Page 1

» AIRPORTS

–PAGE 8 Le Fo as r e

AUGUST 2015 KAMLOOPS Frank Walsh sets positive example for customers,

Commercial Oce Retail

community and family

250.763.6789 ArgusProperes.ca

Thompson/Okanagan WWW.BUSINESSEXAMINER.CA

Farm Loop producing bumper crop of tourists PAGE 12

KELOWNA Hotwire Electric’s strongest advertising is word-of-mouth

PAGE 16

INDEX New Update

2

West Kelowna

4

Kamloops

5

Salmon Arm

5

Kelowna

14

Summerland

14

Vernon

19

Salmon Arm

19

Movers and Shakers 20 Opinion

22

Sales

23

Greensheet

23

Contact us: 1-866-758-2684

OUR 8TH YEAR

West Kelowna Economic Development Office pulling together and promoting local farms

W

EST K E L OW NA – Teamwork is beginn i n g to pay of f for members of the Westside Farm Loop. John Perrott, Economic Development Of icer for West Kelowna - BC’s newest city - told a breakfast crowd at the July Greater Westside Board of Trade at The Cove Resort that the Westside Farm Loop now includes different farms. All of the farms have posted increases. Tourists and locals are taking advantage of the opportunit y to visit the region’s agricultural operations in increasing numbers. It’s one of several tourism-related initiatives underway through the Economic Development Of ice, including wine tours and running and cycling routes. “I called them all in and got them to work together,” he says. “Our farmers are great personalities, and there are stories behind the farms.” Included in t he Fa r m L oop are a wide variety of different

operations, including Grifϐin Farms, Ciao Bella Winery, Paynter’s Fruit Market, Mountain Va lley Far m, L a z y U Far m, Sweet Pea Farm, Westbank

Harvest, Gellatly Nut Farm, Petterson Supernatural Horse and Farm Tour, Rabbit Hollow and Kalala Organic Estate Winery.

SEE FARM LOOP PRODUCING | PAGE 15

Business park creates synergy Signature style design creates consistent flow for pedestrians and vehicles BETH HENDRY-YIM

K Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240

John Perrott, Economic Development Officer for West Kelowna, is excited about a number of initiatives promoting local businesses.

“People couldn’t necessarily ind the farms,” Perrott noted, explaining he had to gently dish out some ‘tough love’ by telling members to spruce up their signs and place them in strategic locations. “We’ve got to tell people what is going on. We need to have the bread crumb trail to get people up here.” It’s not just viewing. Visitors can pick fruit at some of the farms as well. “We take for granted that we can do this any day of the week,” Perrott notes. “People will remember when they pick a fresh piece of fruit right off the tree.” An , annual budget is being spent on product development and retention, as well as visitor attraction and marketing. They also provide visitor services with the funding. “We went on a road trip and visited different Visitor Centres up and down the Valley, and brought dozens and dozens of donuts,” he

ELOWNA - Thirty years ago, Doug MacNaughton, owner of Pier Mac Petroleum Installations, purchased acres of property beside an ex panding Kelow na air por t . With the property’s rich vein of

aggregate and close proximity to a growing city, he saw multiple opportunities. “I saw a city that needed roads and development and a source of gravel close to the work being done,” MacNaughton said. “I knew that one day the land would be ready for secondary use and that having an airport as our

neighbour was always going to be good.” Today, Kelowna Airport Business Park i s t he i r s t of it s kind in the city and is ful illing MacNaughton’s long-term vision. The three phases of the integrated development include zones for retail, commercial and industrial. Phase One has only one lot left,

Phase Two is already nearly per cent sold and Phase Three will be ready for reclamation in . Yvette Mawson, MacNaughton’s personal assistant and consultant, said that the company started SEE BUSINESS PARK | PAGE 13


NEWS UPDATE

2 PENTICTON New Penticton Chief Administrative Officer Eric Sorensen

The City of Penticton announced that Eric Sorensen has been hired to be the new Chief Administrative Officer for the corporation. “Eric comes from the corporate world and brings a different perspective to partnerships, sustainability, service to customers and leveraging opportunities. Council wanted private-sector experience, with a proven track record, and the ability of creating an inclusive and vibrant corporate culture. We are thrilled to have Eric join us and lead the City of Penticton team,” stated Mayor Andrew Jakubeit. Eric Sorensen’s career highlights include President and CEO of Sun-Rype Products 2004-2008, President of Warner Lambert 1995-2001, VP of sales and customer development at Nabob Coffee company and Kraft Food group from 1986-1995. He has extensive education, including Stanford University Graduate School of Business’ Executive Program and University of Michigan’s Strategic Management Program. Despite being retired at 56, Eric has kept busy as an entrepreneur and consultant. “I realized I wasn’t ready to retire and felt an opportunity to culminate all my corporate world know-how and experiences, to help a community I’m very fond of, and it would create a challenge I wanted to tackle,” remarked Sorensen. Sorensen started July 20th. He replaced

Annette Antoniak who left the City in February. “We commend the City of Penticton’s leadership team for continuing to the move the organization forward in the last six months as this transition unfolded, and special thanks to Interim City Manager Mitch Moroziuk for his leadership and guidance,” said Mayor Jakubeit. The CAO oversees and is responsible for all operations of the City reporting to Mayor and Council.

KELOWNA 20 Year lease extension of YLW Ron Cannan, Member of Parliament for Kelowna-Lake Country, on behalf of the Honourable Lisa Raitt, Minister of Transport, announced that the Government of Canada is extending the term of its lease with the City of Kelowna for the management, operation and development of the Kelowna International Airport. The lease is being extended for an additional period of 20 years under existing conditions, and will now expire on December 31, 2054. This lease amendment will help ensure the continued viability of the Kelowna International Airport and will allow the City of Kelowna to invest in airport infrastructure and capital projects on airport lands that require more than 20 years to realize sufficient return on investment. The Kelowna International Airport was built and operated by the City of Kelowna until it was transferred to Transport Canada in 1959 and was immediately leased back to the City of Kelowna under a longterm lease. It plays a vital part in the economic development and prosperity of the Okanagan Valley. YLW’s total economic

FRONTLINE = BOTTOMLINE

Strategic Customer Care Workshop September 16, 2015 1:30 to 3:30 pm • Do your customer service and inside sales people have the skills and confidence to recognize a business opportunity? • Do they too often provide “free consulting” and give out free information to people who are “shopping around”? • Do they lack the questioning and qualifying skills to get to the heart of the prospect’s needs?

Details and Registration

www.glennon.sandler.com

®

AUGUST 2015

impact is 2,730 jobs and $610 million in total economic output to the province of British Columbia. “The Kelowna International Airport is a vital transportation link in the southern interior of British Columbia and its value extends to all sectors of the economy. I am pleased to provide this 20-year lease extension which means continued prosperity for the Airport, its passengers and businesses and communities in the surrounding region,” says Cannan.

OKANAGAN The Okanagan Region celebrates BC on screen British Columbia rolled out the red carpet to celebrate the wide range of screen-based entertainment that is created in BC by proclaiming July 27 as “Screen in BC Day”. As part of Screen in BC Day, the Okanagan Film Commission hosted a regional tour visiting Bardel Animation, Yeti farm Creative and The Film Factory Creative House. Regional Film Offices received operational funding from the Province of BC through Creative BC’s Regional Film Funding Program, which helps support the growth of the film and television industry throughout BC For the current fiscal year, Creative BC will contribute $213,000 toward the regional film offices. This includes $30,000 to the Okanagan Film Commission. Known for excellence in physical production, post production, VFX and animation, interactive games as well as original content by BC based production companies for world markets, British Columbia is one of the top centres for screen-production excellence in North America. British Columbia’s motion-picture industry supports approximately 20,000 direct and indirect quality jobs that make up a talented, highly experienced and knowledge-driven workforce. The Okanagan is headed for another good year with new productions on the burner coming to shoot in Canada’s equivalent of Bella Italia. Recent feature film productions include the George Clooney-starring film Tomorrowland which filmed in Enderby and Armstrong, the Anthony Hopkins-film Go With Me, which filmed in Enderby, Armstrong, Vernon and Lumby, and Vic Sarin’s Nightmare Movie of the Week for Lifetime as well as recent shooting of Tomato Red and starting Aug. 10, The Orchard. The BC indie thriller, The Unseen, was shot in a small town location in West Kelowna and in the back country. The region is also a popular location for shooting car commercials. Bardel is one of the world’s leading animation studios, with two studios in Vancouver and one in Kelowna. The company has nine shows in production. YetiFarms creates world-class creative for all platforms: interactive, web, mobile, advertising, explainer vids, TV, and viral campaigns. BC production expenditures reached an estimated $2 billion in fiscal year 2014/2015 compared to $1.45 billion in fiscal 2013-14.

KELOWNA Harper Government Supports International Growth for British Columbia’s Wine Industry

Michelle Rempel, Minister of State for Western Economic Diversification, announced a $630,000 investment for the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) Okanagan campus to strengthen the British Columbia wine industry’s export readiness and global identity for international growth. With funding from the Government of Canada, UBC Okanagan will provide impartial guidance and expertise, and will work with the BC wine industry to: clarify and promote BC’s unique identity as a wine region; gather intelligence from international trade shows; host workshops, symposiums and towns halls; and develop online tools to strengthen collaboration between key industry players. The global wine market holds great potential for an emerging wine region such as that found in BC By improving the industry’s capacity and raising its international profile, this project will ensure that BC wine remains competitive and ready to take on new opportunities. BC is a key wine region within Canada and houses nearly 270 wineries and 900 vineyards, on approximately 10,000 acres of land. The BC wine sector contributes $2 billion annually to the province’s economy, and provides employment for over 10,000 workers. Funding from the Government of Canada is being provided through the Western Diversification Program. “The BC wine industry enjoys strong local demand, but an enhanced international presence is critical for future sustainability and growth. Through today’s funding, our Government is helping to promote collaboration in BC’s wine industry and create a cohesive brand that will showcase the region’s unique character on the world stage and generate opportunities to expand globally,” said Rempel.

KELOWNA REMAX Kelowna adds new partners RE/MAX Kelowna announced the addition of two new partners to the RE/MAX Kelowna leadership team. Effective July 2nd Jerry Redman and Peter Kirk join Cliff Shillington as Partners at RE/MAX Kelowna, Downtown & the Westside office. As Owner/Managing Director, Jerry Redman brings over 24 years’ experience in the real estate industry. During this time, Redman acquired wide-ranging experience in resort sales and worked extensively with the development community. He is a member of the Okanagan Mainline Real Estate Board’s (OMREB) Technology Committee and the Professional Conduct Committee, which oversees the integrity and professionalism of the sector. As the Owner/ Managing Director, Peter Kirk brings 23 years of experience in the real estate sector. In addition to his practical knowledge and leadership skills, Kirk brings experience in real estate governance from his years as Chair of the Central Division of OMREB. He presently serves as Vice-chair of the OMR EB Professional Conduct Committee. According to Cliff Shillington, Broker Owner of RE/MAX Kelowna, “In addition to their broad experience, Peter and Jerry bring practical industry knowledge and strong technical skills which will help RE/MAX Kelowna expand its


NEWS UPDATE

AUGUST 2015

technological capabilities, providing enhanced tools for realtors to better serve our clients.”

KELOWNA 100 Men Who Give a Damn Grows to 170 T he success of the 100 Men W ho Give a Damn, a group of men who want to give back to t h e i r c o m m u n i t y b u t h a v e l i m i ted ti me, has g row n to 170. I n comm itti ng, members a re asked to g ive $100 directly to one of three nominated charities, four times per year.The first event to select a charity was held on August 5th at the Hotel Eldorado in Kelowna. The 100 Men non-organization was fo u n d e d i n H a l i f a x , C a n a d a . T h e f i rst meeti ng was held i n Febr u a r y 2014, by t he or ig i na l g roup of men who gave a d a m n . T h e fo u ndi n g ch apter h a s g row n to over 350 memb ers, a nd more t h a n 25 new 10 0 M e n c h a p t e r s h a v e b e g u n t o give a da m n th roughout North America. www.100menkelowna.com/join

KELOWNA Local firm wins shipbuilding subcontract Ron Cannan, MP for Kelowna-Lake Country, recently highlighted the awarding of the subcontract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to Always On UPS Systems Canada Inc. valued at $813K. Always On has been hired to supply the Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) systems that will be used to build the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). The UPS systems will be produced at the Always On facility in Kelowna. The AOPS build contract will sustain approximately 1,000 jobs at Irving Shipbuilding as well as many jobs at suppliers across Canada. To date, 265 companies in Canada have benefited from NSPS work. Construction of an initial block started in June; while full production will commence in September 2015. Delivery of the first HMCS Harry DeWolf class ship is expected in 2018. Industry analysts have estimated that government shipbuilding projects would create, both directly and indirectly, 15,000 jobs and generate $2 billion annually through the NSPS. As of April 2015, Irving Shipbuilding had awarded over $720 m illion in contracts to 128 suppliers from across Canada through the modernization of its shipyard and the AOPS project. The $3.5 billion budget for the AOPS includes acquisition costs (for vessel design and build), project office operations, a provision for infrastructure costs (e.g. for jetties), as well as initial spares and support. “Always On UPS Systems Canada Inc., of Kelowna, British Columbia, is proud to have been selected by Irving Shipyards to provide the Uninterrupted Power Supplies for the Artic Offshore Patrol Ships being constructed under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. The award of this contract is a testament to the new leadership group, and the introduction of new, cutting edge technology

3

that is being incorporated into the design of each vessel. The contract award will help to ensure that Always On will continue to grow and contribute to the economic growth of the Okanagan Valley,” said Jim MacLeod, National Sales Manager of Always On.

WEST KELOWNA City of West Kelowna Gets Funding for the replacement of the Horizon Village Lift Station Residents of the City of West Kelowna will benefit from the replacement of the Horizon Village Lift Station thanks to joint funding from the governments of Canada and BC through the Small Communities Fund. This project will replace the Horizon Village lift station to ensure that the overall wastewater collection system continues to adequately serve the growing community. In addition, to reduce the risk of sewage effluent discharge, additional storage will be constructed and a backup energy supply will be installed to improve system reliability in the event of an emergency or an extended power outage. The project is among 55 recently approved in BC that will collectively receive more than $128 million in joint federal-provincial funding under the Small Communities Fund. These projects represent important investments in municipal infrastructure that maintain safe, healthy communities. Once complete, the work will significantly improve key municipal services for residents and help boost regional development. The Government of Canada will provide up to $454,015 through the Small Communities Fund for the project and the Province will contribute up to $454,015 to this project. The City of West Kelowna will be responsible for all remaining costs of the project with the total estimated cost for this project is $1,362,045.

