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9

DESIGN

Showcasing Designers at Work:

an interactive studio environment to engage the Boston art and design community


Design Goals Plans Sections Community Circulation Avenue Elevations Adaptable Studio Lecture Series/Visiting Artists/After School Programs Main Entry Natural Light Studio Perspectives Gathering Stair Landing Connecting to the rest of MassArt Building Components


Southeast Night Perspective

Design Goals:

UP

DN

Ground Level Plan point of view

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-Provide each student with a studio space with access to natural light, views of the city, outdoor space, and adjacency to shops -Formulate a collaborative and interactive work environment -Connect the artist community to the MassArt Studio Building -Provide spaces that are missing from the existing campus -Design a gathering circulation path, to create unexpected interaction between the majors and faculty -Encourage faculty to interact with the students more frequently by having them work within the student studios spaces -Provide a hub for the entire school of MassArt -South facing balconies and exterior spaces -Shading devices on facade as needed


Southwest Perspective


The Fens

housing

housing

housing

parking

(MFA)

park

MFA Lo uis Pra

ng

Ev

housing

an

sW

ay

pedestrian paths

athletic field

Northeastern University

Medical District parking

SitePlan 75

low-income residential housing

low-income residential housing


Ground Level Plan

91


Metal Shop (below) 2000sf

A---

Gathering Space/ Landing/Gallery 600sf

Lobby below

open

view into Metal Shop

UP UP

open

UP

cl.

wet area Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2294sf

m

cl.

h. ec

Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2595sf

cl.

ll o Ha int bly w m vie sse A

Outdoor Patio 600sf

Lounge

B---

-View to lobby below -Gathering Stair + Gallery -3D Studios combined -Views into studios

92

Level 2

Second Level Plan

Assembly Space/ Exhibition (below)


A-

3D Studios 2609sf

---

lounge

wet area

open

open to Lobby

Gathering Space Landing 400sf

UP UP

open to Architecture/Sculpture studios

open

cl. wet area

m

Display Space/ Gallery 1476sf

Art Education Studio 2431sf

lounge

collaborative faculty work area b nt de stu 0sf 20

view into city

h. ec

Outdoor Patio

Lounge

y on alc

B-

---

-Gallery faces city -South facing balconies -Outdoor patios -Views into studios

Third Level Plan

93


outdoor balcony

A-

moveable partition walls

---

lounge

Painting Studios

p -u pi n

e ac sp

3055sf o int g w erin vie ath G

ing nd a L

open Lobby below

paint sink Gathering Balcony UP

UP

view into lobby core 3 levels below

Recording Studio 526sf

open

DN

cl.

Audio/Visual Studio 900sf

cl.

wet area

Dark room 365sf

collaborative faculty work area

b nt de stu 0sf 20

lounge

y on alc

trellis

Photography Studios 2368sf

view into city

B-

---

-Wet/dry studios -Recording studios -Dark room -Collaborative faculty work area to encourage teacher interaction

94

Level 4

Fourth Level Plan


r oo td ou tio f pa 0s 20

A---

Computer Lab 1859sf

cl.

Blackbox Theatre/ Installation Space 2161sf

open

UP UP

open

Recording Studio

cl.

wet area

750sf

view into landing lounge tb en ud f st 00s 2

Gathering Space

UP

trellis

view into city

y on alc

display space

SIM/DMI Studios 3198sf

B-

---

-Black box theatre -Computer Lab -Recording Studio -Views into studios

Fifth Level Plan

95


A---

or tdo y ou lcon ba

Computer Lab 1969sf Blackbox Theatre below open

UP

cl. UP

cl. cl.

