__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

THE MILL carolina piedmont

A LOCAL EXCHANGE INSPIRING VIBRANT, PROSPEROUS COMMUNITIES

magazine

WATERgraphy


ADVANCED EDUCATION KEEPS THESE TALENTED ARTISTS ON TOP


Lupe Voss

Aveda Guest Artist and Educator

DI L o ce

usso

SALON & DAY SPA

Baxter Village | 985 Market Street, Fort Mill SC 29708 | 803.802.5877 Stonecrest | 7808 Rea Road, Charlotte, NC 28277 | 704.542.6550 Market Common | 3050 Howard Avenue, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 | 843.839.2655


PROVIDENCE-CHIROPRACTIC.COM | 3071 HWY 21, FORT MILL, SC | 803.835.0444


Stewart Venable, Office Manager

Dr. Jessica Harden, DC


2460 INDIA HOOK RD, SUITE 206, ROCK HILL, SC 29732 | 803-985-2020 | PALMETTO-EYE.COM


Dr. Paul Burt, OD and Dr. Melissa Wood, OD


NOW OPEN 118 MAIN STREET•FORT MILL, SC

Lisa Banish, Owner


Tracy M. Frick Esquire SC Founding Partner

Christina W. Lizzio Esquire NC | Partner

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE ATTORNEYS

Uptown-Charlotte NC 704-376-8181 University-Charlotte NC 704-376-8181 Fort Mill SC 803-324-4000 Rock Hill SC 803-324-4000

FRICKTRENTLIZZIO

FrickTrentLizzio.com


FOUR COMMUNITY BUILDING DEPARTMENTS

CHARACTER 17 BACKYARD 29 TEXTURE 43 PROVISIONS 57

{

The story begins in

PRINT & continues

}

ONLINE

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM


a TMM T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

E D I T I O N 7 N O . 2

Water-graphy PUBLISHER MarketStyleMedia EDITOR IN CHIEF TraceyRoman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS WilliamEmerson LisaMcTigue OliviaMiller TedMurphy PHOTOGRAPHERS MeganCampbell StevenMills PUBLICATION & WEB DESIGN MarketStyleMedia ADVERTISING themillmagazine.com/advertise

©2016 THE MILL MAGAZINE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM WITHOUT THE EXPRESS WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE COPYRIGHT OWNER. THE MILL MAGAZINE DOES NOT NECESSARILY ENDORSE THE VIEWS AND PERCEPTIONS OF ADVERTISERS.

WE ARE SOCIAL, TOO. JOIN US ON...

12

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


features

p.18

CULTIVATING PASSION WITH A THREAD

WRIT IN WATER

p.30

EBB & FLOW MAXIMIZE THE DOWNTIME

OF YOUR SEASONAL BUSINESS

p.44

THE LATEST TREND IN CONSUMABLE BEAUTY PRODUCTS

BEAUTY WATER

p.58

A REBIRTH OF THE AMERICAN FISH

SEA TO TABLE

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

13


Ola Martin Broker/Realtor NC/SC 803-370-2665 martinadvantagerealty.com

Melissa Boykin Broker/Realtor NC/SC 803-242-2743 boykinshesellhomes.com

506 MERCANTILE PLACE, SUITE 101, FORT MILL, SC 29715


SPONSORED CONTENT

STEELE CREEK ANIMAL HOSPITAL Dr. Patricia Young with Stryker

ENJOY THE GREAT OUTDOORS WITH YOUR FIT CANINE COMPANION Text by Patricia N. Young, DVM, CCRP, CVA

Ah...the sights, sounds, and smells of the great outdoors. Whether it is an afternoon at the lake, a day of hiking, a sporting event, or a beach weekend, outdoor activities are great fun when we are properly conditioned and safety is considered at all times. The same is true for our dog companions. Proper conditioning depends on the activity. But as with any exercise, your dog needs to start slowly. Too much activity too soon puts your dog at increased risk of injury. A physical fitness plan for your dog begins with a complete wellness examination to detect any physical concerns that may adversely affect your pet’s conditioning. Once deemed healthy by your veterinarian, your dog can join you in a cross training program designed to achieve and maintain fitness goals based on the activities you wish to share. Walking or hiking with your dog is very beneficial for overall conditioning. Trail work is also excellent for core strengthening and balance training. Start small, gradually building mileage and increasing difficulty of terrain. If you plan for your dog to hike with a backpack, find a pack that is well padded and fits well. Begin by adding small amounts of weight and increase weight slowly. If water is accessible, swimming is excellent for cardiovascular conditioning. Because it is so low impact, swimming is also kindest to your dog’s joints. Biking and running with your dog are also good cardiovascular activities. You must, however, pay close attention to the outdoor temperatures to prevent heat exhaustion, dehydration, sunburn, and burned foot pads, all of which are more likely with these

higher intensity activities on roads and sidewalks. Remember that your dog can not perspire as you do and must rid excess body heat by panting. Allow plenty of cool rest stops and water breaks during these activities. Appropriate warm-ups prior to exertion are as important for your dog as for you. A proper warm-up (10-15 minutes of walking and trotting) increases the heart rate slowly and delivers more oxygen to muscles. Increased blood flow warms the muscles and joints. Performing a variety of active stretch movements completes the warm-up. These may include repeat transitions from “down” to “sit” to “stand”, play bows, and bending side to side as examples. After exertion, gradually decreasing the intensity of activity over 10-15 minutes allows your dog to cool down avoiding soreness and tension in his muscles. Stretching at the end of activity helps avoid soreness also. Sound like a lot of work for a hike or a run? Preventing injuries is the ultimate goal for your canine outdoor enthusiast as well as the canine athlete. Most sports injuries occur in the poorly conditioned player during times of fatigue. Injuries happen quickly. Proper healing and rehabilitation of tendon or ligament injuries and muscle strains take much, much longer. In the unfortunate event of an injury, our rehabilitation center is here to help. With a range of modalities and tools including water therapy, laser, shockwave therapy and platelet rich plasma, you can trust us to provide the utmost in canine rehabilitation services. Now, get out there and have some fun!

