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DECEMBER 2015

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KELOWNA Edgecombe works on both commercial and high end residential projects

Penticton Indian Band recognized as economic development leader Community sees dramatic turnaround after tragic event to build strong future

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ENTICTON – When the Penticton Indian Band Development Corporation (PIBDC) was named the Economic Developer of the Year by the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO) recently, it was time for Chief Jonathan Kruger to celebrate and reflect. “It’s such an honour to receive an award with this kind of prestige,” says Chief Kruger. “I believe it’s a true reflection of the hard work and vision that this community and its leadership have had. Recognition like this from your peers is very validating, our own internal results have indicated that we’re on the right track, but to get confirmation from an outside source really

makes it special.” Chief Kruger couldn’t help but think back to a triple homicide 11 years ago on Penticton Indian Band lands, as it has become the driving force behind its growth into one of Canada’s leaders in First Nations economic development. Chief Kruger lost his brother in the tragedy, and he has used the fateful event to fuel a dramatic revitalization within his community, both socially and economically. “Going through that kind of deep adversity was the turning point for us,” says Chief Kruger. “It was a serious wake-up call about the needs of our people, and the importance of ensuring that everyone had access to the opportunities they needed to

have a positive future. “We responded by com i ng together and developing a Comprehensive Community Plan focused on eliminating the causes behind the tragedy, and making sure that it never happened again.” The national honour was bestowed on PIBDC at the 22 nd Annual National Conference in Toronto, an accomplishment made possible by a community focused on providing a better future for the next generation. It comes in a year that the Penticton Indian Band was also named as the 2015 Aboriginal Economic Development Corporation Award winner by the Canadian Council SEE PENTICTON INDIAN BAND | PAGE 15

Penticton Indian Band Chief Jonathan Kruger, with the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers’ Economic Developer of the Year award

Coupon book makes fund raising easy Experience has owners focusing on regional business deals BETH HENDRY-YIM

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ELOWNA - Simple. That’s how Don Graston, owner and developer of Lifestyle Coupons, likes to see fund raising. And keeping it simple is why his customers and charities keep coming back year after year. “Our coupon book sells itself,” he said. “Charities get the books on consignment, sell them for $22 and keep $8.50. Whatever they don’t sell, they return.”

For youth groups, churches, schools, and charitable organizations, the returns can be significant and not only for raising funds. The coupons connect the community with special two-forone deals on food, recreation and local attractions. “I select and approach the businesses myself,” said Graston. “I choose them based on what our demographic will appreciate, making sure they are family friendly.”

For information or a free quote contact admin@tdbenefits.ca or visit www.tdbenefits.ca

Tel: 250-861-8834

Graston is like a one-man show. A graduate of Fanshawe College in marketing and design with 20 years of experience in the field, he not only finds the deals - he also designs the coupons and sells the books to the charities. “It’s made of heavy duty card stock with full colour and easyto-use, pull out cards. The deals include two for one coffee and/or meals, discounts on entertainment, attractions, fast food, retail, and specials on recreational

destinations,” he said, adding that it doesn’t take many coupons to earn the initial investment back. Graston first created the Lifestyle coupon book in 1993 on Vancouver Island. After working in Vancouver as art director on projects that included coupon books, Graston moved his family to Nanaimo and once there, he saw an opportunity to create his own product. SEE COUPON BOOK | PAGE 11


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NEWS UPDATE

OKANAGAN Increased Number of International Summer Tourists Landed in BC The latest tourism numbers from Statistics Canada shows that BC had a very strong summer tourist season. International visitors are up 7.6 per cent to date in 2015 compared to 2014. This represents an additional 290,532 visitors coming to BC. Visitor visits were also up in September this year compared to 2014 by 11.5 per cent. Increases in September happened in a number of key markets, including Japan up 25 per cent, South Korea up 11.5 per cent, Germany up 10.3 per cent, China up 7.8 per cent, Mexico up 3.0 per cent and Australia up 2.3 per cent. Growth in the Asia-Pacific region was also up 8 per cent and Europe is up 5.5 per cent. “Tourism operators from across the province are having a good year, with revenues and occupancy rates up significantly,” said Marsha Walden, CEO of Destination BC “With the strong U.S. dollar, we are seeing fewer Canadians crossing the border, which is adding to excellent growth from international tourism markets. And, as a bonus, several of BC’s ski hills and resorts have opened early which should lead to a positive winter season and a superb finish to 2015.” Growth from the United States, BC’s largest international market, was up 14.5 per cent, with an additional 40,175 visitors coming to BC this September compared to September 2014. Visitors from the United States year-to-date have also risen, with an increase of 9.2 per cent in 2015 so far compared to 2014. The Province invests more than $90 million annually in the tourism sector across every region to grow and market the sector.

KELOWNA New Economic Profile For Agriculture Released By Central Okanagan Economic Development Commisson The Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission (COEDC) has released the Region’s first Economic P rof i le for A g r icu ltu re – a n on l i ne document aimed at supporting new and existing agricultural land owners in the Central Okanagan by providing access to a wide range of essential information and quick links to key resources. The new Central Okanagan Economic Profile for Agriculture is accessible through the COEDC’s website. The Profile is the latest addition to the suite of resources available from the Commission which provide statistical information, economic trends and key contacts aimed at supporting econom ic g row th a nd development among all business sectors in the Central Okanagan. “With the significant change taking place around agriculture and Central Okanagan farm operators ex ploring new value-added uses for their land, there is a vast amount of information to be explored, from trends and opportunities around agriculture today to the regulatory infrastructure related to

agriculture in the Central Okanagan,” says Corie Griffiths, Manager for the COEDC. “Our work with the agriculture sector to date has identified the need for both new and existing landowners to have early access to information – but often they don’t know where to access the information to address the questions and challenges they are facing. Whether someone is considering purchasing agricultural land in the Region and is not sure what to do with it, or a traditional farm operator is considering adding agri-tourism activities to their business, the Profile is a valuable tool for understanding the regulatory framework affecting agriculture, identifying viable business opportunities, and accessing resources and contacts available to support them at all stages of their business development.”

KELOWNA Kelowna Yacht Club to host Melges 24 Nationals Kelowna Yacht Club will host the 2016 Melges 24 Canadian National Championship from June 24-26 in Kelowna, BC. The special class of boat, a 24-foot light high-performance racer, will be sailed by all competitors in the championships that promises the fastest race speeds seen on Okanagan Lake. “This is an exciting regatta and we’re pleased to invite the top sailors in Canada and U.S. to show off their racing skills on Okanagan Lake,” says Commodore Murray Ramsden. “Thanks to a strong volunteer core and experienced race committees, Kelowna Yacht Club is quickly gaining a reputation for hosting outstanding racing events.” “It’s a great honour to host this high level event i n the spectacu la r Okanagan Valley and we’re looking forward to some intense competition in th is unique sailing region,” says Marc Noel, vice-president of the Canadian Melges 24 Class Association. The Kelowna Yacht Club boasts over 1,000 moorage slips, near 1,500 members and offers first class amenities i n thei r awa rd-w i n n i ng clubhouse. Located on Okanagan Lake, the club is home to the largest fresh water marina in Canada and one of the newest fleets of Melges 24s. As the world’s lead i ng one-desig n sportsboat, the Melges 24 is raced with a crew of four. The high-tech design includes a carbon fibre spar, rudder, bowsprit and vertical keel fin. Nearly 30 teams are expected to compete in the event, with teams from both Canada and the U.S. Last yea r, Ca nada was wel l represented by a total of seven entries out of a f leet of 36 boats at the 2015 CSR Marine Melges 24 US National Championship hosted by the Columbia Gorge Racing Association in Oregon. Kelowna Yacht Club opened its new clubhouse in the fall of 2014; the twostorey 2 4,100 squa re-foot bu i ld i ng boasts the la rgest deck overlooki ng Okanagan Lake. T he 2016 Melges 2 4 Ca nad ia n National Championship is open to all boats that meet the obligations of the Melges 24 Class rules and IMCA rules, includi ng class membersh ip. Reg istration is ava i lable on l i ne sta rti ng Ja nua ry 2016. Race information can be found

DECEMBER 2015

at melges24.ca.

KELOWNA Accelerate Okanagan CEO resigns T he Board of Directors of Accelerate Okanagan regret to announce the resignation of Pilar Portela as Chief Executive Officer. “I w i sh to p erson a l ly ex pre ss my si ncere appreci at ion to Accelerate Okanagan’s clients, partners, and community advocates for their support,” says Pilar. “In allowing me to disrupt the technology scene with ideas, programs, and services, I believe there has been a positive collective impact that has enhanced the growth of the Interior’s technology community.” In her 14 months leading Accelerate Okanagan, Pilar has worked together w it h m a ny com mu n ity leaders a nd stakeholders in various capacities. “The board wishes Pilar all the best i n her f utu re endeavors a nd is ver y appreciative of all her hard work and contributions this past year,” says Accelerate Okanagan Board Chair, Simone Brunton. “T he boa rd has ex pressed its full support to the staff and we are confident that the organization will continue to thrive in their very capable hands.” Accelerate Okanagan has retained the services of LoveHR, a Kelowna based recruiter, to assist with the selection of a new CEO. In the meantime, Accelerate Okanagan’s Board of Directors has appoi nted Raghwa Gopal as the interim CEO. “As a co-founder of the very first tech company in Kelowna, I have been very passionate about Accelerate Okanagan since its inception,” says Accelerate Ok a n a ga n E xecut ive i n Residence, Raghwa Gopal. “I am very fortunate to step in as the interim CEO and support the very passionate and capable staff, most of whom I have been working with for the past few years. Pilar’s vision for Accelerate Okanagan, as well as the plans and strategies she’s already put in place, has created a foundation that will see some big wins in the very near future.” Pilar will be relocating to Rossland, BC to expand her software development firm and consulting services; she will proudly continue to volunteer in the growth and solidification of innovation in BC’s Southern Interior.

SUN PEAKS Wine Festival Returns to Sun Peaks The Sun Peaks Winter Okanagan Wine Festival returns with an expanded roster of delectable events, January 14 to 24, 2016. Now in its 18th year, the festival has built on two of the province’s best assets, winter recreation and British Columbia wine, growing into one of  Ca nada’s prem ier w i nter events. This growth is not only defined by an increase in attendance, but also by the nu mber of u n ique festiva l w i ne a nd culinary offerings, which continues to attract thousands of guests to Canada’s second largest ski area. “Each year it redefines the experience a nd ex pectation of trad itiona l w ine

festivals,” says Christopher Nicolson, President of Tourism Sun Peaks. “From its modest beginnings of a weekend Icew i ne event, the festiva l has progressed into a fantastic ten day experience that is truly one of our premier winter celebrations. It showcases the unique combination of BC’s best wines and the adventure of Canada’s Alpine Village”. “T he Festival is a testament to the phenomenal regional wine culture in the province, which has now surpassed $1 billion in wine sales annually, with BC wine comprising the largest market share of any region’s wines sold in the province,” said Blair Baldwin, General Manager, The Okanagan Wine Festivals Society. “With 50 British Columbia wineries and a number of unique Canadiana inspired wine and culinary events like Coureur Des Bois Repas, which celebrates the famous ‘runners of the woods’ and the superb Comforts of Grilled Cheese and Wine, we offer an inspired pairing of the best of British Columbia for t hose that enjoy fine wine, skiing, food and riding in a spectacular mountainside setting.”

PENTICTON Casino Doubles Down TOTA website Gateway Casinos & Entertainment has announced plans to build a new, 45,000-squ a re-foot enter ta i n ment and gaming property next to the South Okanagan Events Centre. It w i l l b e c a l le d Cascades Casi no Penticton. The project promises up to 150 new jobs and a $25-m illion construction investment. Gateway has entered into a lease with the City of Penticton for the property. The casino will feature a large gaming floor with entertainment and multiple d i n i ng options, i nclud i ng a rooftop patio. “Gateway … is very excited to a nnou nce ou r i ntent ions for ou r nex t big redevelopment project,” Jag Nijjar, vice-president of operations with Gateway, said in a press release. “The SOEC is Penticton’s entertainment destination, and we believe a new, full-service facility will be a valuable and exciting addition that will provide patrons a first-class experience.” If all goes as planned, construction could begin in 2016, with a grand opening in spring 2017. “I am thrilled that Gateway Casinos is planning to stay in Penticton,” said local MLA Dan Ashton. “This new property will have more food and beverage options, as well as more job creation for the entire area. Not only is this is a win for Penticton, this is a win for Gateway and all of its employees.” Mayor Andrew Jakubeit said the City of Penticton has worked hard to keep the casino in Penticton after it was announced its lease would not be renewed at the Penticton Lakeside Resort. At stake was also $1.6 million in hosting revenue for citizen services. “Anytime an established business in the community is growing, creating jobs and investing $25 million in the community, it is very exciting,” he said. Com mu n ity i nput is bei ng soug ht before the project gets final approval from BC Lottery Corporation.


