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a·pé·ri·tif noun

a small, low in alcohol, pre-dinner drink, meant to whet the appetite


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Tastemakers of Drinks FOUR COMMUNITY BUILDING DEPARTMENTS

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ED I T I O N 9 N O . 2

Apéritif PUBLISHER MarketStyleMedia EDITOR IN CHIEF TraceyRoman COMMUNITY EDITOR AubreyDucane CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Franck Celhay CandaceMattingly NicoleLee LizThach

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eatures F T

p.18

DIFFERENT DRINKS

MAKE YOU DIFFERENT DRUNK?

p.30

AMERICAN WINEMAKING A BRIEF HISTORY

p.58 TOP TEN

p.44

WINE LABELS

Artful

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DIFFERENT DRINKS

MAKE YOU DIFFERENT DRUNK? Te x t b y N i c o l e L e e

R

eports of a study linking different kinds of alcoholic drinks with different mood states were making the rounds recently. The research used 30,000 survey responses from the Global Drug Survey and found that people attached different emotions to different alcoholic drinks.

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For instance, more respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits than when drinking wine.

around on a Sunday afternoon with their friends and a few beers, you might expect beer to make you more sociable. Kids as young as six have been found to have expectancies We all have friends who swear they feel about alcohol, well before any experience of differently when drinking different types drinking. of alcohol. But can different drinks really influence your mood in different ways? ALCOHOL IS ALCOHOL Let’s cut to the chase. No matter what the drink, the active ingredient is the same: ethanol. When you have a drink, ethanol enters the bloodstream through the stomach and small intestine and is then processed in the liver. The liver can process only a limited amount of alcohol at a time so any excess remains in the blood and travels to other organs, including your brain where mood is regulated.

We build conscious and unconscious associations between alcohol and our emotions every time we drink or see someone else drinking.

We could even be influenced by music and art. “Tequila makes me crazy” is a common belief, which also happens to be a line in a The direct effects of alcohol are the same Kenny Chesney song, and Billy Joel’s Piano whether you drink wine, beer or spirits. Man might reinforce the idea that gin makes There’s no evidence that different types of you melancholy. alcohol cause different mood states. People aren’t even very good at recognising their IT’S THE ‘HOW’ mood states when they have been drinking. MORE THAN THE ‘WHAT’ So where does the myth come from? Other chemicals, called congeners, can be produced in the process of making alcohol. GRAPE EXPECTATIONS Different drinks produce different congeners. Scientists have studied specific alcohol-related Some argue these could have different beliefs called “expectancies”. If you believe a effects on mood, but the only real effect of particular type of drink makes you angry, sad these chemicals is on the taste and smell of or sexed up, then it is more likely to. a beverage. They can also contribute to a cracker of a hangover. We develop expectancies from a number of sources, including our own and others’ But there is no evidence that these congeners experiences. If wine makes you relaxed, it’s produce specific mood or behavioural effects probably because you usually sip it slowly while you are drinking. in a calm and relaxed atmosphere. If tequila makes you crazy, maybe it’s because you The critical factor in the physical and usually drink it in shots, which is bound to be psychological effects you experience when on a wild night out. drinking really comes down to how you drink rather than what you drink. Different drinks Or if you regularly saw your parents sitting have different alcohol content and the more APÉRITIF•EDITION 9 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

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PARTY ANIMALS AND BAD EGGS Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, which means it slows the brain’s functioning. Spirits have a higher concentration of alcohol Alcohol’s effects include reducing activity in (40%) than beer (5%) or wine (12%) and are the part of the brain that regulates thinking, often downed quickly, either in shots or with reasoning and decision-making, known as a sweet mixer. This rapidly increases blood the prefrontal cortex. Alcohol also decreases alcohol concentration, and therefore alcohol’s inhibitions and our ability to regulate effects, including changes in mood. emotions. alcohol you ingest – and the faster you ingest it – the stronger the effects.

The same goes for mixing drinks. You might have heard the saying “Beer before liquor, never been sicker; liquor before beer, you’re in the clear”, but again it’s the amount of alcohol that might get you into trouble rather than mixing different types.

“In vino veritas” (in wine there is truth) is a saying that suggests that when drinking we are more likely to reveal our true selves. While that’s not completely accurate, the changes in mood when someone is drinking often reflect underlying personal styles that become less regulated with alcohol on board.