S T E E L E C R E E K A N I M A L H O S P I TA L

C O M PA N I ON A N I M A L R E HA B I L I TAT I ON S E RV I C E S I N C HA R L OT T E

9 7 2 9 S . T R Y O N S T R E E T | C H A R L O T T E , N C 2 8 2 7 3 | 7 0 4 . 5 8 8 . 4 4 0 0 | K E E P I N G P E T S H E A LT H Y. C O M


Randy C. Newton, CPA, CVA

9355 FOUNDERS STREET, SUITE C, FORT MILL | 803.403.8493 | NEWTONCPAPLLC.COM


C CHARACTER ...inspiring small town living

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

17


WRIT IN WATER

Cultivating Passion with a Thread Te x t b y L i s a M c T i g u e

Tourists flank Fontana della Barcaccia, a commemorative fountain at the base of the Spanish Steps, Scalinata, in Rome Italy. Over four centuries ago, the Tiber River flooded the city depositing a river barque nearly half a mile away in the Piazza di Spagna. The Fontana della Barcaccia was built in the location where the boat remained after the flood withdrew. The Barcaccia may be a resting place for tourists on a hot summer day, however, nearly two hundred years ago it played a pivotal role for one man from England. A young poet, nearing his death, roomed in an apartment above the Spanish Steps where sounds of the “Fountain of the Old Boat” made their way into his consciousness. Growing up in England, the future poet’s life was plagued with continual money woes that were exacerbated by each death of his elders. By fifteen, John Keats withdrew from school and apprenticed in surgery. Three years later, he had become consumed with writing poetry. Many in England, particularly Keats’ guardian Richard Abbey, regarded poetry as a hobby for the wealthy and the noble who possessed the education and leisure to dabble

18

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

Water Wheel, Carolina Orchards, Fort Mill, SC


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

19


Cascading Water in the Hardin Family Garden, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC

in wordsmithing. His early works were rebuffed as a “pretender” and “ignorant and unsettled.”

and desire. Experiencing beauty in all its forms helps us teach ourselves how to live. It begins:

Without delusions of the struggles he faced, Keats left medicine in determination to follow his dreams. He ferociously read Shakespeare and Spenser, and any other book that he could borrow. His love of books inspired his most famous poem, On First Looking Into Chapman’s Homer.

A THING of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.

John Keats’ first volume of poetry, Poems was published in 1817. After Richard Abbey read the poems, he remarked, “Well, John, I have read your book, and it reminds me of a Quaker’s Horse which was hard to catch, and good for nothing when it was caught - So, your book is hard to understand and good for nothing when it is understood.” Abbey claimed years later that he meant his opinion in jest, but Keats took it to heart. The book sales did nothing to help bolster Keats’ ego.

Endymion, published in 1818, like Keats’ other works received critical reviews.

The remainder of the year, Keats travelled through England, focusing for the first time solely on his writing. He felt he grew as a writer penning three books before returning to London. The final book, Endymion, written while in Oxford, as a complete work is frustrating and inconsistent. However, taken apart, the passages are witness to Keats growth and finding his own voice.

Keats’ friends and publisher pushed him to go to Rome, where it was believed that his health would recover. In the summer of 1820, his last works were published and received positive reviews, even from those that had been so critical in the past.

The book birthed the Romantic movement, as Keats explored ideas about nature and our relationship with it; about melancholy

20

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

Battling constant illness, he wrote a friend, “If I should die, I have left no immortal work behind me - nothing to make my friend proud of my memory - but I have lov’d the principle of the beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remember’d.”

He arrived in Rome in November. The sounds of the Fontana della Barcaccia water below his apartment and his yearning for a love left in England reminded him of the play, Philaster or Love Lies Bleeding, written between the Timber flood and the


Cascading Water in the Hardin Family Garden, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

21


Terraced Pond, Sun City Carolina Lakes, Indian Land, SC

22

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


Lake Wylie, Ebenezer Park, Rock Hill, SC

commission of the fountain. A line in the play reads: “As you are, living; all your better Deeds / Shall be water writ, but this is in Marble.” Keats requested that upon his death his tombstone shall not bear his name, but rather an inscription. He died a few months after arriving in Rome on February 23, 1821 at 25 years old. His gravestone in Italy reads: Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water. WRIT IN MARBLE Keats worried his entire life that he would be writ in water. Writ is Old English for a written manner, when you write in water the words are lost as soon as they are written. Therefore, to be writ in water means to be forgotten. Despite the negative reviews, and knowing that giving up his passion for a steady career path in medicine would have afforded him a better life...a life with his beloved, Fanny Brawne. Keats met Fanny the same year Endymion was published. Fanny’s mother, Mrs. Brawne, liked Keats, but would not allow her daughter to marry a poor writer. The two were unofficially engaged. Fanny encouraged him to continue writing. He had to figure out how to take the tools he developed as a writer to turn his passion into a sustaining

career. A friend had told him he should pursue playwriting for profit. Like his literary idol, Shakespeare, he would become a playwright. He also made plans with his publisher for another book. A month later, he showed the first signs of the tuberculosis that would take his life. CULTIVATING PASSION As Keats suggests in Endymion, we must teach ourselves and allow ourselves the ability to experience beauty to learn how to live. Keats did more than follow his passion. He prepared himself for a life as a writer. While, he was not formally educated after fifteen, he read any book that he could borrow. Society as a whole, rejected him primarily because they thought he was foolish and should take a job like other people in his social class. He believed in his abilities even if it meant he would not achieve his goals. He found ways to better himself and his writing. Remember, he published multiple works in only three years and by the time he was twenty-four. Cal Newport, Ph.D., would call this cultivating a passion. Cal is an assistant professor of computer science at Georgetown University. He’s trying to decode the patterns of success, why people lead successful, meaningful, and enjoyable lives.