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DECEMBER 2015

WORK SMARTER NOT HARDER Do not be afraid to set your own rules, what your boundaries are will be different from your co-

DOWNTOWN PENTICTON KERRI MILTON

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c h i e v i n g a w o rk / l i fe balance is never an easy thing – now add the holiday season and you start to feel swamped. Your business is busier than ever, there are staff parties to think about and then…. oh right, the Life part. How can you keep your business successful and still try to find a balance? Start by stepping away from the emails for a while. It is so easy to be constantly plugged in with the smartphones of today, but just for a mental break, make it a goal

workers, employees or your partners to not check the email after 6 or 7pm, so you have some time to wind down and reflect on the day. “Work Smarter not Harder”, we all think the harder we work the more we get done, we sacrifice eating and sleeping and many other things to just get that “one more thing” complete. Instead map out your day, think what the priorities are and allot a certain amount of time to complete the task. The key is to be productive and working longer does not equate productivity. Try to avoid structure-less meetings or if in retail, allow for a certain amount

of time to merchandise and then move onto something else in order to keep your productivity moving forward. Be willing to delegate duties, no one likes a martyr! The best way to balance your life is to get help from others around you. Do not think you have to “do it all yourself” – this is a recipe for disaster. If you want a more balanced life at work and home reach out and ask for help from those around you. Funny thing is people want to help and if you make them feel like they are not needed – it’s a lose/lose for everyone. Do not be afraid to set your own rules, what your boundaries are will be different from your co-workers, employees or your partners. We are witnessing a generational shift in our attitudes to work. Millennials (those born after 1980) are more likely than their elders to blur the lines between work and home, but they are also more likely to take time for themselves as well. Take time for you – we hear this all the time, but what does this

really mean? It means different things for different people. For some, it is to get a monthly massage, to work out at the gym, to go for a walk, to cook, it really does not matter as long as it allows you to think and calm your mental state. I have heard people recommend taking an hour a day for yourself, sometimes we have to be realistic and that time is just

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not there, so find what you need in order to control your work/life balance. Do not be afraid to go for it your staff, family, clients and friends will thank you for it. Kerri Milton is Executive Director of the Downtown Penticton Association. She can reached at kerri@downtownpenticton.org

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CUSTOMER RETENTION: MAGIC OR METHOD?

HIRING LUCY GLENNON

I

t’s a generally accepted notion that acquiring a new customer is more expensive than retaining an existing customer. Add to that fact a sluggish economy where businesses are scrutinizing budgets and considering alternative suppliers, and it’s easy to understand why it’s important to have a customer retention strategy in place. After all, current customers (as well

as past customers) have already demonstrated that they want and are willing to pay for your products and services. It makes good sense to hold on to them. Doing so is crucial to the growth and success of your business. A sales guru once described a five-step magical process for customer retention. The five steps are: 1) Follow Up; 2) Follow Up; 3) Follow Up; 4) Follow Up; and (you guessed it) 5) Follow Up. OK, there’s nothing magical, or even remarkable, about the process. I suppose the guru was trying to drive home the point that if you don’t want your customers to drift away, then, in addition to normal buyer-seller interactions, you should maintain regular contact with them throughout the year. Makes good sense. But simply “following up” is not enough. The real “magic” is

how, when, and in what manner you maintain contact. Making monthly “keep-in-touch” phone calls is not sufficient. So, let’s look at five follow-up strategies you can implement to cultivate a closer relationship with your customers. 1. Send a “Thank You” card to new clients. (Yes, a card…not an e-mail.) An elaborate pre-printed card with a foil-stamped company logo isn’t necessary…or desired. A simple card with your handwritten message, “I look forward to working with you. Please don’t hesitate to contact me for any reason,” is all that’s needed. Make sure to include your cell phone number and e-mail address. 2. At regular intervals, send to your customers a printed copy of your company’s newsletter, or an article or white paper that is relevant to their businesses or industries. Add a hand-written

note—“Thought you’d find this interesting.” 3. Send birthday cards to your customers. (You do know their birthdays, don’t you?) Again, no elaborate card with a company logo or imprint. A simple birthday card with your hand-written note, “Enjoy your day,” is sufficient. 4. Send information about new products or services to your customers. Add a handwritten call-to-action note. For example, “Let’s discuss. I’ll call on Tuesday at 10am.” 5. Send customers printed copies of articles relevant to their personal interests. (Yes, you should know something about your clients’ personal interests.) And, as you’ve already guessed, add a personal note like, “Saw this in the Business Journal…thought you’d like to have it.” The underlying theme is: communicate in a personal manner.

Most salespeople are so focused on their work that they don’t take enough time to meet with, talk to, and listen to their customers. Much of their communication takes place in a most impersonal manner—via e-mail. While that’s a valid means of communication for day-to-day business interactions, there’s little room for it in a customer retention program. L i t t l e t h i n g s t h a t yo u d o throughout the year remind your customers that you are thinking about them and you care about and appreciate their business. Customers who feel appreciated are much less likely to jump ship when your competitors come knocking at their doors. Copyright 2015 Hireguru™. Lucy Glennon can be reached at 866-645-2047 and her website is www.hireguru.ca

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4

DECEMBER 2015

YEAR-END REFLECTIONS ON THE BUSIEST CHAMBER YEAR YET Our Chamber networks are absolutely buzzing with questions, solutions, webinars, and the occasional award: notably in our case, BC Chamber

KELOWNA

of the Year

CAROLINE GROVER

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t’s now late November – getting colder in the mountains (great news for our ski and sport retail members) – signaling that it’s time for us to reflect, plan, identify our shortfalls, celebrate our wins and prepare for those few precious moments of pause in late December before we hit the play button again. 2015: The Kelowna Chamber of Commerce is declaring this year our most successful year, ever. There are a number of factors that build up that statement. Ou r members. Never i n ou r h istory have we had more members, and more members joining. And, do they ever display a high degree of commitment to business excellence and community support! Every day, I comment on the diversity of businesses joining the Chamber, and the ways they stretch us to grow and work together to create business solutions. Another compelling proof that this has been our best year ever? Recognition

from our colleagues, across the province, and across the country. Our Chamber networks are absolutely buzzing with questions, solutions, webinars, and the occasional award: notably in our case, BC Chamber of the Year. What an honour! And, the highest nominee count ever for our prestigious Business Excellence Awards, given out in October. Learning. I’ve learned so much this year, particularly about the opportunities in Canada’s resource-based industries. I’ve been on trips to the oil sands, to see the pipeline operations along the coast of BC– and have become a follower of Resource Works, to stay up to date on the province’s resource sectors. I’m a huge proponent of responsible development, job creation, a nd the ma i ntena nce of a clea n a nd hea lthy environment. Identifying shortfalls should always be pa rt of a ny look-back-a nd-pla nforward. What do I see? The need for

JOHN GLENNON

speed – gett i ng pl a n ned st rateg ies into place faster, so the evolution and solution of what the plan is meant to fix, is done within a timeframe that delivers needed results, sooner. Actually, all the “shortfalls” are really centered a rou nd work i ng w ith l i mited staff and resources – a familiar theme for so many of our businesses, small, medium and large. A nd like a lot of shor tcom i ngs, m a ny of t hem are in my head, based on the perception that we need to be further ahead tha n we a re – yet we a re i n a rea l ly strong, productive position. So perhaps learning to accept where we are wh i le pu sh i ng for wa rd i s t he most s e n s i b l e p l a n t o m a k e r i g h t n o w. Looking ahead, the Chamber is examining its branding. We realize that in this communications saturated world, we require a continu ity of message, of look, and mission in everything we do. We’re hy per-critical of ou r ow n com mu n ications, a nd a re spend i ng time late this year, and more time next year, in ensuring that what we look like to our audience, and how we are perceived has a strength and consistency that will reflect our very best face to our internal and external audiences. As we look into our roster of speakers in

PLANN

e for n a l T H he FAS

WT O R G NESS

Get in

BUSI

t

Kelowna, BC

DETAILS & REGISTRATION: www.glennon.sandler.com December 17: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Caroline Grover is the CEO of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached by email at caroline@kelownachamber.org

CP RAIL HOLIDAY TRAIN TRADITION

SALMON ARM CORRYN GRAYSTON

INESS S U B 2016 RKSHOP O ING W

our first quarter of 2016, we see MLAs, MPs (one new), our Mayor (new last year), and our Premier presenting our provincial budget. 2016 also brings a trip to Kelowna’s sister city in Japan, in cherry blossom time, which is sold out, and an exciting excursion in the summer to Haida Gwai. In the second quarter, we’ll host the prov i nce-w ide BC Cha mber a n nua l convention and reception for attendees right here in Kelowna. If our hosting the national Chamber convention 18 months ago is anything to go by (yes, delegates are still talking about the party we threw for them), the provincial celebration will be another landmark. A strong membership; a strong board; a supportive and knowledgeable staff – if the term ‘count your blessings’ is appropriate at this time of year, then, yes, I am doing that. But I’m also looking around the corner at 2016, and seeing excitement, learning, involvement, advocacy, and pretty much thinking “I have the best job in the world, right now, right here in this place, Kelowna.”

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almon Arm is excited to welcome Roberta Brunin to our community. Roberta recently relocated to Salmon Arm and she is looking forward to providing her unique services as a hypnotherapist to assist clients in releasing addictive behaviors such as; smoking, over eating, alcohol, gambling, etc. Roberta also offers group presentations to empower individuals to stop smoking. To learn more about Roberta’s services she invites you to contact her at www.robertabrunin.com ■■■ Robert Steffen, Certified Security Guard and owner of Robin Hood Security is pleased to have recently expanded his operations and security services to include the community

of Salmon Arm and surro u n d i n g a re a . R o b i n Hood Security is committed to providing the highest level of quality security services by protecting and securing the interests of their clients at fair and competitive prices. Their mission is to build longterm relationships with e ach c u s tomer. M a i ntaining the highest level of professionalism, integrity, honesty and fairness is our goal. Robin Hood Security offers security services in the areas of Commercial, Construction, Residential, Alarm Response, Patrols, Home Watch, Crowd Control and Security Escorts. Call Robert at 250-9369498 for all your security needs. ■■■ The Salmon Arm Chamber recently attended a regional Visitor Centre meeting at the Quaaout Lodge in North Shuswap hosted by Shuswap Tourism. In attendance were Visitor Centre representatives from Salmon Arm, Sicamous, South Shuswap, North Shuswap, Chase and Enderby. This 3 hour session focused primarily on innovative ways in which tourism services can be delivered to visitors and locals by creating focused marketing and awareness campaigns on the invaluable resources and services

that are provided through Visitor Centres. Projects for 2016 have been identified such as quality service training modules (on-line versions for ease of access and time availability), marketing of services provided by Visitor Centres and continued awareness, cross-promotion and focused marketing of our tourism operators, attractions and events. ■■■ Each hol iday season brings traditions, and a Salmon Arm favourite is the annual CP Rail Holiday Train. Each December, the train rolls in and gathers donations for local food banks while also enter ta i n i ng t he community. This years’ Holiday Train is on December 16, 2015 at 6:30 p.m. at the Lordco Gravel Parking Lot located at 51 Lakeshore Drive N.E. ■■■ The Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce would like to extend our warmest wishes for a safe and happy holiday season. We look forward to a healthy and prosperous 2016. Corryn Grayston is the General Manager at the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at (250) 832-6247 or admin@sachamber.bc.ca


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DECEMBER 2015

TAKE TIME TO SHOW APPRECIATION Without our staff and our clients, we would likely have failed to achieve all we have over the past year

KAMLOOPS DEB MCLELLAND

A

s we head into the final month of 2015, it will be easy to cast our eyes solely on the 2016 calendar as we look to implement new plans, make new connections and grow our businesses. Doing so - strategically planning for the year ahead - is exceptionally important (those who know the Kamloops Chamber know we LOVE our strategic planning!) As John Lennon famously said, “how can we go forward when we don’t know which way we’re facing?” And yet, it is just as important to understand where we have come from and what has helped to get us to where we are now. Looking back on your successes over the past year, what factors have helped you mark

your achievements? Who has assisted you along the way and helped make your accomplishments possible? For many of us,

our staff and our clients will be primary candidates when we think about this “whom”. Our staff care for our clients, bring new ideas to the table and enable our businesses to run on a day to day basis. Our clients, believing in us, and the service we provide, support us with their business. Without our staff and our clients, we would likely have failed to achieve all we have over the past year. In recognizing this then, we encourage you to look back on the past year, and spend some time thanking those who have helped you achieve success this past year, before you get too focused on the New Year. Doing so encourages your supporters to continue with you into the next year, building on past successes and establishing new ones. Not sure how to do so? Borrowed from Kara Ohngren Prior, part time editor at YoungEntrepreneur, here are five suggestions to get you started: ■ Be Specific - A focused “thank you” will be more meaningful and thus increase employees’ motivation and productivity. A recent poll by TJinsite, a division of TimeJobs.com, found that more than 35 percent of respondents consider lack of recognition

FIRST PHASE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A CHARTER OF SUSTAINABILITY Responsible Tourism includes assisting our stakeholders in their efforts

THOMPSON OKANAGAN TOURISM GLENN MANDZIUK

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he Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association (TOTA) and GreenStep Solutions are excited to announce that they have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding as part of the first phase of regional efforts in the development of a Charter of Sustainability. GreenStep Solutions is a Kelowna based company, which operates across Canada, and has worked with more than 1200 businesses since 2008 on a wide variety of sustainability-related projects and programs. T h rough Green Tou ri s m , G re e n S t e p S o l utions provides third-party

to provide Green Tourism Products and attracting the right customers certification and expert guidance to all types of tourism businesses, helping them create a green action plan. Members include hotels, motels, resorts, campgrounds, casinos, attractions, tour operators, restaurants, wineries, breweries, distilleries and even tourism centers and offices. The Green Tourism program is recognized internationally and to date has certified more 2,300 businesses around the world and has been recognized as the most credible such program for the tourism and hospitality industry by Totem Tourism in their 2013 “Greenwash Report”.

