED REGION Drawing on extensive expertise from both offices covers all areas of the electrical power industry

K

AMLOOPS — Struthers Tech, a consulting electrical engineering firm based in Penticton, recently expanded to reach a broader clientele base and to stay better connected with its existing customers in the Kamloops region. “The company is growing and felt that this location was a good choice for expansion,” said Marcie Cochrane, branch manager, adding that it also felt that there was a market opportunity to expand in the Kamloops area. “The new branch draws on the knowledge of our entire engineering team, offering its combined expertise on a wide range of projects and industries.” Struthers Tech provides electrical power system

“Our projects are diverse, from wind farms in Northern BC to hydropower generation, substations, and overhead power lines.” MARCIE COCHRANE BRANCH MANAGER, STRUTHERS TECH

engineering services to diverse industries from p o we r d i s t r i b u t ion to energy recovery feasibility and design. “Our projects include wind farms in Northern BC, microhydro and biomass projects. We provide complete designs and create drawings for electrical systems and control systems. We can provide programming for relays and the programmable devices used for systems control, as well as offering commissioning and ongoing maintenance support services.”

Cochrane, who was born and raised in Kamloops and graduated from UVIC in 2002, has worked with the City of Kamloops and consulting firms in Edmonton and Victoria. She’s been with Struthers Tech since July 2016. “I’ve worked w ith BC Hydro and utility compa n ies to desig n electrica l systems that a re i nte rc on n e c te d to t h e power grid and have provided consulting services for companies that don’t have in-house electrical expertise.” She said that although Struthers has worked extensively on regional projects, its reach also extends into Northern BC, Yukon, NWT and across Canada, as well as into the international marketplace. It provides professional engineers and draftspeople who work closely with a wide range of associated specialists in the electrical power industry. S t r u t h e r s Te c h i s a t #106-970 McMaster Way in Kamloops www.strutherstech.com

questions … and listen carefully to the prospect’s answer. Pay close attention to the words, the tonality, and the body language, and you’ll know whether to position your product or service as something that will help the prospect move away from an undesirable situation (pain) or move toward a desirable situation (pleasure). Questions to help you make that determination include: “What precipitated your interest in (your product or service)?” “ W h at sp eci f ic a l ly a re you hopi ng I ca n do for you? “W hat would the most ideal outcome be?” Assume you were to ask that CFO that first question, “What precipitated your interest…?” Consider the stark difference between these two possible responses: Response 1: I’m getting a lot of heat from our CFO to fix the assembly line bottlenecks which have not only thrown our production numbers off but also d r iven up ou r m a i nten a nce costs…both of which, he continually reminds me, are eating into our bottom line. Response 2: My goal for the next 60 days, and my commitment to our CFO, is to get our production numbers up by 10%, back to where they were in the first quarter of the year … and

at the same time, to smooth out the fluctuations in production throughput and reduce maintenance costs. Each answer describes the assembly line production situation, but each does so from a different side of the coin. One frames the situation from the perspective of the problem to be solved; the other frames it from the perspective of the goals to be achieved. The Winning Edge Avoid i ng pa i n or secu r i ng pleasure. There’s a subtle difference between the two positions likely to motivate a prospect. Yet by recognizing which side of the pain/pleasure coin is facing up, and by framing the discussion of your product or service from that perspective (thereby matching the prospect’s motivation), you can gain a slight edge. T h i s adva ntage of ten makes the difference between making the sale and not making the sale.

1 eB ag p John Glennon is the owner of Insight aRdS– B1 ge aW Sales Consulting Inc, an authorized pa ket eB S– Bucilling IR d V F Sandler Training Licensee. He acan e t ag aR ep Se d aW et be reached at jglennon@sandler. oW eB ck g u R R n B i C ll VI Fi e ag com, toll free at 1-866-645-2047 Rd at ep m Se s Co i Wd Re t o or visit www.glennon.sandler.com. » CR jec nstr Rd pro the co s m d Copyright 2013 Sandler t Co Training an 3 l e 5s age in i 1 0 s R I 20 » er and Insight Sales All12e2150w130e2 oorpmy en ject str s Consulting vInc. nk li ve n g ha di ams il d to Bu ee te cte for le d r se Th ids lan

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26

FEBRUARY 2017

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS FOR OLD FASHIONED MEAT MARKET Consumers are becoming more aware of the importance of quality and traceability in their food

K

AMLOOPS – Taste tests usually help determine a choice of what to eat; what has the best flavour or texture for example, but for Margaret Jordens a taste test turned out to the catalyst for opening a second gourmet meat shop. When she first moved to Kamloops in 2003, it was with the intention of eventually retiring. Her husband, Michael had recently passed away and after owning and operating a meat shop with him for almost 30 years it was time for her to turn it over to the next generation. Commuting every two weeks, she continued with her administrative duties at Seafair Gourmet Meats in Richmond, teaching her daughter the fine points of bookkeeping and management while her son managed the day to day operations of the shop. But back in Kamloops when she started serving Seafair’s beef cuts and FarmFed Halal chicken at dinner parties, her friends noticed the difference and started placing orders. “I was commuting back and forth between Kamloops and R ichmond and would end up bringing three or four marine coolers of meat back with me.” I n 2 0 05, Jo rd e n s w a s a pproached by a developer building a new strip mall in the city. The plans included a bakery, produce store and eventually a fish market and he thought it would be a good fit for a butcher shop. Jordens couldn’t resist and decided to postpone her retirement plans and open Summit Gourmet Meats. It was a good choice, not just for the Jordens family but also for Kamloops, to date, Summit has won the Reader’s Choice Award for best meat shop in the city nine times in ten years of