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

23


Fountain at Romare Bearden Park, Charlotte, NC

He explores passions in his book, So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love. Cal believes the cliche “follow your passion,” is bad advice, misleading, and potentially dangerous. Cultivating a passion, on the other hand, can lead to a fulfilling life. By creating a world for your passion to evolve, you create a way for your passions to grow into substance. It takes effort and a plan to take a desire to a working passion. Keats cultivated his passion for writing. Leaving medicine was not him following his passion. It was allowing himself the time to develop his toolbox and to experience life. Reading everything he could and traveling around England gave him the ability to critique and develop his own writing voice. It’s that voice that led to his notoriety. He wasn’t born with it. He worked for it. In 2010, a photographer set out in New York City to cultivate his passion, photography. His initial goal was to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers to catalogue the people of New York. Brandon Stanton, says that somewhere along the way he started talking to the people and interviewing them. Brandon shared his art project on Facebook. About three years after he began, Humans of New York, gained social media momentum. The stories of the people connected with many others outside of the city.

24

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

CREATING LEGACY Brandon’s art project became a global phenomenon and spawned two best-selling books. To follow Brandon’s work you can sense that he does not do Humans of New York for a paycheck. He cultivated HONY, as his fans call it, for years before he was paid. Brandon is interested in documenting and inspiring the lives of others...all lives. On one of his outings, he met a young man named Vidal. Brandon asked him, “Who’s influenced you the most in your life?” Vidal’s response, “My principal, Ms. Lopez.” This piqued Brandon’s curiosity and he had to meet Ms. Lopez because how many young people are the most influenced by their school principal? After meeting Ms. Lopez, Brandon decided it was time to put his social media following to task. Ms. Lopez is the principal of Mott Hall Bridges Academy, a middle school located in New York City’s highest crime ridden neighborhood. Every year she tries to take the sixth graders on a trip to visit Harvard University. To show these kids that it is a real place and that it is an achievable dream. But, to take the kids every year comes with a huge price tag. Brandon started a $100,000 crowdfunding campaign to ensure the students, or Scholars as Ms. Lopez refers to them, can visit Harvard every year. The campaign raised over $1.4 million from


Waterfall at Romare Bearden Park, Charlotte, NC

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

25


Pond at Roosevelt Wilson Park, Davidson, NC

26

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


Sunset over Lake Norman, Davidson, NC

51,466 people in 20 days. In addition to taking the scholars to Harvard, the school now has a funded summer program to help the kids stay off the street, and a college scholarship program, The Vidal Scholarship Fund, named for the kid that started it all.

ONE LIFE. ONE THREAD. Pondering our life’s legacy and how we will be remembered is a centuries old quandary. Will you be remembered? Or, will you be writ in the water of history?

Brandon continues to use his notoriety to help others, aside from the stories that move and inspire people all over the world. Brandon continues to use his platform to raise money and awareness. He started a petition to help Syrian refugees and raised over $3.8 million to fund pediatric cancer research, including a cure for a brain tumor called DIPG. This tumor affects about 200 children per year, so it is not high on the funding list. DIPG does, however, kill 100 percent of the children that have it.

Not everyone is destined to be a poet. Not every passion leads to a profession. Not everyone will do something so grand that they will be cast in marble.

Dr. Souwedaine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center began work on the cure for DIPG in 1990. He told HONY, “I thought: ‘I’ll figure it out in two years.’” A cure has been difficult because the tumor infiltrates the brain stem...untouchable by a knife and no room for error. He received approval for his first clinical trial in May 2012, twenty-two years after he began. Dr. Souwedaine has given extra life to twenty patients. He told HONY, “My childhood was building things. And, I didn’t just build them...I focused on every detail. It felt so good when that work was finished and appreciated.” It was the same drive and passion that took him into neurosurgery.

Everyone can impact one life. We are all threads linked through time. A flood in the sixteenth century, commemorated by a fountain in the seventeenth century, inspired an unknown poet to leave an inscription on his tombstone that is still argued about today in the twenty-first century. A man sets about New York to document its inhabitants. A kid in Brooklyn receives a college scholarship. A doctor spending the past twenty-two years, nearly the length of Keats’ life, towards one goal, has access to research funding. What is your story, your thread, your legacy?

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

27


Angela Woods, Owner · BRIDAL REGISTRY · FURNITURE · HOME DECOR · GIFTS · ANTIQUES · JEWELRY · DESIGN SERVICES

2306 INDIA HOOK RD ROCK HILL, SC 803-980-7770 AWOODSINTERIORS.COM


B BACKYARD ...inspiring small town communities

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

29


30

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


EBB& FLOW MAXIMIZE THE DOWNTIME OF YOUR SEASONAL BUSINESS Te x t b y Te d Mu r p h y

From the beach, surfing looks easy. You follow the steps and everything will work out. The start of a surf lesson begins on the beach. Your board lays on top of the sand and the instructor walks you through the steps: lie on the board, look back at the wave, paddle, pop up, plant your feet, bend your knees, and lean to steer. Seven simple steps that will have you falling off the board for the first several days. Surfing is one part skill and one part awareness of the environment. All the waves are different. The wind and current constantly change. Finding your timing and flow takes practice. A surfer needs a willingness to accept changes and allow the environment to guide them. Like surfing, a seasonal business owner needs to be prepared for the ebb and flow of a season. From running a surf camp to restaurants in a tourist driven area, business fluctuates day to day and season to season.

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

31


In a perfect world, customers arrive at evenly spaced intervals allowing a business owner to maximize employee schedules and inventory. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect. An owner must find the balance between the peaks of cash flow and the valleys of minimizing expenses. Digging into your business in the off-season will allow you to discover ways to create a more sustainable business. RE-EVALUATE THE PLAN Several years ago in the middle of winter, Joey, a kayak tour operator, vacationed on the Caribbean coast of Panama. He spent the month of January kayaking the waters and spending time with his grandmother. Every night after his grandmother went to bed, he wandered into the hotel bar.

32

Seasonal businesses run a high volume of customers in order to turn a profit and maintain its off-season expenditures. Use this time wisely to gain and retain customers at the start of the season by reviewing the business plan, align business practice with the brand, and expand marketing plans. One night at the hotel bar, Joey chatted with a fellow American and seasonal business entrepreneur, Rick. As the men talked, Joey expressed his concerns about his business and wasn’t sure what to do. He loved kayaking and offering tours, but the offseason expenses were too much. The previous season’s bad weather had nearly taken down his business.