Responsible Tourism includes assisting our stakeholders in their efforts to provide Green Tourism P ro d u c t s a n d a t t ra c ting the right customers. The Thompson Okanagan Region is abundant in its natural beauty and it is imperative that as we grow the tourism product, we also work to ensure this rich environment is protected. With Green Tourism the Thompson Okanagan Region has the opportunity to support the tourism industry while engaging in more green and responsible business practices’, therefore ensuring the natural environment stays healthy for years to come. This initiative is in supp or t of t he T homp son Okanagan regional strategy released in 2012, TOTA continues to work with industry partners to realize the vision of the strategy for the region. Glenn Mandziuk is President and Chief Executive Officer of Thompson Okanagan Tourism Region. He can be reached at ceo@totabc.com

of their work the biggest hindrance to productivity. Make it Personal - Connecting your appreciation with the recipient’s personal life can make your message more resonant. Go Old School - When was the last time you received a handwritten thank-you note? In the era of Facebook and text messaging, it’s likely been quite some time. Don’t underestimate the impact of sending a note through snail mail. Taking the time to write a thoughtful note indicates a deeper level of appreciation than simply dashing off a short email or text. The extra effort will not go unnoticed. Be Authentic - If you don’t mean it, don’t say it. Your customers and employees will know right away if a “thank you” is genuine or not. Similarly, don’t dole out gratitude when it’s not deserved. If you go around t h a n k i ng ever yone for every tiny thing, it won’t mean much when it’s actually warranted. Add Some Real Value Sometimes words aren’t enough. If your customers and staff feel that you go

out of your way to reward them, they’re more likely to choose you over your lessappreciative competition. Still struggling? Why not bring your staff and clients to our Corporate Christmas Luncheon on December 11th! There will be fantastic food, games, prizes, entertainment and, of course, Santa! Friday, December 11th from 12:00PM – 2:00PM at the Hotel540 - 540 Victoria Street Members - $50 + GST and Future Members - $70 + GST R . S.V. P. b y D e c em b er 5 t h - k a m l o o p s c h a m b e r. c a o r 250.372.7722 ■■■ 2016 membership renewals are coming to an inbox near you! The first round of invoices is being emailed out soon; payment is due December 31st. Not yet a Kamloops Chamber member? We would love to chat with you about who we are, what we do, and how we can help you build your business! Connect with us today! membership@kamloopschamber.ca | 250.372.7722 Deb McClelland is the executive director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached email at deb@kamloopschamber.ca

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6

DECEMBER 2015

A FOCUS ON GETTING DOWN TO BIZ 5 business tips for pouncing on an idea and bringing that project to

PENTICTON

completion

BRANDY MASLOWSKI

I

f you asked any entrepreneur their main reasons for NOT getting something done, the answers would flood off the page about too many distractions and not enough time! Despite the high acclaim one might garner for being considered a multitasker, working on multiple tasks at the same time can sometimes be a recipe for getting a whole lot of nothing done. As bestselling author of the Rich Dad series, Robert Kiyosaki is most famously quoted, “Focus! Follow One Course Until Successful!” Do you find at the end of the year, you are looking back at a few great goals you have not even pulled out from under the pile? When you really get down to the day to day duties of running a business, it makes sense to reduce distractions, prioritize projects and tackle one task at a time for the clearest path to success.

Here are 5 business tips for pouncing on an idea and bringing that project to completion. TIP # 1 - Make Sure It’s In The Plan. You must have an overall picture of what your mission and vision are and where your goal priorities fall into your strategic plan. No plan? Then simply, my friend, you have just realized why you may have an issue with follow through. It is imperative in any business from solopreneur to big corporate entity, that you book a strategic planning session with an expert, or even alone with your dog, which results in a clear mission, vision and goals

with outcomes and timelines. When you have a plan, you can prioritize and choose one project to complete first. TIP # 2 - Break It Down. Create the specific tasks you need to accomplish and build a realistic timeline. If you are planning to launch a product or idea, start with the major deliverables. For example; if you are planning a large luncheon the major deliverables would be to book the speaker, the date, the venue and the title sponsor. From there you can break it down further. You want your tasks to be manageable enough that they feel attainable and everything leads to the bigger goal. Once you have the end date chosen you can work back to the present and build a clear timeline for each set of tasks. TIP # 3 - Take The Time To Make The Time. Book plenty of ti me on you r ca lenda r to get the project done. Consider the amount of time you invest in meetings, conference calls, phone calls, emails and more, not to mention those annoying time wasters like Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram. Why are those more important than booking chunks of time for solo meetings? Truth be told, it is way more important to finish the items on your own agenda than to participate in anything

else. It should not sound crazy to book a half day, every day to follow your own agenda - that may still not be enough time. So make it happen by booking time and tasks on your calendar right now. And back to Tip # 2 - make sure tasks are broken down. They should be as small and attainable as those other pesky items that keep distracting you. If you are constantly interrupted by phone calls, emails, online pop ups and knocks at the door, throw up a sign that says ‘meeting in progress’ (even a solo meeting) and turn off your phone and all other notifications so you can get the job done. TIP # 4 - Monitor Outcomes. Whether it is a 2 week project with daily check-ins or a 2 year project with monthly meetings, it is crucial to monitor your progress. You’ve worked hard to set your goals and create timelines for a reason. Monitoring your progress not only helps you stick to the plan, keeping it simplified and attainable, but also helps you identify and solve problems and be better informed if the need for a change in the plan should arise. Book monthly check-ins from the beginning with agendas, expected outcomes and new actionable items to make sure you are consistently in line with your goals and keeping your

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priorities in order. It is very easy to get sidetracked by someone with a passionate idea and their own agenda. Suddenly you are doing a lot of work that is not in your plan. TIP # 5 - There Is No Failure. Whether it’s one task or an entire project, sometimes it is scary to put yourself out there. But if you think of a failed task as just one more learning step before success, you’ll be well on your way. It’s very important to mark your achievements clearly in your mind, no matter how small, so you are motivated to take another step forward rather than slump back in your chair and get lost on Facebook. Write your achievements down, if you meet a big goal treat yourself to a massage on your lunch break or meet a friend you’ve been missing for a nice coffee. Focusing on your achievements will help you overcome set-backs and build confidence. And the moment you decide to clarify a problem is the moment you move from a perceived failure to success mode! Brandy Maslowski is the new Executive Director of the Penticton & Wine Country Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at director@penticton.org or 250-492-4103.


7

DECEMBER 2015

2015 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SUMMERLAND CHRISTINE PETKAU

2

015 has been an exceptional year of new projects and exciting opportunities for the Summerland Chamber. Here’s a short list of some of those accomplishments: Tourism Management - The Chamber provides comprehensive Destination Management Services to the District of Summerland. We welcome more than 12,000 visitors each year to our Visitor

Centre, provide images, content and design for the Summerland Visitor Guide, manage the image bank and handle all tourism marketing for our town. Regional Bike Path Guides and Summerland Specific Hike and Bike Trail Map - Building on our region’s tourism and economic development focus on biking as an economic driver, we were a partner in the creation of a comprehensive South Okanagan regional bike map and we also used that data as well as other Summerland hiking material to create a new local bike/hike map. GoMedia - In 2015 Destination Canada hosted their annual international travel media conference in Penticton. We were exhibitors at this conference and also hosted more than 50 international writers through two ½ day Fam tours in Summerland. We have created a new media section with stories and images

on the tourismsummerland.com website and the event has already generated media coverage for our community. New chamber website: Our new Chamber website was launched in May. A clean new look with important information front and center helps us promote our members and the work of the Chamber, a comprehensive new business directory makes local business easy to find and the site’s responsive design means it is user friendly on all digital platforms, from laptops to handheld devices. Our Connected Community video - Launched in February, this video showcases the value of shopping locally. Sector Meetings - This year we hosted a number of meetings within particular sectors to improve our connections to our members and hear their issues. Business Walks - The Chamber Board, joined by District of

Summerland Mayor and Council, also made significant connections with our business community via Summerland’s first ‘Business Walk’. Seven teams were able to meet 66 businesses on the morning of Oct. 22. 90 per cent of respondents said that business was steady or improving and also shared their perspectives on what we can do to improve the business climate in our community. Regional Economic Development - The Chamber represents Summerland on the South Okanagan Economic Development Consortium as part of our business retention, attraction and expansion portfolio. Su m merla nd Busi ness a nd Community Awards Gala - Held the last Saturday of February, the 77th awards Gala celebrated the best of our Summerland businesses and community supporters. Festival of Lights - The 28th annual Festival of Lights, organized

each year by the Summerland Chamber, celebrated a Country Christmas theme and was bigger and better than ever. Growing Web and Social Media Presence - The Chamber reaches thousands of unique visitors each year through our three websites. We also have more than 7,000 daily followers across our 3 Facebook pages, 3 twitter accounts, Instagram, Pinterest and Blog. Please connect with us online at SummerlandChamber.com to learn more about our work in Summerland and the South Okanagan. The Summerland Chamber of Commerce wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year. Christine Petkau is Executive Director at the Summerland Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at cpetkau@ summerlandchamber.com

NEW HOTEL WINS KUDOS AT SICA AWARDS SPOTLIGHT

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops is getting rave reviews

K

AMLOOPS - The Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops recently won the award of merit in the hospitality category at this year’s Southern Interior Construction Association (SICA) awards. The hotel, which opened this past June 17, makes a new architectural statement, encompassing all the latest features in the hotel’s Fairfield brand. Construction was by RBI Construction Group Inc. Fairfield Kamloops general manager Steve Earl noted that RBI had previously built a number of hotels in Kamloops and elsewhere in Western Canada. “It’s quite a standout building in a high traffic area as you’re coming into Kamloops,” he said. “It’s a really nice architectural addition to the area.” He added that winning the award was a nice and welcome surprise.