Margaret Jordens gives credit to her long-term employees for helping with the stores success CREDIT: KENT WONG

operation. It also won two Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards, one in 2012 and one just recently in 2016 where it was one of 186 businesses to be nominated. The Jordens’ journey to business excellence began when Margaret and Michael first met in Victoria in 1975. He was a butcher and she owned a restaurant with her mother in the community of Colwood. They eventually wed and founded their first meat shop in Victoria, operating it for four years. In 1983, however, the Jordens’ were beginning to tire of island living and desired to be closer to family on the mainland, so when an opportunity arose in Richmond they just couldn’t refuse it. The Jordens’ decided to

Hanging and aging a carcass for 21 days breaks down connective tissue and creates a more tender product

At Summit Gourment Meats butchers, like Jackson Baron, take pride in their trade CREDIT:KENT WONG

CREDIT: KENT WONG

Margaret Jorden’s son, Michael Jr. learned the tricks of the trade from his father, who had more than 25 years experience in the industry CREDIT: KENT WONG

With quality meat and customer service that is second to none, it is no surprise that Marg and her team are celebrating 10 great years in business! Congratulations from your friends at Cypress Insurance. Here is to celebrating the next 10 years! ✔ Commercial Insurance ✔ Business Insurance ✔ Bonding ✔ House Insurance

a division of Otto & Associates Insurance Agency Ltd. Rob Lemire

Lindsay Hobson

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27

FEBRUARY 2017

Margaret Jordens planned on retiring in Kamloops but opportunity knocked and she opened the door CREDIT: KENT WONG

“I was commuting back and forth between Kamloops and Richmond and would end up bringing three or four marine coolers of meat back with me.” Summit Gourmet Meats has won the Kamloops Readers Choice Awards for ten years in a row as well as the Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence in 2012 and in 2016

MARGARET JORDENS OWNER, SUMMIT GOURMET MEATS

CREDIT: KENT WONG

relocate to Richmond and offer the growing city a place to buy high quality, aged meat from an ‘old-fashioned meat market’. “ My h u sb a n d w a s a g re at butcher,” Jordens said. “He was a firm believer in dry aging carcass beef for a minimum of 21 days to break down the connective tissue and make cuts more tender, as well as processing the meat in store rather than bringing in precut portions. He liked to do as much as possible in house, including making our own sausages, ground meats, cutlets, etc.” For 25 years the Jordens operated Seafair Meats, sharing their love of the industry with their two children, Michael Jr. and Chrissy. But in 2001, he passed away.

“We were fortunate that Michael Jr. followed in his father’s footsteps and became a butcher. He learned his father’s methods and continues the legacy of quality in every product. Chrissy originally learned more of the administrative side of the business, with her role later expanding to be more involved in the day to day operations as well.” Summit is exceeding Jordens’ ex pectat ions. She sa id t hat people are becoming more aware of the importance of quality and traceability in their food and how meat is raised and processed. “We’ve developed great relationships with our suppliers, like Johnston Packers. They have the same high standards as we do. Our chicken comes from Meadow

Valley Meats in Chilliwack, and Colonial Farms in Armstrong and we carry local beef from Heffley Creek, BC as well as Alberta beef.” She emphasized that Summit sources ethically raised products and carries gluten free sausages, meatballs, deli items and perogies. They even carry made-instore pet food. A big part of the success Summit has seen is in its long-term staff. Most have been with the company since it first opened its doors. “We see them as family. It was one of the things we taught our kids, to treat staff as you want to be treated. Because we are open seven days a week and till seven at night, it’s hard to find the time for us all to get together. When we need to, we shut the store down.” Location has also been

Family owned and operated!

instrumental. “There is a fish market, produce market, meat market and bakery. People will tell us that they come to the Summit to shop without needing to go anywhere else.” Summit Gourmet Meats is at 1180 105C Columbia Street West in Kamloops www.summitgourmetmeats.com

Western Canada’s Meat and Deli Distribu�on Specialists.

Congratulations On Your 10th Anniversary! Grass Fed Beef & Lamb Free Range Chicken Pork & Turkey

250.672.9629

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Congratulations on 10 years of Business. We are looking forward to many more years to come.

27417 Gloucester Way, Langley, B.C., V4W 3Z8 604-856-3911


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Business Examiner Thompson/Okanagan - February 2017  

Featuring the latest business news and information from Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, West Kelowna, Summerland and Penticton.

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