Mixing a stimulant (like an energy drink) with alcohol can also mask how intoxicated Studies of aggression and alcohol, for example, you feel, allowing you to drink more. show that people who are normally irritable, You can reduce the risk of extreme mood cranky or low in empathy when they are not changes by drinking slowly, eating food before drinking are more likely to be aggressive when and while you drink, and spacing alcoholic their inhibitions are lowered while drinking. drinks with water, juice or soft drink. Stick to drinking no more than four standard drinks As with all drugs, the effect alcohol has on your mood is a combination of the alcohol on a single occasion. itself, where you are drinking it and how you’re feeling at the time.

So does alcohol make you crazy, mean or sad? If it does, you were probably a bit that way inclined already, and if you believe it enough it may just come true.

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

Nicole Lee is a Professor at the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University. She works as a paid consultant in the public, private and not for profit alcohol and other drug sector and to commonwealth and state governments. She has previously been awarded grants by the state and federal government, NHMRC and other public funding bodies for alcohol and other drug research. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

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AMERICAN WINEMAKING A BRIEF HISTORY Te x t b y L i z T h a c h

T

he American love affair with wine dates back to the earlier European settlers in the 16th century, when they began making wine with a native grape known as muscadine. Today every state produces wine, though almost half of the more than 9,700 wineries are based in California. APÉRITIF•EDITION 9 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

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While I don’t own a winery, I do tend to a small hobby vineyard and make my own garagiste wine. I also study the wine business. Here’s a primer on the history of the U.S. wine industry. SETTLERS ON THE VINE When Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon arrived in what is now Florida in 1513, he was followed a half century later by Spanish and French Huguenot settlers, who began making muscadine wine.

Thomas Jefferson attempted to establish a winery and plant Vitis vinifera vineyards in Virginia in the late 1700s and early 1800s. He was, like the others, unsuccessful due to attacks of black rot and phylloxera.

But that didn’t stop wineries from popping up all over the East Coast and Midwest, including in Wisconsin, Ohio and New Jersey. Because of the threat of phylloxera, they used grapes that are native to the U.S. such as Concord and Efforts to plant the great wines of Europe Niagara or hybrids like Catawba and – known as Vitis vinifera or classic Marechal Foch, as they still do today. grapes – failed because their rootstock couldn’t withstand attacks from pests like Brotherhood Winery in New York, for phylloxera, which thrive in wet climates. example, established in 1839 and the oldest continually operated winery in An interesting historical footnote is that the U.S., continues to use some native 34

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American grapes as well as the classic Today, of course, due to its dry and Vitis vinifera, especially Riesling. sunny climate, which is perfect for grape growing, California produces more than So it wasn’t until Spanish Missionaries 90 percent of U.S. wine. discovered the dry climate of New Mexico in 1629 with its sandy soils that In 2016, the U.S. produced 3 billion liters the first Vitis vinifera vineyards were of wine, making it the fourth-largest in planted in what is now the United States. the world after Italy, France and Spain. At They planted Mission grapes brought the same time, Americans drink the most over from Spain. of any country – some 3.59 billion liters in 2016, or about 11.1 liters per person. WINE COMES TO CALIFORNIA Wine didn’t come to California until 1769, when the Spanish started a mission Jefferson, a passionate wine connoisseur, in San Diego, with accompanying would be proud. vineyards. As they settled further north, they established 20 more missions, TMM concluding with one in Sonoma in 1823. Thach is a Professor of Management and Wine Business at Napa Valley began growing grapes in the Liz Sonoma State University. This article was originally published on The 1830s. Conversation.

a T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

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WINE LABELS

CRAFTING NARRATIVES THAT SPEAK TO US Te x t b y F r a n c k C e l h a y

M

arketing professionals often consider packaging to be a product’s primary means of communication. It communicates explicit and implicit messages to the consumer, particularly through its visual aspect. In the wine sector, the importance of packaging is all the greater as marketers generally make little use of such media as TV, radio and billboards, either because of legal constraintsor budget limitations. Thus if wine brands want to signify their differences and tell a story, be it real or fictional, about their product, they do so primarily through label design. The semiotician François Bobrie analysed the Wine Spectator’s Top 100 over five years and identified two broad categories of labels that tell different types of stories. The first are “ego-centred Jupiterian” labels that develop stories about the wine itself, its greatness

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and history, and the savoir-faire behind its production. The second are “consumer-oriented Bacchic” labels, which evoke not only the wine but also the consumers who drink it and the benefits of doing so. For example, the Château les Chevaliers label (shown above) falls into the first category. Through the use of of uppercase serif letters, gilding, an etching of a chateau and a coat of arms, it tells the story of a prestigious and aristocratic wine. The Château Clerc Milon label uses the same overall codes in its typography and colours, but the representation of dancers also evokes festivities and thus some of the benefits associated with wine drinking, such as exhilaration and headiness. FOUR EGO-CENTRED STORIES A recent study of 166 wine labels from vineyards in Australia’s Barossa Valley refined this typology by 48

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identifying four subtypes of “ego-centred” labels, each with its own illustrative theme. Some represent the production site while others highlight the winegrower or winemaker. Some of the labels displayed visual codes evoking the theme of culture, whereas others evoked nature. In all, four distinct types of brand storytelling emerge: •

Producer/culture: telling the story of wine as a work of art, whose intrinsic qualities come from the expertise and inspiration of an artist-winemaker.