Steve Earl says the new hotel is performing very well since its opening this past summer “I think it’s a real credit to the building,” he said, adding that the hotel has performed very well since opening this past summer. “Obviously the Marriott brand is highly recognized regionally and internationally so people are quite happy to see the name come to the Kamloops market. From the business community to leisure travel, people who walk in are quite amazed at how great the product looks – the size of the rooms and the quality. It’s been received very positively.” He noted that he has previously managed other hotels

Executive king rooms are a big hit with business travelers

The Fairfield Inn & Suites boasts an outstanding architectural design for Pacific Hospitality, which operates six hotels in Kamloops and 11 in BC and Alberta, and there was no question he would take on the responsibility of the Fairfield when it was offered to him. “It’s always great when you can associate yourself with the best product,” he said. “I don’t think there is anything quite like it in Kamloops at this time.” What makes Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops so special? It starts with the new modern look, Earl said. The lobby is spacious and open and also serves as the breakfast area in the mornings. Earl said it has a warm, welcoming feel. Hallways are wide and easily navigated. Comments flood in about the size of the rooms and the amenities offered. Much thought went into the space allowed to walk between the beds and furniture. The décor is bright and modern. Even the simplest things were meticulously thought out such as the design of the mobile desks and the convenient placement of electrical outlets. Bathrooms are also open, bright and spacious. Quality was also important: rooms feature a Keurig coffee machine, mini fridges and microwaves. Free Internet connections are

offered on two levels including the ultra fast premium package free to Marriott Rewards guests. Earl said that breakfast is also a point of pride: food is fresh and bountiful and includes fresh fruit, yogurt and even a waffle bar. The fitness facility offers four pieces of cardio equipment with built in TV’s as well as free weights. Guests can also relax by the pool or in the hot tub. Since opening in the summer, Fairfield Kamloops has seen a good deal of leisure as well as business travellers, with about 60 per cent of the market in business. Many business travellers appreciate the executive king rooms with a separate sitting area. “We’re only going to get busier as time goes on,” Earl said. “We are building a regular client base. We have a very high quality product. People come looking for the hotel.” He added that Marriott also believes in giving back to the community and the new hotel is definitely involved in local activities. “Our business community is very supportive of us,” Earl said. “ “We certainly want to give back on the community level.” Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops gives every indication

of starting the new year off right. The city is hosting the Women’s World Hockey championship in the early spring, giving the hotel a strong boost into 2016. Due to its high exposure, the hotel is also a favourite for drive-by traffic on the busy Lower Mainland to Calgary route. Its location in close proximity to the new Gateway Casino is also a boon. Earl said that the casino with its live shows and restaurant offers guests terrific entertainment options. “We offer a very good and consistent product,” Earl said. “But what we also pride ourselves on is making sure that every guest who comes and stays with us has a great experience beyond the physical building in terms of the service we provide. We make sure they feel at home when they’re travelling. We give them extra special attention and make sure that they are well taken care of.” Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops is at 1475 Hugh Allan Drive in Kamloops. www.marriott.com/ykafi

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8

DECEMBER 2015

COMMUNITY IN

SALMON ARM City gets $10 million fiber optic network Industrial sector is focus for expansion and growth BETH HENDRY-YIM

S

ALMON ARM - Geological forces, ancient fault lines a nd melti ng glaciers a l l came together to make a perfect environment for creating the fertile soil around Shuswap Lake. Originally home to the Shuswap First Nations, in the late 1800’s Salmon Arm, located on the lakes shore near the Salmon river, attracted settlers to the region for its rich soil, abundant water and accessibility to the trans-continental railway. Today agriculture still plays an important role in Salmon Arm with 200 farms operating within the City boundaries and 400 in the surrounding rural areas. Corryn Grayston, general manager of the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce said that agritourism is growing in popularity due to the variety of products grown and produced in the region. With a temperate climate providing an average 1900 hours of sunshine and an annual rainfall of 478 mm, it has attracted small and large scale agri-businesses including, large scale organic dairies and poultry operations. It also boasts high quality and unique wineries and breweries. “ Vi neya rd s i n t h i s reg ion grow cold-climate grapes that produce a crisp, fruitier white wine,” she said. “It has quite a cult following.” She added that farming operations from the Fraser Valley looking for large stretches of affordable property are seeing Salmon Arm as a potential place to relocate. Mayor Nancy Cooper said that dairy, egg and chicken producers are ramping up production but they aren’t the only businesses looking at relocating to Salmon Arm and capitalizing on the region’s offerings. “In 2012, Telus announced that it would be putting a new fiber optic network in select communities across Canada,” she said, adding that after hearing the news she took the opportunity to contact the company and suggest Salmon Arm. “They said yes! Salmon Arm got a $10 million network that goes right to each door. We were the biggest community to get it.” The high tech addition should attract more than businesses specializing in technology. Sa l mon A r m h a s a t h r iv i ng

“A big portion of our lending is in succession loans for businesses where the owner is ready to retire.” ROB MARSHALL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR COMMUNITY FUTURES SALMON ARM

fabrication industry and the fiber optics network ensures elaborate designs and large chunks of data get where they need to, fast. Cooper said that Salmon Arm, with its large industrial park, is looking at expanding the manufacturing segment and is offering an industrial revitalization tax exemption program to support new industrial development in specific areas of the city, including the industrial park. “Eligible developments will receive a 5 year 100 per cent exemption on the municipal portion of property taxes, plus an additional 5 year sliding scale exemption, returning the property to full taxation in year 10. Eligible projects include new industrial buildings or major expansions with a value over $300,000.” She added that the city is pursuing the manufacturing segment as it not only provides a strong tax base, but also because it provides employment opportunities. Lana Fitt, economic development manager for Salmon Arm Economic Development Society (SAEDS), said that the city is well positioned to expand, not only in manufacturing, technology and agriculture, but also in tourism, education and retail sectors. SAEDS follows a unique econom ic development ser v ice delivery model with a board of directors made up of business leaders who represent different sectors of the city’s economy. In 2013 the society created a fiveyear action plan with a focus on

Rob Marshall said Salmon Arm has a strong entrepreneurial spirit

Lana Fitt said the city is well positioned for expansion

CREDIT:ROB MARSHALL

CREDIT:LANA FITT

Cooper helps dedicate newly purchased soccer field CREDIT:ROB MARSHALL

its Business Retention Expansion program. Fitt said that among other initiatives, the action plan includes an education component with an offering of business workshops and information sessions on a variety of topics including labour, finances and export assistance. “SAEDS also partnered with Okanagan College Enactus and Community Futures Shuswap on the Shuswap Launch-a-preneur program which provides business planning support and mentorship for those wanting to launch new businesses in the Shuswap,” she said. Cooper said in addition to providing training, the entrepreneurial program also acts as a business planning competition, similar to Dragon’s Den, a popular reality TV show that has business experts evaluating business proposals. A t h r e e-m o n t h p r o g r a m , Launch-a-preneur, guides participants through various stages

of developing a business. Cooper said that the best part of the program is the pairing of volunteer business mentors with entrepreneurial hopefuls, citing not SEE SALMON ARM | PAGE 9

change management; leadership boots-on-the-ground; process audit & design; temporary business management

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SALMON ARM

DECEMBER 2015

9

Mayor Nancy Cooper with David Askew at the new Uptown Askews Food Store

Canoe Forest Products recently completed a $14 million upgrade

CREDIT:NANCY COOPER

CREDIT:LANA FITT

SALMON ARM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

just the support but also the sharing of expertise. Rob Marshall, executive director of Community Futures said that Salmon Arm has a strong entrepreneurial spirit in diverse sectors. “We see quite a variety of business ideas from retail to food vending. This past year we saw food vendors wanting to customize food trucks.” One of those trucks was a participant from the Launch-a-preneur program showcasing a portable wood fired pizza oven. Community Futures’ objective is to provide resources, including loans, that will help take an idea to a successful business. It offers a variety of services and has a database of consultants and mentors. “A big portion of our lending is in succession loans for businesses where the owner is ready to retire. New people or families come to the region because of the lifestyle, but they are also looking for business opportunities.” He added that growth in the region is above the provincial average at 1.8 per cent, compared to 1.4 per cent for all of BC, and Salmon Arm is seeing that growth across the board in residential development, and commercial and manufacturing sectors.

Grayston said that projections show stable growth and that an upswing will continue into 2016. She said that the city has strong and diverse fabrication and manufacturing businesses that are remaining productive and viable throughout the oil and gas economic downturn. Fitt said that the city is seeing new business investments in the agriculture, commercial and industrial sectors including a $14 million upgrade to the largest private sector employer, Canoe Forest Products, and a new and larger 33,000 sq ft shop for Access Precision Machining Ltd. Salmon Arm also just welcomed Rocana Meats, a pork processing plant, several new retail stores, like Askews Food Store, Bulk Barn and Winners, which will be opening soon, as well as renovations to the iconic Tim Hortons. “We’ve also seen the doors open on Salmon Arm’s first casino, Chance’s Gaming Centre,” she added. The facility, run by Berezan Management, is located on Adams Lake Indian Band land and will employ 85 people and is projected to generate more than $7 million in first year revenue. Real estate is also seeing change with Shuswap zone totals up year-to-date by almost 10 per cent. In October the sale of lots shows a significant increase of 21 per cent over last year with acreages seeing a 23 per cent increase. Overall residential sales including townhomes, recreational property, duplexes and apartments saw a

6 per cent increase. Median price for a residential property rose 5.52 per cent, from $330,500 to $348,750 from October of 2014 to the same month in 2015. Apartments and duplexes saw the biggest jump in price with apartments moving from $149,500 to $192,000 and duplexes jumping by 50 per cent. Fitt said that recent activity in multi family developments coupled with new business is attracting both retirees and new families.

“People are attracted by Salmon Arm’s strategic location, the climate, and unique quality of life,” Fitt said. Grayston added that it takes 5-10 minutes to get to the lake for paddling or swimming and minutes to get to the mountain for cross country skiing and the nearby Kelowna and Kamloops airports provide regular flights to both Vancouver and Calgary and international destinations. “Everything a family needs is right here,” she said.

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10

DECEMBER 2015

MCDIARMID CONSTRUCITON HONOURED WITH AWARD OF MERIT SPOTLIGHT

Local company builds big range of quality projects

S

ALMON ARM - At the recent Southern Interior Construction Association (SICA) awards, McDiarmid Construction in Salmon Arm was recognized with an Award of Merit for its iconic new Columbia/Shuswap Regional District Building. The public-private partnership project was unique in several ways. McDiarmid Construction president Ian McDiarmid pointed out that such public-private partnerships are rare, and this was a particularly successful one. The project designed by Bernd Hermanski Architects, used local materials and local contractors and trades wherever possible. One of those local companies was Brisco Manufacturing Ltd., a company known for its trademarked Fine Line panels made of composite wood. McDiarmid called the new 22,000 sq. ft. building “beautiful.” “It has 10-foot overhangs all the way around, which are used partly for aesthetics, but also to keep the sun out in the summer and give heat gain in the winter. It also has a huge central skylight - there’s a huge amount of natural light in the building.” The building is also

The new CSRD building won a SICA Award of Merit strongly sustainable, using geothermal heat as well as passive heat from the sun. “I think it turned out really well for us and for the taxpayer,” McDiarmid said. McDiarmid Construction is known not only for its commercial work but also for residential buildings in the Salmon Arm area. Past projects include high-end residential homes as well as the community theater and the Aboriginal Study Centre at the local college. McDiarmid founded the company 35 years ago when he moved back to Salmon Arm from Vancouver. Shortly after getting his start in

“Construction is so dynamic. It changes and keeps evolving. It never stays the same.” IAN MCDIARMID PRESIDENT, MCDIARMID CONSTRUCTION

McDiarmid Construction has built several off-the-grid homes construction, he decided to strike out on his own. He said there was never any question that he would be in construction. “Construction is so dynamic. It changes and keeps evolving. It never stays the same.” He added that over time the company has grown, partly because he believes in giving a fair price and good value. McDiarmid has also built relationships with his clients over the years. In 2011, his son, Ross McDiarmid, joined the company as general manager with an eye to taking the reins in the future. McDiarmid said that his son has modernized the company, including adding a web presence. The company continues to display

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tremendous flexibility. It has built several homes completely off the grid and has worked on eye-catching architectural designs. The company’s main focus is working with concrete and wood. McDiarmid said that the industry has changed tremendously since he started the company 35 years ago. “”Back in the day, you could build a house with a hammer, a saw and a level. Now, there are 60 tools to do every job.” But that, he said, is not a bad thing. Change is good and more change will come in the future. He said that he hopes the company remains relatively small so that it continues to offer high quality and a personal touch to all its clients. He gave tremendous credit to everyone involved in the award of merit winning Columbia Shuswap Regional District building, including Charles Hamilton, CAO of the district who advocated strongly for the public private partnership, which made the project so successful. McDiarmid said he is also proud of the building where the company’s office resides. “It’s the old courthouse in Salmon Arm,” he explained. “It was the provincial courthouse since 1930. We completely re-did it and added on to it. It’s one of many projects that we are very proud to put our name on.” McDiarmid Construction is at 20 Hudson Avenue NE in Salmon Arm. www.mcdiarmidconstruction.ca


11

DECEMBER 2015

GIVING AND GETTING MORE LOVE IN YOUR WORKPLACE

D

r Love (aka Dr. Paul Zak) is a neuro-economist at Claremont Graduate University. He’s also a self-professed nerd who loves to be in his lab ‘avoiding humans’. Yet he’s also one of the world’s foremost experts on the love molecule, oxytocin. Oxytocin is also commonly called the trust molecule. When people feel they are being trusted, their brains respond by producing oxytocin. And according to Jan Hills of Head, Heart + Brain in her artic l e   ‌w h e n p a r t i c i p a n t s felt they were trusted, their brains responded by producing oxytocin, and when participants were shown increased levels of trust their brain produced even more oxytocin.â€? A l l of t h i s b o d e s we l l fo r t he econom ics of a he a lt hy workplace. 