PENTICTON Penticton Indian Band begins process to take control over its lands MP Dan Albas and Chief Jonathan Kruger at the signing ceremony adding the Penticton Indian Band to the First Nations Land Management Regime. Dan Albas, M P for Oka naga n-Coquihalla welcomed the Penticton Indian Band to the First Nations Land Management Regime. Attended by community members and representatives from the Lands Advisory Board, the celebration signals the beginning of a new land management era for the First Nation. The First Nations Land Management Regime replaces 32 land-related sections of the Indian Act with respect to land, the environment, and most resources. This is a practical step towards self-government, increasing First Nations’ responsibility to manage their land and to take advantage of economic opportunities. Supporting and expanding the First Nations Land Management Regime is a key component of the Harper Government’s commitment to unlocking the economic potential of First Nations. As announced in Budget 2015, the Government will provide $30.3 million over five years, which is expected to lead to an additional 25 First

Nations joining the First Nations Land Management Regime. The First Nations Land Management Regime enables First Nations to manage their own land, resources and environment according to their own land codes, laws and policies. Across Canada, there are 90 First Nations operating or developing land codes under the First Nations Land Management Regime, of which 47 First Nations are in British Columbia. “Over the last 15 years of land governance experience through the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management (Framework Agreement), cumulative investments on operational First Nation reserves are now estimated at approximately $270 million, with thousands of on-reserve jobs having been created for both members and non-members. There is absolutely no doubt that the Framework Agreement is working for our First Nations

and for Canada as a whole! Framework Agreement signatory First Nations are forging new partnerships with their neighbors, businesses, investors, bankers as well as with all levels of government. The Lands Advisory Board and the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre have worked diligently towards providing support to the Framework Agreement signatories and towards creating opportunity for all First Nations in Canada to pursue this initiative, if they so desire. My great appreciation goes out to Minister Valcourt and his staff for working with us to see the addition of Penticton Indian Band to the Framework Agreement. On behalf of the Lands Advisory Board, and the Framework Agreement signatory First Nations, we welcome Penticton Indian Band and look forward to the prosperous future ahead of them,” said Chief Robert Louie, Chair of First Nations Lands Advisory Board.


WEST KELOWNA

4

WESTSIDE CULTURE DAYS Culture Days takes place on a national level, September 25, 26, 27 with more than 900 communities participating

WEST KELOWNA KAREN BEAUBIER

W

hat is ‘Culture Days’? Culture Days is a cross Ca n a d a e v e n t t h at started in Quebec in 2009 and aims to foster, protect and affirm the cultural life of the community. Westside Culture Days believes that the arts and cultural sector makes a vital contribution to the economic and social development of our community and contributes to the overall health of the country and our community. Culture Days takes place on a national level, September 25, 26, 27 with more than 900 communities participating. Westside Culture Days started in 2014 with over 50 events, 100 artists and 40 businesses, which resulted in the creation

of SWAC – the Suk’w təmsqilx w We s t K e l o w n a A r t s C o u nci l. (Su k’ w t ə m sqi l x w (so oktem-sqayl-hoo) is the Syilx/ Okanagan word meaning “half indigenous, half non-indigenous” and represents the connection between Westbank First Nation and West Kelowna). A rtists, businesses and other non-profits benefit by working together creating a unified presence and a destination for the public. Potential future doors of cooperation can open for all partners. There is no jurying, there is no directing. It is up to the business and the artist, as partners, to decide what type of activity they would like to do. At the Greater Westside Board of Trade we must choose a partner or it just might be multiple partners - with so many members that are artists and creative talents – it will be exciting to see what we come up with! Last year banks, shopping centres, nurseries and wineries participated and we encourage as many

AUGUST 2015

businesses to get involved this year. There is no cost to get involved! Activities should be fun to plan, fun to do. Some examples include workshops, demos, tours, presentations, dance, music, poetry, theatre and film. As a new community activity, SWAC will be actively marketing the program as well. SWAC is providing personalized posters to all businesses who sign up prior to August 1. For SWAC member businesses there is also no cost for these posters, for non SWAC member businesses these posters have a nominal $25 fee. Artists and other creative partners can register at http://bit. ly/2015Partner and business and other non-profits can register at http://bit.ly/2015Business O r contact Julia Trops 250.215.0079 or Tracy Satin 778.755.2787 or swac.a r ts@ gmail.com Websites: www.swac-arts.com www.westsideculturedays.com. zzz We are pleased to welcome the following new members: Pentar Homes, Sara Lussier - Canadian First Financial & BlueTree Mortgages, Scotiabank, Indigenous World, Ronda Barzilay & Associates, Okanagan Outdoor Adventures Ltd and Interior Polygraph. Karen Beaubier is the Executive Director for the Westside Board of Trade. She can be reached at 250-768-3378 or admin@ gwboardoftrade.com

Joanne Iormetti Senior Marketing Advisor

PUT YOUR COMPANY IN THE SPOTLIGHT In the life of every business, certain events always stand out: t A grand opening t A brand new building t Completing a major project tLanding a major contract t Celebrating a milestone anniversary Spotlights are your opportunity to spread the word about your firm to the entire region of the ThompsonOkanagan. Contact me today to have your business featured in our publication.

To market your firm in the Business Examiner contact Joanne Iormetti at 1-866-758-2684, ext. 122 or joanne@businessto.ca joanne@businessexaminer.ca

PRIME RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE

COMMERCIAL STRATA LOTS

CLEARWATER, BC

KAMLOOPS, BC

365 MURTLE CRESCENT

VICTORIA LANDING $2,950,000 i

Downtown commercial oĸce space

i

93% leased, long term Government tenant

i

Premises have been fully improved

i

15,159.87 sqŌ

i

Call Mona Murray

i Located in Clearwater’s New Retail Centre on Highway 5 i Tenants Include - Buy-Low Foods, Pharmasave & Interior Savings Credit Union. i OpportuniƟes - Restaurant, Oĸce, Medical & Retail (clothing, giŌs, hunƟng, Įshing, & tourism)

TANYA COKRAN tanya@mcmrealestate.ca

250.372.2277 www.mcmrealestate.ca

MONA M. MURRAY mona@mcmrealestate.ca


KAMLOOPS/SALMON ARM

AUGUST 2015

5

CONNECT 2015 Throughout the year there are a variety of opportunities for members to get more involved in their local chamber

KAMLOOPS DEB MCLELLAND

T

he fall is right around the corner and often business ow ners see it as a fresh start, a relaunch time, a chance to try a new approach for your business or kick off some of your goals for the year. If making new connections is part of your goals or marketing your business in a new way, you should definitely consider attending Connect 2015! This business tradeshow is a great opportunity to showcase your bu si ness i n a new l ig ht a nd make some great new connections in the Kamloops business community. Join us at the Connect 2015 Tradeshow, brought to you by Cascades Casino Kamloops & the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday September 23,

2015 from 4:00 - 7:00pm at the Coast Kamloops Hotel & Conference Centre. Everyone welcome and the admission is free. The will be lots of prizes including 2 grand prizes of a HP Printer from Staples and a $500 Gift Card to Aberdeen Mall. Over 60 exhibitors will be in attendance. If you want to be an exhibitor or learn more about the event Visit Kamloopschamber.ca for a registration information package, tradeshow exhibitor map and to register your business. Please note that only chamber members can exhibit. zzz Take your chamber membership to the next level Ever thought about getting more involved in your chamber? What issues or initiatives a re most i mpor ta nt to you? Throughout the year there are a variety of opportunities for members to get more involved in their local chamber. Here are just a few: Business Excellence Awards selection committee. Be a part of an awards program that celebrates local business. Help decide who the big winners will be. Membership Council. T his team act as ambassadors for new members. It is a great chance to have first contact with new

THE MAGIC OF THE THOMPSON OKANAGAN COMES TO VANCOUVER

THOMPSON OKANAGAN TOURISM GLENN MANDZIUK The first annual Caravan Fest sees the Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association (TOTA) breaking from traditional channels to engage stakeholders and increase tourism visitation through new marketing platforms and initiatives. From September 18-20 Olympic Village Plaza will be transformed into a kaleidoscope of rich flavours, exquisite experiences, and unparalleled local Thompson Okanagan Specialties. Caravan Fest is a unique experiential marketing event that folds all four seasons into one three-day, soul pleasing regional preview. From interactive immersive exhibits to

one-of-a-kind wines and local artisan masterpieces, this fall Vancouverites will indulge in the best the Thompson Okanagan has to offer without having to leave the city. The event features an Experiences Pavilion that takes guests on a year-round adventure exploration debunking the myth that the Thompson Okanagan is a ‘summer only’ destination. If that weren’t enough, local musicians, spoken word artists, and poets take the main stage while the Harvest Bistro showcases mouth-watering cuisine and cellar envy wines. Caravan Fest takes a snapshot of the Thompson Okanagan and brings it to life in Vancouver. TOTA reaches its audience through a multi-channel approach that will assist local businesses in their growth and increase the region’s tourism exposure. Caravan Fest is a chance for the Thompson Okanagan to bring all of the things we love about the region to the Vancouver community and connect with attendees on the benefits of visiting our hometowns any time of the year. CARAVAN Fest is presented by the Thompson Okanagan

Tourism Association with BRANDLIVE Management Group and the support of Destination British Columbia. The event is planned to be held annually in Vancouver. Further programming announcements including sponsors, activations, and a full events schedule will be launched in August. Follow Caravan on social media to stay up-to-date on exciting announcements to come: www.caravanfest.com, instagram.com/caravanfest, Twitter.com/CaravanFest or Facebook.com/CaravanFest. To speak with a Caravan Representative, or receive more event information, please email marketing@ totabc.com zzz Save the dates! TOTA Golf Tournament, in partnership with the BC Hospitality Foundation, August 26, 2015 Talking Rock Golf Course TOTA AGM & Summit, Oct 28-29, 2015 Manteo Resort.

Glenn Mandziuk is President and Chief Executive Officer of Thompson Okanagan Tourism Region. He can be reached at ceo@totabc.com

businesses and new chamber members. Join a Committee: Have you wondered what other opportunities are available through your membership at the Kamloops Chamber? Our committees work hard for you and you, as a member, can take part in that work. The Campaign Issues Committee is gearing up for the fall federal election.  Tell us what business issues should be driving the campaigns this time.  And help us to ensure that our elected officials follow through with their promises. Our Policy Development Committee works on changing government policies to make them more business friendly.  Input

S W E N

is always welcome, either at the committee level or at our semiannual roundtable discussions. Our Membership Committee works to evaluate overall membership value and make suggestions for enhancement. The Awards Committee monitors the overall awards process and vets all nominations to ensure they are aligned with set criterion. Contact us today to discuss your role on one of our many committees. 250.372.7722 Deb McClelland is the executive director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached by email at deb@kamloopschamber.ca

Visit

BusinessExaminer.ca

Today!


6

AUGUST 2015

SERVICE LIGHTS WAY FOR THE LAMPOST SPOTLIGHT

Okanagan lighting company celebrates 35 years in business

K

A M LOOPS – A s l ig hting solutions specialist The Kamloops Lampost celebrates its th anniversary, its longevity and success can be distilled down to its dedication to customer service. The company provides lighting solutions for residential, commercial and industrial construction projects throughout the Okanagan Valley. “We get a very high level of positive feedback from our customers,” says company President Todd Pineo. “We look after each situation to the best of our abilities, it doesn’t matter how big or how small a customer’s need is, they’re going to get the same level of service. “We never lose focus on the key to success, our goal is to make the client happy, if they’re happy they pass it on and refer other people to us. At lot of our growth over the years has come from providing that positive experience.” Pineo purchased The Lampost in 2009 from its previous owners, despite not having any previous

Todd and Carolyn Pineo, Owners of The Kamloops Lampost

The exterior of The Kamloops Lampost building

Examples of Hubbardton Forge Platinum light fixtures (PHOTO CREDIT: ENLIGHTENMENTMAG.COM)

www.russell-lighting.com

Congratulations Todd!

We're proud to be your supplier!

experience in the lighting industry. His professional background includes 21 years working for the Overwaitea Food Group, and 8 years as a Petro-Canada franchisee. “Working with the large companies that I have has given me a really strong business background,” he says. “The training you receive is incredible, and there are so many different opportunities to learn. I was fortunate enough to have had some great mentors who lent their knowledge and experience to me. “It enabled me to develop a lot of general business acumen that can transfer over to many

different situations. I’ve been able to grow The Lampost into an even more successful business than it already was, largely due to the transferrable skills and knowledge base that was built throughout my career.” One of the key things Pineo gleaned from his previous employers was leading by example. “This industry is all about delivering excellent customer service,” he says. “I know that for us to be successful, retain customers and acquire new ones, that’s an area where we have to excel. My philosophy is to ‘treat people the way they want to be treated’. “I’ve ingrained that in my team

over the years, by providing the best possible example that I can in each interaction that I have, whether it’s with a customer or my own team. Over time it’s become a part of our culture, the staff pride themselves on doing their best and solving people’s problems. They thrive on knowing that they’re practicing excellence in every situation.” The end result of excellent customer service is a personalized experience that’s tiered towards the individualized needs of each client. “Making our customers happy means that our team has to be very thorough in the onboarding

process,” says Pineo. “We work through a project’s layout with interior design teams and architects, with the goal being to identify what the specific needs are. “From there we move to providing options to fit those needs, depending on things like the desired aesthetics, functionality, and what product is going to give optimal lighting for the specific situation. Once the customer has made a decision, we develop a delivery plan and timeline, and continue to stay in touch with them throughout the duration of their project.” What sets Pineo’s company apart from others is his ability

Proud supplier to an outstanding organization and group of people at The Lampost

Canadian based DVI Lighting is a proud partner of The Lampost. Congratulations to Todd and staff on over 35 years of lighting up Kamloops.

