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Showcas i ng D E S I GN E R S A T WOR K Engagi ngt hei nt er act i ves t udi oenvi r onment

Mar kRi emi t i s


Final Thesis Presentation


Massachusetts College of Art & Design Mark Riemitis Master of Architecture Thesis 2012


MassArt Studios


Signatures

MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN Submitted to the Department of Architectural Design in partial fulfillment for the degree of Master of Architecture at Massachusetts College of Art & Design in December 2012

Mark Riemitis: Master of Architecture candidate at MassArt Signature: __________________________________________ Elizabeth Turowski: Adjunct Visiting Professor at MassArt, Thesis Advisor Signature: __________________________________________ Patricia Seitz: Professor of Architecture/ Thesis Coordinator Head, Graduate Program of Architecture Signature: __________________________________________


Copyright c2012 Mark Riemitis, All Rights Reserved Grant of Reproduction and Distribution The author herby grants to the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, royalty free, non-exclusive and irrevocable permission to reproduce and to distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document, including any accompanying unbound supplementary material, in whole or in part in any medium now known or hereafter created.


Abstract

Thesis Title: Showcasing designers at work;

an interactive and collaborative studio environment to engage the artist community and the public.

In what ways can a graduate studio building be designed to create an interactive and collaborative work environment that engages the campus art community as well as the public? In such a building, spaces can be designed to encourage collaboration in order to allow for the exchange of ideas. If spaces are opened up they can provide a clear view to students and to the public outside of the methods of design, interaction, and studio culture. To further engage the public, the studio building consists of protruding volumes that address the street edge. Through visibility and public access a connection is built between the local neighborhood and the designers at work to convey the power of art and design.


Table of Contents 1 Observations from the artist community

Collaboration in Education............................................................................................................................................................1 Research Methodology..................................................................................................................................................................2 Research Framework......................................................................................................................................................................3-4 Student Surveys...............................................................................................................................................................................5-8 Student Survey Matrix.....................................................................................................................................................................9-10 Student Interviews...........................................................................................................................................................................11-12

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Exploring the culture of local design schools

Design Studio/Spaces: Tours and Dialogues...............................................................................................................................13-24 Conclusions......................................................................................................................................................................................25

Investigating spatial relationships

The Process of Making....................................................................................................................................................................26 Dissecting the process of making..................................................................................................................................................27 Herman Hertzberger “Lessons for Students in Architecture� Design of social interactive spaces........................................28-29 Andy Warhol New York City Factory: Workspace and art studio..............................................................................................30-31 Studio Culture + Gathering Spaces + Community Spaces........................................................................................................32 Spatial Diagrams.............................................................................................................................................................................33-35 Studio Space Analysis.....................................................................................................................................................................36 Conclusions......................................................................................................................................................................................37

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Reaction to the research and investigations

Vision of the building/Interdisciplinary Interaction......................................................................................................................38-39 Concept Sketches + Models.........................................................................................................................................................40-45


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Connecting to similar building precedents

University of Michigan Art + Architecture Building............................................................................................................................46-47 University of Washington Gould Hall...................................................................................................................................................48-49 Cambridge, MA MIT Media Lab..........................................................................................................................................................50-51 Brown University The Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts .................................................................................52-53 Goucher College, Baltimore MD Athenaeum...................................................................................................................................54-55 Julliard School of Music, NYC Allice Tully Hall....................................................................................................................................56-57

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The making of a public art institute for the Commonwealth

History of MassArt: A School about Making and Engaging with the Community.........................................................................58-59 MassArt Building Time line.....................................................................................................................................................................60-61 Drawing Act of 1870.............................................................................................................................................................................60-61 Existing Conditions at MassArt: Disconnection between shop environment and studios............................................................62-63

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Observing the impact of existing conditions

Site Analysis............................................................................................................................................................................................64-65 Neighborhood Evolution......................................................................................................................................................................66-67 Site Sketches + Photos..........................................................................................................................................................................68-69 Site Maps + Models...............................................................................................................................................................................70-75 Sustainable Strategies..........................................................................................................................................................................76-79

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Programmatic Elements to encourage collaboration

Studio Space Design Criteria...............................................................................................................................................................80-81 Program details.....................................................................................................................................................................................82 Program Adjacency Matrix.................................................................................................................................................................83 Diagramming Program Relationships.................................................................................................................................................84-85 Program Sketches.................................................................................................................................................................................86-87