Producer/nature: telling the story of wine from the countryside, a rustic product created by a rural winegrower/maker with expertise and a deep connection to nature.

Production site/culture: telling the story of wine from the chateau, whose intrinsic qualities come from the


traditional expertise of a prestigious chateau/estate with a long and illustrious history. •

Production site/nature: telling the story of wine as a gift of nature, a natural product whose intrinsic qualities come from the exceptional characteristics of a well-delimited natural environment.

This typology seems to be applicable to any wine-growing region. For example, outside the Barossa Valley, we can identify the stories told by the labels of the following wines: •

Opus One (Napa Valley, USA). Its label presents the wine as a work of art, with a rapid sketch of the busts of its two “creators”. We also see their signatures, as if to suggest that the wine is an original work signed by the two artists.

Ben Marco malbec (Mendoza, Argentina) shows a black-and-white photo of a winegrower’s hands holding pruning shears and a bunch of grapes. It’s thus the story of a country wine.

Château Libertas (Western Cape, South Africa) uses a blackletter typeface that echoes the calligraphy of medieval monks and yellowed paper to suggest the great age and historical richness of the chateau.

Parinacota (Maule Valley, Chili) tells the story of a wine as a gift of nature. In this case, neither the winemaker nor the chateau is represented. Instead, the volcanic environment of the wine is featured.

FOUR CONSUMER-ORIENTED STORIES Studying the visual codes of wine labels also reveals four subtypes of consumer-oriented labels. Some feature APÉRITIF•EDITION 9 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

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shared pleasure, others personal pleasure; sometimes the pleasure is unbridled, others time controlled. Four subtypes of storytelling emerge at the intersection of these two oppositions: •

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Controlled/personal pleasure: telling the story of wine for relaxation, a product to be enjoyed for its taste and with which to relax. It is associated with themes of vacation and “slow living.” Unbridled/personal pleasure: telling the story of wine for escape, a product for freeing one’s spirit and imagination. It is associated with themes of getting away from it all, art and inspiration. Controlled/shared pleasure: telling the story of wine for seduction, a product to be shared with one’s partner. It’s associated with themes of romance, love

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 9 NO. 2•APÉRITIF

and temptation. •

Unbridled/shared pleasure: telling the story of wine for festivities, a product to be shared with friends during celebrations. It is associated with themes of dance, headiness and frivolity.

Here again, the typology seems to apply to any region. •

Vista Mar Brisa (Central Valley, Chili) tells the story of a wine as relaxation – the label shows a man snoozing in a hammock.

Auspicion (California, USA) tells the story of a wine as escape: it shows a woman being swept up by a cloud of birds and thus associates the wine with themes of elevation and escape.


Besame Mucho (Yecla, Spain) rather straightforwardly tells the story of wine as seduction. The typography illustrates the brand name with the shape of lips waiting to be kissed. The kiss may be part of a romantic dinner but, more metaphorically, it may represent the encounter of lips with the wine itself. In this case, the sly suggestion is that the experience of wine tasting approaches the order of sexual pleasure.

Francis Coppola (Alexander Valley, USA) tells the story of wine as festivity. The label shows a devil dancing on a ball and thus suggests unbridled festivities, dancing and inebriety. The shape of the label and the decomposed movements also echo the cinema arts and the winemaker’s profession.

These different stories undoubtedly correspond to what Roland Barthes would have described as the “mythologies”

of wine. Of course, these carefully constructed myths have a commercial purpose, as they differentiate the brands so as to assert their value. They may also correspond to a reality (in the case of a wine really made at a chateau) or to a complete fabrication (in the case of a private label, negotiator or cooperative appropriating the codes of a chateau wine). However, consumers are not necessarily fooled and these stories, whether real or fictitious, probably contribute to consumer satisfaction as long as the wine merits its price. As Alfred de Musset asked, “Qu’importe le flacon, pourvu qu’on ait l’ivresse?” – “Of what importance the flask, as long as the wine is heady?”