Recording Studio 760sf

wet area

UP

tb en ud f st 00s 2

display area trellis

B-

-Film/Video studios -Comp. Lab -Recording Studio

96

view into city view into lower studios

---

Level 6

y on alc

Gathering Space Landing

Film/Video Studios 2915sf

Sixth Level Plan


view into city

A---

cafe seating Art "Made" Store 1600sf

Gathering Landing

UP UP

Outdoor Space 750sf

UP

Roof below Gathering Landing below

display space

B---

-Student Center -Art Store -Cafe seating

Seventh Level Plan Level 7

97


student lounge

A---

kitchen

cafe seating below

Cafe 2100sf

skylight above open

UP

Gathering Landing

UP DN study station

student work area 1500sf

B---

-Student Center Loft -Cafe -Lounge -Work stations

98

Eighth Level Plan

to roof


Building Section A

B

84


Community Circulation Avenue

100

Museums are designed to invite the public in to view art, allowing an intimate connection to the artist’s work and ideas. The public has a clear path to travel through as they pass from one exhibition and gallery space to another. Within the building I design, the public will view the design process by traveling through an avenue that slices into the studios and exhibition spaces. Having a straight path through will invite the community to experience the works of the MassArt students. Providing a vertical circulation node piercing the core of the building will engage the interest of the public as it is offered a unique and dynamic view of designers at work. The community avenue will act as access the makings of art, but also functions as structural reinforcement braced to hold the hanging studio spaces projecting out from the central artery of the building. As the public and community pass through the circulation core, they ultimately reach the peak of the tower, landing at a cafÊ and lounge overlooking the urban neighborhood. Despite the transparency of the spaces along the walkway, the public will flow past the activity of the studios without disturbing the users. When the function within the studio requires privacy, visibility and noise from the circulation avenue can be blocked temporarily by means of moveable walls. The flexibility of the studio and transparency of the circulation walk will bring benefit to the students as well as to the public and community. The central artery will provide way-finding through the building as the spaces branch off the avenue. The main circulation core will be equipped with a grand stair elevating to each level while overlooking the double-elevation spaces, as well as into the studios. Notched into one side of the grand stair is a high speed elevator wrapped in glazing, opening views

into the mechanical systems, structural components, and multiple angles of the surrounding spaces. The avenue will have a surrounding arrangement of circulation, gathering, and rest areas created to provide a flow of pedestrians through the graduate studios.


Building Section B

clerestories to stream light into student center Views of city and public view of galleries and studios

double-glazed wall system outdoor space off of studio Facade oriented due south controlled by shading louvers

skylights above to bring in natural light to studios below

Gathering Stair

Circulation Avenue shifts from core Central Core

views of studios from central core

views of students working from gathering stair balcony Public enters through the main entry and moves through the building using the gathering stair passing by the students working in studio

double height space

Fabrication lab and metal shop activity views of sunken wood shop from street level

101


Level 11 108' - 0" Level 10 104' - 0" Level 9 98' - 0"

South Elevation

Level 8 86' - 0" Level 7 74' - 0" Level 6 62' - 0" Level 5 50' - 0" Level 4 38' - 0" Level 3 26' - 0" Level 2 14' - 0" Shops 8' - 0" Level 1 1' - 2" Ground Level 0' - 0" Level 11 108' - 0" Level 10 104' - 0" Level 9 98' - 0"

North Elevation

Level 8 86' - 0" Level 7 74' - 0" Level 6 62' - 0" Level 5 50' - 0" Level 4 38' - 0" Level 3 26' - 0"

102

Level 2 14' - 0" Shops 8' - 0" Level 1 1' - 2" Ground Level 0' - 0"


Level 11 108' - 0" Level 10 104' - 0" Level 9 98' - 0"

West Elevation

Level 8 86' - 0" Level 7 74' - 0" Level 6 62' - 0" Level 5 50' - 0" Level 4 38' - 0" Level 3 26' - 0" Level 2 14' - 0" Shops 8' - 0" Level 1 1' - 2"

Ground Level 0' - 0" Level 11 108' - 0" Level 10 104' - 0" Level 9 98' - 0"

East Elevation

Level 8 86' - 0" Level 7 74' - 0" Level 6 62' - 0" Level 5 50' - 0" Level 4 38' - 0" Level 3 26' - 0" Level 2 14' - 0" Shops 8' - 0" Level 1 1' - 2"