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DESIGN Showcasing Designers at work; an interactive studio environment to engage the community

Design Goals...............................................................................................................................................................................88 Plans.............................................................................................................................................................................................90-98 Sections.......................................................................................................................................................................................99-101 Community Circulation Avenue...............................................................................................................................................100 Elevations....................................................................................................................................................................................102-103 Adaptable Studio.......................................................................................................................................................................104-105 Lecture Series/Visiting Artists/After School Programs..............................................................................................................110-111 Main Entry....................................................................................................................................................................................112-113 Natural Light................................................................................................................................................................................114 Studio Perspectives....................................................................................................................................................................115-119 Gathering Stair Landing............................................................................................................................................................120-123 Connecting to the rest of MassArt...........................................................................................................................................124-125 Building Components................................................................................................................................................................128-133

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Bibliography

Book and Internet Sources........................................................................................................................................................134-136


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Observations from the artist community


Collaboration in Education Research Methodology Research Framework Student Surveys Student Survey Matrix Student Interviews


Collaboration in Education “Using collaborative learning activities means structuring student interaction in small, mixed-ability groups, encouraging interdependence, and providing for individual accountability. By taking part in cooperative experiences, students are encouraged to learn by assimilating their ideas and creating new knowledge through interaction with others.” -Dennis Adams in ‘Cooperative Learning: Critical Thinking and Collaboration Across the Curriculum’

“Making a concerted effort to include others in all aspects of brainstorming, project planning, and writing, developing, and implementing projects, however, can only add to the chances of success and will yield a collaborative mind-set that continues beyond the life of a project.” -Chris O’Neil in ‘Teacher Leadership- Team Building and Collaboration: A Necessary Combination’

“Research has shown that peer learning can bolster children’s self esteem, awaken their interest in challenging tasks, enhance scholarly achievement, and foster pro social behavior. In particular, it is an effective means of enabling children to grasp basic concepts that underlie school curricula.” -William Damon in ‘Peer Education: The untapped potential’

“Whether it is formal or informal education, learning typically requires participation in a social process of knowledge construction. Knowledge emerges through a network of interactions, and it is distributed and mediated by the people and the tools that they use for interactions.” -Krishna Alluri and K. Balasubramanian in ‘Achieving Development Goals: Collaboration in Education and Development’

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Research Methodology:

The design process is a series of steps that an artist or designer undergoes to seek inspiration and to complete an image generated in the mind. A designer’s ideas can be influenced by many factors, such as the environment, peers, mentors, and the community. A personal workspace connected with its surrounding environment enhances the development of design thinking and ideas. The process of creating objects is a fascinating one that takes years to develop and master. It must be repeated many times to refine craftsmanship and skill of the artist or designer. My thesis is a framework within which the design process, and designers at work as a community, will benefit from interaction with the public. The architecture will give a clear view of the design methods, peer interaction, and studio culture experienced by graduate students on a daily basis. The phenomenon of making will be revealed to the public, which will be drawn to understand the process. The function and order of a studio has a strong impact on the performance of a designer. Each artist has certain needs and preferences within their personal and community spaces. Adjacencies and arrangements of these spaces dictate the flow of an artist’s work. When certain resources are easily accessible and properly placed, more time can be spent on thinking, designing, and making.

Designers use their peer’s surrounding work and review boards throughout the design process. This interaction within the studio is crucial to broadening the horizons of ideas and input into a design. Working individually limits the potential outcomes and can jeopardize the driving concept of a design, as surveys and interviews with students unanimously proved: each participant showing interest in seeing other people’s work throughout the semester. Most students interviewed also felt that isolation hinders the successful outcome of a design concept and slows the flow of ideas. In my studio experience at The Boston Architectural College, it was clear that certain students needed the influence of their classmates: in some cases, the work of isolated students suffered and did not meet professor’s expectations. Collaborating with designers and artists, especially those in other disciplines, is an important way of opening the door to creative potential. Peering into multiple minds gives insight into how successful an idea can be. Receiving a great deal of feedback assures richness in the design. The design of ‘The Studios at MassArt’ building is a way to magnify the process of making and to encourage the interest of the public and community within a mile radius of the site, in neighborhood houses, other design schools, and art museums. The proposed building represents a new, built opportunity for this expanded arts community to interact.