Running a seasonal or holiday dependent business means that the business runs for several months, then business slows down or shuts down for some period of time. Unlike businesses that operate year-round, owners of seasonal businesses can usually find time for vacation and reflection.

Rick had recently sold one of his seasonal businesses. For twenty years, he owned a restaurant in Florida and he would close the restaurant every summer when the temperature rose and the snowbirds returned to the north. A few years prior, he considered taking the restaurant mobile with the boom of the food truck industry. He decided against it, but told Joey that he might want to consider going mobile.

The off-season is a time to relax, but it also gives time to strategize for the upcoming season. Seasonal business owners often have several months to figure out ways to extend their business, achieve personal missions, and focus on improving the business and its marketing.

For the next week over late night beers, the men banged out a business plan. Joey would continue his business through the season letting all his customers know that the following year his business would be mobile. That summer he also met his now wife, Rose.

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

33


34

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


Joey and Rose are heading into their second year of their mobile kayaking tours. They are expecting a child in the fall, so they spent this past off-season figuring out how to expand their business. GUARANTEE BUSINESS North Carolina’s Outer Banks is a popular destination. It is also home to one of the world’s best surf spots. The beaches stretch for more than 100 miles along the barrier islands that create the eastern coast of North Carolina. The waves range from beginnerfriendly to monster waves during storm surges. Throw a stone in the OBX, what locals and seasonal visitors call the area, and you will find a surf shop. There is one surf shop that stands out. Along the 12-mile stretch of Nags Head, you’ll find Farmdog Surf School. Robert “Farmdog” Farmer has dedicated his life to natural living and surfing. He grew up in Virginia where he was a talented athlete and scholar. On a trip to the Outer Banks, he tried surfing for the first time and loved the challenge. In his youth, he worked at a natural food store and ran an organic food delivery service. When his delivery service took off, the distributor stopped selling to Farmer and opened his own delivery business. Farmer decided to move to the Outer Banks and live a beach life. Then in 2002, he opened a surf shop.

In 2007, he and his business partners added a surf school. They offer lessons in surfing and stand-up paddle boarding (SUP). Along the way, they also extended the business to include a coffee shop, fresh-pressed juices, fruit smoothies, and a natural food store. Although they offer lessons year-round, June, July, and August dominate all of their businesses. During the summer months, the surf school has summer camps for kids, teens, and adults. The adult camps were added in 2013 when they kept receiving requests for an adult camp. Two years before the adult camps began, Farmer received an email asking him to host a camp for cancer survivors. After investigating First Descents, a non-profit based in Denver, Colorado, he immediately knew that he needed to work with them. First Descents offer adult cancer fighter and survivors an opportunity to reclaim their lives with outdoor adventure. The challenges of facing their fears and pushing themselves to their limits provides a chance for them to regain self-efficacy and confidence that may have been lost during their treatments. The partnership between Farmdog Surf School and First Descents sends up to 15 participants to surf camp. All the accommodations, meals, and surf school are provided to the

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

35


cancer survivors free of charge through the non-profit. Farmdog is paid for hosting the camp, which guarantees summer business, but it also aligns with Farmer and the Farmdog brand. ALL YEAR MARKETING PLAN Seasonal business owners, and small business owners in general, forget that their peak season might only be one slice of the commerce pie. The slower months allow seasonal businesses to maximize their peak season business. As an owner, you need to take advantage of every opportunity and some opportunities might not be so obvious. Think about the direct sales television channel QVC. They promote Christmas in July because shoppers are already planning their holiday purchases. Seasonal owners tend to miss out on these types of opportunities because they are not planning for them when business is slow. Shopping guides for potential customers are created months in advance. One clothing company that made a specialty line of winter socks started their marketing campaign in May. The owner of the company knew that holiday shopping guides are put together during the summer months. This means that editors are looking for products to put in the guides during the late spring and early summer. Another strategy is aligning your business with complementary

38

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

businesses. Building a marketing co-op with other seasonal businesses in the area to pool advertising money for a big advertising push. Small business owners need to be master guerilla marketers. The best time to create alliances, experiment with new ideas, and brainstorm out of the box ideas is the offseason. Use the downtime to re-visit your marketing materials and website. Your website should capture email addresses, so you can reach your customers all year long. Write blog posts for the year that promote your business through education. Social media is also a great way to stay in touch and find potential new customers. MAXIMIZE YOUR DOWNTIME You are leaving money on the table. It is a matter of finding the places to make extra money during the season without increasing your overhead and expenses. When the season ends, take a vacation and refresh your mind. Allow your mind to explore ways to increase business during the season. Then, immediately start planning the following year. You should reach out to your previous customers and thank them for a successful season or offer them a discount for the next season.

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

39


' SHOP, EAT, and DISCOVER . . . LOCAL EVENTS

{ { 27TH ANNUAL

JURIED

COMPETITION EXHIBITION

JUNE 16 - SEPT 11 CENTER FOR THE ARTS | 121 EAST MAIN ST. | ROCK HILL, SC

JULY 5 - JULY 10 BELK THEATER | 130 N TRYON ST | CHARLOTTE, NC

40

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


SHOP, EAT, and DISCOVER . . . LOCAL BUSINESSES

{

BURNS CADILLAC

p.2

p.6

p.4

{

DOLCE LUSSO SALON & SPA

985 Market Street, Fort Mill, SC | 803.802.5877 7808 Rea Road, Charlotte, NC | 704.542.6550 3050 Howard Ave, Myrtle Beach, SC | 843.839.2655 dolcelusso.com FRICKTRENTLIZZIO REAL ESTATE ATTORNEYS Uptown and University, Charlotte NC | 704.376.8181 Fort Mill and Rock Hill SC | 803.324.4000 fricktrentlizzio.com IDLIFE - IDNUTRITION Cutomized Supplementation Program Todd & Robyn Albaum | 424.354.3364 Free Health Assessment Online at CoachRobyn.IDLife.com