-0"

Ground Level 0' - 0"

103


Adaptable Studio Each artist has a preference as to how his or her own workspace is arranged. When space limits layout possibilities, it also hinders the potential flexibility to adapt to different tasks. Having a studio space that adapts to multiple functions will make working fluent and instill efficient work habits. Instead of wasting time traveling to another area, the space could transform to fulfill the needs of the artist and designer. Within an open space, the student will be given a set of parts that can be installed in workspace so that it can be arranged exact. The parts will consist of sections of desk, slatted wall for hanging extensions, shelving, chairs, and toolbox. The desk will build into a number of formations to tailor to the artist’s needs. The wooden slatted wall would be framed within the column grid. Locking the walls in place, or removing them, could create larger space for presentations or smaller intimate space for desk critiques. The hanging extensions will consist of pin-up walls, lighting fixtures, bookshelves, tool supplies, computer stands, model displays, material storage, and other hanging objects. Shelving can be placed in between the slatted walls, hung from wall, or latched onto the desk. The chairs will be adjustable to fit different heights and comfort levels. The toolbox will fit in between the dividers of space or underneath the desk. The toolbox will be set on wheels for easy movement and rearrangement. Within the designated gathering/presentation space, the walls will have separations so that the space will appear more open. Within the separations, a temporary wall will slide from the ceiling to close off the space from sound and direct views. The ability to alter the layout and dimension of the studios to accommodate different functions and occupancies will assure that space is not being wasted. 104

Metal Shop (below) 2000sf

---

Lobby below

open

view into Metal Shop

Gathering Space/ Landing/Gallery 600sf

UP UP

open

UP

cl.

wet area Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2294sf cl.

m

h. ec

Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2595sf

cl.

into ly w mb vie sse A

Outdoor Patio 600sf

Lounge

ll Ha

Assembly Space/ Exhibition (below)

---

Second Level Plan 1

Level 2

1. Personal workspace

The personal workspace can be transformed into different configurations based on the desired function of the student. The tables, shelving, and pin-up walls can be re-arranged for different layouts appropriate to the program.


2. Gallery space

The Gallery space can be constructed by clearing the floor and hanging the moveable partition walls on the horizontal slats. Track lighting and art work will be hung on the walls creating a functioning exhibition space.

3. Lounge

The Lounge space can be constructed by clearing the floor and replace the desks and studio materials with couches, chairs, coffee tables, and entertainment systems. This space will be a great way for the students and faculty to gather and interact within the studios in a comfortbale atmosphere.

105


South Night Perspective

UP

DN

Ground Level Plan point of view

106


Museum Avenue Perspective

UP

DN

point of view

Ground Level Plan

108


86


Lecture Series/Visiting Artists/ After School Programs MassArt has active programs for lecture series, visiting artists, and after school programs for the local youth. Within the new graduate studio building there will be an assembly space large enough for large venues and designed to engage the public to bring in more guests. Having a connection to the street edge will promote interest within the general public and neighboring design schools. As at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, the lectures will be an event shared with the people of Boston in addition the MassArt community. The Art Education and Continuing Education programs that work with the local children, will have a large, functioning classrooms to facilitate diverse activities. Providing these kind of spaces for those programs is important in order to create opportunity for less privileged and under-served children to learn and make art. The new space aims to involve graduate students as volunteers who would share and teach their skills to local children and other members of the community. Creative engagement and the exchange of ideas do not have an age limit. A broader approach to the teaching of art and design, as well as learning, follows MassArt’s original vision. Developing a relationship between the graduate students and younger art students is critical to the public mission of this building. The Studios at MassArt building has these elements to invite the public and to adapt to the visiting artist’s needs such as:

110

1. Large Assembly space open to ground level 2. Views from the street edge 3. Advertisement for lectures to bring in local institutes 4. Views from upper studios 5. Proper seating, lighting, and audio equipment 6. Gallery space adjacent to lecture hall 7. Cafe for intermission and time between events