Made In Canada

Congratulations to the Lampost for their very long and rich service to the Kamloops’ Community

Artcraft is the oldest Canadian Lighting manufacturer

www.artcraftlighting.com


7

AUGUST 2015

Award winning Hubbardton Forge Quill Pendant light fixtures

A unique Hubbardton Forge light fixture, available at The Kamloops Lampost

The innovative Cirque Chandelier by Hubbardton Forge

A Corona Pendant lighting fixture by Hubbardton Forge, available at The Kamloops Lampost to make effective and realistic projections, relative to market activity. “My wife Carolyn and I purchased the company right as the

global economy was going into turmoil,” he says. “In the years before we bought, the business had experienced some of its best years in its existence, but as we

RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING & FANS

© 2015 Swarovski Lighting, ltd

looked forward it was really important that our expectations remained reasonable. “Our business very much mirrors the economy, and as we

looked forward, we made sure that our projections aligned with the regional construction market. As long as we’re maintaining market share relative to what else

is going on, and plan accordingly, we’re going to do well. Since the crash of 2008, we have seen steady, consistent growth.” The Lampost offers a wide variety of products to its customers, and has had the opportunity to provide them to a large range of projects, including: a 105-unit seniors home, high-end custom homes in Revelstoke, Bridge L a ke a nd Sun Peaks Resort, gated communities, multi-family housing and a unique development for the Gitga’at Nation in Hartley Bay. “We’re not pre-disposed towards a specific type of construction,” says Pineo. “We can handle any kind of lighting job, our team has a diverse skill set backed by a lot of experience. “That experience is complimented by an extensive product offering that keeps up with industry trends and innovation. Right now we’re seeing an increase in the demand for LED products, they have evolved so fast and the quality has improved immensely. It’s given us the ability to be really imaginative with the solutions we can offer.” Outside of day-to-day business, The Lampost is an active member of the Central Interior Canadian Home Builders’ Association and the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. They’re also a sponsor of the Y Dream Home and Habitat for Humanity. www.kamloopslighting.com

IT’S A SCHONBEK. A MOMENT TO IMPRESS. Since 1870, Schonbek chandeliers have brought timeless sophistication to interiors. With their unsurpassed quality and beauty, each piece is a cherished heirloom for generations to come. STERLING and other illuminating designs available for viewing at schonbek.com. Schonbek® is a member of the Swarovski Group.

Always a pleasure to work with Todd and his team! www.kendallighting.com


8

AUGUST 2015

AIRPORTS Airports play significant role in building community BC’s airports see increase in passenger numbers across the board BETH HENDRY-YIM

A

irports across BC forecast continued growth and expansion due to increased passenger numbers and demand for services. James Bogusz, vice-president operations and development, Victoria Airport Authority (YYJ) said that the demand for more lights and new routes has put the capital’s airport in growth mode. YYJ is the tenth busiest airport in Canada, sees . million passengers a year and has annual revenue of million.

The economic generation of an airport cannot be understated JAMES BOGUSZ VICE-PRESIDENT OPERATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT VICTORIA AIRPORT AUTHORITY

“Over the past ive years passenger numbers grew, with a record in pushing six per cent year over year growth.” He added that this consistent growth has stimulated several capital projects including increased parking for planes. “Traf ic is either a light of origin or destination. We have no connecting lights. As a result we have aircraft needing to park overnight.” He added that as part of the airport’s capital initiative it is expanding the north apron to add two to three additional parking stalls. YYJ also adding environmental enhancements to the area by upgrading the existing and expanded apron with storm water collection and a glycol treatment pond. In addition to accommodating aircrafts, Y YJ is also planning more parking for passengers. “We want to be prepared for the future and to accommodate long term parking,” he said. “Last Christmas parking went beyond capacity with cars parked on the side of the road. It’s a short but busy -day window around the holiday season.” Recently, YYJ announced that Delta Airlines will be providing service to Victoria starting April , with three daily lights between Seattle and Victoria. “Currently, the airport has ive lights a day to Seattle through

YXS receives world’s second largest cargo plane carrying seven helicopters Horizon Airlines,” Bogusz said, adding that the additional lights will serve the Delta hub and introduce a new airline to the capital region. “The economic generation of an airport cannot be understated,” he said. “As a result of having an airport and the ability to have air transportation into the city, we can grow tourism, technology and direct and indirect jobs. We have a greater capacity to move cargo and the ability to get business people where they need to go.” Airport authorities receive no funding from the government. Each airport is responsible for its own operating costs. Flight fees

alone do not cover the enormous budget. Most airports add to the cash low coffers through nonaeronautical revenue. “Low fees are attractive to airlines,” Bogusz said, adding that million in revenue comes from renting land to high tech, manufacturing and industrial companies as well as to aviation related companies like Paciϐic Sky Aviation, Viking Air, and Vancouver Island Helicopters. Additional revenue comes from concessions, restaurants and retail outlets. Mike Hooper, president and chief executive of icer, Nanaimo Airport (YCD), said land leases

Daily flights at Kelowna International Airport take passengers to international and domestic destinations like Seattle and Toronto


ylw.kelownaairport

ylwkelowna

ylwkelowna


AIRPORTS

10 offset the central island’s airport fees. With acres of property km south of Nanaimo and minutes from the ferries, rail and port, it offers highly visible development opportunities to aeronautical and non-aeronautical businesses. With this year already surpassing projections and every month breaking records in passenger numbers, Hooper said YCD is taking steps to ensure passenger and air carrier needs are met, noting that several projects from safety equipment to additional destinations are currently in process. “We’re working with aircarriers to secure new service and routes. We’ve improved ire safety with a , ire truck, trained ire ighters, and a ire station that should be completed by early .” YCD has also put in a request for million for a terminal expansion from Build Canada Fund. “YCD is looking to double the size of the terminal,” Hooper said. “A third of the million would be from the province, a third from the federal government and a third from YCD.” He added that when approval for the funding gets a green light expansion of the terminal should be completed within months. Kelowna Airport (YLW) has a lso seen steady g row t h, up per cent since . Jenelle Hynes, business development and community relations, YLW, said

that in January the airport had seen consecutive record breaking months. She added that from February to May they saw a . per cent decrease, citing changes in the oil industry and fewer charter lights as the cause. “We feel a stronger ripple effect at YLW because of the larger number of oil workers who live here and work in the oil ields.” The eleventh busiest airport in Canada, YLW sees approximately per cent leisure travel and per cent business. Hynes said that Kelowna has an older af luent demographic of seniors with a set income and suf icient disposable income for traveling. She added that YLW also sees Albertans, with second homes in Kelowna, traveling back and forth to visit grandchildren. “At the end of October we’ll have our winter schedule in place. That’s when we have our lights to Phoenix, Las Vegas, Mexico and Cuba.” Providing strong seasonal service is a draw for airlines looking at creating additional lights to different destinations. “YLW researches and establishes a business case for a destination; so does the airline,” Hynes said. “When the airline sees a lot of connectivity, for instance when a passenger from Kelowna lies to Vancouver and then to another destination, the airline can track it and then determine what destinations are in demand.”

AUGUST 2015

In December Sunwing adds Cuba to its line up of sunny destinations said Jenelle Hynes

James Bogusz said Victoria Airport Authority is the tenth busiest airport in Canada Recently, Sunwing, with established service at YLW added a new direct light to Cuba. “Domestically, with Air North lying from White Horse to Kelowna and back t wice a week and Paciϐic Coastal Airlines lying Cranbrook to Kelowna, we are seeing the passengers from these lights using YLW as the connecting airport to other destinations like Mexico,” Hynes said. “As the third largest airport in BC, only , passengers separate us from second place Victoria. Our city population is much smaller than the capital city, but, as a hub, we service the Thompson-Okanagan as well as

parts of BC’s southern interior.” Growing services means the need for expansion and Hynes said t hat Y LW, bet ween and , will invest more than million in expansions and upgrades. “Our outbound baggage haul expansion will more than double the processing capability and we’ll be using modern technology for screening and a self-baggage drop.” She added that the large project would be completed in three years. In addition, the departure area and existing retail outlets will have modern upgrades as well as the addition of food kiosks, duty free shops and a family center. “YLW wanted to be smart with expansion and growth,’ she said. “We didn’t want to build just for the sake of building. Planning and

design considers growth, but it also maintains customer satisfaction levels.” Lindsay Cotter, manager of communications, Prince George Airport (YXS), called YXS the Gateway to Northern BC. With healthy, steady growth, its passenger travel is heavier on the business side. She said that YXS, with the third longest runway in Canada, has a fairly aggressive cargo program. “Any aircraft can land on our runway. We’ve had the third largest operating cargo plane in the world land here, picking up seven helicopters headed to Angola.” Expanding the runway to , ft. was the irst step in the airport’s cargo program. Cotter said that the second was bringing in common storage fuel tanks. “We have the capacity to store , litres of fuel onsite. Now, we can offer fuel at more competitive prices.” T he t hird phase is t he construction of a , sq ft cargo warehouse. Only announced at the end of June , the project will be completed by the end of November. The cargo program puts YXS as the closest Canadian airport to the Asian market, not only for refueling, but also for distribution of cargo to and from Northern BC. “Cargo planes can use us as a fuel stop before flying on to places like Chicago,” Cotter said. Airports in BC are strong economic drivers, bringing direct

AIRPORT BUSINESS PARK PHASE 3 LOTS READY FOR SALE

or WILL BUILD TO SUIT INFORMATION PACKAGE email: piermac@shawlink.ca

250-765-3155

www.AirportBusinessPark.net


Fly through Edmonton

Be rewarded with ÛIGHTS ŸFOODŸŸMORE

• Choose one of 13 flights per week to Europe with KLM, Icelandair or Air Canada • Be automatically entered to win two free flights every month • Get exclusive offers to shop, dine and relax with over 60 services • Instantly receive four Plaza Premium Lounge passes (a $160 value) — Experience quiet luxury including complimentary food and drinks • Stay at the Renaissance Edmonton Airport Hotel with a preferred rate

Join today at flyeia.com/YLWrewards

%DMONTONŸ)NTERNATIONALŸ!IRPORT

f

/


12

AUGUST 2015

TRIBUTE TO ICONIC BUSINESS MAN SPOTLIGHT

Frank Walsh sets positive example for customers, community and family AMLOOPS - At J. Walsh & Sons the focus has always been on c reat ing long-ter m relat ionships; not just with customers, but also with staff and the community. It’s a winning standard of service Frank Walsh espoused and lived t hroughout his life and what helped make the company his father founded in a year success. On May , , Walsh passed a w a y s u d d e n l y. H e w a s yea r s old . He is sur v ived by w ife, Janet and children Michael and Taylor. Though he h a s move d on , h i s leg ac y of posit iv it y, energ y, and spirit continues through a strong philosophy and vision for life and his business. “He was my best f riend and mentor,” Taylor said. “If I neede d ad v ic e , he w a s t he one I asked and no matter what I said or did, he always put a positive spin on it.” At , Taylor is now managing the business. With a Queen’s University education and a lifet ime of her fat her ’s business lessons, she is ready, w illing and motivated. “I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how I can make a positive impact on the world and how I can use my skills to make it better. When I took over the business it was like the glove fit perfectly.” Taylor plans on keeping the same vision her dad had for J. Walsh & Sons. She said that it has added furnace duct cleaning, carpet cleaning and chimney clea n ing t o t heir lineup of ser v ices bec au se her dad wanted the company to of fer all-encompassing ser v ice for the whole home. “We are providing a variety of services because dad wanted to

K

He was well loved in the community. Over 800 people attended his funeral TAYLOR WALSH GENERAL MANAGER J. WALSH & SONS PLUMBING AND HEATING

Taylor said her dad was her best friend and mentor CREDIT:TAYLOR WALSH

make sure customers’ homes were well taken care of.” She said that working in the business, starting at the ground level, has been intense and although she is enjoying the work, it is overlaid with the sadness of her father’s passing.

Taylor Walsh is keeping her dad’s vision of servicing the customer’s whole home alive and moving forward CREDIT:TAYLOR WALSH

Proud to work with the team at J Walsh & Sons to provide heating solutions

www.regency-fire.com

CONGRATULATIONS!

200—121 St. Paul Street Kamloops, BC V2C 3K8

Tel: 250-374-4463 Fax: 250-374-5250


13

AUGUST 2015

Years of Frank’s business lessons has Taylor Walsh ready to run the business CREDIT:TAYLOR WALSH

Frank was well loved in the community. Over 800 people attended his funeral CREDIT:TAYLOR WALSH

Building value in your business KPMG’s professionals are dedicated to helping owners and entrepreneurs of privatelyheld companies grow and build value in their business for the long term.

Congratulations to J. Walsh & Sons on almost 70 years in business from all of us at KPMG’s office in Kamloops! kpmg.ca

“He was well loved in t he communit y. Over people at tended his funeral and people were constantly bringing in f lowers, cards and food.” She added that though he was running a successful business, he wasn’t one-sided about it. “ He w a s t he mos t g r eg a r ious, joyful and hilarious man. S ome t i me s he wou ld r e a l l y look at you and ask if you knew how much greatness you had inside and what you were capable of. Then he would foster that.” She added t hat he was also willing to help people through hard times. “He mentored so many people,” she said. “ T he main vei n of s t or y t hat I r u n i nt o is of people saying that when t hei r bu s i ne s s w a s f l a i l i n g , they called up dad, he’d have lunch with them, connect them with the right people and even find them a job.” Stephen, who’s been with the company for years and takes care of purchasing and quotes, said that there was never a dull moment with Frank. “ We l i k e d t o c a l l h i m t h e Tasmanian de vil,” he said. “He came into the shop with million ideas and things to do and he was never negative. He dealt only in the positive. Whenever he was in the store we felt invigorated and motivated.” Taylor believes this legacy is what has kept business moving smoot h ly s i nce May, add i ng t hat it w a s a l so bec au se t he staff knows every aspect of the business. “Ray, our retail specialist, is , comes in three days a week and k nows where ever y nut , bolt , pipe and screw is,” she said. “He’s been in the plumbing indus t r y for ma ny yea r s a nd i s a font of w i sdom a nd experience. He’s also one of the nicest people you’ll ever meet,” She added that Donna, who t a kes c are of t he f ront desk , invoicing and scheduling, has been with the company for over years, since Taylor first visited the shop at six months of age. “Donna works in the main office and ties it all together.” Walsh said that walking into the office a few days after her dad passed was daunting, but be c au se her d ad h ad bu i lt a s t r on g , loy a l t e a m i t w a s a smooth transition. “ We have a st rong posit ive dynamic in the office,” she said. “Our team members know how t o r u n t he bu siness, t hey ’ve been here a long time and are a key to the company’s past and continued success.” “It ’s ea s y t o get los t in t he business, not knowing what to focus on,” Taylor said. “But following dad’s example of always putting people in the forefront is what kept and w ill keep J. Walsh & Sons successful.” J. Walsh & Sons is at Trans Canada Hwy, in Kamloops. www.jwalshandsons.ca

BUSINESS PARK

There is a synergy within

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

the development with the sale of land to the Four Points Sheraton, adding that it met all of Pier Mac’s expectations and guidelines. Phase One of the project works forward from this strategic location. She said having the airport and hotel next to the business park means easy access for non-resident owners and employees and for the shipment and receiving of freight. Kelowna International Airport (YLW) services a projected . million visitors annually, generating an economic impact estimated at million. Service is provided by Air Canada, West Jet, Horizon Air, Harmony and United Airlines and is supplemented with charter carriers and cargo lights. Another neighbour and a large economic driver is the University of BC’s Okanagan campus. It opened its doors in with students and is now seeing more than , students, adding more than billion to the economy annually.