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Research Framework

1. Observed a design charrette as a means of understanding working processes. 2. Conducted Surveys designed to elicit qualitative design data. 3. Investigated a range of precedents

Library Design Charrette:

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The first step in preparing for the surveys and interviews was observing a library design charrette. A design charrette is a group of designers collaborating to solve a design problem. The MassArt library is currently undergoing a renovation; in order to generate ideas about the new design, the library hosted group idea sessions. I took notes during the charrette to observe the ways in which professors addressed the audience, how they informed the audience of the project, and how they addressed the discussion to each of the groups participating. As I watched the two groups cooperate throughout the exercise, I noticed the different roles each member took based upon their knowledge and connection to the project. After documenting the different groups’ dynamics, I participated in the charrette and stated my opinion of the design problem. I noticed that, by keying into the different conversations that passed through the session, I became more capable of summarizing the collective concerns. I was intrigued by the rapid flow of ideas sparked by the group, and impressed by the power of a group discussion. This was just one design charrette; by repeating a similar exercise and monitoring the approach of each person, it is possible to come up with a well-conceived solution for a design. The organization of the charrette helped me to gain knowledge about this groups process, as well as to see the value of generating ideas from multiple viewpoints.

ADD Inc. Feasibility Study:

The feasibility study was conducted for the new freshman dormitories at MassArt. It consisted of a number of site options for the MassArt dormitory. ADD Inc. analyzed two different locations and created massing studies to justify the positive and negative aspects of each arrangement. The site conditions, such as orientation, adjacent context, sun exposure, wind direction, pedestrian path, vehicular traffic, and campus lines, have parallel effects on my project’s site. I used this investigation of the conditions of the area to help develop my site concepts. (Example on next page)


Example of Study:

information from PDF at: http://www.mass.edu/library/documents/FAAP10-04MSCBAProjectApprovalMassArt.pdf

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MassArt Student Surveys Attached below are examples of survey results. After receiving the surveys I looked at each question for key patterns. I took note of the similarities in the data such as interest in collaboration, views to other studios spaces, ability to personalize space, and need of a communal space.

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Student Survey Diagrams responding to the best representation of a space that includes private and community space.

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STUDENT SURVEY- MATRIX After collecting the data from the student surveys I organized the feedback into most widely described answers. The repeated answers were put into this matrix to give an overall census from the students. With this data I can start to produce a list of program options and layout reacting to the feedback of the surveys.

TOP COMMON ANSWERS QUESTIONS:

Top 5 Selected

1. What is your favorite space at home?

kitchen

space by a window

2. What kind of space did you enjoy most growing up?

screened porch

family room

3. What is your favorite aspect of your own studio space?

windowsviews

openness

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sun room

personalization

bedroom

porch/patio

studio

private hide-out

views to other studios

privateaway from noise


QUESTIONS: 4. Within MassArt and the neighborhood of Boston, where would you go to relax?

cafecoffee shop

5. What elements of the graduate studios that might be distracting while working?

noise, music, street noise

temp. control

stress of other people

distance from shops

poor lighting

6. What makes a successful common space/community space?

collaboration

flexibility

sharing

public/ private

natural light

gardengreen space

library

bar

lounge

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Student Interview- Graduate Coordinator/MFA Graduate: Leah Gadd My next strategy was to conduct a range of interviews to provide detail to the questionnaires, and create a perspective of the MFA programs at MassArt. Below is an example of the questions I asked the MFA students.

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1. What are the ultimate needs in an artist studio? -clean and dirty spaces (fabrication and display work) -small private space -large worktable -spray booth, toxic, flammable areas -kitchen -Internet connection -storage -place to lock up belongings -climate control 2. With an unlimited budget, what are some things you would want in an artist studio? -loading dock and garage door into studio -wet working space (fibers) -industrial sink -paper making printer -natural light (skylights) -larger door openings -gallery space -high ceilings What kind of elements would encourage collaborative interaction? 3. -communal workspace and shops -open to everyone -open floor plan -visibility -public and private spaces 4. Do you know of some ways that MassArt could intertwine with different graduate programs? -curriculum -less formal events to bring people together -social events -overall orientations