UP

DN

point of view

Ground Level Plan


Assembly Space arranged for large events and small functions with student studios overlooking space and street edge


Main Entry The entrance to a civic building should display a clear but intriguing gesture in order to invite its users and welcome the community. Sweeping across a high pedestrian path beside Huntington Avenue, the front entry can act as a meeting place as well as direct the lane of circulation. To create place, the entry will provide shelter from weather and drape shade. Overhangs, awnings, and cantilevers construct enclosure blocking from sun, wind, rain, and snow, dropping at any moment within the northeastern climate. Being protected will give an area for people to gather, smoke, or relax without blocking entry into the building. Seating will also draw in crowds of college students to hang out along the pedestrian’s route. Within my building design, the elevated metal shop hangs over the tucked entryway. The extruded volume containing the architecture studios will showcase students busy constructing models and producing drawings. Creating action as well as shelter will attract the public and students to fill up the street corner. Suspended along the perimeter of the studios is the circulation avenue. Overlooking the shops and the entrance, the space will showcase students’ work from the viewpoints of ground level or up close along the avenue. This way-finding is an important factor in the success of the entry and lobby. Adjacent to the front door, signage indicating building type and purpose should be revealed in the architecture. For this new graduate building for MassArt, prominent banners with the school emblems will claim territory in the dense college neighborhood, boosting the recognition of the college and offering guidance to its guests encountering the building. As users move confidentially through the entry, the public will be intrigued to follow. When entering the graduate studios, the user will pour into a larger open lobby space. Within this space, 112

views of the sunken wood shop, lofted studio spaces, and suspended gallery spaces appear. The internal spectacle of the movement of students and visitors will illuminate the lobby, penetrating to the outside. Large events such as the thesis show can be advertised all over the lobby and displayed within the shifted gallery spaces. Layering these frames of space will open up the curtain of the design process and participants of the school.

UP

DN

point of view

Ground Level Plan


Front Entrance Perspective 113


Natural Light The presence of abundant natural light in most of the spaces will bring energy to the students, faculty, and visitors. When surrounded by a multi-story building on all sides, absorbing natural light becomes challenging. Sun studies will dictate the orientation of the glazing and placement of shading devices. Elements that control solar heat gain are overhangs, horizontal/vertical louvers, fenestration, trees, screens, and tinted glass. Bringing streams of light into the exhibition spaces, gathering areas, studios, and green spaces attracts people but also save on energy consumption. Having an open plan will allow the sunlight to travel further into the structure. Orienting the spaces toward the south will bring in beneficial sunlight during the summer and warmth during the winter months. The use of color has an effect on how the sun penetrates the envelope of a building. To absorb and distract the sun from the building, the designer will use black and dark colors on materials. The application of white and light colors helps reflect the light. The use of materials will also be a factor in the direction of the natural light. Certain materials such as metal retain heat and reflect light. Overuse of metal could create a glare into the building or refracted to an adjacent building. Concrete acts as a thermal mass so it absorbs the heat but does not bounce the light to the spaces within. Spaces can become dark and dreary with the overuse of concrete and masonry. Wood does not retain heat and also does not reflect light. When wood is used properly, it can control light nicely without creating glares and blocking all the light. When combining these materials, the building can work to benefit from the properties and neutralize their flaws.

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Architecture/Sculpture Studios

Metal Shop (below) 2000sf

---

Lobby below

open

view into Metal Shop

Gathering Space/ Landing/Gallery 600sf

UP UP

open

UP

cl.

wet area Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2294sf cl.

m

h. ec

Architecture/Sculpture Studios 2595sf

cl.

into ly w mb vie sse A

Outdoor Patio 600sf

---

Lounge

point of view

Second Level Plan 1

Level 2

ll Ha

Assembly Space/ Exhibition (below)


DMI/SIM/Photo Studios

r oo td ou tio f pa 0s 20

---

Computer Lab 1859sf

cl.