McNaughton said the city is pleased to have the land converted to commercial use With a variety of programs and large student body, the university is a rich source of trained personnel, research and development opportunities. Both the airport and the university add another level of opportunity for future business within the park, not only with a large customer base but also with facilitating the movement of goods and services and ease of corporate travel. Sam Samaddar, YLW director, said that having the ancillary services in the business park satis ies the needs of the people who use the airport for business purposes. “The airport has land constraints and any land it does have is used for the aeronautical industry.” He added that with growth in the north end of the city plus the university, airport, recreational facilities and residences, the need for services has increased. “There is a synergy within the combination of businesses, residential aspects and facilities,” he said, adding that with diverse services close by, people don’t have to travel far to get what they need.

the combination of businesses, residential aspects and facilities SAM SAMADDAR DIRECTOR KELOWNA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Mawson said Pier Mac is looking for a diverse cross section of lessees and purchasers with the focus on sustainable businesses. “We are looking for a well controlled consistent look throughout the park,” she said. “Materials are contained within the buildings and follow our development guidelines.” She added that ideal businesses to enhance existing establishments could include food and leet services, auctioneering establishments, automotive rentals, broadcasting studios, commercial storage, contractor services, liquor primary establishment, ofices, utility services, warehouse sales, drive in restaurants, gas bars, indoor recreation, private clubs, animal care clinics, and care centers. She said many of the businesses will have not only the airport but the university to cater to and may provide attendant services. “Pier Mac is looking for a balance of high tech, recreational and retail businesses that compliment the company vision,” she said. As diversity is key, Pier Mac is ensuring roads provide a safe, comfortable and attractive environment for both vehicles and pedestrians. Roads will have appropriate buffering techniques used between adjacent lots and Highway . In addition, building setbacks and design will create adequate parking for each business that is buffered from public view. Development standards include the overall look of the building façade, sustainable landscaping and design guidelines. The concept is a signature style with buffers, streetscapes and generous onsite landscape treatments. Pier Mac’s attention to detail coupled with a strong team of dedicated and hard workers has earned it respect within the industry and the city. Businesses can expect the highest level of standards while properties are developed. “You won’t ind an untidy site on any of Pier Mac’s projects,” MacNaughton said. “We have a strict mandate for reclamation of land.” Mawson said the city is pleased to see the land converted to commercial use, not only for visual appeal, but also as a component of the tax base, job creation and future development. Kelowna Airport Business Park is at Airport Way and Highway North in Kelowna www.airportbusinesspark.net


KELOWNA/SUMMERLAND

14

AUGUST 2015

OCTOBER 19TH – A LANDMARK DAY FOR CANADA – A LANDMARK DAY FOR BUSINESS The upcoming election is a unique opportunity to shape a Canada that is stronger, more

KELOWNA

economically stable and

CAROLINE GROVER

more competitive

W

hen Canadians go to the polls on Monday October 19, some results from this summer’s two major economic earthquakes will be known to us. Or at least, more clear. Greece: Is it still in the Euro community after the July emergency meetings? Did August see it go back to drachmas and a more local economy? It is currently insolvent with 26% unemployment, and a debt to GDP ratio of 180%, despite the last-hour agreement with the EEC in mid-July. China: shares have dropped more than 30% since June. US$340 billion has been lent out by brokers for stock purchases, and the downturn is forcing shareholders to sell to cover losses. Share prices would be even lower except the government

halted trading in 1,300 companies and directed state-owned financial institutions to buy shares. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce recognizes that many factors are contributing to uncertainty in the economic landscape, at home and abroad. We recognize we are racing against the greatest competitors in the world’s toughest marathon – the global economy – and in addition to feeling the effects of the two earthquakes noted above, we continue to lose ground to the frontrunners. BC’s economy continues to be robust compared to many other jurisdictions in Canada. But we need to strengthen both it, and our Canadian economy, and to this end, the Canadian Chamber is calling

OCTOBER 22, 2015 | KELOWNA

on all federal candidates to take action with practical solutions in four areas: Access to a powerful workforce, Access to capital, Access to technology and innovation and Access to markets. Workforce: competitiveness means finding and fostering workers with the skills businesses need. Better labour market information. Immigration changes: stop limiting employers’ access to international talent. Address serious processing issues and inflexible features of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. More post-secondary co-op placements. Financial incentives to retain employees during apprenticeship. When it comes to access to capital, all parties must commit to: better tax incentives for venture capital. Investment by insurance companies and pension plans into venture capital funds. Tax system review and simplification. Income threshold increase for small companies to encourage growth. Simplified capital cost allowance rules. Kelowna is a leader in the Chamber’s third initiative, Access to Technology and Innovation. Through forward thinking by the City, the Regional District, and local businesses and educational institutions, we are already doing what the federal party leaders

must do: provide incentives to move ideas from mind to market. Invest in digital infrastructure. Reward private sector investment. Provide incentives that encourage technology clusters. Accelerate Okanagan and the new Innovation Centre are just two outstanding examples of local action. What about access to markets? BC can now ship its wines to the east coast of Canada, and cherries to China. More action is needed. An ambitious free trade agenda must be concluded and implemented with Europe and Asia. Our local Chamber remains active and vigilant on this front, working with local business and elected officials. Federal parties must make it an essential to invest in transportation infrastructure, strengthen export and international tourism promotion services, tackle internal trade barriers, and streamline regulatory processes around natural resources. We are committed to competing – and winning. We must invest in our local economy, and invest in our young people. Here at the Kelowna Chamber, we have now spent one full year introducing new, remarkably far-reaching innovative programs to entice, and retain, young people as they emerge from education into their business lives right here in the central Okanagan.

business solutions forum is to create the opportunity for businesses struggling with common issues to

SUMMERLAND

share existing creative solutions with each other

CHRISTINE PETKAU

A PRESENTED BY

For tickets & information visit:

www.businessexaminer.ca/events

Caroline Grover is the CEO of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached by email at caroline@kelownachamber.org

BUSINESS SOLUTIONS FORUMS SUPPORT MEMBERS The goal of the proposed

2015

Developing local wealth and opportunities means we can pay for new technologies here at home, and produce income streams to pay for the education, infrastructure, health care and other advantages valued by Canadians. T he upcoming election is a unique opportunity to shape a Canada that is stronger, more economically stable and more competitive. A Canada that wins. Potential leaders will have to explain how they will make Canada work between now and October 19. We’re helping that process by hosting a Federal Candidates Roundtable Breakfast September 25, which will air on valley radio and be well-attended by our members, who will arrive questions in hand. We’ll all have questions; it will be an enlightening exercise in democracy to hear the answers. And to know how our candidates are planning to repair the economic cracks that continue to appear world-wide, especially in Greece and China, but most importantly, here at home.

s part of business retention and expansion support for our members, South Okanagan Chambers have been planning a series of Business Solutions Forums. T he need for these for u ms arise from previous collective work with our business members that have identified that com mon i ssues ex i st i n t he busi ness com mu n ity. T hese com mon issues i nclude, but aren’t limited to: cost of living, housing costs and availability, seasonality of much of the available work, shortages in skilled labor, succession planning and business skill building, community reticence to

growth, workers with spouses who can’t find employment, etc. The goal of the proposed business solutions forum is to create the opportunity for businesses struggling with common issues to share existing creative solutions with each other; both to learn

from one another and to explore potential collaborative solutions in a neutral environment. In addition to the Chamber Executive Directors from Penticton, South Okanagan and Summerland, the planning group has included an economic development representative from Penticton, Summerland and Osoyoos, economic development staff from the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skill Training (JTST) and representatives from Okanagan College School of Business. T hrough the fall communities w i l l be orga n izi ng a nd conducting business walks and individual business interviews in order to gather information. In the early winter of 2016, the forums will be conducted with the goal of determining solutions that can be implemented. Findings will also be shared with other regions. Hopefully these forums will provide tangible solutions for our business members and culminate in a stronger more competitive regional business environment. Christine Petkau is Executive Director of the Summerland Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at cpetkau@ summerlandchamber.com


OFF THE COVER

AUGUST 2015

15

FARM LOOP PRODUCING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

says, noting their invitation to promote and visit West Kelowna was well received. Visitors have been tracked from Kelowna, Vancouver, Surrey, Calgary, Edmonton, Vernon and Penticton. The Westside Wine Trail is also increasing in popularity. There are nine active wineries in the West Kelowna area, and another three under construction, with “rumblings� of another one in the planning stages. The Westside Wine Trail produces “The Fresh Sheet� which is sent out each Monday and

Griffin Farms has u-pick cherries, raspberries and apricots

There are acres and acres of produce along the Farm Loop! Above is the Paynter’s Fruit Market pumpkin patch Tuesday to let people know of opportunities and events. “Between people went through our wineries in February,� Perrott says. “People come from out of town, and residents are walking to the wineries and have a glass of wine. “There are not many places you can do that, and we’re very proud of this,� he says, adding that wine ties in well with local food outlets and hotels. The Economic Development Ofice also produces ive activity maps for West Kelowna: Hiking/

There are 19 farms and farm gate experiences for you to enjoy along the farm loop. They are easy to find with Visit Westside’s interactive and mobile friendly mapping system. www.visitwestside.com/maps

MOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT CO-OP IS COMING TO THE ORCHARD PARK

O

kanagan residents and visitors are expected to eagerly anticipate MEC’s arrival in the region, as Canada’s store for active outdoor lifestyles plans to open a 20,000-squarefoot location in the Orchard Plaza Shopping Centre next spring. When news of the Kelowna store was given to the Co-op’s BC employees last week, the response was swift and overwhelmingly positive. Staff were heard to say, “Finally,� and “Awesome,� while others pumped fists in the air to shouts of “Yes!� “As many of our staff can attest, the Okanagan offers almost limitless opportunities to be active outdoors,� said MEC CEO David Labistour. “We’re thrilled at the prospect of being able to serve existing and new MEC members from a landmark commercial location in the heart of Kelowna.� For the retail Co-operative, MEC Kelowna is another way

to serve Okanagan and visiting members with a comprehensive assortment of world-class outdoor products – including its value-laden house brand of MEC clothing, bikes, packs, tents and sleeping bags – while also deepening its connection to the region’s outdoor community. MEC Kelowna will feature a full-service shop for bike and ski repairs as well as bicycle fitting and an equipment rentals program. The store’s product assortment will be tailored to regional activities and member preferences. The Co-op also plans to introduce its popular events programming to the region, including the MEC Race and Century Ride series. With nominal entry fees, the running races and cycling events are designed to encourage participation. (MEC’s Langley store drew almost 3,000 participants to its events last year.)

MEC will also continue to invest in projects to help strengthen recreation infrastructure and organizations in the region. Over the past decade, MEC has contributed more than $550,000 to projects within the Thompson Okanagan, including $350,000 to help protect climbing access to the Skaha Bluffs near Penticton. C F O Sa n dy T re ag u s s a i d , “Members have been asking for a store in the Okanagan for years – and we’re stoked to soon deliver on that call. We’ll take possession of the former Future Shop space in December, and then get on with bringing MEC Kelowna to life inside and out with an extensive renovation. We’re keen to open next spring.� MEC Kelowna will be the Coop’s si x th BC location a f ter Vancouver, North Vancouver, Victoria, Langley and the UBC Outpost.

biking, parks/beaches, the farm loop, wine trails, and a sculpture/ studio tour. They’re also currently working on a map listing the area’s many running and cycling routes. Perrot t gave at tendees ive steps to sign up and participate in the programs they’re promoting: . Sign up as a stakeholder – it’s free to sign up; . Tell us what you can do; . Connect with us; . Share with us; . Promote us. For more information, contact Perrott through: www.districtofwestkelowna.ca

.&%*",*5 Vancouver Island | Victoria | Thompson-Okanagan | Peace]Cariboo Skeena 7BODPVWFS*TMBOE ] 7JDUPSJB ] 5IPNQTPO0LBOBHBO 'SBTFS7BMMFZ

SUBSCR TODAY I&BE STA INFORMY ED! 7 "5 % 08 3 $

7BODPVWFS*TMBOE ] 7JDUPSJB ] 5IPNQTPO0LBOBHBO ] 'SBTFS7BMMFZ

YOUR SOURCE OF LOCAL BUSINESS NEWS

What’s happening in your region? Make sure you find out by subscribing to:

3% $0 3&

x

14

 

20 #

,4 */  (- BWF */ I  -% NT EUP 6* F B 5I

SF

FU MFDUF PS  E G TF JET MBO FO FC I*T U D WJE PSU KF QSP S/ 1SP KP MT NB QJUB T )P

CF

 (& 1"



 )'  2 SZ HP UF

To get your own copy of Business Examiner, starting with the next issue, simply provide us with the information required below, and it will be on its way to your door!

47

$ ONLY

(

#:

U UP FMF IF U MV 6D UVSF Q DB FU SL NB

SU

/ 40 $6 '0

x

B T 7JD FMPQ JOHT T W W EF ETB HSFT JM CV LQSP D USB

3*

"

+B

 (& 1"

7 &4 3* 8& & #3 $P

 PO QT PN 5I

&9 -979*9 .949 FEE "939 MFBTO OBTMJ U VU $9)9 UNEFPSM TJN MB PMQUF

& ((& 1"1"

MAKE IT EASY!