PIEDMONT MEDICAL CENTER 222 S. Herlong Ave Rock Hill, SC 29732 803.329.1234 myPMC.com/pulse

PROVIDENCE CHIROPRACTIC 3071 HWY 21 Fort Mill, SC 29715 803.835.0444 providence-chiropractic.com

STEELE CREEK ANIMAL HOSPITAL 9729 S. Tryon Street Charlotte, NC 28273 704.588.4400 keepingpetshealthy.com WILKINSON ERA REAL ESTATE 506 Mercantile Place, Suite 101 Fort Mill, SC 29715 Melissa Boykin | Broker-Realtor NC-SC | 803.242.2743 Ola Martin | Broker-Realtor NC-SC | 803.370.2665 boykinshesellhomes.com | martinadvantagerealty.com

{

521 BBQ & GRILL

p.56

'

1135 Stonecrest Blvd, Suite 101, Tega Cay, SC 803.548.0123 | 521bbqtegacay.com 6257 Carolina Commons Dr, Suite 300, Fort Mill 803.548.pork | 521bbq.com

{ {

LISA B'S 118 Main Street Fort Mill, SC 29715 NOW OPEN in Historic Downtown Fort Mill

shop local

for a vibrant

NEWTON CPA 9351 Founders Street Fort Mill, SC 29708 803.810.0824 newtoncpapllc.com

SHOP•EAT•DISCOVER

2460 India Hook Rd, Suite 206 Rock Hill, SC 29732 803.985.2020 palmetto-eye.com

back cover

2515 Cherry Road Rock Hill, SC 29732 800.424.0852 burnscadillac.com

DANCE CENTER USA 855 Gold Hill Road, Suite 101 Fort Mill, SC 29708 704.819.7170 dancecenterusa.com

p. 1

{ { {

PALMETTO EYE

ANGELA WOODS INTERIORS & ANTIQUES 2306 India Hook Road Rock Hill, SC 29732 803.980.7770 awoodsinteriors.com

prosperous

local

community

'

EXPLORETHEMILL.COM


Dmitriy and Gabriela Solomakha Master Instructors and Professional Ballroom Finalists - USA

DANCECENTERUSA.COM 855 GOLD HILL RD, STE 101•FORT MILL, SC 29708•704.819.7170


T TEXTURE ...inspiring small town culture

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

43


THE LATEST TREND IN CONSUMABLE BEAUTY PRODUCTS

BEAUTY WATER

Te x t b y O l i v i a M i l l e r

Beauty isn’t only skin deep. An emerging beauty trend suggests that we should consume our beauty products, too. No, we’re not talking about eating your lipstick or drinking your toner. We’ve been told that we need to drink eight glasses of water per day. But, what if that’s not enough? There is a connection between nutrition and skincare. Water hydrates the skin, which plumps the cells giving us a younger appearance. Through the juicing movement, we’ve gained awareness about our ability to consume nutrition that are a boon to our health. People are more conscious of what they are putting in their bodies. A new beauty category is filling up with options to satisfy our need to drink to our health. The trick is discovering the right products and striking the right balance for our unique body chemistry.

44

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

45


BASIC WATER I’m not talking about the type of water that comes out of your tap directly from the local municipality. Basic Water refers to a pH level, a measurement of the concentration of hydrogen ions. Solutions with a high concentration of hydrogen ions are known as acidic solutions like battery acid or lemon juice. At the other end of the pH scale are the basics with a low concentration of hydrogen ions like olive oil and bleach. Tap water is typically a neutral, which has a pH level around seven. While purified water drops into the acidic range at six. It’s recommended that we consume water at a pH level of 7.5 to balance our inner environment. Our diet and environment affect our inner pH levels. With a basic water, the idea is that we will be able to balance our system back to neutral. The average American diet is heavy in processed and fried foods, which are overbearingly acidic. Neutralizing the body’s systems has the claimed benefits ranging from clearing acne to fighting aging signs including wrinkles. The combined health benefits contribute to a more youthful appearance. 5 BEAUTY BENEFITS Basic water is more commonly referred to as alkaline water, which gives it a high pH number. This increase makes the water taste a bit smoother and sweeter. One - Weight Loss Alkaline water aids in weight loss by cleansing the body of accumulated waste and acidity. Cleansing the colon is a tried and true way to lose weight. But doing so with a gentle change of acidity levels will lessen shock to your body. As we all know, losing weight slowly is always best. Reducing constipation and fecal waste in your system will boost your energy levels as well to help encourage movement and additional weight loss. Two - Immune System Reducing acidity additionally boosts the

46

immune system. When your organs are in balance, you will be less likely to catch the cold or flu. Being healthy gives your body the ability to focus on improving your health that gives you the glow you crave. Three - Hydration Skin needs hydration to keep it healthy and to create elasticity to keep it looking youthful. When water is ionized, it not only creates a higher pH, but also reduces the size of water clusters. The electrolysis process makes it easier for our bodies to absorb alkaline water at a cellular level. When our body and skin can hydrate easier, it glows! Four - Antioxidant Drinking antioxidants has been popular for many years, and for good reason. Antioxidants promote anti-aging by slowing down cellular breakdown. The body absorbs vitamins most completely when it is in liquid form. Same goes for antioxidants. Healthy cells are less likely to turn cancerous, as well as show signs of aging. Five - Detox Once your body is neutralized, your system can naturally focus on what it needs to. Your body wants to optimize its efficiency. So, let it! Everyday, we come in contact with dirt and pollution. If we are healthy, our bodies will be able to detox itself and rid the system of the pollutants. Once your system has pushed them out, your hair and skin will be cleaner and show the wonderful effects. You will look more refreshed. BE A SCIENCE EXPERIMENT Don’t worry! I’m not going to ask you to create a hypothesis, but if you just guessed that you are an acidic or a base, your hypothesis has been formed. Now, it's just a trip to drug store. Simple, right? Too much of a good thing also applies to alkaline water. The purpose is balance. So if your body is already higher than a 7.5 pH balance, you do not need alkaline water. The best water for someone with a