Blackbox Theatre/ Installation Space 2161sf

open

UP UP

open

Recording Studio

wet area

750sf

view into landing UP

lounge nt de f stu 00s 2

Gathering Space

SIM/DMI Studios 3198sf view into city

n lco ba

display space

y

trellis

point of view

---

116

cl.

Fifth Level Plan


Painting Studios

point of view

outdoor balcony

moveable partition walls

---

lounge

Painting Studios

p -u pin

e ac sp

3055sf in nd La into g w erin vie ath G

open Lobby below

g

paint sink Gathering Balcony UP

UP

view into lobby core 3 levels below

Recording Studio 526sf

open

DN

cl.

cl.

wet area

Dark room 365sf

Audio/Visual Studio 900sf b nt de stu 0sf 20 y on alc

trellis

Photography Studios 2368sf

lounge view into city

---

Fourth Level Plan 1

Level 4

117


Recording Studio

r oo td ou tio f pa 0s 20

---

Computer Lab 1859sf

point of view

cl.

Blackbox Theatre/ Installation Space 2161sf

open

UP UP

open

Recording Studio

wet area

750sf

view into landing UP

lounge nt de f stu 00s 2

Gathering Space

n lco ba

display space

y

trellis

---

Fifth Level Plan

118

cl.

SIM/DMI Studios 3198sf view into city


Gathering Stair Landing The main stair will be the center gathering area for the building. It is a place where small groups to larger shows can take place viewed from the upper and lower levels. The stair landing is extended out to create a space designed to hold presentations and critiques for all the graduate programs at MassArt. Starting at the ground level of the first flight of stairs, the landing projects out thirty feet, overlooking the lobby and hovering over the gallery space below. The two longer ends of the landing will have partition walls positioned for pin-up space and a place for people to congregate around the presenters. The end of the landing faces the open glazed curtain wall, to bring natural light into the open space. As the stair rises to the second level, the landing steps back ten feet to create views to the lower gallery spaces. As the stairs move up to the third floor, the landings become smaller and more intimate. The landing then acts as a observing balcony and hang out spot, inviting a glimpse of the open core and framed studio spaces. The gathering stair will be used by MassArt students and faculty as a functioning presentation space, but can also be an access path for the community to move through the building. The studios, shops, and classrooms overlook the gathering landing, acting as a centerpiece for users and visitors moving along. The stair acts as a main circulation path, where people will unexpectedly bump 120

into each other as they gather and interact. The structure will be comprised of concrete slabs and thin concrete columns reinforced with haunches to make the stair rigid. The treads will be made of sheet metal ribboned to eliminate the need for stringers. This allows for the treads and risers to appear weightless. On the surface of the treads will be wood to add softness to each step. The railings will be constructed of terra-cotta aluminum slats. The material is also used as louvers along the exterior envelope of the building. The light tone of brown in the wood and aluminum louvers is also expressed on the other details within the structure. The central stair will be a conduit for the community to pass through the building, as well as a space for students and faculty to gather as they discuss art and design. As the user moves vertically up the gathering stair, the circulation avenue shifts towards the front of the building and the dramatic view looking out over Huntington Avenue. The stairs climbing to the upper levels float over the street edge and open views of the urban skyline of the Fenway area. As the users experience the building and its form, they can also see the students’ work displayed along the walls and ceiling of the space. Galleries and common areas are hard to come by, and the gathering stair landing provides these important programmatic elements for the school. The students and faculty will have more options for space selection when the school becomes busy during final week.