Order your subscription online at

www.businessvi.ca www.businessexaminer.ca

Âťx

B BH BO 0L O $P 

US /0 &: ET VO OJU TP V IU N D JH DPN LJT UN BUB B O TFF UI FTUC BU T 8 VUUI PSE C PX GF X MJ 5 PSN i / BUF JE US TB TTT JBU OF TPD P "T BJS DI B $I i

3 *$

e ke oS FoZ rMiMb B a 7  B FeSC al BaTc P'eS EORGE rci JOU

4

ST GU 4 AU201

1 20

&3

#:

9449 9-9" JUT T 9%9$ FQEJS MBT 939- BMFOT4 EMJ$U U 990 BEHP PSMB V 8

TJN VMQ BVOU Sh8 60UL CPFMPE MJTO VJ J R N C E EPV UFMMFNSh WFMJ MVUF P MVUJ JO %EPJT N MJUE B TJT FT TJN U FSJ

  )' 2 SZ HP UF

I OU IF UP 7JD B TF J PG OU X BE E P BE JUI BUUI UI DMVE JO

* W*&A4R $ -G*A N 0 1I I5LD / U & B R/N. &H3E 0R7T N(O 

Postal Code:

4*

4 -%

/

Name: City:

*0

O UPX U XOPMMBCPSB P % FXD

NV SQ TONV  J 64VU UFPMPHZ QMJSP RVJO N UB EB PJ TEUSP BUFEUN FWUFSFMJ BMVSNUF FMV ZJO UDEIP BEIP XN UI O TJT PBXMJ U HFTSP MMTJN UB TFNSJ

Address:

/ %:

OH OUJ Z WF I *O BOJD IPSF BMMF 4B TU4 BO7 L 8F XJDI IB $P MFT 4 H 4B WFST VJO .P PT4 8I X B -B JUPSJ &E

14

 

20

Paper Name:

00

40 &3 8 5/ */ (

#:

P 4Q TTI 7BMM SU O TUB JDIB X

x



X O /F JDIB X P $P JN OB MF /B TWJM  SL PBTU 1B TU$ B 8F PY7 N $P QC N $B W .P &

OP BO JD BTTFMT 7 6 NJF$

50

 &: -- FT 7" TFSJ ,: 57 O 00 JMMF HJ 41 PLTW PPUJO Z F

(includes GST)

"



7*$



Invest Northwest Publishing, 25 Cavan St., Nanaimo, BC V9R 2T9

4*

 (& 1"

SJB DUP 7J

11 OU 4" OUB /( DPV  7* BD UP 4" UPSJB BQQ OE

Please send cheque to:

*0

 9 %& EBUF Z */ T6Q 7BMMF

20

'  ) 2 Z PS FH

/ %:

T BO FMQJO BN TI O J UT BJTJ U JP F ) S V D IFH T U TU SJO J F BJT O ) BSU OBJN BQ /B JO 38 PG OZ QB FO N øá



14

per year

00

* &/5 5. &4 7 */

 

25

Fax us at 250-758-2668 so we can start your subscription today!

OE TMB S* WF PV  D O BJT 7B B) THS O L O %P BJTCSFB E ) PSM X

5 "4  OP $0 J  45 FSO 5PGJ N 8& "MC BOE VSJT 1P

Peace Cariboo Skeena

& *3

(&

M SJBB JUPPSJ &&EEJU FO PWF .(SF

*% 3E Eny -A&C TpFa for R"R1 cPoMFm ce T.E VacUeE eSllTeJNn eMJ&T

e Z mm MF Co BOH OGJF

rrU c asJ liJOst T6e Es EPxMP rUFbN a N MJU MV P wEin UcoEpPte aTTFJTin JN t B sF li jeT c hBeMJ esVaU pSJroU cMQ aF pOlaV areRVnJ MJ N foWrF UF MV EP

G CE  IN & : PR / ( -"

$

A ON

LD

Air

4 53 h CD t 6 Jo MA ER g a St. s R K SH in rt ge ild Fo d MA BLI bu in e Ju e th PU he ad th th C

E6

- PX E CTS HOJN N d Ro me er in BC na inn ern ds J lw th r


16

AUGUST 2015

COMPANY BUILDS REPUTATION ON SERVICE Strongest advertising is word-of-mouth

K

ELOWNA - Over the past 15 years, Hotwire Electric has g row n f rom a oneman operation to a company employing more than electricians and administrative staff. Owner, Robert Rickard, said he built his business by focusing on the calls many larger companies didn’t want.

Mr. Electric is Rickard’s service division that does both residential and corporate work with ongoing contracts serving corporate outlets like Michaels, McDonald’s and PetSmart

Hotwire was recognized in Okanagan Life magazine as one of the best in the region CREDIT: SALINA RICKARD

“Taking service calls instead of working on large projects helped Hotwire build a strong reputation,” he said. “Now our strongest advertising is through word-ofmouth referrals.” Though Hotwire now contracts for large projects, it still provides the same service and maintenance for its clients that helped make it successful. Rickard started his electrical career in , earning his certi icate and then journeyman title in . He worked for an electrical company on larger projects for

several years but saw a strong ne e d for ser v ice on sma l ler jobs, like installing new plugs, changing lighting or upgrading existing systems. “I enjoyed connec t ing w it h customers,” he said. “I could do a few tasks a day and do them really well.” A f ter years of elec t r ical, R ick ard hung up his elec t r ician’s belt, and donning suit and tie went into selling wholesale fashions and housewares. Eventually, he dusted off his belt and started Rob’s Electrical Services. Soon after, he changed the name to Hotwire Electric. “ I s t i l l have a r elat ion sh ip with the company I apprenticed with,” he said. “When I started out with my own company they sent me t heir over f low business. I appreciate their trust as it gave me a good start.” That good start continued to grow as referrals from his clients brought new business and

Rickard is a proud father and happy to have wife, Salina, working with him at Hotwire CREDIT: SALINA RICKARD

www.gescan.com 250-860-2334

Congratulations To Rob and his team! From all of us! 837 McCurdy Pl, Kelowna


17

AUGUST 2015

Our strongest advertising is word-of-mouth ROBERT RICKARD OWNER HOTWIRE ELECTRIC

new clientele. In , Rickard acquired Mr. Electric, a franchise t hat prov ided nat ional br a nd ing , a g loba l net work , support and resources. It’s a trusted brand with the proprietary systems, software and business experience to help electrical businesses manage and sustain growth. Mr. Electric is Rickard’s serv ice div ision t hat does bot h resident ial and corporate work with ongoing contract s serving corporate outlets like M i c h a e l s , M c D o n a l d ’s a n d PetSmart. Then two years ago, Rickard said, he made one of his smartest business moves by hiring Wayne Warner, a past project and service technician from the same company that gave Rickard his start. “Warner started his own company, went up north and, when he decided to come back to Kelowna, contacted me saying he was going to work for Hotwire,” Rickard said. “At the time, I didn’t think I needed him. But the next day he showed up, tools in hand, and asked what I wanted him to do. He hasn’t left since.” R i c k a r d s a i d t h a t Wa r n e r helped him realize the workload from managing two companies and developing a successful corporate presence was too heavy.

Rickard built his business by focusing on the calls many larger companies didn’t want CREDIT: SALINA WALSH

“I couldn’t do it all myself,” Rickard said. Currently, Hotwire has multiple projects including a contract wiring the houses at West H a r b ou r, K elow n a’s ne we s t high-end lakefront community. “We were also contracted to do the wiring at several CorWest Builders as well as the electrical and data connections at Agility Fuels, to name a few. This month alone we completed more than work orders.” Wiring for data connections is an area of electrical work that Hotwire is now developing as organizations and individuals wa nt access to w ireless a nd wired connections. The compa ny ’s t e ch n ic i a n s h ave r e ceived both in-house specialty training and Hubble certification, allowing Hotwire to work on larger government jobs, corporate and private connectivity. Hot w i r e h a s a l so l a nde d a contract with Prosera, a data m a n a gement pr ov ider f r om

Sweden, opening offices in Kelowna. The Okanagan division supplies back-up information services, and Hotwire has the expertise for installing all the electrical equipment for a climate-controlled environment. As a result of Hotwire’s dedication to ongoing growth and development, it has been recognized in Okanagan Life magazine as one of the region’s best electrical companies. “We were recognized in the magazine three years in a row,” Rickard said. He believes that part of doing business in a community is giving back, so he and Hot wire’s employees regularly take part i n f u nd r a i s er s a nd c h a r it y events. “Costco general manager, Mike Rizzo, is a past WWE wrestler, so every year he organizes the Kelow na Inva sion w it h proceeds donated to t he Boys & Girls Club and t he Children’s Hospital Foundation. Hotwire

donates its time by helping with the electrical set up.” He added that Hot w ire also donates time and resources to McHappy Days, the cit y ’s annual parades and the Hospital Foundation.

In response to it s business g row t h, Hot w ire ha s moved to a new location at # Leckie Rd. Hotwire Electric is at # Leckie Rd. in Kelowna www.electriciankelowna.com

Congratulations to Hotwire Electric on your continued success. Vicky Conway, Small Business Advisor Dilworth Shopping Centre 2339 Hwy 97N Unit 700, Kelowna (250) 712-3350 ext. 300 victoria.conway@td.com

®

The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank.

M05236 (0314)

ARE YOU MAKING ANY OF THESE 20 BIG MARKETING MISTAKES? Visit slicmarketing.com/ examiner To Find Out Now!

SLIC Marketing

250-575-8119

“The Okanagan’s true one stop shopping experience.... Costco Wholesale”

It’s always a pleasure working with Rob and his team at Hotwire Electric. www.costco.ca • 2479 Highway 97 N, Kelowna


ACCOUNTING/LAW

18

AUGUST 2015

PATENTING A COMPUTER IMPLEMENTED INVENTION Patent Eligible Claims

F

or a nu mber of yea rs, many US patents relating to computer implemented i nventions a nd the i nternet were granted. Then, on June 19, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its unanimous decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International. It had long been established that one cannot patent an “abstract idea”, but for many years, it was possible to obtain a patent for a business method (essentially an abstract idea) as implemented on a computer. However, in Alice Corp., the U.S. Supreme Court held that merely implementing an abstract idea on a “generic computer” does not make it patent eligible. The Court further held that claims describing implementation of a method “usi ng a handful of generic computer components” are not patentable either. T he A l ice Corp. decision severely weakened,

In order for a claim to be patent eligible, it must clearly convey that the computer is programmed to perform the steps of the method

if not destroyed, any business method patent that claims a demonstrably old and fundamental method with nothing more specific or “innovative” in the claims than implementation of that method on a computer. A ser ies of cases t hen followed in which the Alice Corp. decision was applied. For example, in Ultramercial Inc v Hulu LLC, a claimed method of offering free streaming video i n exch a nge for v iew i ng a n advertisement was held to be

not patent eligible. A year has passed since the A lice Corp. decision and it is now time to revisit what is and is not patentable regarding computer implemented inventions. The U.S. Patent Office acknowledges that a general purpose computer, when programmed by program software to perform a series of steps, creates a new machine because a general purpose computer becomes a special purpose computer once it is programmed to perform particular functions

pursuant to instructions from the program software. In order for a claim to be patent el ig ible, it mu st clea rly convey that the computer is prog ra m med to perform the steps of the method. There must be integral use of the computer to achieve performance of the method, as compa red to the computer being merely being an object on which the method operates. The computer must impose meaningful limits on the execution of the claimed

method steps, as compared to the computer contributing only nominally to the execution of the method steps (e.g., in a data gathering). B y fo l l o w i n g t h e m e t h o d claimed, one should produce an observable and verifiable result. The foregoing can be used as a guide in determining whether a computer implemented invention is patent eligible. It is important to understand that what is being considered is the invention “as claimed” (the claims are the part of a patent application that define the exclusive rights that the applicant hopes to obtain) and that care should be taken in the claiming strategy. When preparing an application for subject matter that could be characterized as a mere abstract idea, it is important to emphasize in the claims, and fully describe, features that differentiate the claimed subject matter from a mere abstract id e a , for e x a mple, s p e ci f ic technical details that are only possible or practical when implemented on a computer. Doug Thompson and Michael Cooper of ThompsonCooper LLP

TECH INNOVATION KEY TO GROWTH

A

growing tech cluster in the heart of the ThompsonOkanagan could create opportunities for partnership and greater collaboration that will drive economic growth in our region, and capitalizing on these opportunities will be critical for industries in every sector. Technological innovations taking place here go beyond software development. For example, in 2014, the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Summerland, one of Agri-Food Canada’s 19 research centres, helped develop a brow n-sugar test to prove cherry crops are pest free. This test, along with an integrated pest management system, helped the BC Cherry Association sign a deal with China. The deal allows cherries to be shipped directly to China without the two-week

cold storage requirement other countries have to follow. The result: BC cherries now arrive to the Chinese market fresh. The Okanagan tech industry collectively contributed over $1 billion to the local economy in 2013. And according to the CPABC Regional Check-Up, a report by the Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia, the Thompson-Okanagan has the second-largest cluster of digital media companies in BC With the Okanagan Centre for Innovation slated for occupancy in late 2016, the tech cluster is expected to continue to expand. However, a key challenge to growth in the tech sector, as well as being able to effectively commercialize new innovation, is the ability to attract and retain talent. Our region is home to three anchor post-secondary

Coming in September

Spotlight on

CONSTRUCTION CONTACT: Joanne Iormetti 1-866-758-2684 x 122 joanne@businessexaminer.ca

Thompson Okanagan

The Okanagan tech industry collectively contributed over $1 billion to the local economy in 2013

institutions, Thompson Rivers University, Okanagan College and UBC-Okanagan. According to the CPABC Regional Check-Up, these institutions attract over 21,000 students annually. Despite the volume of students graduating from these three schools, our region still doesn’t have enough skilled labour to work in specific industries, including the technology industry. While new graduates can fill positions at the junior level, recruitment outside the region still takes place for intermediate and senior positions and compared to other jurisdictions within Canada and the US, our wages are not competitive, especially when coupled with high housing costs. The problem of recruiting labour is not isolated to the technology industry. Agriculture and farming

are failing to attract as a viable career option, and despite record grape and apple harvests last year, there was a decline in the number of people employed in the agriculture industry. Without people, new innovations to better manage the fruit-picking process will need to be developed, with labour focused on operating the technology. Technology touches all of our industries across the board and there’s a huge opportunity to leverage it within our businesses to become more efficient and cost effective. For this industry to be able to support other key sectors here in our region, we need to have incentives that would attract skilled talent and create innovation that would support the operations of our businesses. Karen Christiansen is a partner at MNP LLP in Kelowna.

Kamloops 29th Annual Business Excellence Awards nominees released Nominations for the 2015 Business Excellence Awards were released today by the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce and TD Bank Group. A record total of 509 nominations were received, nominating 202 Kamloops businesses in 16 award categories. Please see the complete list of nominees below. The gala event celebrates the Kamloops business community and highlights 17 award winners in total (Business of the Year is chosen from the winners of the other 16 awards). On October 24 the Business Excellence Awards Gala will be held at the Coast Kamloops Conference Centre.

“We continue to be amazed at the number of nominations for the Business Excellence Awards,” stated Steve Earl, President of the board for the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. “This is a testament to the quality of our business community.” “We want to thank TD, the Premier Sponsor of the Awards, for supporting this program,” continued Earl. “We value TD’s partnership and their dedication to our business community. The Business Excellence Awards Gala is Kamloops’ version of the Emmy’s,” stated Earl. “Everyone will be there. It’s an event not to be missed.”