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

basic pH level, is a neutral water or even an acidic water. While, the science behind alkaline water is in its infancy since it is such a new idea. People with acidic problems like kidney disease, acid reflux, or kidney stones could benefit from alkaline water. There is no one right answer for the ultimate health, but with acids and basics, you can easily figure out the balance that is right for your body and your beauty. Before investing in and installing an athome alkaline water system, test how alkaline water affects your body with bottled water. Most brands advertise their pH level on the bottle. Waiakea Hawaiian Volcanic Water, Iceland Springs, and Essentia have the highest pH levels available. Essentia is created by using reverse osmosis and rolling the water over ions to activate ionization thus artificially raising the pH to 9.5. Such a high pH is not found in nature enough to source for consumption. Iceland Springs is sourced from a nature reserve with 8.8 pH water. The natural ionization occurs from a natural chemical reaction when the water runs through porous calcium and potassium. When it is sourced, it has been fully filtered. At the drugstore, pick-up a pack of pH level test strips. Note what you are consuming and test your pH with the strips throughout the day. Test your saliva pH two hours after eating. Fill your mouth with saliva, swallow, repeat, and then place some on the pH strip. Your goal is to balance yourself enough that your morning urine and saliva pH is between 6.5 and 7.5 for several days. WHAT PH IS YOUR TAP WATER? Each county and city has a different filtration system for their individual source water. Test your TAP water with the pH strips, too. Most likely your public water is a bit acidic or neutral.


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

47


BEYOND COCONUT WATER Beauty waters’ common factor is almost all of them use alkaline water. The pitch for beauty water is certain minerals and vitamins are hard for the body to absorb. In water form, your skin and hair will be able to benefit fully from them so you can glow and shine. A nutritionist can tell what vitamins you are missing by looking at your skin. So, it makes sense to feed your skin from the inside out. In the last decade, coconut water has grown to become a $1 billion industry. Coconut water was the first produce drink to take off as a sports drink replacement. Naturally occurring electrolytes hydrate the body just as fast as artificial ones without the calories or harmful residues, particularly red or orange food coloring. The variations include beauty water, fat water, maple water, rose water, aloe water, coconut water, and alkaline water. Health gurus laud their potential and benefits. But, do they really live up to all of the hype? Or, are they just the newest Vitamin Water owned by Pepsi?

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

49


MAPLE WATER The second most popular hydration water, after coconut water, is maple water. Unlike maple syrup, maple water is all natural and comes directly from a maple tree. Syrup is created by creating a concentration aka removing the water and natural movement of sap. Sap in its natural state has antioxidants, vitamins, as well as a relatively low sugar that can be used as an electrolyte. Compared to coconut water, maple water has half the calories, as well as a lower sugar count and taste. Manganese for strong bones and B vitamins to improve metabolism. Naturally filtered water with a sweet taste. Tip: drink maple water as closely as it would come out of the tree. Keep it in a cool and dark place at about forty degrees. DRINKmaple (Saint Albans, VT) Two Ironman triathletes, Kate Weiler and Jeff Rose, opened the company after discovering maple water while racing in Quebec, Canada. Both natives of the Northeast, they found the drink to be hydrating, refreshing, and naturally nutritious. (drinkmaple.com) Vertical Water (New York, NY) Feronia Forests, a Certified B Corporation awarded "Best for the World Environment Impact” in both 2013 and 2014, believes their water will impact the planet tree by tree. Sourcing from forest owners ensures a financial incentive to keep trees vertical. (verticalwater.com) Happy Tree (Grahamsville, NY) Brothers Ari and Chaim Tolwin founded Happy Tree in 2014. They offer cold pressed/HPP, organic raw maple water in lemon, ginger, and cold brew coffee. Happy Tree also offers all of their employees a living wage. (drinkhappytree.com)

50

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

51


CACTUS WATER Cactus water is actually made from prickly pear concentrate, prickly pear extract, and water. A study at Tulane Health Science Center by Jeff Weise recruited 55 adults to drink in the name of science. They drank prickly pear five hours before consuming alcohol. The study revealed that an antioxidant in prickly pear extract known as betalains eases hangover symptoms like dry-mouth and nausea by dampening the body’s inflammatory response. CALIWATER (Los Angeles, CA) Inspired by the varied landscapes of California, CALIWATER founders, Melissa Reed and Matt McKee, sought to source prickly pear cactus fruit from local desert regions. The beauty editor of Allure magazine, Anne Bauso, knew the power of prickly pear extract and wanted to know its effects from the inside - out. She challenged herself to drink it for seven days and these were her results: "dewier, calmer... healthier and more glow-y" skin. (drinkcaliwater.com)

52

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


WATERMELON WATER Watermelon water is like a cold-pressed watermelon juice. Watermelon is 92% water, high in beta-carotene, vitamin C, lycopene, and potassium, as well as citrulline, which helps build blood vessel health. Without adding any water, watermelon juice is naturally alkaline with a pH level of nine. WTRMLN (New York, NY) Jody and Harlan were seeking to smash their passion with their desire to make an impact. They soon realized that ugly, unwanted watermelons were discarded. Desiring to enter the healthy consumer beverage market, they discovered a product that also helped create a more sustainable planet, and turned a farmer’s loss into a profit. (wtrmlnwtr.com) [EDITOR’S NOTE: As this edition went to press it was announced that Beyonce became an investor. "I invested in WTRMLN WTR because it's the future of clean, natural hydration; as partners, we share a simple mission to deliver accessible wellness to the world," Beyoncé said in a statement.

"This is more than an investment in a brand, it's an investment in female leaders, fitness, American farmers and the health of people and our planet."] NOTHING IN EXCESS IS GOOD Consumable beauty products should be used in balance with your body. Be careful not to consume too much sugar, which could throw your pH levels off. It’s important to consume electrolytes when your body needs help recovering from exertion. Electrolytes are potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium and they need to be replenished when you sweat. Consuming excessive electrolytes can cause kidney failure, dizziness, fatigue, or seizures. Every water is different and each has a different chemical makeup and benefit. Learn what best benefits your body from the inside - out.