Emotions Drive Engagement Nothing meaningful happens

Barbara Ashton of Ashton and Associates in the workplace until people a r e  e n g a g e d e m o t i o n a l l y, which comes from trust. And trust is of course a product of great leadership. Companies with higher em-

ployee engagement see the biggest financial gains in their sales

g row t h a nd  sha reholder return respectively at +4 per cent, compared to an average company. Companies with lower employee engagement see the biggest financial loss in their shareholders return at -8 per cent, compared to an average company. Employee motivation guru, Susanne Jacobs ties the development of trust in the workplace to these eight intrinsic drivers: Belong and connect, Voice and recognition, Significance and position, Fairness, Learn and challenge, Choice and autonomy, Security and certainty and Purpose. On Building Trust From the Get-go Trust is the single most imp or t a nt  fou nd at ion a l  va lu e sought i n h igh performa nce employees. Regurgitating a gobbly-gook mishmash of someone else’s corporate culture or mission statement will get you about as far as your next mediocre hire. So heed this warning well: do not pretend to be someone you’re not when trying to woo a star candidate. You may not have an exact, crystal clear vision of what your organization will look like in the future, but you need to be very

COUPON BOOK

coupon promotion alone.� It doesn’t get much more simple than that.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“At the time I was amazed that there were no coupon books. So my wife and I decided to do our own. Initially we had businesses pay to go into the book and we would then mail it out.� But as Graston explained, that didn’t work out very well and the idea developed into businesses providing deals and Graston selling the books. “In a couple of years we were off and running, selling thousands of books through Canadian Tire, Zellers, the Bay, schools and charities.� As interest and the success of the program grew, Graston expanded into the Vancouver market, maintaining the quality and keeping it simple. Twelve years ago, Graston sold his island product and moved his family to Kelowna. “Up until two years ago we were still selling the product on the lower mainland.� Currently, Graston has books in Kelowna, West Kelowna and Peachland with the focus on regional deals and buying local. Graston and his wife have plans to expand the book’s reach into Vernon/Shuswap and Kamloops/Prince George regions with the goal of keeping it concentrated on local businesses and charities. “When we produced the books in Nanaimo, the coupons were for the whole island from Victoria to Port Hardy. But we found that people would buy based on what was available in their area.� He said that keeping the books local and regional means they get used and that’s good for repeat business. For Graston, talking to businesses and getting deals means looking for the right companies to partner with. “I’ve looked at the demographics of the area, gauged what people want and then focused on finding the deals they’ll use.� He said that after purchasing the book,

concise about the values you are in search of when hiring top talent.   Clarity and conviction around your values and culture conveys authenticity which is essential to building a trusting relationship with that star candidate in front of you, regardless of whether or not they come to work for you. L eadersh ip is about  g iv i ng first, reaping the rewards later.

I was pleasa ntly rem i nded o f t h i s r e a d i n g D r. L e o Buscaglia’s book, LOVE: “What love we’ve given we will have forever. What love we fail to give is lost for all eternity.�   Giving, paying it forward, and treating others as you would have them treat you ... it’s always about putting one’s trust forward, which brings to mind two other essentials in our workplace: authenticity and transparency, powerful precursors to building a trusting workplace. We trust people because they showed up when it wasn’t convenient, because they told the truth when it was easier to lie and because they kept a promise when they could have gotten away with breaking it. - Seth Godin What’s your leadership philosophy on building a trusting workplace? Barbara Ashton is a no-limits executive search and recruiting professional, your  &# go-to for finding exceptional talent. "( 1 o Offices in Kamloops and Kelowna %4 "3 # serving the BC Thompson Okanagan.&#"8 o1"(ck&et g u 3 %4 B Fillin www.ashtonassociates.com "57* "3 8 % 8 #" et Contact Barbara at 800-432-6893 ck 30 3& Bu ing

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CREDIT:DON GRASTON

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12

DECEMBER 2015

EDGECOMBE BUILDERS: SUCCESS BUILT ON CLIENT SERVICE SPOTLIGHT

Award-winning custom builder works on both commercial and high end residential projects

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ELOWNA – A company that ex ists a l most by chance, but one with an artistic heart and a philanthropic nature, Kelowna’s Edgecombe Builders has become one of the Okanagan’s premier high end construction firms. “In 1989 I came to Kelowna from Vancouver Island where I was working in the architecture field,” explained company founder and President Kevin Edgecombe. “I came from an architectural background, after having gone to school in Edmonton at NAIT (Northern Alberta Institute of Technology). After graduation I went out to Vancouver Island and was building some houses and doing some architectural work out there and came to Kelowna on a ski vacation and happened to meet Mike Jacobs who runs Emil Anderson Construction. I went to work for them from 1989 to 1991. I then went out on my own in 1992 the original company was called Straight Edge Design Build Services. I began doing residential design and building in and around the Kelowna area.” Edgecombe’s initial foray into construction went well with his firm specializing in commercial building projects. “I was doing a stint in mainly commercial work, doing a lot of tenant improvement type stuff and franchise operations. I built A & W restaurants and Robins Donuts and that type of thing and I was traveling around quite a bit,” he explained. “I had a friend who in 1999 asked me if I would build him a house, I’d been out of house construction for a couple of years at that point and kind of reluctantly decided to go back into it. But ended up building a beautiful home for him here on the lake in Kelowna and kind of aggressively

Kevin Edgecombe came to Kelowna in 1989 to go skiing but ended up becoming one of the city’s premier builders

“I like to try to buck the system and not follow trends in building styles too closely” KEVIN EDGECOMBE PRESIDENT EDGECOMBE BUILDERS

Edgecombe Builders specialize in the creation of high end residential properties, homes noted for the quality of their materials got back into residential construction in and around that 1999 to 2003 range. In a lot of cases I was actually wearing a tool belt back in those days so I was doing one or two homes at a time at the most. I’m fairly hands-on so I did a lot of the design work and then carried on with the construction management.” The big break for the expanding company, now renamed Edgecombe Builders was the development of the Wilden subdivision, a ground breaking master plan development that involves some 1,800 individual lots. “In 2004 Wilden (subdivision) was just in its infancy. The developer conducted a little bit of a survey around town to get short-listed names for builders who might be the right fit for the Wilden neighborhood. It was a beautiful master plan subdivision, one that was very well received in the city,” Edgecombe explained. “In 2004 we were one of four builders selected to be part of the builder program there. From 2004 right through to this past

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The company works on major commercial projects as well as residential ones, including at Kelowna’s Delta Grand Okanagan Resort year the same four builders conducted business there. But a year ago I chose to exit out of Wilden because I wanted to do a little less residential and a little more commercial. I wanted my focus to be on the high end residential side as opposed to the middle, entry level world. We are still in Wilden today as we have one house to complete there, quite a beautiful home located next door to the

Wilden showhome. Our time at Wilden certainly put us on the map as far as name recognition in Kelowna. We’ve built more than 100 homes in Wilden over that time.” Today’s Edgecombe Builders has grown to become one of the region’s top builders of both high end commercial and SEE EDGECOMBE BUILDERS | PAGE 13

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13

DECEMBER 2015

The Sole Kelowna in the city’s downtown is the company’s largest project to date and also serves as its new head office

With an eye for detail, even something as simple as developing an entry way is designed to be unique and inspiring

Spectacular and unique are only some of the words that can be used to describe any of Edgecombe Builder’s custom homes

Not a cookie cutter style of builder, each Edgecombe Builder property is unique and reflective of the tastes of its owner

As a high end home builder Edgecombe Builder’s crews get to work in some of the Okanagan’s most beautiful locations

EDGECOMBE BUILDERS

the sub trades that I used in 1989 we’re still using today,” Edgecombe said. “It’s a much busier building market in Kelowna now than it

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

residential projects. “We have approximately 16 employees and

Always a pleasure working with your team! Office: 250-491-0680 Fax 250-491-0623 #105-171 Commercial Drive, Kelowna BC

have numerous sub trades who work almost solely for us, not entirely all of the time but certainly many of them focus on our company and on our company

alone from a sub trade perspective. We consistently work with the same designers and some of the other services tend to be a pretty tight knit group. Some of

was even a year ago so you have to have numerous options available in every trade category as not SEE EDGECOMBE BUILDERS | PAGE 14

Congratulations on another great project! 1136 Richter Street, Kelowna, B.C. VIY 2K7 Phone: 250-861-4777 • www.horizonelectric.net Commercial • Residential • Industrial • Maintenance • A/V • Control Systems


14

DECEMBER 2015

Approximately 60 percent of Edgecombe Builders’ projects involve commercial work such as on the West Kelowna Sears outlet

EDGECOMBE BUILDERS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

all of the people you might want are available all of the time. We have a really good core group of people in our company and that’s critical as this is a very competitive building market. Kelowna has some of the best builders in Canada, there is an extremely high level of good quality builders in the area and we’re proud to be recognized amongst the group on a regular basis - whether it is the Tommie Awards (from the Canadian Homebuilders Association), the SICA Building Awards (Southern Interior Construction Association), a Chamber of Commerce business event or any others. We have a lot of pride in being a very transparent and relationship-based company.” Edgecombe says his company’s production output is divided roughly 60/40, with commercial building projects representing the larger portion. “Our primary goal is to continue on the commercial and residential game plan. The Sole Kelowna project has been a big part of our work load over the past two years. It is a 40-unit mixed use

commercial / residential project here in downtown Kelowna. We were the developer, the framing contractor and the general contractor on this project so it was quite a significant one for us. We recently moved our office into the building which is a six-storey wood framed structure with about 76,000 gross square feet, by far our largest project,” he said. “Not only is it our largest construction project to date but it’s also our largest development project as we were also the developer on this one. That made for a significant amount of work and as we’re all sold out now we’re quite happy with how it worked out. When we moved our office into this building it was a really nice change and being downtown is great. Certainly being in our own building is a pretty prideful feeling.” Proud as Edgecombe is of his company, his staff and their collective achievements, he’s equally proud of its role as a good corporate citizen. “Our company really does spend a fair bit of time in the philanthropic level, primarily with two organizations. For the last 10 years we’ve been pretty heavily involved with the

BC SPCA. For eight of those years we were the title sponsor of the annual golf tournament. That particular tournament has raised heaps of money over the last 10 years and many of our colleagues and sub trades have really been a big part of that,” he explained. “But even more than that, I’m the president of a charity called IWEN (Intercultural Women’s Education Network). Our work is focused in Nepal where we effectively rescue young girls from bonded labour contracts where young girls are sold into servitude for various purposes. In the last five years we have managed to run school programs for these girls through sponsorship here in Canada,” he said. “We’ve also completed five construction projects over the last five years where I would lead a team of volunteers from Canada to go over and build classrooms in Nepal. We’ve completed four classrooms to date and most recently we’ve completed a 4,000 square foot women’s vocational center called Unako House. It’s a big part of what we do and I’m extremely passionate about it. I go to Nepal each year and by default our company is heavily involved as well.”

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In the Sole Kelowna project one of its features include a number of compact but state of the art residential units For Edgecombe his company’s future couldn’t look brighter. “The future holds a lot of promise. We’ve probably got the highest level of long term planning in both commercial and residential projects than we’ve ever had. This is particularly true with the larger commercial projects. We have our fingers into the very early design concepts on a couple of major projects in the Okanagan. One senior’s care project, and a similar project to the Sole development – we may be moving forward on another version of that,” he said. “The Delta Grand project (an extensive renovation of a local hotel complex) is a pretty h i g h prof i le one for u s a nd we’re thrilled to be the chosen contractor for that one for the fourth consecutive time with that company. Now we’re working for Marriott Hotels which has purchased Delta so we’re pretty happy now to be working for the largest hotel chain in the world. We’re hopeful that we might be able to develop some western Canada relationships with the Marriott and the Delta corporations.” Every Edgecombe Bu i lders project can be identified by its

unique, one-off nature, and by the quality and attention to detail that permeates all aspects of the project. “I like to try to buck the system and not follow trends in building styles too closely. We’ve done a fair bit of spec building over the years and sometimes you can let your personal interests run amok and I could be accused of that in some of our showhomes where I try to do things that I like as opposed to what the masses like. Part of our job as a project manager is to build equity for our client. We know we can build a good product, we know we know how to build good quality in very technically sound buildings. But we also pride ourselves on building a good relationship through the process,” he said. “If I wanted any one thing to be noted about our company that would be it - we really want to make sure that we do what we say we’re going to do. We are a medium sized company appearing small. In other words we give people the attention and personal touch that they deserve.” To learn more please visit the company’s website at: www. edgecombebuilders.ca/

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VERNON/OFF THE COVER

DECEMBER 2015

15

NOMINATIONS OPEN FOR 2016 BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS