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

Franck Celhay is an Associate professor, Montpellier Business School – UGEI. Franck received funding from the Fondation Nationale pour l' Enseignement de la Gestion des Entreprises. He carries out occasional assignments as a company consultant. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

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TOP TEN

Artful

APÉRITIFS

A

Text compiled by Candace Mattingly

n apéritif, the before dinner drink, is not only a nice gesture to your guests, but serves a purpose as well. It actually prepares the stomach and the palate for food. After reviewing many local purveyors, we've hand selected our top ten favorites based on presentation, ingredients, and creativity. Be sure to experience them in person. À la votre! APÉRITIF•EDITION 9 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

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Black Hand

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1 oz Cardinal Barrel Rested Gin 1 oz Fernet Branca 1 oz House-Made Rhubarb Caraway Shrub Pinch of Activated Charcoal Garnish with Cantor Calla Lilly Photo by TMM Staff Photographer

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SOUTHERN SUGAR

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Ciroc Summer Colada Coconut Cream Pineapple Juice Simple Syrup Lime Juice Rim with Honey and Toasted Almonds Garnish with Fire Roasted Pineapple Photo courtesy of Southern Sugar

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LBH Negroni

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Prairie Organic Gin Mancino Chinato Mancino Rosso Campari Orange Zest Eau de Fernet Branca Garnish with Orange Peel and Fresh Herb

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FISH MARKET

}

5 oz Brut Rose 1/2 oz St Germain Liqueur 1/2 oz Aperol 1/2 oz Hibiscus Berry Reduction Club Soda Photo courtesy of Fish Market

Photo by Remy Thurston Photography

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First in Flight

{ 64

by LF Mixologist

LEROY FOX

War of the Roses

}

by Martin Olivos, Bar Chef

{

LOFT & CELLAR

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Bulleit Rye Bourbon Aperol Amaro Montenegro Fresh Lemon Juice Orange Bitters Garnish with Lemon Peel

2 oz Sake (unfiltered) 1.5 oz Butterfly Pea Tea 1 oz Lemon Juice 1 oz Aloe Vera 1 oz Egg White Garnish with Citrus Zest and Rose Petal

Photo courtesy of Leroy Fox

Photo by TMM Staff Photographer

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 9 NO. 2•APÉRITIF


Retro Cosmo

{

by House Mixologist

EMMET'S

Espresso Black Manhattan

}

Absolute Citron St Germaine Triple Sec Fresh Squeezed Lime White Cranberry Juice Garnish with Frozen Cranberries

{

by House Bar Chef

THE CELLAR AT DUCKWORTH'S

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Espresso-Infused Cynar 10 year Elijah Craig Bourbon House-Made Tobacco Candied Cherries Photo courtesy of The Cellar at Duckworth's

Photo by TMM Staff Photographer

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Queen City Swizzle

{

by House Bar Chef

DOT DOT DOT

Dragon Moonshine Rum Green Chartreuse Mint Sugar Angostura Bitter Crushed Ice Photo courtesy of Dot Dot Dot

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THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 9 NO. 2•APÉRITIF

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Putting Down Roots

{

by House Mixologist

BARDO

}

Muddy River Carolina Rum Sombra Mezcal Carrots Golden Beets Ginger Dill Lime Photo courtesy of Bardo


Mixologist Lance Moussa with his creation the Rookie of the Year. - Photo courtesy of Southern Sugar


Live Longer with Earth Fare HEALTHY FOOD COMING TO FORT MILL If you’ve driven past Len Patterson Road lately, you may have noticed construction and a “Coming Soon” sign for Earth Fare – the newest grocery store to arrive in Fort Mill, opening this fall. Asheville, NC-based Earth Fare has been on a mission to bring healthy food to everyone for over 40 years. “For us, it’s a passion,” said Earth Fare president and CEO Frank Scorpiniti. “Healthy food improves lives, and our entire team is passionate about providing communities with better access to healthier, affordable food.”

Earth Fare offers more certified organic and non-GMO produce than any other supermarket in the industry.