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E


Robyn Albaum Todd Albaum

IDLife Regional Director

IDLife Senior Director Certified Health Coach

Are you taking the right supplements for YOUR needs? End the guesswork with IDNutrition, a customized supplement program designed specifically for YOU. Take your FREE health assessment at COACHROBYN.IDLIFE.COM or call 424-354-3364.


SMAINHSTREET OP BE A LOCALIST. SUPPORT SMALL BUSINESS. INVEST IN OUR COMMUNITY. HELP US GROW DEEP.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY CITIZENS FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION & EXPLORETHEMILL.COM


Michael Dial, Owner

5 2 1 B B Q . C O M 5 2 1 B B Q T E G A C AY | 1 1 3 5 S T O N E C R E S T B LV D | T E G A C AY | 8 0 3 . 5 4 8 . 0 1 2 3 5 2 1 B B Q I N DIA N L A N D | 7 5 8 0 C HA R L OT T E H W Y | F ORT M I L L | 8 0 3 . 5 4 8 . P OR K


P PROVISIONS ...inspiring small town flavors

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

57


58

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


SEA TO TABLE A REBIRTH OF THE AMERICAN FISH Te x t b y W i l l i a m E m e r s o n

Friday night, we went out for sushi. I love a delicate cut of fresh fish and prefer to order a simple maki or sashimi. In my post-meal stupor I began to wonder, where did the fish come from? My brain processed the information. Sushi is Japanese. Did the fish come from Japan or was the fish from America? If it is from Japan, was it fished in the area of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster? That was a few years ago, but it’s radiation. I don’t know the half-life of radiation, but people in Hiroshima are still sick from the Atomic bombs. Is radiation as poisonous as the Atomic bomb? I couldn’t immediately answer these questions as they kept me up that night. I grabbed my phone and turned to Google for my mid-night answers. My phone wasn’t fast enough, so I got up and went to my laptop.

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

59


60

As the sun stabbed me in the eye, I realized that I had lost a night of sleep over this one meal. I care about the food that I put into my body and didn’t even think twice about the fish at the sushi restaurant… because it is fish. Fish is good for you!

thought about where and how we source our fish. Ways to meet the demands of our increased desire for seafood. Interest in organic and small farms has also renewed the market for American fish.

I discovered that more than 90 percent of consumed seafood in the United States is imported from places like China, the Mediterranean, South America, and Australia. Most of the food offered to us comes from other countries. The government even blocked labeling that would tell us where our food originated. This concerns me and I am not alone.

People are already creating ways for us to continue our love for seafood, while creating sustainable and regional supply chains. Technology, alliances, and awareness make a rebirth in the American fishing industry possible.

The organic movement has rapidly grown throughout the United States. There is a call for transparency in the supply chain. I’ve been on the organic, locally-grown bandwagon for several years now, but it was only this weekend that I thought about fish.

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED FISHING As the sky turns from night to dawn, the fishermen set off in search of their harvest. Often gone for several days at a time without a guarantee of finding the ocean’s bounty, the life of a fisherman is a daily gamble. Their workplace is as unpredictable as their potential income.

I was very excited to learn that there are others that have already

In Beaufort, South Carolina, Captain Laten “Pops” Reaves

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

61


62

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


doesn’t shy away from life as a fisherman. He began working on boats when he was 13 years old. By 16, he was the captain of the Cheryl Ann. He’s trawled for shrimp from Mexico to Virginia, “a seaman is someone that has to love the ocean, has to know what the ocean can do, and respect it. You got to know a little bit about everything. You got to be an engineer. You got to be a navigator. All in one package.” Pops has lost toes and his favorite shrimping boat to the sea, but he prefers not to dwell on the negative. The original company he founded in 1970, Reaves Brother’s Seafood in Holden Beach, North Carolina, has grown to a four-generation company with a mission to change the seafood business model. Over the past 20 years, the seafood industry has declined in the United States with many fishermen across the country abandoning their boats in favor of a more stable industry. The family moved the boats from Holden Beach to Beaufort in 1992

when the industry in Beaufort was about 90 vessels strong. The family realized in the late 1990s that the American fishing industry was, “literally on the brink of extinction,” said Craig Reaves, Pops’ son. Large corporations and foreign countries flooded the American market with seafood. There are, “less than fifteen commercial shrimp boats,” left in Beaufort, he added. When others gave up, the Reaves dug deep. In order to stay afloat, the family pooled their funds to make ends meet. They tried a variety of businesses to ensure they would continue to fish. Through their trial and error, they have found the right mix. Business for the Reaves became more stable when they put a focus on community. Community Supported Fishery (CSF) The Reaves launched Community Supported Fishery to help

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

63


themselves, their fellow seaman, and the South Carolina fishing industry. Through the family’s Sea Eagle Market, a retail and wholesale market, the community can partner with their local fisherman. The partnership allows the seafood to go directly from the sea to the dinner table during the season. It also ensures that the fishermen have the working capital to keep their boats ready for harvest.

Confusion still remains in the marketplace and not everyone is honest nor transparent about where the food originates.

CSF helps the consumer save money, keeps money in the local economy, and preserves the South Carolina fishing heritage. Pre-paying for twelve weeks of in-season, low-impact, locally and freshly caught fish, shellfish, or shrimp secures the local fishing industry’s future. It also builds a relationship between the community and the fishermen.

In 2013, Oceana, a conservation group, traveled the country and purchased 1,200 seafood samples. They found that 33 percent of their purchased seafood did not follow the Food and Drug Administration labeling guidelines. Another of their reports found that consumers paid up to double for mislabeled seafood at restaurants when the restaurant served cheaper alternatives.

CSF’s Mission Our ultimate goal is to get the freshest South Carolina seafood to our state’s communities.

So, how can the consumer know that their fish is actually local? Craig Reaves in collaboration with the South Carolina Seafood Alliance, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, and the South Carolina Department of Agriculture added a new certification to the state’s certified local program, Certified SC Seafood.