VERNON/SALMON ARM

AUGUST 2015

19

CITY OF VERNON LAUNCHES NEW BRAND

VERNON DAN ROGERS What’s in a brand? Better yet, is managing your brand important to a City? The simple answer is yes. Everybody and everything has a brand and it lives in the minds of those who think or experience the product, service, individual and yes – even city. Unlike bricks and mortar, a brand is an intangible aspect of an organization. It lives in people’s heads and is defined by brand marketing and the cumulative contacts a person has with an organization. Whether they know it or not, communities are facing stiff competition in trying to attract investment and growth. It is why many cities are investing public resources into managing their brand. Without intervention, the costs of an outdated or inaccurate city image can be lost jobs, income and new investment

Without intervention, the costs of an outdated or inaccurate city image can be lost jobs, income and new investment – and this leads to less tax revenues, less government services, diminished credibility and an unwanted reputation – and this leads to less tax revenues, less government services, diminished credibility and an unwanted reputation. For ambitious and forwardthinking cities, establishing a positive brand identity is not an option, it’s a necessity. They understand the competitive environment they are in with an aging demographic and heightened competition for young families, entrepreneurs, immigrants and investment. On the positive side, a wellmanaged brand can attract loca l a nd foreig n i nvestment, diversify and strengthen the local economy, promote tourism, strengthen community identity and pride, and help compete

more effectively against other communities. It’s for that reason the City of Vernon recently launched its new slogan and brand identity. A fresh and clean looking logo is now complimented with the new tagline “Activate Life” and the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce (GVCC) had a major role in its development. “We were pleased to have played a significant role in getting the City to freshen its brand identity,” said Jaron Chasca, GVCC president. “Our Chamber has been pushing this idea for a number of years and was pleased to contribute to the research and have several members of our Board participate on the steering committee that the City put together to come up with the new slogan.”

SUNRISE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT RECENTLY LAUNCHED

SALMON ARM CORRYN GRAYSTON Thrilled to have recently celebrated their one year anniversary in business are owners Elton Hydamacka and Shad Fridell of Dough Boyz Pizza. Elton and Shad pride themselves on consistently providing their customers with the best pizza experience in Salmon Arm. Their recipe to success is ensuring great customer service while sourcing freshly-prepared ingredients for their home-made, hand-tossed dough and toppings then baked to golden perfection in their stonebake ovens. They go to great lengths to ensure their pizza is a difference you can taste. You can

dine in or take out at 81 Shuswap Street N.W. or visit their website www.doughboyzpizza.ca for more menu details. zzz Downtown businesses are doing well as The Tea & Spice Shoppe is also excited to have recently celebrated their one year anniversary in business. Owner Diana-Lynn Shaw carries a large selection of loose leaf teas, specialty spices, herbs and blends, natural candles, rustic home décor items and much more. Conveniently located downtown, The Tea & Spice Shoppe samples unique gift ideas as well as delicious full-flavoured tea to sip on as you enjoy the store and beyond. Find them at 261 Alexander Street N.E. or visit their website www.teaspiceshoppe.com for more information. zzz Poised and ready to help our region’s business community is Susan Robinson with her recently launched company, Sunrise Business Development. Susan has 15 years’ experience and her expertise range in a variety of services from business counseling, meeting facilitation, and workshop creation and delivery to the owners and operators of small businesses and non-profits

throughout central British Columbia. For more details, please contact Susan at (250) 515-2630 or visit her website www.sunbiz.ca. zzz Heading into its 23rd year, the Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival is ready to deliver another weekend of toe-tapping and bodymoving music ranging from Blues to Bluegrass, Celtic to Cuban and Americana to Afro-beat. To sum up the festival, incredible music is at the centre and is complimented by the variety of culinary delights from an international food village, a dance stage, a fun zone for children, an artisan market-place featuring handcrafted Canadianmade originals, and a tranquil camping site within earshot of the festival. This years’ headliners feature Marty Stuart, John Oates, and Elephant Revival with a multitude of other talented Canadian and international artists. For festival details and artist line-up, visit www.rootsandblues.ca or call (250) 833-4096. Corryn Grayston is the General Manager at the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at (250) 832-6247 or admin@sachamber.bc.ca

The committee’s objective was to create a bold brand message that attracts visitors and businesses to Vernon, that relates to residents and that provides direction for local business marketing efforts. The result is the new tagline which will be used as a key message in tourism, economic development and business efforts in the community. zzz In other news, GVCC has been generating some buzz in the region over the last month with visits from a number of high ranking elected officials with both the federal government and opposition. Long time liberal MP, Honourable Ralph Goodale spoke at a Chamber breakfast in late June and outlined what his party believes should be the focus for economic development while Federal Attorney General, Honourable Peter MacKay was the special guest at a chamber luncheon in July where he spoke on the government’s success in strengthening the economy. The Minister of Justice was actually in the city to announce

$350,000 in federal funding of a much-needed advocacy centre for children and youth. During a speech to the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce, MacKay said helping children is something he is passionate about. zzz Mea nwh i le i ncrea si ng t he amount of U.S. tourists coming to the Okanagan was a key issue that was discussed during a Round Table on Tourism held in Vernon in July. Over a dozen representatives from the tourism sector in the region joined the Chair of the Parliamentary Tourism Caucus in a discussion on the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. MP Blake Richards was in Vernon to share the federal government’s strategic plan for tourism and also to listen to the concerns of industry reps. The Alberta MP has been looking at ways to grow the industry whether it's through special events, sporting events or festivals and he added that there are great opportunities with Canada's 150th anniversary celebrations coming up. And finally a special welcome to the new members of the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce, Diversified Rehabilitation Group, Pacific Inn and Suites, EnviroMez Services, Staples - The Business Depot, Bounce Hire Inflatable, Bannister GM – Vernon, Kootenay Administration Services Inc., Triumph Coffee, Nicholas Alexander Landscaping, Castanet Media Ltd., and Repair Express. Dan Rogers is the General Manager at the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and can be reached at manager@vernonchamber.ca

Residential · Commercial Industrial · Institutional · Residential Call Us Today to See How We Can Help With Your Next Project! #101, 2903 – 35 Avenue Vernon, BC V1T 2S7

250.545.0784 Office

www.trta.ca


MOVERS & SHAKERS

20

AUGUST 2015

KAMLOOPS After more than 10 years as the Interior Savings Centre, the arena will now be known as The Sandman Centre. The Blazers and City of Kamloops signed the 10-year naming-rights partnership as of July 29. The South Thompson Inn & Conference Centre has been awarded a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for the 2015 Hall of Fame. The Honourable Todd Stone, BC Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, has announced federal funding of over $18.3 million and $76.1 million in provincial funding for the expansion of Highway 1 from Hoffman’s Bluff to Chase Creek. The project will expand a 7.5 kilometre section of Highway 1 from two lanes to four lanes, and ties into 16 kilometres of four-laning improvements currently completed or under way between Monte Creek and Hoffman’s Bluff. Zimmer Wheaton has welcomed the addition of David Payne to its team, located at 685 Notre Dame Drive. Fulton & Company LLP has announced that Michael Blackwell is the firm’s newest associate. Epp Cates Oien has announced the rebranding of its new name, Cates Ford Oien Epp, effective September 2015. The City of Kamloops has unveiled a new bike map available online at Kamloops. ca/trailandbikemap. Pocket-size paper version are available at Tourism Kamloops and from local bike shops. Hummingbird Drones, an aerial imaging, remote sending and software development

Kalamalka Lake. A future phase two would lead to a third dock with 16 boat slips.

company consists of four TRU Alumni and one TRU student. Robert Atwood – president and CEO, Richard Sullivan – vice-president and CFO, Jay Bell – lead software developer and CTO, Jamie Shippit – GIST technician and Gavin Keusch – software developer. This new companies current focus is thermal imaging software.

Upgrades are moving ahead for the Killney Beach water system, which will increase the holding capacity of the upper reservoir by 500 cubic metres through construction of a new holding cell, and decommission of an aging lower reservoir. Also included in the project is the installation of new, more powerful water pumps at the water intake, a new pressure reduction valve, and the replacement of 4.9 kilmometres of distribution pipes.

Kamloops Airport has reported a 6.3 per cent increase in travelers for the month of June compared to June 2014. The year to date increase is up 1 per cent. The airport is currently in the midst of reconstruction of 6,000 feet of its main runway.

Judy Russell, owner of Good Gracious Comtemporary Gifts on 30 th Avenue, has sold her business to an unnamed foreign investor.

VERNON The installation of arena boards at Priest Valley Arena has been completed ahead of schedule and $112,200 under budget from the initial $270,000 allotted. The contract was completed by Riley Manufacturing of Woodstock, ON.

Clark Robinson Accountants, located at 3109-32 Avenue, congratulated Kyle Britton on obtaining his CPA, CGA professional designation. Dr. Brian Clark of Cornerstone Dental Group has welcomed the addition of Dr. Johnny Tran to the practice, located at #102-4005 27th Street.

Tween Lakes Resort has applied to the provincial government to construct two docks with 66-slips at the marina on

Vernon Dodge congratulated Kam Randhawa on being named Salesperson of the Month for June.

.&%*",*5 Vancouver Island | Victoria | Thompson-Okanagan | Peace]Cariboo Skeena 7BODPVWFS*TMBOE ] 7JDUPSJB ] 5IPNQTPO0LBOBHBO 'SBTFS7BMMFZ

SUBSCR TODAY I&BE STA INFORMY ED!

7BODPVWFS*TMBOE ] 7JDUPSJB ] 5IPNQTPO0LBOBHBO ] 'SBTFS7BMMFZ

YOUR SOURCE OF LOCAL BUSINESS NEWS

What’s happening in your region? Make sure you find out by subscribing to:

x

57 %" 08 3 %$ 03 &$ 3

14

 

20

#6

S* WF PV OD 7B

4 /, -* WF /( TIB  %* *- FBN EUP

5I

SF

)



 )'  2 SZ HP UF

To get your own copy of Business Examiner, starting with the next issue, simply provide us with the information required below, and it will be on its way to your door!

47

$ ONLY

x

& /7 /* 40 6 0$ '

7*$

50

3*

(0

0

/*0 %:

#:

 PO QT PN 5I

&9 -979*9 .949 FEE "939 MFBTO OBTMJ U VU $9)9 UNEFPSM QTJN MB VPMQUF

/

& ((& 1"1"

Address:

#:

9449 9-9" JUT TT 9%9$ QEJS MB 939- MFOT4F SMBEMJ$U U V P 9890 OUBEHPB 8 TJN VMQ

BV Sh O 0UL CPFMPE 6 MJT RVJ N C E ShJ MJ EPV UJUF MMFN WF PMVUF MV %EPJT JTNJO MJUE B T FT JN UT FSJ

  )' 2 SZ HP UF

Âťx

1 20

&3

-%

:/

(&

R" cP nc &T T.E VacUeE eSllTeJN eMJ t U rr c asJ JO s PxMP bN T6e

ali s E MVrUF inN E MJU wEinP UcoEpPte TFJT JN t B sFaT li Tc hBeMJ MQesVaU FpSJroUje c VnJa pOlaV are MJR foWrF MVUFN EP

PR

E6

Nancy Quinton has started Okanagan Foodie Tours; a culinary walking tour for lunch for locals and visitors of downtown Kelowna.

Mr. Transmission has changed its name to Mountain Transmission, located at 1012307 Enterprise Way. The newly named e Z m F M m Co BOH OGJF company is now independently owned and - PX E CTS HOJN N operated by Tom Bischoff and Scott Evans. M SJBB JUPPSJ &&EEJU FO PWF . (SF

% E * FaEny r &C3 R1-A oMFmTp e fo

The former Spa Pure franchise at 549A Lawrence Avenue has changed its name to Amora Day Spa.

4

0 TUS OE JU PV VO UT N D JHI DPN LJT UN BUB B O TFF UI FTUC BU T 8 VUUI PSE C PX GF X MJ 5 PSN i / BUF JE US TB TTT JBU OF TTPD P " BJS DI B $I i

3& *$

ee Sk FoZo rMiMb B a 7  B FeSC al BaTc P'eS EORGE rci JOU

4

ST GU 4 AU201

B BH BO 0L

* W*&A4R -G*A$ N 0 1I I5LD &U/ N.B 3ER/ & H 0R7T N(O 

City:

I O U I F JDUP 7 B TF G J UP X O BE EP IBE JU BUUI UI DMVE JO

O UPX U XOPMMBCPSB P % FXD

V N HZS SP MP TON VJOJ 4VU UF 6 R B P UNPJQMJ SFMJUB N E TEUSP BUF E UF SNUF FMV JOFW IPBMV BEIP JT UIZ OUDE N TX PBXMJ U HFTSP MMTJN SJUB TFN

Name:

4*

H UJO FO I Z *OW BOJD IPSF BMMF 4B TU4 BO7 L 8F XJDI IB $P MFT 4 H 4B WFST VJO .P PT4 8I X B -B JUPSJ &E O $P 

14

 

20

Paper Name:



Ben Wasyliuk has been appointed by the Regional District of Central Okanagan as the new fire chief for the Joe Rich Fire Protection District.

"



Invest Northwest Publishing, 25 Cavan St., Nanaimo, BC V9R 2T9

Order your subscription online at



41

'  2) Z PS FH

KELOWNA

XT BO7 /F I  XJD $P BJNP  O JMMF  /B SLTW PBTU 1B TU$ B 8F PY7 N $P C NQ $B W .P &

&: T -F 7" TFSJ ,: 57  00 TWJMMF OHJO UJ L PP FZ PP TI 7BMM 4Q T SU O TUB JDIB X $P



Please send cheque to:

www.businessvi.ca www.businessexaminer.ca

 (& 1"

&9 EBUF Z F 6Q BMM

 (& 1"

(includes GST)

MAKE IT EASY!

* /5 " .& 45

Basil & Mint Restaurant and Bar has P OOMT opened for business at 3799 Lakeshore B  D J TF Road under the ownership of Ken Cheung 67NJF$BT +B and Peter McGeown. 40 &3 /8 5 */ Dr. Hugh Jarvin has retired from his 7 &4 3* private dentistry practice at 478 Bernard & &8 #3 Avenue after 40 years in the industry. x SJB DUP 7J

11 OU 4" OUB /( DPV P 7* BD U 4" UPSJB BQQ OE

per year

Postal Code:

4 E *0 PSM TX BO FMQJO BN TI O J UT BJTJ U JP F ) S V D IFH T U JTU SJO JT OF B JN SU ) B OB BQ /B JO 38 PG OZ QB FO N øá

:/ 0%



14

25

Fax us at 250-758-2668 so we can start your subscription today!