A FOOD PHILOSOPHY IS BORN It’s easy to question the authenticity of terms like “healthy” and “natural” these days, but Earth Fare is the real thing. The roots of its Food Philosophy started more than 40 years ago in a tiny storefront in Asheville. The modest shop offered a simple selection of bulk foods and wellness items. It was the town’s first natural food store, and it had an ambitious mission: let people take control of their health with real food. Earth Fare grew from a storefront into a full supermarket at a time when convenience and cheap food ruled, and artificial ingredients were on the rise in the food industry. The need to better define “real food” became apparent. In 1993, Earth Fare rose to the challenge and began to define its Food Philosophy, starting with the ban of hydrogenated oils. The boldness of the Food Philosophy worked – it turned out that people didn’t want to eat fake ingredients. Over the years, the company’s philosophy continued to evolve, and now mandates that high fructose corn syrup, artificial fats and trans-fats, added hormones, artificial sweeteners, bleached or bromated flour, antibiotics, artificial preservatives, and artificial colors and flavors are all banned from the store’s food products. “Earth Fare’s Food Philosophy creates the cleanest assortment of the best tasting food compared to any other grocery retailer in North America,” said Rich Ramey, vice president of merchandising. “We are proud to provide the healthiest assortment in a convenient, full shop, friendly atmosphere. THE BOOT LIST Shopping at most grocery stores these days isn’t as simple as picking up your favorite items. With so many hard-to-pronounce, artificial ingredients on the labels, it’s easy to walk away confused. At Earth Fare, they read the labels so you don’t have to. Its list of banned items, called the “Boot List”, regulates the brand’s Food Philosophy and has grown to include over 100 ingredients, which you can find at www.earthfare.com/BootList.


Here’s a Look at What’s Banned at Earth Fare

ADDED HORMONES

ANTIBIOTICS

ARTIFICIAL FATS AND TRANS-FATS

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

A HEALTHY SELECTION With so many banned ingredients out of the way, Earth Fare has plenty of room for healthy food. Front and center of the store is the produce department, naturally. According to the company, it carries the most organic and non-GMO in the industry and the organic integrity goes even further; the fresh vegetable “wet” wall is sprayed with only filtered, reverse osmosis water and team members take care to separate organic when stacking.

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

ARTIFICIAL PRESERVATIVES

BLEACHED OR ARTIFICIAL COLORS BROMATED FLOUR AND FLAVORS

LIVE LONGER WITH EARTH FARE According to Scorpiniti, the driving force behind Earth Fare’s steadfast commitment to making Clean, healthy food accessible to all is a genuine desire to empower consumers to take back control of their health through their food choices. In January 2017, the company launched the Live Longer With Earth Fare campaign after the National Center for Health Statistics revealed that life expectancy for Americans in 2015 declined for the first time in more than two decades. “We believe—and science A commitment to organic and non-GMO is evident throughout supports us—that the better you eat the healthier, happier and the store. In fact, all 1,000+ Earth Fare private brand food longer life you can live,” said Scorpiniti. “We are advocates products are made with only non-GMO ingredients. The store for healthy eating, and want all Americans to experience the boasts over 4,000 additional non-GMO items storewide, with difference Clean eating can make.” over 1,000 gluten-free products, and a wide assortment to meet other dietary needs as well. The meat and seafood department LEARN MORE carries an impressive array of grass-fed beef and 100% The Fort Mill store marks the sixth store in South Carolina sustainably-sourced seafood. And if the store doesn’t have the and the fifth in the greater-Charlotte area. The chain currently catch you’re looking for, it fulfills custom orders within 48 hours. operates more than 40 stores in 10 states, with several more new stores planned in the next year. Visit the Fort Mill Earth Fare, At 24,000 square feet (a big jump from their first humble 1,200 opening this Fall. Hours will be 7am - 11pm daily. square foot storefront), the Fort Mill Earth Fare will include a full service Heirloom Juice Bar and Café, featuring all fresh juices, smoothies, and coffee. If grab and go is more your speed, OPENING THIS FALL an extensive prepared foods department awaits, with a fresh salad and hot bar and ready-to-go packaged meals. (Insider Tip: Mills Crossing the store offers $5 Whole Roasted Chickens every Monday!) 2351 Len Patterson Rd Fort Mill, SC 29708 Last but not least is the bakery with a gorgeous display of freshearthfare.com baked goods, including traditional French macarons, a 98¢ nonGMO baguette, and several artisan bread options. Best of all, Earth Fare offers this wide array of healthy food at an affordable price, with even more savings available through their Healthy Rewards loyalty program and a Weekly Email Flyer. “The Fort Mill community deserves a place where they can shop for their families confidently, knowing that their carts are full of only the healthiest, tastiest foods at a price they can afford, and we are thrilled to provide that confidence,” said Frank Scorpiniti.


Let's work together to protect, foster, and strengthen the local independent businesses that make our community unique. Think, buy, and source LOCAL. MADEINTHEMILL.COM


ESPRESSO THEN PROSECCO

BREAKFAST · LUNCH · DINNER 100 MAIN STREET, FORT MILL · 803·396·8055 · SOUTHERNSUGARCAFE.COM

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The Mill Magazine Edition 9 No. 2 Apéritif  

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