To preserve and prolong our South Carolina commercial fishing heritage by keeping South Carolina seafood in South Carolina. Continue to generate jobs for our families and yours by reestablishing fleets and vessels on South Carolina’s working waterfront. Certified SC Seafood People want to buy local and organic produce and meats. Until recently, these terms did not have a legal definition, which meant that they could be used by anyone and defined however they saw fit.

64

For instance, a “local” product at Publix supermarket means that it was grown in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, or South Carolina where the company has stores. It wasn’t until the 2008 federal Farm Bill that the word “local” received its first legal definition, as a food that is marketed less than 400 miles from its origin.

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY

The Certified SC Seafood logo may only appear on packaging by an approved licensed wholesale dealer, distributor, retailer, aquaculture permit holder, or shellfish mariculture permit holder. The approval requires an application through the marketing department at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture. The program’s goal is to help consumers easily identify South Carolina farmers, products, and seafood.


FISH SUPPORTED FARMING Standing in an opaque greenhouse are rows of leafy greens floating on rafts and ripening tomatoes sitting in perlite, a volcanic material. Overhead, strawberries dangle from cylindrical containers. This farm is not an ordinary farm. The only soil that reaches this greenhouse is under the floor. The farm is an aquaponic farm, a process of combining hydroponics, growing crops in a soilless system, and aquaculture (the raising of fish). This closed cycle farming system helps plants grow faster, yet uses 90 percent less water than soil farming and allows the plants to grow in a tighter environment. The only water loss in the recirculation is through evaporation and transpiration from the plant leaves. Aquaponics allows the farm to grow a wide variety of pesticideand herbicide-free plants in an atmosphere that promotes faster growth. The water is in continuous motion bringing a fresh supply of nutrients directly to the root of the plant, rather than the plant needing to seek nutrients to absorb from the ground. Powered by Gravity Aquaponic farms are generally small, which means that they do not own large farming equipment and harvesting is done by hand. The farm’s only need for power is for the water pump that recycles the water. Reservoirs collect rainwater runoff from the greenhouse, which accounts for 95 percent of the water used on the farm. The water is pumped up eight feet into the large fish tanks that reside in the greenhouse. A second tank sits lower than the fish tanks to capture the overflow. Gravity removes the solid fish waste leaving nitrites and ammonia.

As the water moves through the cycle, the bacteria converts nitrites and ammonia into nitrate-rich plant food. This nutrient water flows under the plant rafts and through the absorbent perlite where the plant roots soak up the nitrates before the water returns to the reservoir and continues the cycle. Tilapia Several farms choose to farm Tilapia, one of the most popular kinds of seafood in the United States. This freshwater fish is called, “The Chicken of Sea,” for its mild taste and firm, porous texture. It also happens that Tilapia is one of the easiest fish to raise. Native to the Nile River Basin on lower Egypt in Africa, the tropical fish is one of the oldest farmed fish on the planet. A 4,000-year-old Egyptian tomb displays a bas-relief of Tilapia ponds. This species also delays breeding until the fish ages, which allows farmers to easily maintain the population. While Tilapia is popular, it is not the only fish raised on aquaponic farms. The fish available on the farm depends on the farmer, however, Trout, Bluegill, Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Goldfish, and Koi can also be found. The popularity of aquaponic farming and the desire for most aquaponics farmers is to be as natural as possible, which means that some farms might only grow species native to their area. SEA TO TABLE There are two dishes that I love more than a clean fish. They are two South Carolina seafood staples: the Low Country Boil and Shrimp and Grits. Oh man, I just made my stomach growl.

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

65


66

THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM•EDITION 7 NO. 2•WATER-GRAPHY


Low Country Boil The Low Country Boil is also called Frogmore Stew. Don’t worry, you will not have to track down frogs for this dish. It is named after the very small South Carolina town of Frogmore that once served as the mailing address for the people that lived on St. Helena Island. In a pot, combine local shrimp, sausage, potatoes, and corn. You can add other ingredients like butter, onion, or crab. Lay down some newspaper, take out the napkins, and let the crowd chow down. Shrimp and Grits This humble dish is a true regional food that has garnered national fame. It originates from the Charleston area and was locally known as “Shrimps and Hominy,” the local term used for grits. In 1985, a writer at The New York Times stopped in for Chef Bill Neal’s Shrimp with Cheese Grits at Crook’s Corner in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The following morning, the recipe was published in the newspaper.

Locally National You might be able to order Shrimp and Grits in Anchorage, Alaska, and a Low Country Boil in San Francisco, California, but always remember to look for locally-sourced seafood. Help every small boat fisherman or aquaponic farmer stay in business. These are small business owners that care about their product and their community. The businesses that care about their product and where they source their food, also care about their reputation within the community. Knowing your local fisherman or fish farmers or where the fish originates gives you peace of mind. You will not lose sleep wondering if you unwittingly poisoned yourself with radioactive fish.

aM T M T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

WATER-GRAPHY•EDITION 7 NO. 2•THEMILLMAGAZINE.COM

67


Let's work together to protect, foster, and strengthen the local independent businesses that make our community unique. BECOME A CERTIFIED MADE IN THE MILL BUSINESS. Think, buy, and source local. MADEINTHEMILL.COM


Now

ER

FAST

w i t h m o re physicians . to serve you

R myPMC.com/E

We understand that waiting in the ER is no fun. That’s why we’ve increased our ER providers during our busiest times of the day. We also offer an online check-in service so you can reserve your space and wait comfortably at home. IF YOU HAVE A LIFE THREATENING EMERGENCY, CALL 911.

REDUCE YOUR WAIT TIME BY

CHECKING-IN ONLINE!* www.pmcinquicker.com *There may be an additional wait due to severity of complaint before you’re treated.

| 222 S. Herlong Ave., Rock Hill

Profile for Market Style Media

The Mill Magazine Edition 7 No. 2 Water-graphy  

A local exchange inspiring vibrant, prosperous communities.

The Mill Magazine Edition 7 No. 2 Water-graphy  

A local exchange inspiring vibrant, prosperous communities.

Advertisement