P GJO  5P TN MC SJ OE SU" MFUB UPV F 1P UI MVF 6D UVSF Q U DB SLF B N

8&

 

B T 7JD FMPQ JOHT T W W EF ETB HSFT JM CV LQSP D USB

OE TMB

*

(0

#:

5 "4 $0 J  45 FSO

% */

20

Parkway Gas in Lake Country, owned by Franca La Melia, is the newest U-Haul dealer. The gas station offers trucks and trailers for do-it-yourself movers.

 BJT B)LTHS O O %P BJTCSFB

FU MFDUF PS E G O TF JET FO FC I*TMB U WJE PSU KFD QSP S/ 1SP KP MT NB QJUB T )P

CF

 (& 1"

Peace Cariboo Skeena

& *3

The Electoral Area Advisory Committee has recommended to the Regional District of North Okanagan board that a development permit with variances be issued for a new lodge at Keefer Lake Wilderness Resort.

G  CE IN -&: /( -"

$

D AL ir ON 4A 53 h CD t 6 Jo MA R g a t. s R K SH E in r t S dge ild Fo MA BLI bu in e Ju th PU he ad th the C d Ro me er in BC na inn ern ds J l w th r

Rennie Wutke, Senior Account Manager of Commercial Banking at Valley First Credit Union, has retired from his position after 23 years. As of July 1, the Kelowna Food Bank and the Westside Food Bank have amalgamated to become the new Central Okanagan Food Bank. The main Kelowna warehouse at 1265 Ellis Street will continue to be the hub of distribution and administration. Santa Fe Furniture has expanded and moved to a new facility at 2463 Highway 97N after five years at its Banks Road location. The Rotary Club of Kelowna has announced its new Board of Directors for the 2015/16 term. Members include: John McIntyre as president; Dennis Campbell as past president; Rick Putter as president elect; James Kay as secretary; John Walker as treasurer; Dick Dummond; Karyn Schueler; Jamie Briggs; Raghwa Gopal; Lyle Isenor; Michael Dorsel; Sharron Simpson. Michelle Warren, an instructor at Arion Therapeutic Farm, has received the Instructor of the Year Award from the Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association. Arion has also been nominated for the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Award for Social Enterprise. The new Wings Restaurant has opened for business at 210 Lawrence Avenue, under the ownership of Dino Cabalfin. WTFast has been named one of the five semi-finalists in The Globe and Mail’s Small Business Challenge Contest. The winner of the contest will receive a $100,000 business grant, along with a number of secondary prizes, and will be announced in September. Peter Kirk and Jerry Redman are joining Cliff Schillington as partners at ReMax Kelowna, downtown and Westside office. Karen Christiansen, FCPA, FCA, an MNP partner, has been appointed to the board of the Legal Services Society. Dendy Orchards has named Domenic Rampone as its new local sales manager, managing domestic sales for the valley. Heather Banham, Business Dean at the Okanagan College School of Business, has been elected to the inaugural board of the Chartered Professional Accountants of BC (CPA). The United Way has announced its new board for the 2015/16 term. Members include: Bruce Olson of BMO Commercial Banking, Kathy Conway of Interior Savings, Andrew Brunton of Pushor Mitchell, Jennifer Robins of CIBC, Peter Shannon of BMO, Greg McGowan of South Okanagan Labour Council, Jim Paterson, Scott Murray of Farris Vaughn Wills & Murphy LLP, Laura Thurnheer of Okanagan College, Sandi Fazan of the RCMP, Brenda Rayburn of Best Western, Jennifer Kilback


MOVERS & SHAKERS

AUGUST 2015

of Instep Consulting, Ken Robinson of North Okanagan Labour Council, Sinead Scanlon of BDO LLP, and George Jacob.

PENTICTON

Jessica Rose has been named the new investment representative with Quadrus Investment Services, located at #4061708 Dolphin Avenue.

A century-old property restriction from 1912 has thrown a stumbling block on the city’s plans to promote hotel development next to the South Okanagan Events Centre. The 1912 indenture restricted the use of the property to parks, sports and recreation, a horse racing track, or for public benefit.

Elliot Wilkins is now to sole owner of Abro Water Technician Services Inc., located at #8-1414 Hunter Court.

MLA Dan Ashton has been elected as the Canadian vice-president of the Pacific Northwest Economic Region.

Suncity Treasures and Imports, located at 2900 Pandosy Street, is closing its doors for business at the end of August as owners Lyn and Mia Chorney will be leaving Kelowna. The BC Wine Institute has announced its new board of directors for the 2015/16 term. Members include: David Wilson of Mission Hill Winery, Greg Berti of Andrew Peller, Ezra Cipes of Summerhill Pyramid Winery, Duncan McGowan of Hillside & Bistro, Shaun Everest of Tinhorn Creek, Christa-Lee Bond of Evolve Cellars, Charlie Baessler of the BC Grape Growers Association, Judy Tyabji of Constellation Brands, Erik Fisher of Monte Creek Ranch, Christina Ferreira of Squeezed Wines, and Miles Prodan.

Invictus Entertainment Group is up for five Canadian Country Music Awards this year, marking the first time one industry organization has racked up that many nominations. Dr. Anita Buttar General Dentistry has welcomed Dr. Ashkan Afshinkia to its practice, located at 123-725 Carmi Avenue.

Drew Vincent Retired entrepreneur Eric Sorensen has been named the City of Penticton’s new chief administrative officer. Chris Bower, executive director for Tourism Penticton, is leaving his position after just over a year on the job.

Invis Mortgage celebrated its 15th anniversary on July 15, located at #5-1455 Harvey Avenue.

Black Press Group Ltd. has announced the appointment of Andrew Franklin as its new Director of Digital Development for the Black Press Group British Columbia Divisions.

Michel and Terri Metcalfe have started Roots & Vines Tours, which services the entire Okanagan Valley from Lake Country to Osoyoos.

SUMMERLAND

Donaven Neitzel has opened Dono’s Moving – the area’s newest moving company. Hanna’s, located at 1352 Water Street, has welcomed Stuart Klassen as its new executive chef. Rosie Breault has been named a new rental sales and leasing representative with Trailer Wizards Ltd., located at 1910 Old Okanagan Highway. Stan Nisbet has retired from his position on the board of directors for the Kelowna and District S.H.A.R.E Society after 16 years of service. The General Paint location at #1011990 Cooper Road celebrated its grand re-opening after undergoing renovations under the new ownership of Sherwin-Williams. Orthoquest Pedorthics and Rehabilitation has opened a new facility known as Kelowna Kinesiology at λκλο Richter Street. CedarCreek Winery received the award for Best Red Wine in Canada at the Decanter World Wine Awards in London, UK. The winery has also announced the appointment of winemaker Alexis Moore to the business. The Serwa family has given Χοκ,κκκ to the Bright Horizons for Skills fundraising campaign behind the Χνν-million renovation and expansion of Okanagan College’s trades training facilities in Kelowna. Kelowna Kia has also pledged Χοκ,κκκ to the project. Chriscan has welcomed Jim Kitchin as a new member of its ownership team. Chriscan’s ownership ensures long-term and continued commitment to quality, integrity and sustainability. Kitchin has been with the company for over λκ years, beginning as an apprentice. Drew Vincent has been named the new Okanagan Young Professionals Collective co-director of the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission. Dustyn Baulkham will also be joining the commission as Workforce Development Co-ordinator.

The Summerland Chamber of Commerce welcomed the following new businesses to its membership: Lunessence Winery & Vineyard, a holding of Moonlight Valley

21

Winery Ltd., will be welcoming people to the winery soon on Gartrell Road at the former location of Sonoran Estate Winery; Carl’s Flower Company, which has moved onto Main Street providing flowers, plants and accessories for all occasions; White Lily Ltd., which offers mobile dental services with a particular focus on residential care facilities; Berryland Summerland, which features its own homegrown product at the roadside stand; Scooter’s Ice Cream, which operates a mobile truck at a beach in Summerland; Synergy Home Inspections; Solara Homes Inc; Carmichael Electrical Ltd.; Freemind Apparel Co. Christa-Lee Bond of Evolve Cellars was named to the B.C. Wine Institute’s Board of Directors to represent small wineries. Bond was elected during the institute’s annual general meeting on July 6 in Osoyoos, and is one of nine members on the board of directors. The B.C. Wine Institute represents 148 B.C. wineries and has been promoting the Province’s wines since 1990. Last month, Dirty Laundry’s 2013 Say Yes Pinot Gris & 2014 Woo Woo Gewurztraminer were announced GOLD medal winners at the San Francisco International Wine Competition The competition, now in its 35th year, is the largest and most influential wine competition in America. Congratulations to Dirty Laundry and its winemaker, Mason Spink.  Evolve Cellars has launched its lunchtime patio service with the appointment of Telea Bremer as winery chef. Originally from Australia, chef Bremer is in the Okanagan for the 2015 season and will work under the guidance of Local Lounge Grille’s executive chef Brad Clease. Alois Thurn’s new venture, Bodega 1117 Winery has opened as of the end of June.

Dustyn Baulkham Kelowna-based Metro Liquor, which has a store at the corner of Clement Avenue and St. Paul Street, is looking at opening a second outlet in the city at a location that is yet to be determined. The store is owned by a Kelownabased investment group run by Brent Peacock. The Okanagan College Foundation has welcomed five new directors to its board for the μκλο/λπ term. New members include: Anne Clarke, Bob Eby, Gladys Fraser, Keith Grayston and Alan Sanderson. Frank Richter retired from the board after nine years with the foundation, Cher Watkins retired after four years, and Vern Nelson retired after five years of service to the board.

Does your business need a competitive edge?

Big White Ski Resort is opening to the public in the summer for the first time ever. Available activities include guided hiking tours, summer chalets, and a variety of dining options. Jasmeet and Pavneet Singh have opened a new Freshslice in the historic building at 227 Bernard Avenue. The new Cactus Club at the Kelowna Yacht Club is still undergoing construction as scheduled. The Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Sun Country Highway to promote tourism through green initiatives, including new electric car charging station partnerships. Renovations to Rutland Centennial Hall are a step closer to reality as a federal grant has been awarded to assist with improvements to the interior of the 48-year-old facility. The grant, which amounts to more than $270,000, has been awarded to the Rutland Park Society.

WE CAN HELP. From professional office spaces to large retail locations (and everything in between), Kelowna’s award winning, commercial interior design specialists are ready to revitalize your company’s workspace.

CONTACT HATCH INTERIOR DESIGN TODAY BECAUSE GOOD DESIGN IS GOOD BUSINESS.

t: 778.484.4466 w: hatchdesign.ca e: info@hatchdesign.ca


OPINION

22

AUGUST 2015 A division of Invest Northwest Publishing Ltd. Thompson Okanagan Office #210-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 8C7 Toll free: 1.866.758.2684 Fax: 1.778.441.3373 Email: info@businessexaminer.ca Website: www.businessexaminer.ca

PUBLISHER/EDITOR | Lise MacDonald, lise@businessexaminer.ca SALES | Thom Klos –thom@businessexaminer.ca, Josh Higgins – josh@businessexaminer.ca, Joanne Iormetti – joanne@businessexaminer.ca WRITERS | Goody Niosi, Julia MacDonald, John MacDonald, Beth Hendry-Yim WEBSITE | John MacDonald

COUPONS, GROUPONS AND DISCOUNTS: ARE THEY A SLIPPERY SLOPE?

MARK MACDONALD

T

here are many different ways to attract customers to your place of business. Advertising and marketing options are an obvious place to start, and it is clear that entrepreneurs are adept at putting on their thinking caps to come up with unique ways to bring new clients through the doors. Coupons, groupons and discounts are popular, but are they short-term gain resulting in long-term pain? Do they present eventual problems for business profitability? Yes, these methods do bring people in, but do they on their own get cash registers to ring at amounts that ultimately make sense for the owner?

If you’re considering using coupons/groupons, make sure the offer is substantial enough to entice customers to come your way. 10 per cent off is viewed as paltry. . .a “we pay the tax” offer, a slight increase, is more appealing, because, well, we all hate paying tax. But effective coupons need to promise more than a slight savings in order to work effectively. Generally speaking, if a business receives a 10 per cent redemption rate on coupons, that’s looked at as a “win”. Depending on what discount/offer is being extended, and to how many potential customers, that could prove enormously costly and perhaps not even worth the effort, once the till tapes are tabulated. And even if a coupon works, if a person only buys once, was it worth the effort at all to get them into the business? At best, coupons/groupons/discounts can be likened to “tasters”. Perhaps no-one is better at “tasters” than Costco. There, if a visit is timed right, mom and dad can feed the whole family by walking up and down the aisles around lunch or dinner time. An entire meal isn’t available at every station, but one

can get enough nibbles to make the tummy rumblings seriously subside until reaching the till and beyond. Tasters are effective, and they do work, but the vendors aren’t giving away the farm. They are giving potential buyers a nibble, a try, in hopes that their taste buds are satisfactorily affected, enough to encourage their brains to buy the entire bag or box. Still, they are only samples. By the end of the day, the product presenter has divvied up plenty of product, but it’s only a little bit at a time to a wide number of potential customers. The message is clear: If you like what you’ve tasted, buy the bundle. But, lest we forget, someone, somewhere, needs to pay full price – or a reasonable price - frequently, or there won’t be a company at all. Like most business exercises, the bottom line of the company is the ultimate statement about whether or not any sales method is effective. And if, at the end of the day or sale period, it results in red ink, then what’s the point? Discounting is a slippery slope, and, while being the easy way out for salespeople, it can become a very

real problem for the company. If people become accustomed to buying items at discounted prices and their frequency is based on price alone, how does a store get them to pay higher rates that make sense for the business? Yes, discounting works. But by continuing to do so, are you devaluing your business? And is it making you work harder and longer, with nothing to show for the effort at the end of the day? The answer is one word: Value. Many years ago, a presenter at a sales seminar made a statement – over and over – that has been permanently etched in my mind: “In the absence of value, price becomes an issue.” He urged us to concentrate on value when making sales pitches. He encouraged us to equip our staff to make skilled sales presentations and help buyers make purchases knowing they are making an investment in quality. It takes research, product knowledge and confidence in order for a salesperson to be confident to sell on value, rather than price, but the investment is always worth it. If the sales team is educated about what they’re selling, they’ll be able to present an understanding of value

to customers prior to purchase. Commission-based salespeople need to be reminded that their longevity with the company depends on their ability to sell goods and services at healthy margins that make sense for the owners, as well as the customers. Not everyone buys based solely on price. Of course there are many who do, but there is always a segment of the market that buys products and services based on long-lasting value. It is these who are more apt become loyal, longterm, valuable customers, and likely word-of-mouth advertisers for the company if they’re happy. If selling your products at or near your cost has become the long-term standard of conducting business, perhaps the next major discount the regular “customers” will get from the business is from the “going out of business” sale as you sell the remainder of your assets. It all comes down to the issue of value. Do you believe in your company, your products, and your people? Then it’s worth holding the line on the prices you’re asking. The results are much better than the alternative.