Gathering Stair Landing Perspective


Gathering Stair Landing Detail Model

122


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Connecting to the rest of MassArt Designing a separate graduate building potentially creates a break with the college as a whole if there is no coherent connection to it. Currently, the graduate studios are located on a different level than those of the undergraduates, though the two groups still share the same building and most of the facilities. In their first year, graduate students take introductory courses with undergraduates becoming part of the larger studio community at the college. This set-up allows for a broader range of feedback and constructive criticism during presentations and class time. This also opens up the opportunity for collaborative projects and interaction between the undergraduate and graduate programs. As graduate students continue into their second year, they do not have class with the undergraduates and interact solely their classmates. As time passes, connection and interaction with the undergraduates slowly diminishes. For the most part, graduate students would not interact with MassArt undergraduates in other majors. Sharing a building does not always encourage communication because most students stay within their own studio and never cross paths with other programs and undergraduates. Constructing a building for graduate studios will open up the possibility for creative interaction between graduate students and undergraduates, as well as the rest of the school, filling the major void existing now. MassArt is currently missing specific community spaces that bring students together on a regular basis. A student center will provide a hub for all MassArt students and faculty. To join together and share ideas as they formulate relationships would most likely not occur in the existing buildings at MassArt. Currently there is a student center, but it is 124

not utilized in any great measure and does not give students a reason to leave their work spaces. The student center now feels like an enlarged hallway with some couches and chairs. To draw students away from their studios and collect within a community lounge, there must be adjacent spaces around the student center to keep people from leaving. The student center must be in the middle of all the action and should feel lively at all times. The student center should be near a cafĂŠ, library, or studios to give quick access to these spaces, where students can take a break from their work and relax, but not waste time traveling across campus. An assembly space is also a community space that brings the school together for events and lectures. The existing assembly hall at MassArt is outdated and most lectures are held in other spaces that may be too small for larger venues. To overcome the constraints of the old assembly space the school has tried to adapt other spaces on campus to replace the dysfunctional available area. Currently, these spaces are not big enough, which leads to crowding and discomfort for the users and presenters. A successful assembly space should provide enough room for large and small groups, fitted with the latest visual and audio equipment, and possesses good acoustics, comfortable seating, and multiple views for the audience and passing public. Eighth Level Plan

student lounge

---

kitchen

cafe seating below

Cafe 2100sf

skylight above open

UP

Gathering Landing

UP DN study station

to roof

student work area 1500sf

point of view ---


Student Center Perspective


Southeast Perspective

UP

DN

point of view

Ground Level Plan

118


Building Components:

A. Column to beam connection

B. A typical detail for the slab-wall junction

C. two-way solid slab

128

Allen, Edward; Wiley, John. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, Fourth Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2004.


D. insulated concrete panel R-value: 28 image from: http://www.spec-net.com.au/press/0111/cgs_120111.htm

F. curtain wall mullion system R-value: 3.13 image from: http://www.trulite.com/curtain_wall_systems.aspx

G. terracotta louver system

E. terracotta metal panel R-value:16 image from: http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/483842702/Terracotta_Panel_Curtain_Wall.html

image from: http://xy-terracotta.en.alibaba.com/product/678494633-213208845/Terracotta_Louver_exterior_wall_ panel_terracotta_facade_panel_terracotta_wall_panel_clay_ panel_exterior_outdoor_louver_panel.html

129


Wall Section Detail A

aluminum mullion

double glazed insulated tempered glass louver support column metal pin terra cota louvers drain pipe j-bolt 2x10 wood block metal cap angle metal panel AV Barrier air gasket metal clip precast concrete pan rigid insulation airspace drip edge steel flat plate steel girder steel angle recessed lighting drain pipe concrete column

130

Level 2 14' - 0"


Wall Section Detail B Level 4 38' - 0" metal cap rubber roof mebrane rigid insulation precast concrete roof panel drip edge scupper drain pipe AV Barrier

Concrete Insulated Panel Roof System: R-value: 50

metal railing rigid insulation precast concrete slab

concrete beam

Level 3 26' - 0"

131


Structural Building Components: -Poured Concrete Slabs -Concrete Columns -Concrete Beams reinforcing open shaft spaces -Concrete Roof

132

Wall System: -Aluminum Shading Louvers -Terra-cotta Panel System -Semi-polished Aluminum Panel -Stone Veneer