VERNON DAN ROGERS

J

ust a few weeks after electing a new MP, citizens in the Greater Vernon area are heading back to the polls to vote on a referendum for a new arena. Residents in Coldstream and some in the regional district will also participate in the regional referendum that would authorize borrowing $13.25 million dollars for the new facility. The proposed arena would add another sheet to the existing complex at Kal Tire Place

that is the home to the Vernon Vipers of the BC Hockey league. The City has attempted to provide information on the proposed project through a special website and public meetings but it is unclear if that will be enough to ensure a good turnout. Voter fatigue could be a major factor in influencing the outcome. “We want to ensure the public can find the answers they may have about the project—whether they are looking for general information or wish to drill down into the details,” says Doug Ross, director of recreation services for the City of Vernon. Local elections traditionally have a low turnout and coming on the heels of a federal election, many voters may have not had the opportunity to digest all the information and or be motivated to get out and vote again. The results will be known in early December and if supported could shape the priorities and financial picture of the region for some time. ■■■ I n other news, the Greater

This years theme is The Sky’s the Limit and builds off the excitement from last years gala that showcased the area’s premier businesses and community leaders

Vernon Chamber of Commerce recently announced the opening of the nomination period for the 2016 Business Excellence Awards. Nominations are being accepted until late December. This years theme is The Sky’s the Limit and builds off the excitement from last years gala that showcased the area’s premier businesses and community leaders. The Chamber

is also pleased to recognize Valley First as the presenting sponsor of the long running awards program. “Recognizing local businesses that make our community stronger and more vibrant is extremely important to Valley First and we’re proud to lend our support,” says Ben Robinson, business banking advisor with Valley First in Vernon. T he Excellence Awards are scheduled for Friday March 11, 2016 and will feature a number of new awards including Tourism Excellence, Non-Profit Excellence, Community Leader of the Year, Business Person of the Year, People’s Choice Award and News Maker of the Year. The Nominee’s Luncheon which recognizes the top three in each category goes Tuesday Feb. 9, 2016. “We’re really excited to be introducing some new award categories this year. It will be a great opportunity to have a fresh outlook on the community and recognize a variety of businesses, organizations and individuals for their achievements,” says Dan

PENTICTON INDIAN BAND CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

for Aboriginal Business, and recognized as one of the Okanagan’s leading Job Makers by the Province of British Columbia. “Where we are today is a direct result of making economic development a primary focus,” says Kruger. “Our goal has been to keep people within the commu n ity, become completely self-sustaining and build a great environment for our children, and to do that we need to be able to create good paying jobs.” More than a decade into its turn around, the Penticton Indian Band now has a reputation as being an innovator and model for other First Nations communities, with four significant business operations, and more planned for the future. Those ventures include Tommie Award-winning Skaha Hills, an environmentally friendly, multiphase 550 acre, mixed use development with 600 single and multi-family homes, Westhills Aggregates, a construction sand and gravel services provider, Coyote Cruises, which provides tube rentals and transportation along Penticton’s River Channel, and Sn’pink’tn Forestry. “We’ve come so far,” says Chief Kruger. “Within the last 11 years we’ve gone from dealing with challenging social issues, to becoming a leader in several different industries. Our young people have great jobs available at their doorstep, our elders have long-term security, and our families have new high-end facilities available to help nurture the next generation. “Coyote Cruises is run almost exclusively by our young people, Westhills Aggregates has grown

One of the recent Penticton Indian Band developments, the environmentally friendly and innovative Outma Sqilx’w Cultural School at an incredible rate, and we’re now the largest trucking company of our kind in Penticton, and service the entire South Okanagan region. I’m incredibly proud of our people and what we’ve accomplished so far, and look forward to what’s to come.” The Band’s successes in business are directly correlated with its ability to provide programs and facilities for its members. Revenues are reinvested in the community, paying for education and training initiatives, a brand new state-of-the-art health building, the new Satikw Crossing bridge spanning the Okanagan River Channel, a new school, language center and community garden. “Maintaining our culture and ancestral traditions are vital to long-term sustainability,” says Chief Kruger. “But what’s

Coyote Cruises’ customers enjoying the summer heat as they travel down the Penticton River Channel enabled us to really develop at this pace is an acceptance that we need to think progressively to make sure there’s a positive

future for all of our people. This focus on economic development has allowed us to take advantage of our natural resources and

Proulx, membership & events coordinator with the Chamber. Nominations can be submitted through the Chambers website. The Awards Gala is a near sell-out event every year. ■■■ In closing, the Greater Vernon Chamber is pleased to welcome a number of new members including Esprit Consulting & Counselling Services, TD Mobile Mortgage Specialist Reece Dolezsar, David Bastin - The Fear Fighter, Louisa Cochrane Personal Real Estate Corp., Smart Living Okanagan (Vernon), Royal LePage Downtown Realty Ltd., Neil Scott, Seven 5 Seven Millwork & Installation, Public House Marketing, The Victorian Retirement Residence, Lucid Water Co., and the John Howard Society of the North Okanagan/Kootenay. Welcome to the Chamber network! Dan Rogers is the General Manager at the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce and can be reached at manager@vernonchamber.ca talented community.” He also credits partnerships with other organizations and governments as playing a major role in the Band’s achievements, including: the City of Penticton, Regional District of OkanaganSimilkameen, the Federal and Provincial Governments and the Canadian Wildlife Service. One of the unique products of those relationships has been the development of the Band’s Locatee partnerships, which enable individual ownership of reserve lands. This program incentivizes investment on reserve lands and allows the Band to establish a tax base. But despite all of the recognition and accomplishments, Chief Kruger and his team aren’t sitting back and getting comfortable, the next few years could be some of the biggest in the Band’s history. “We can always be better,” he says. ““It takes strong people to do great things, and we have so many strong people here who are committed to the vision we’ve set out. We’re in the process of updating our Comprehensive Community Plan, installing a new water-line, developing our river channel lands, working on our land management strategies to build a tax base, and starting down the road of looking at a new community center. “I’m very appreciative of the unity within our Band, there are so many different moving pieces that need to work together to make the changes happen the way they have. I’m very excited about what we’ve built in such a short time, and the legacy that we’re going to leave for years to come.” www.pibdc.ca www.pib.ca


16

MOVERS & SHAKERS

EntireTea has opened at 104-1912 Enterprise Way under the ownership of Alexey Spehalski.

KAMLOOPS Kamloops Airport has announced its traveler numbers for the month of October and year-to-date as compared to the same period in the previous year. According to these numbers, the airport has seen a five per cent increase from the same month last year, and a 2.7 per cent increase in the year-to-date compared to last year.

Four Points by Sheraton Kelowna Airport Hotel has teamed up with Tesla Motors to provide Tesla Destination Charging. For the eighth consecutive year, MNP LLP has been named one of the Best Employers in Canada for 2015 in the Aon Best Employers in Canada study. Drive, to its new clinic at 100-1940 Harvey Avenue.

Four Kamloops businesses have been nominated for the 13th annual Small Business BC Awards, which includes: Hummingbird Drones for the Premier’s People’s Choice category; Rainbow Roost for the Best Workplace category; Tradeopolis Communications for the Best Company category; Recruit Right Staffing Solutions for the Premier’s People’s Choice and Best Concept categories. The awards ceremony will be held Feb. 25.

Associated Property Management, located at 1-1441 St. Paul Street, has announced the acquisition of the Colliers residential portfolio. Broker/owner Daniel Lobsinger has also welcomed the additions of Ron Wiebe, Aliske Webb, Kevin Jersey and Loni Shaw to its team. Graydon Security has opened its first Kelowna location at 1920 Kirschner Road. The 43-year-old security company now has nine locations across BC.

Barre Kamloops, which offers classic, express and pre-natal barre classes has opened for business at 103-150 Victoria Street.

Okanagan Lavender & Herb Farm, located at 4380 Takla Road, has won a silver award in the New Zealand Supreme Oil Awards – an international competition for producers of lavender essential oil.

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory has opened its new location on the corner of McGill Road and Summit Drive. Peavy Mart, a 35,000-square-foot supermarket, has opened in Valleyview at 2121 East Trans-Canada Highway.

Sue and Ben Boschman

Work has begun on the new 3,500-square-foot Browns Social House in the Summit Shopping Centre, which is expected to open in early 2016.

Lakehouse Home Store, owned by Ben and Sue Boschman, has won a Global Innovator Award from the International Housewares Association and Home Style Magazine. The 4,200-square-foot store opened in 2011 at the corner of Bernard Avenue and Ellis Street.

Pacific Hospitality Group has plans to redevelop the Hospitality Inn property at 500 Columbia Street W. into a luxury hotel and condo development. The Cooper’s Foods store on Lansdowne Street in downtown Kamloops has been purchased by the Overwaitea Food Group.

KELOWNA Accelerate Okanagan elected its new board of directors at its annual general meeting in November. Members include: Blair Forrest as chair; Scot Speiser as vice chair; Quinton Pullen as Treasurer; Aidan Cole; Lane Merrifield; Steve Wandler; Corie Griffiths; Karen Hawes; Jeff Keen; Tana Plewes; Heather Schneider; Gordon Prokes. Ten Kelowna students graduated from the certified general accountant program at the Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia’s CPA convocation ceremony held November 21. The Kelowna students are; Amanda Burchell, Amrit Buttar, Leyla Guliyeva, Sydney Harper, Michael Hazen, Schuyler Holoboff, Jason Lamont, Wei-Fu Li, Laura Toneff, John Van Alphen. Mission Group Homes has announced that sales for the first homes at Central Green, Kelowna’s newest master-planned community, are anticipated to begin in early 2016. The new Mountain Equipment Co-op store in Kelowna will be moving into the former Future Shop location at Orchard Plaza, and is expected to open in the Spring.

DECEMBER 2015

Seven Kelowna companies have been nominated for Small Business BC Awards, including: Apple Artworks for the best workplace category; Cottage Quilting, Float Space and Lake Okanagan Realty for the Premier’s People’s Choice category; The Habitat for community impact; Cryo Care for the best emerging entrepreneur category; The Executor’s Assistant for best concept. The top five businesses in each category (as determined by public vote and judges) will pitch to judges Dragons’ Denstyle to determine category winners, which will be announced Feb. 25. Kelowna-based Community Sift has been selected as one of Canada’s top 20 startup companies. Wes Rosso, owner of Rent 2 Buy Kelowna has won his second consecutive “All Star” practitioner award at a recent national conference of rent to own home professionals. Steven Wilson has been appointed as a master of the Supreme Court of British Columbia. Wilson, who is affiliated with Pushor Mitchell LLP, has taken his seat as of Nov. 23. Pacific Coastal Airlines has launched its new daily non-stop service between Kelowna and Victoria in an aim to convenience local and regional business and tourism communities by providing an easy option for those travelling to Kelowna and the surrounding Thompson-Okanagan area. NexGen Hearing has moved its Professional Hearing Services from its previous location at 114-1605 Gordon

Renovations are new complete at the cultural gift store Globally Fair, located at 1695 Burtch Road. Changes include the removal of a wall, which expanded the floor space, repainting, and new track lighting. Studio9 Independent Arts Society has a new Board of Directors for the 2015-16 term. Members include: Kevin Purnell as chair; Dave Manual as vice-chair; Chuck Abney as finance committee chair; Jeannette Deshayes as secretary; Lyle Isenor; John-Gary Alyward. Impressions Weddings & Events, formerly a home-based business, now has a storefront location at 2424 Last Road in West Kelowna. Ashbury Bridal, located at 1619 Ellis Street, is celebrating its third anniversary this year. Mosaic Books is celebrating its 47th anniversary this year, located at 411 Bernard Avenue. A program designed to improve engagement between students and teachers in Central Okanagan has been recognized by the Canadian Education Association as the top program of its kind in Canada. Kelowna’s newest education institute, Career City College, has opened at 2011634 Harvey Avenue. The college is owned and operated by Matt Mathai and Satnam Basran. Elyse Selig, owner/operator of Driving Miss Daisy in Central Okanagan for the past nine years, is retiring, and has sold the business to Lisa Santos. Kim Grout has been appointed as CEO of the Agricultural Land Commission effective Dec. 14. Rodney Warren is celebrating the opening of his new store, Gem Wellness Centre, located at 3670 Hoskins Road.

Scott Murray has recently joined the firm of Farris, Vaughan, Wills & Murphy LLP as an associate in the litigation group. Ian Rudling has joined Rutland Physical Therapy at 145 Asher Road. Randy Sheehan, formerly the manager of Sears, is the new operations manager at Quality Greens. Jamie White has opened Jamie’s Men’s Hairstylist in Unit G-2009 Enterprise Way. White has been a hairstylist for 15 years, and previously worked with MVP Modern Barbers on Harvey Avenue.