ALBERTA’S NOTLEY CREW SWIFTLY BECOMING BOB RAE 2.0 It’s becoming clear that the Notley NDP is intent on following the disaster policies set by the Rae government

JASON CLEMENS AND BEN EISEN

T

here are many parallels between Alberta’s first NDP premier, Rachel Notley, and Ontario’s only NDP premier, Bob Rae. Some similarities, like the fact neither was expected to even contest the election let alone form a majority government, are interesting for conversation but not necessarily impactful on the lives of average Albertans. There are, unfortunately, other similarities that will adversely affect the Alberta economy and the prosperity of Albertans now and for the foreseeable future. The first worrying similarity is that Notley, like Rae before her,

seems totally unconcerned with controlling government spending in the face of large deficits. Rae inherited a $3.0 billion deficit when he was elected in late 1990. His government increased spending by over $5.3 billion (or 13 per cent) in one year, resulting in a deficit of $10.9 billion. These increases came on top of the large increases introduced by Liberal Premier David Peterson. In the three years the Peterson Liberals governed as a majority, they increased program spending by 35 per cent. The early actions of the Notley government suggest it is following the same course. Despite an expected deficit of almost $5.0 billion, the government has announced over $600 million in new spending, including $39 million for social assistance and housing, over $100 million for education, and a whopping $500 million for healthcare. The second worrying parallel between Rae and Notley is their proclivity to increase taxes without understanding (or worrying about) how such increases affect competitiveness and economic incentives.

The Rae NDP aggressively increased personal income taxes and raised a host of other taxes including business taxes. These tax hikes came after large increases to the same taxes introduced by the Peterson government. The result was that Ontario was markedly uncompetitive with respect to many key taxes and the incentives for work effort, savings, investment, and entrepreneurship were eroded. The result was predictable: a sluggish economy throughout Rae’s tenure. Alberta’s NDP government appears determined to repeat the tax and competitiveness mistakes of the Rae government. In the Throne Speech, the Notley government confirmed it will proceed with a 20 per cent increase in the province’s general corporate tax rate and introduce two new personal income tax brackets, eliminating the country’s only single-rate tax. These changes mean all that remains of Alberta’s once meaningful tax advantage is the absence of a provincial sales tax. However, most economists agree that this is in fact not an advantage, since

consumption taxes are among the least economically harmful taxes. In fact, Alberta would be better served economically with a low sales tax that allowed for even lower personal and business income taxes. Surprisingly, unlike the Rae government that unsuccessfully tried to promote manufacturing, the Notley government seems uncompromisingly committed to reigning in what has been an anchor of the provincial economy: the oil and gas sector. There have been a slew of announcements that undermine investment and development in the oil patch including the review of the province’s royalty regime with a clear eye towards collecting greater revenues and new environmental regulation including a doubling of the carbon levy. And the government has mused about replicating the disastrous energy policies of Ontario which have caused electricity prices to skyrocket and competitiveness to plummet. The new government’s punitive approach to the province’s energy sector will have immediate,

tangible effects. The marked decline in Alberta’s competitiveness make investment in neighbouring Saskatchewan and British Columbia as well as the Dakotas that much more attractive. It’s reminiscent of a comment by former Alberta Premier Ralph Klein when he joked that the most productive cabinet minister in Alberta was B.C.’s premier because his policies made Alberta so attractive for investment. As our recent analysis demonstrates, there was nothing inherent about the election of the NDP in Alberta that predetermined bad policies. Saskatchewan’s NDP demonstrated in the 1990s and early 2000s that good policies are nonpartisan. Unfortunately, it’s becoming clear that the Notley NDP will walk the same road travelled by the Bob Rae NDP of Ontario, with predictably similar results. Jason Clemens and Ben Eisen are economists with the Fraser Institute and co-authors of Fiscal Policy Lessons for Alberta’s New Government from Other NDP Governments.

SUBCRIPTIONS | $45 PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $80 FOR 2 YEARS (24 ISSUES), SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: WWW.BUSINESSTO.CA. DISTRIBUTION: FOURTH WEEK OF EACH MONTH VIA CANADA POST AD MAIL. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Produced and published in British Columbia. All contents copyright Business Examiner Thompson Okanagan, 2015. Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240


23

AUGUST 2015

SIX WAYS TO IMPROVE CUSTOMER SERVICE Customer service has often been called the “frontline” of an

SIMONE SUNDERLAND

GREEN SHEET BUILDING BRIEFS

organization

THOMPSON NICOLA REGIONAL DISTRICT

SALES JOHN GLENNON You know good customer service when you experience it. It’s hard to explain at times when it’s not so great, but it’s easy to recognize when a customer service agent has gone above and beyond to make sure you’re satisfied. At some p oi nt, ever y d ay, everyone is a customer. A good customer service experience is something that everyone can relate to – so what is it that makes for an exquisite customer service touchpoint? Because of word-of-mouth and social media, companies can’t afford to provide less than stellar customer service. Sandler Training teaches companies how to focus on the fundamentals of customer service due to its direct impact on the bottom line. Whether you’re in B2C or B2B sales, the following tips are tried and true and will help your company reap the rewards that come with exceptional customer care. Ask questions upfront. From the very beginning of a customer relationship, it’s crucial to know exactly what’s expected. This allows for you to manage expectations and also gauge what your customer will consider a success. If you’ve heard Sandler mention the “upfront contract” you know it all starts at this step. Listen to your customer. W hen a customer speaks, you should be listening. This is when you’ll discover their pain and identify where you’ll really be able to make an impact and move the needle for their business. Additionally, sometimes a customer just needs an outside opinion to ‘hear them.’ This is when you’ll establish that trusting relationship salespeople long for. Com mu n icate reg u la rly.  A good business practice is to always be ahead of your customer. They should never be wondering when they’ll be hearing from you. Make it your practice to establish regular communications. And if there’s a particular situation that needs tending to, make sure you’re on top of the need and communicating accordingly. Remember, you’re there to make their job easier and more efficient. Be sincere. This should go without saying, but your efforts and communications with your customers should be nothing short

LOCATION 3969 Crawford Ave, Merritt Hotel - Convention Centre - Retail and Commercial Space PROJECT TYPE Commercial New PROJECT New hotel and convention centre - 4 storeys - 83 units - 350 seat convention centre - 120 seat restaurant - retail and commercial units - stone and fibre cement siding - stucco and long board cladding - heavy timber structure - aluminium windows - steel frame doors and frames PROJECT STATUS Construction start anticipated mid 2015

of sincere. Take a moment and put yourself in their shoes. If it’s important and pressing to them then make sure they know you understand their concerns and needs. Then, do your best to provide solutions to remedy the problem. Request feedback. A customer likes to be heard – and why shouldn’t they? They’re paying for a service and want to be handled to their liking. Insist that they rate you and give their feedback so that you can better service their needs. This is mutually beneficial as you’ll grow as a professional and they’ll likely continue to do business with you. K e e p a l o n g-t e r m m i n dset. There’s no quick fix when it comes to customer service. Companies that thrive invest in long-term training that tackles behaviours, attitudes and techniques that are essential to customer service. Customer service has often been called the “frontline” of an organization. When executed properly, a happy customer will share their positive experience which will ultimately lead to referrals and positive word-ofmouth marketing. What are some of your customer service best practices? John Glennon is the owner of Insight Sales Consulting Inc, an authorized Sandler Training Licensee. He can be reached at jglennon@sandler.com, toll free at 1-866-645-2047 or visit www.glennon.sandler.com

ARCHITECT Keystone Arch and Planning Ltd - 110-2881 Garden St, Abbotsford V2T 4X1 604-850-0577 DEVELOPER Rattan Hospitality Inc - 3571 Vo g h t S t , M e r r i t t V1 K 1C5 250-378-4016

SALMON ARM LOCATION 131 Harbourfront Dr – Fourplexes PROJECT TYPE Multi-family New PROJECT New townhouses - 3 fourplexes - 2 story’s - 12 units - wood frame construction - attached double garages PROJECT STATUS Development permit application submitted ARCHITECT Bernd Hermanski Arch - Box 1438 40 Alexander St NE, Salmon Arm V1E 4P6 250-832-7400 SURVERYOR Browne Johnson Land Surveyors - Box 362 201 371 Alexander, Salmon A rm V1E 4N5 250-832-9701

VERNON LOCATION 5900 Rimer Rd & 5975 Lefoy Rd - Parkwood Retirement Resort

PROJECT TYPE Seniors Housing PROJECT New seniors orientated condominiums - 4 storeys - 150 units - stucco siding, simulated stone veneer siding, exposed aggregate concrete, prefinished metal fascias, flashings and trim, black metal windows, door frames and guardrails - multipurpose trail PROJECT STATUS Development permit application submitted ARCHITECT MQN A rch itects - 100 3313 32 Ave, Vernon V1T 2E1 250-542-1199 OWNER Regency Retirement Resorts - 250-861-7714

KELOWNA LOCATION 140 Hwy 33 E and 145 Rutland Rd N - Rutland Crossing PROJECT TYPE Commcercial New PROJECT New commercial building - 1 storey - 7,000 sf - 3 primary food spaces - drive through - 119 sm outdoor seating area - 13 parking spaces - stucco, brick, metal trim, metal canopy, aluminum and glass railings, metal flashing - Memphis Blues Restaurant, Dominios Pizza and Starbucks with a drive through and patio PROJECT STATUS Site work commenced July/15 APPLICANT Compass Real Estate Development Ltd - 1574 Harvey Ave, Kelowna V1Y 6G2 778-436-2077 ARCHITECT BlueGreen Architecture Inc 202-110 Highway 33, W Kelowna V1X 1X7 778-753-2650

KELOWNA LOCATION 519 529 539 Truswell Rd - Commercial - Apartment Hotel PROJECT TYPE Mixed-use Dev PROJECT New mixed use development - tourist rental apartment hotel and commercial development 6 storeys - 8 commercial units - flat roof, stucco, fibre cement siding, balconies with painted metal guardrails, tempered glazing - 29 parking stall parkade - 23 above ground parking stalls

- walking paths PROJECT STATUS Rezoning application at 3rd reading ARCHITECT Garry Tomporowski Arch - 243 1889 Springfield Rd, Kelowna V1Y 5V5 250-979-1668 OWNER M K S R e sou rc e s I nc - 5 4 6 Bernard Ave, Kelowna V1Y 6P1 250-868-2324

KELOWNA LOCATION Ethel St and Clement St - Commercial Building - Starkhund Brewery and Brew Pub at Urban Square PROJECT TYPE commercial new PROJECT New commercial and retail building - 1 building - 2 storeys - 58,000 sf - main floor includes tasting tap room, retail sales, production, storage, processing, staff and outdoor patio space - 2nd level includes a walkway mezzanine area to view brewery operations below, brewery tasting area, administration and staff areas - tumbled brick and timber accents, exposed metal finishes - 64 above ground parking stalls PROJECT STATUS Construction start anticipated fall/15 - construction completion anticipated mid 2016 ARCHITECT BlueGreen Architecture Inc 202-110 Highway 33, W Kelowna V1X 1X7 778-753-2650 DEVELOPER Compass Real Estate Development Ltd - 1574 Harvey Ave, Kelowna V1Y 6G2 778-436-2077 *Redevelopment of the BC Tree Fruit Packing House property

KELOWNA LOCATION Cooper Rd - Mountain Equipment Coop PROJECT TYPE Commercial New PROJECT New commercial outdoor store - 20,000 sf - renovations to the Target and Future Shop Stores across from Orchard Park Mall PROJECT STATUS Construction start anticipated September/15 - construction completion a nticipated summer/16 ARCHITECT Interform Investments - 1936 Templeton Dr, Vancouver V5N 4W1 604-644-5308 OWNER Mountain Equipment Coop 1977 Great Northern Way, Vancouver V5T 1E1 604-707-3300


P r o f e s s i o n a l

D e v e l o p m e n t

CONTINUING STUDIES

Invest in Your Business Invest in Yourself People and expertise are the most vital components of your business. Invest in them with professional development at an institution that boasts nearby campuses and a 50-year history of answering community needs with quality education and training. Okanagan College offers a comprehensive range of programs and courses to serve the business market.

www.okanagan.bc.ca/cs.

Contract Training #ONTACTUSAT   TO DISCUSSCUSTOMIZEDON SITETRAINING TAUGHTBYQUALIlEDINSTRUCTORSAND TAILOREDTOMEETYOURORGANIZATIONS SPECIlCNEEDS

/##50!4)/.!, (%!,4( 3!&%49 #%24)&)#!4% 'ETANINDUSTRY RECOGNIZEDPRACTICAL EDUCATIONANDTHE UP TO DATESKILLS YOUNEEDTOBE COMPETITIVEIN TODAYSJOBMARKET

s,EADERSHIP3KILLS#ERTIFICATE (Kelowna, Vernon, Penticton, Salmon Arm) s,EADERSHIP7ORKSHOPS (Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon, Salmon Arm) s0ROJECT-ANAGEMENT#ERTIFICATE(online) s0ROJECT-ANAGEMENT7ORKSHOPS (Kelowna) s"ASIC!CCOUNTINGMANUALACCOUNTING (Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon, Salmon Arm) U"OOKKEEPINGCOMPUTERIZEDACCOUNTING (Kelowna, Vernon, Penticton, Salmon Arm) s1UICK"OOKS (Kelowna, Vernon, Penticton, Salmon Arm) U2EVIT!RCHITECTURE%SSENTIALS3ERIES (Kelowna) U NEW /CCUPATIONAL(EALTH3AFETY Certificate (Online) U-3/FFICE7ORD %XCEL0OWER0OINT U0RODUCTIONAND)NVENTORY-ANAGEMENT (Kelowna)

For more information or to register visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/cs or call 1-800-856-5445

/#240

Explore our business-focused Continuing Studies courses at

Courses and Programs

Business Examiner Thompson/Okanagan - August 2015  

Featuring the latest business news and information from Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, Summerland and Penticton.