Structural Building Explorations


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10 Bibliography


Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary. Cooperative Learning: Critical Thinking and Collaboration Across the Curriculum. Illinois: Charles C. Thomas Publishers, 1996. Allen, Edward; Wiley, John. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, Fourth Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2004. Alluri, Krishna; Balasubramanian, K. “Acheiving Development Goals: Collaboration in Education and Development.� Commonwealth of Learning and the Carribbean Consortium. August 2002. Print. Bailey, Mark. Simple Home. Ryland Peters & Small, 2009. Bareither, Harlan. University Space Planning, Translating the Educational Program of a University into a Physical Facility Requirements. Illinois: University of Illinois Press, 1986. Ching D.K., Francis. ARCHITECTURE Form, Space, and Order. Canada: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1996 Damon, William. Peer Education: The untapped potential. Houston, TX: Elsevier Inc., 1984. Doorley, Scott & Scott Witthoft. Make Space: How to Set the Stage for Creative Collaboration. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 2012. Friedman, Avi. The Nature of the Place. A Search for Authenticity. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2012. Hertzberger, Herman. Lessons for Students in Architecture. Ratterdam: Uitgeveri, 010 Publishers, 1991. Hester T., Randolph. Design for Ecological Democracy. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2006. Holl, Steven, Juhani Pallasmaa, Alberto Perez Gomez. Questions of Perception: Phenomenology of Architecture. California: William K. Stout Publishe; 2 edition, 2007. Jacobs B., Allen, Elizabeth MacDonald, and Yodan Rofe. The Boulevard Book: History, Evolution, Design of Multiway Boulevards. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2002. Marcus Cooper, Clare and Wendy Sarkissian. Housing as if People Mattered. Berkely CA: University of California Press, 1986.

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Maxwell, A. Jospeh. Qualitative Research Design and Interactive Approach, Second Edition. London: SAGE Publications Inc. 2005. Neufert, Ernst. Architects’s Data. Granada, London: Halsted Press, John Wilet & Sons, Inc., 1980. O’Neil, Chris. “Teacher Leadership-Team Building and Collaboration: A Necessary Combination.” Edutopia. September 26, 2006. Print. Rubin, Herbert. Qualitative Interviewing. London: SAGE publications, Inc. 2012.

Internet Sources: Athens, Emily.“Your Brain: How Architecture is Food for Thought.” sensingarchitecture.com/927/how-brainwhy-architecture-is-food-for-thought/. Web. 5 May 2012. Craven, Jackie. architecture.about.com/cs/socialconcerns/a/schooldesign.htm. Web. 15 March 2012. Lehman, Maria. “Bringing Architecture to the Next Level.” http://sensingarchitecture.com/wp-content/uploads/myimages/newsletter/2010-Bringing-Arch-Next-Level.pdf. Web. 10 April 2012 Preuss Hartmann, Deborah. www.infog.com/articles/agile-team-room-wishlist. 24 July 2007. Web. 14 March 2012. Tischiller, Linda. www.fastcompany/1638692/11-way-can-make-your-space-as-collaboration-as-thedschool. 6 May 2010. Web. 10 March 2012. Vilano, Matt. campustechnology.com/articles/2010/06/01/7-tips-for-building-collaborative-learning-spac es.aspx. 01 June 2010. Web. 14 March 2012. www.ednewscolorado.org/2011/11/29/29065-29065. 29 Nov. 2011. Web. 17 March 2012. www.personal.psu.edu/mas53/timln870.html. Web. 18 April 2012. 135


www.noteaccess.com/approaches/ArtEd/History/MADrawingAct.htm. Web. 18 April 2012. art.unt.edu/ntieva/HistoryofArtEd/1851-documents.html. Web. 19 April 2012 www.ednewscolorado.org/2011/11/29/29065-29065. copyright EdNewsColorado.org. Web. 29 Nov. 2012.

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“Building art is a synthesis of life in materialised form. We should try to bring in under the same hat not a splintered way of thinking, but all in harmony together.� -Alvar Aalto



Thesis Book_Mark Riemitis_Part Two