VERNON The BC Museums Association has recognized the Vernon Public Art Gallery with an Award of Merit for its successful Okanagan Print Triennial. Kidston and Company LLP has welcomed the addition of Sunny Gakhal to its firm as an associate. The Family Resource Centre Society has elected a new executive at its annual general meeting for the 2015-16 term. It includes: Mary Malerby as chairperson; Marcel Korver as treasurer; Keri-Ann Austin as secretary; Anne-Marie Hague; Barbara Keith; Cheryl Turcotte; Melanie Prince; Andy Erickson; Jennifer Morrison. Spine & Sports Northend is celebrating its 10th anniversary, located at 201-4710 31st Street. A referendum to borrow $13.2 million to twin Kal Tire Place has passed. The new facility will replace the ice sheet at the almost 80-year-old Civic Arena. The Vernon Family Doctors Medical Clinic in the Fruit Union Plaza will be closing for business as of March 19, 2016 due to a doctor shortage. Associated Engineering has announced that its subsidiary, Summit Environmental Consultants, will now be known as Associated Environmental Consultants. Central Hardware Ltd. has welcomed John Fulton to its team, located at 4211 25th Avenue. Kiki Gardens Restaurant has achieved the Overall Best Chinese Food and Best Buffet for two consecutive years, and seven years total, from the Okanagan Reader’s Choice Awards. The restaurant is located at 3411 30th Avenue.

SUMMERLAND The Summerland Chamber of Commerce has welcomed the following new members to its organization: Paws ‘N Hooves for Half-Pints, which provides animal


MOVERS & SHAKERS

DECEMBER 2015

facilitated wellness & therapy, horsemanship and riding lessons to children of all ages; Hawt Dawgz Gourmet Burgers & Dogs; Local Motive Organic Delivery, which is a farm based company striving to help consumers connect with local and BC farm products; Cartwright Mountain Construction, which works in new build residential construction; OHHC Holdings Ltd., which provides snow removal services; Quality Painting; Edgewater Plumbing and Heating, which offers full service plumbing, heating and drain cleaning for commercial, residential and strata customers; S.C. Restorations Ltd.; DBA Stutters DKI, which offers disaster clean-up and restoration needs in Summerland and throughout the Okanagan Valley. Dominion Cider Co. is a new craft cidery in Summerland that just launched its first batch of cider: a dry, English pub-style cider made with local heirloom apples. The cidery’s tasting room will be officially open after the weekend of November 28 -29.

energy-efficient “Revolution Home” designed specifically for the NWT using its patented ‘Revolution’ Electro Motion “Revolution Home” technology. The Revolution replaces traditional heating, cooling and hot water systems with one complete unit that also generates electricity - and when the power utility fails - automatically switches to provide backup heat and power to the home. The entire system is designed to be efficient and environmentally-friendly by reducing diesel fuel consumption by some 30 per cent and carbon emissions by approximately 50 per cent. Signwave Signs is celebrating its second anniversary this year. After 14 years in business in Summerland, RE/MAX Orchard Country has been sold. You’ll continue to see the familiar faces of the realtors there but under the new ownership of Deborah Moore, owner of Re/Max Penticton Realty.

Beauty Box Studio Inc. celebrated its first year in business in November.

Beauty & the Brit is moving to a new location on December 1st. Services will now be located in Summerland Reflexology on Henry Avenue, behind Santorini’s.

Cherry Tree Quilts Quilt Shop & Studio celebrated its third anniversary. ElectroMotion Energy has unveiled a cost effective and

TH Wines was showcased this month across Canada. The first feature was a video made by the Okanagan Wine Club, which features local Okanagan wineries

paired with chefs. The second was in a feature in the MercedesBenz Canada Magazine called “Toast to Coast,” which looks at the changing landscape of Canada’s wine regions.

PENTICTON Parkers Chrysler Doge Jeep recently received an award from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles for having the longest serving Chrysler dealership in BC. They celebrate 70 years in business.

Council for Lakawanna Park. His concept involves an outdoor Caféstyle seating area, beachfront, boardwalk and park-themed concession inspired by the Grand Floridian at Disneyworld in Florida. Tightrope Winery at 1050 Fleet Road on the Naramata Bench

17 was named the Small Winery of Distinction at the 2015 Northwest Wine Summit Awards. The winery is owned by Graham andLyndsay O’Rourke. Junior Chamber International Penticton celebrated the 75th anniversary of their chapter recently.

Council has approved phase 1 of a new residential project at 3388 Skaha Lake Road, the previous location of Wonderful Waterslides Park which closed in 2006. It is the first of three towers. Mike Van De Leest has achieved top salesperson for the October 2015 at Penticton Hyundai. BC VQA Wine Information Centre is celebrating its 19th anniversary. Penticton’s Wine Information Centre was the first VQA Wine Store in BC and operated by the BC Wine Information Society. The profits are returned to the local community to support the wine industry. Gordon Ferguson has submitted a proposal to Penticton City

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TIM DOWN RETURNS TO COLLIERS AFTER 10 YEAR HIATUS Associate Vice President to create a specialized Unique Properties Division

K

ELOWNA – With nearly 30 years of experience as a Commercial REALTOR® and Professional Accredited Appraiser, Tim Down, Associate Vice President is a key member of the Colliers International office in Kelowna. “I’ve returned to Colliers after previously working with Colliers as the Director of Property Tax Services for Western Canada,” he explained. “I chose to return to Colliers to assist with growing the BC Interior market share on the investment side. I will continue to focus on investment sales while creating a Unique Properties Division that will promote the lifestyle real estate assets in the Okanagan Corridor and BC Interior. These are properties that don’t normally fit the typical investment commercial / industrial property groups. For example manufactured home parks, RV resorts and campgrounds, wineries, hotels and motels, development land and estate properties. Property with either a cash flow or desirable lifestyle attributes but not your typical retail commercial

Tim Down is an Associate Vice President at Colliers International in Kelowna office building type of property.” Down left Colliers in 2005 and during the intervening time continued to work as a REALTOR® with various national firms while operating his own real estate advisory firm, PacWest Commercial Real Estate Advisors. “I continue to manage multinational property assessment portfolios across Canada so have remained involved with my Colliers colleagues over these intervening years,” he said. “I have a unique background in real estate evaluation as an appraiser, property assessor, corporate consultant and REALTOR®. I’m also actively involved in a number of different real estate organizations including the Okanagan Mainline Real Estate Board where I was the founding

Chair of the Commercial Zone representing the Board’s Commercial REALTORS® in all aspects of commercial real estate. My background in real estate valuation allows me to fully analyze a property’s potential and assist with the marketing and ultimate sale for clients.” Down’s recent return and with the release of the annual property assessments only a few weeks away, couldn’t have come at a more opportune time for Colliers commercial clients. “I will be working with the Colliers Property Tax Services Group assisting with the annual reviews and appeals of the 2016 property assessment notices to ensure that they are both accurate and fair,” he said. “You can’t appeal your property taxes but you can appeal your property assessment notice. Really what we’re talking about is controlling your annual operating expenses as every dollar saved goes to the bottom line performance and that adds value to the property owner or reduces the tenant’s operating costs. It’s something that should be done regardless on an annual basis to ensure you’re only paying your fair share.” To learn more please visit the Colliers International website at: www.collierscanada.com/en/ offices/kelowna

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OPINION

18

DECEMBER 2015 A division of Invest Northwest Publishing Ltd. Thompson Okanagan Office #210-347 Leon Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 8C7 Toll free: 1.866.758.2684 Fax: 1.778.441.3373 Email: info@businessexaminer.ca Website: www.businessexaminer.ca

PUBLISHER/EDITOR | Lise MacDonald, lise@businessexaminer.ca SALES | Thom Klos –thom@businessexaminer.ca, Josh Higgins – josh@businessexaminer.ca, Joanne Iormetti – joanne@businessexaminer.ca WRITERS | Goody Niosi, Julia MacDonald, John MacDonald, Beth Hendry-Yim, David Holmes, Linda Wenger WEBSITE | John MacDonald

POLITICIANS AND BUREAUCRATS FIND A NEW WAY TO STOP FORWARD PROGRESS: DELAY

MARK MACDONALD

“D

elay, delay, delay.” Those words, uttered by a n N DP candidate recently, outlines an anti-development mindset that is more prevalent than anyone would dare admit. This is apparently the new marching orders for the No Development Party. It’s the nouveau way to stall and prohibit investment and development. The “anti” crowd has learned how to kill projects with kindness, smiling as they declare they are open to development and the jobs they create, while silently slowing down the process to a glacial pace that strings out investors and drains their cash flow. We’ve seen it happen with increasing regularity at the municipal level, as politicians and bureaucrats pay lip service to the business community as they create new obstacles to prevent

forward movement. It’s reaching the upper levels of government. Not a surprise, since politicians often start at the civic level before moving up to prov i ncia l a nd federa l politics. I recently interviewed an Alberta-based, oil and gas sector company, which expressed their frustration at the current state of affairs under Rachel Notley’s fledgling NDP government. To paraphrase their comments: They’ve survived the National Energy Policy, the downturn in the price of oil and other serious challenges, but the indecision and vagueness of Notley’s Crew is proving to be excruciating for their company. They’re in a constant holding pattern, not knowing if they will even have an opportunity to grow in Alberta. Should they downsize to ride out the storm? How about moving east to Saskatchewan to a more businessfriendly environment? The owner says the current conditions are the worst they have experienced as a company. Anti-oil industry protesters may find news like this to be delightful, and think their dreams are being realized. With antiresource sentiment reaching an all-time high in Canada, as an increasing number of people v iew resou rce-based industry as evil and something that

needs to be stopped, or at least choked into submission. I n the recent past, a rou nd 5,000 people living in the Okanagan – and approximately the same amount on Vancouver Island – were directly employed by the oil and gas industry in northern BC and Alberta. They worked there and lived here, resulting in an influx of cash that boosted local communities and businesses. That doesn’t include the number of ancillary businesses positively affected by having those high-paying jobholders living in our towns. The rapid growth in air passenger numbers is directly attributable to workers commuting to and from the oil fields for work, for example. A lt h o u g h t h e y m a n a ge to stay under the radar most of the time, the forest industry on Vancouver Island employs close to 6,000 workers. These are not minimum-wage jobs – they often pay in six figures per worker. A l l t hese represent a ver y significant contribution to not just our local economies, but government coffers due to the higher levels of tax they pay, c ompa re d to t hose hold i n g entry-level positions. So, if the anti-resource and no-development forces that have ma naged to cl i mb i nto positions of influence want to

fu nda menta l ly cha nge that, they’re now in a place they can try it. As they endeavour to do so, they’d best make sure they have an alternative - as in better method – of creating replacement high end incomes. We don’t need to look too far back in history to see what happens when a society decides to ma ke a qua ntu m sh i f t i n its economy. In 1958, Chairman Mao anno u nc e d t h at Ch i n a wo u ld abandon its agricultural roots i n favou r of t he potent ia l ly more lucrative stainless steel industry. In what was called “The Great Leap Forward”, Mao encouraged Chinese people to begin manufacturing stainless steel, which they did, in their backyards, homes. . .anywhere, in home-made “smelters”. This was how they would leap out of economic reliance on agriculture. The problem was that the stainless steel they made was, not surprisingly, completely worthless. This social experiment lasted for three years, ending in futility, and starvation for something in the neighbourhood of 30 million Chinese citizens. In their drastic shift towards industrialization, they forfeited not only their traditional occupations, but the means by which they fed themselves as a country. They stopped growing food.

It was, rea l ly, a g reat leap backward, as that period was the only time between the years 195 3 a nd 1985 t h at Ch i n a’s economy shrank. What does that have to do with Canada? Resource-based industry has been the backbone of ou r e c onomy for d e c a d e upon decade. If we want that to change, then that needs to be made incrementally, not suddenly. I’m not suggesting that turning off the oil and gas taps will result in millions of Canadians starving. But we’re already starting to feel the pinch, and it’s more than just lower prices. A n estimated 50,000 Canadians have already lost their oil and gas related jobs. There could be more, and will be, if governments persist in carryi ng out t hei r a nt i-resou rce pronouncements. We’re waiting eagerly to hear the news about the change in economic policy that will replace those six figures jobs. Not with minimum wage options, but with similar yielding positions that raise families, buy homes and vehicles, and provide a future for our young people. It would be prudent to create those first, rather than cutting off the revenue supply we’ve traditionally had in this country without any reasonable replacement on the horizon.

PROVINCE’S RED TAPE REDUCTION EFFORTS WORTHWHILE

LAURA JONES CFIB

G

overnment departments are fundamentally different from private businesses in that they do not face competition. There is no voting with your feet if you think that frontline staff are unfriendly or if forms are confusing. It’s a recipe for mediocrity or worse, unless other ways of pushing for better service can be found. In this context, elected officials soliciting our feedback a b o u t go v e r n m e n t s e r v i c e

improvement is a substitute, albeit a grossly imperfect one, for competition. Provincial Minister of Small Business and Red Tape Reduction Coralee Oakes is doing just that. She is looking for your help to identify the blizzard of little irritants that arise from interacting with government. The six-week consultation, which ends on Dec. 3, is part of the government’s broader effort to keep a lid on red tape while preserving justified regulation. T he minister is looking for “simple fixes that will i mprove you r l i fe when you i nteract w ith govern ment.” It’s easy to contribute an idea on the website at: engage.gov. bc.ca/helpcutredtape. It’s also worthwhile. The commitment to those who contribute is that, “While not every idea will be implemented, every comment and idea submitted will be reviewed and considered. A list of actions will be posted on the website.”

This is not for show. The minister and her staff are taking this seriously, and we know they will be looking for things to announce on the recently legislated Red Tape Reduction Day in March and during Red Tape Awareness Week in January. The site now has over 100 comments and suggestions. Much of it is common sense. One woman describes the frustrating experience of dealing with six different doctors as they tried to diagnose her husband. Next, in her words, “We asked to see his chart, so that we could at least piece his prognosis together ourselves. We were handed a form and told it would be 30 business days. Apparently, the patient has no right to their own healthcare information. Obviously, this is not helpful.” Not surprisingly, there are many comments on the website about the challenges of dealing with the government electronically, from not being able to save

a PDF to not being able to report a personnel change for a charity’s board without declaring the former board member deceased. The consultation is the perfect place to raise any number of business issues too, such as this one: There is a rule requiring a truck driver who is also a temporary foreign worker to get a work permit before being issued a driver’s license, while another rule requires the worker to get a driver’s license before being issued a work permit. And while we are on the topic of driver’s licenses, over 1,000 British Columbians renew their licenses each day. What if we could do that once every 10 years instead of five? Think of the time that change alone would free up for everyone, including government employees. Broader issues for consideration include making sure gover n ment com mu n ic at ion i s intelligible, training staff to better understand the realities

of the people they help, a nd ensuring auditors have appropriate incentives to behave professionally, with repercussions if they do not. In launching this consultation, Oakes has created an opportunity to take action on the small but important red tape issues that don’t grab headlines but do make differences in people’s lives. Resolving them contributes to the constructive relationship between a government and its citizens that is so important. It prevents the blizzard of little irritants from undermining our productivity and our good humour. This consultation is well worth the minister’s time and ours. Laura Jones is Executive Vice President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She can be reached at laura.jones@cfib.ca. Follow her on Twitter @CFIBideas.

SUBCRIPTIONS | $45 PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $80 FOR 2 YEARS (24 ISSUES), SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: WWW.BUSINESSTO.CA. DISTRIBUTION: FOURTH WEEK OF EACH MONTH VIA CANADA POST AD MAIL. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Produced and published in British Columbia. All contents copyright Business Examiner Thompson Okanagan, 2015. Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240


SALES/GREENSHEET

DECEMBER 2015

THE POWER OF THE MINDSET Some people will view a challenge, and after analyzing the positive and negative aspects of it, choose to focus on the

SALES

positive

JOHN GLENNON

Y

ou r m i ndset has more to do with your success than almost any other single element. There are plenty of salespeople who possess extensive product k nowledge, have numerous influential business contacts, are well-spoken, and have appealing personalities, yet their sale performances are average… sometimes, only marginally acceptable. 

ment SIMONE SUNDERLAND

GREEN SHEET BUILDING BRIEFS

ny

ment

n to poser to lone last ish a oals the and om-

onal e viany. The

19

KAMLOOPS VERNON

PROJECT

Then, there are salespeople who have just enough product knowledge to get by, have few business contacts, don’t always articulate their thoughts in the most artful manner, and don’t have pa r t icu la rly spa rk l i ng personalities, yet their sales performances rank in the top ten percent. How can that be? Success in sales, or almost any endeavor, is not simply a product of one’s talent, education, personality, or contacts (although, those elements can surely help), but rather the result of one’s attitude—the natural tendency to have a positive outlook and maintain positive expectations. But, it’s more than just being able to see the glass as halffull rather than half-empty. It’s the ability to see possibilities…coupled with the resolve to take the required actions to

turn those possibilities into realities. Some people will view a challenge, and after analyzing the positive and negative aspects of it, choose to focus on the positive. T hey see possibilities and envision success.  The more they focus on the positive aspects, the stronger their belief grows about their ability to successfully meet the challenge.  And, the stronger their belief grows, the more resolute is their judgment to take the actions necessary to achieve their goals.  They press on, regardless…and they succeed. O t hers w i l l v iew t he sa me ch a l len ge a nd fo c u s on t he negative aspects—all the reasons (real and imagined) that the challenge can’t be met successfully.  They only see limitations, and envision only failure.  T he more t hey focus on t he negative aspects, the stronger

thei r bel iefs g row about the improbability of successfully meeting the challenge and the futility of investing any effort in its pursuit. They give up, or at best, make a half-hearted effort…and they don’t succeed. Your success is nothing more (or less) than what you envision it to be…and your determination to act in a manner consistent with that picture. If success has eluded you thus far, perhaps it’s time to change your picture, and then press on. Copyright 2015 Sandler Training and Insight Sales Consulting Inc. All rights reserved.

PROJECT New residential subdivision 82 SFD lots

KELOWNA

stores - above ground parking

PROJECT STATUS Submission of subdivision application anticipated shortly - rezoning approved CIVIL ENGINEER SIMONE SUNDERLAND Focus Corporation - 702 1708 Dolphin Ave Kelowna V1Y 9S4 250-980-5500

15

LOCATION

325 Drysdale Blvd - Seniors Residential Care Facility PROJECT TYPE Seniors housing PROJECT New residential seniors care facility - 3 storeys - 92,000 sf - 118 beds total - fibre cement and cultural stone siding wood frame construction - common and administration areas

CENTRAL OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT KELOWNA

PROJECT TYPE DEVELOPER New water Mixed-use dev treatment facility - the disBlenk Development Corp - 132 trict is currently testing several methPROJECT Sky Court, Kelowna V1V 3A2 ods including membrane technology LOCATION LOCATION New mixed use development - 2 250-762-2325 PROJECT STATUS PROJECT STATUS 175 Kokanee WayBellevue - RamadaDrHotel high rise 4405 and 4611 structures built atop Footings and foundation underDesign underway Tender call for Condominiums Okanagan a 4 storey commercial podium PROJECT TYPE way - construction completion General Contractor anticipated Ridge - 22 and 30 storeys - 161 units commercial new anticipated March/17 - 1st storey is a completion July/14of- podium construction PROJECT TYPE PROJECT parkade structurelate containing ARCHITECT anticipated 2015 Multi-family new LOCATION LOCATION Integra Architecture Inc - 416 stalls - 35,000 sm New Ramada Hotel in the Campbell 210 parking CONSULTANT 2241 St -Springfield Rd - Mission W Pender St, Vancouver V6B PROJECT Creek industrial park - 4 storeys - of commercial space - 128 hotel 3030 Pandosy Daytondaycare Knight space - 255 1715 Crossing Westside Condominiums - Offices New condominiums 3 build- - pool 1T5 604-688-4220 units -Opus dedicated 3,780 sm - 80 rooms -- restaurant Dickson 9G6 250-868-4925 ingswaterslide - 3 storeys- elevators - 87 units,- concrete 75 188 sm - publicAve, art V1Y - 2 electric Townhouses PROJECT - SoPa Square with TYPE GENERAL CONTRACTOR units and 57- roof unitsarticulation with car charging OWNERstations - 2 swim- PROJECT TYPEcommercial new construction ANR Construction - 1 1395 running track, porte cochere - asphalt shingles - 98 ming pools, Stevens Rd, West Kelowna V1Z PROJECT STATUS District of Sicamous 1214 Mixed-use dev green space and 10 bicycles for PROJECT Development 2S9 250-769-9069 surface parkingpermit stalls applicaRiverside Ave, Sicamous V0E 2V0 residents and tenants use New commercial urban lifestyle PROJECT tion submitted construction 250-836-2477 PROJECT STATUS New multi family development centre - 6 buildings - 2OWNER to 7 storeys start contingent on market PROJECT STATUS Baltic Properties - 2337 Butt PROJECT MANAGER Construction to be built over an existing 2 at ground level - retail commercial start anticipated conditions start anticipated late Construction Rd, West Kelowna V4T 3L3 2502014 MHPM - 550 555 W 12th Ave,storey parking late spring/16 andoffice commerwith units above768-3802 - underground ARCHITECT Vancouver V5Z 3X7 604-714-0988 cial podium 14 storeys 105 parkade 80 above ground short ARCHITECT Paul Tarjan Architects - 555 11 ARCHITECT units - 81 townhouses builtstalls term parking Points West Architecture Ave SW, Calgary T2R 1P6 403DF Architecture Inc - 1205 4871 Shell around an inner amenity space 203 2190 West Railway St 514-0558 PROJECT STATUS Rd, Richmond V6X 3Z6 604-284-5194 - amenity space is located on Abbotsford V2S 2E2 604-864Development permit application OWNER the roof of the podium on the DEVELOPER 8555 submitted Carlisle Group - 342 4 Ave LOCATION 3rd level LOCATION Prism Ventures Inc1C9 - 3571 Barmond DEVELOPER Green Ave and the Channel SE, Calgary T2G 403ARCHITECT Ave, Richmond 1A4of 604-338-4656 Premiere Pacific Properties Parkway - Channel Crossing 571-8400 andV7E Pointe View To Be Determined - Ice Facility PROJECT STATUS Ekistics Town PlanningShopping - 1925 Main 202 43869 Progress Way, Centre Developments 342 4th Ave Construction start anticipated OWNER PROJECT TYPE St, Vancouver V5T 3C1 604-739-7526 Chilliwack V2R 0E6 604-795SE, Calgary T2G 1C9 403-571early/16 PROJECT TYPE Prism 2195 institutional add/alter 8400Hotels and Resorts - 800 DEVELOPER Commercial new 14800 Landmark Blvd, Dallas Texas ARCHITECT

VERNON

PENTICTON

PROJECT

R366 Enterprises Ltd - 4870B Chute, CEI Architecture Planning PROJECT New ice facility for the Greater Kelowna V1W 4M3 250-764-8963 New commercial shopping Interiors - 500 1500 W Vernon area to replace the aging GENERAL centre on 22 acres - 278,000 Georgia, Vancouver V6GCONTRACTOR 2Z6 Civic Arena - 4,000 seats - may be sf - mix ofLtd retail, 604-687-1898 Lambert and Paul Construction - wholesale LOCATION LOCATION an addition to Kal Tire Place or the and commercial, tenants may 300 2000 Spall Rd, Kelowna V1Y 9P6 1368 St Paul St & 526 145 Clifton - Clifton PriestRd Valley Arena or construction of CONTRACTOR GENERAL include TD Canada Trust, 250-860-2331 LOCATION Doyle Ave - Condominiums Highlands Aquilini Construction - 200 510 Shoppers Drug Mart, private a new ice facility - Commercial - The 451 Shuswap St- Hotel - SD 83 North OkanaW Hastings St, Vancouver V6B liquor store, Dollarama, food PROJECT TYPE PROJECT STATUS Monaco gan Shuswap Administration Building Subdivisions 1L8 604-687-8813 store, electronic and fashion Feasibility study and cost analysis PROJECT TYPE study anticipated shortly - the institutional new Greater Vernon Advisory Committee 75254 214-987-9300

KELOWNA

SALMON ARM

KELOWNA

OKANAGAN SIMILKAMEEN

John Glennon is the owner of Insight Sales Consulting Inc, an authorized Sandler Training Licensee. He can be reached at jglennon@sandler.com, toll free at 1-866-645-2047 or visit www.glennon.sandler.com

PROJECT STATUS Master plans and civil engineering underway - preleasing underway - start of site servicing anticipated December/15 - construction start anticipated spring/16 DEVELOPER PDG - Property Development Group - 717 1030 W Georgia St, Vancouver V6E 2Y3 604-6965155 GENERAL CONTRACTOR Ledcor Construction Ltd - 4 3302 Appaloosa Rd, Kelowna V1V 2W5 250-491-2991 OWNER Penticton Indian Band Development Corporation - 200 Westhills Dr, Penticton V2A 6J7 250-492-3154

PENTICTON LOCATION

Penticton Indian Band Land - Skaha Hills Winery and Vineyard PROJECT TYPE Commerical new PROJECT New winery - vineyards - wine shop - tasting lounge - indoor outdoor bistro - meeting space - viewing platform PROJECT STATUS Construction underway - construction completion anticipated spring/16 GENERAL CONTRACTOR Greyback Construction Ltd 402 E Warren Ave, Penticton V2A 3M2 250-493-7972 OWNER Penticton Indian Band Development Corporation - 200 Westhills Dr, Penticton V2A 6J7 250-492-3154


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Business Examiner Thompson/Okanagan - December 2015  

Featuring the latest business news and information from Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, Summerland and Penticton.