-better communication between groups -faculty and student events 5. What role would technology play in the future of MassArt? -organized emails -skype discussions -wi-fi stations -better tech support -3D printing -diversity, provide more technology -more affordable lap tops -centerpiece for accessibility 6. If MassArt built a new Graduate Studios building, what are some ways the building could draw in students whom are not graduate? -gallery space -public space -auditorium -café -student center -media lab -exhibition space -transparent façade -layout to give views of people working (being on display) 7. Envisioning MassArt identity in the community, what are some key aspects that could be carried over to a new building? -weird hodgepodge spaces -making space your own, personalization -grow organically -don’t build a new neighborhood it builds itself overtime -adaptation, flexibility 8. How could the student’s administration/faculty be connected without stepping on each other’s toes? -being close and in the same building -popping in frequently -close quarters -shared spaces

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2

Exploring the culture of local design schools


Design Studio/Spaces: Tours and Dialogues MassArt studios Northeastern University studios Illinois Institute of Technology studios Wentworth Institute of Technology The Boston Architectural College Conclusions

The goal of this segment of research was to test the survey and interview results through observation of a range of art and design schools. This included sketching/documenting the studio layouts, informal conversations with students at each school, and through analysis of positive and negative aspects of the spatial configurations.


Design Studio/Spaces: Tours and Dialogues To gain an understanding of the variety of ways in which design studios are arranged and function, I visited multiple studio spaces. I explored the details of the buildings and observed layout and student interactions within the studio. I investigated the current MassArt studios, as well as visited Northeastern University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Wentworth Institute of Technology, and The Boston Architectural College studios. I discovered that each school had its own identity supported by its spatial layout. Sketching and recording these spaces and conversing with current architecture students on these campuses provided me with an understanding of how these design programs operate, as well as a visual of the arrangement of the studios.

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MassArt DMI student’s studio space: open space personalized for students creative functions

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Massachusetts College of Art & Design graduate MFA, M.Arch, DMI Studios Studio Diagram MassArt Studios

Based on my investigations of the studios:

Positive Aspects: -Flexible Spaces

desk

circulation path

-Views to other studios -Ability to personalize -Access to natural light -Positive studio culture

Negative Aspects:

Typ Area: 80 SF open between studios

-Lack of storage and flex spaces

shared desks

open plan closed walls

-Lack of lounge space

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Northeastern University Studios 30 SF

-Blocked views into MFA studios

Overall Studio Plan

-Flexible -Views to other studios -Ability to personalize -Sunlight -Messy -Lack of Organization -Lack of storage -Out-dated -Lack of gathering space

-Disorganized studio layout -Outdated furniture and partition walls

Design Studio An

Illino

-O -Su -Fl -V -Liv


MassArt Master of Architecture studio space: space separated by half-walls filled with drafting tables, desks, and shelving

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Northeastern University Architecture Studios

-Views to campus courtyard

-Minimal personal workspace

-Lack of lounge space

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-Messy -Unorganized -High solar heat gai from over glazing -Loud -Lack of privacy

Studio Plan

-Open Space -Sunlight -Flexible -Views to all studios -Lively

-Adjacent to noisy MBTA train tracks

Illinois Institute of Tech. Studios

-Lack of printers and plotters

-Flexible -Views to other studios -Ability to personalize -Sunlight

-Inability to reorganize desks

-Messy -Lack of Organization -Lack of storage -Out-dated -Lack of gathering space

Negative Aspects:

circulation path

30 SF

-Access to natural light

Northeastern University Studios

-Movable pin-up walls

MassArt Studios

-Views to other studios

desk

shared desks

-Organized studio layout

Studio Diagram

Typ Area: 80 SF

Positive Aspects:

open between studios

Based on my investigations of the studios:


Northeastern University Architecture studio spaces: Rows of desks separated by half-walls with built storage and views to courtyard

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Illinois Institute of Technology Architecture Studios Design Studio Analysis

Based on my investigations-Flexible of the studios: MassArt Studios

Illinois Institute of Tech. Studios

-Views to Positive Aspects: other studios -Open plan, desks can -Ability to be rearranged personalize -Sunlight circulation path

Studio Diagram

-Plenty of window views

-Messy -Lack of a: -Views to all studios Organization -Lack of storage en studios -Lively atmosphere -Out-dated -Lack of -Plenty of pin-upgathering space and space

-Open Space -Sunlight -Flexible -Views to all studios -Lively storage

Negative Aspects: Northeastern University Studios

ared desks

-Excessive Solar Gain, 30 SF no exterior shading

-Messy -Unorganized -High solar heat gain from over glazing -Loud -Lack of privacy

40+ SF personal workspace Studio Plan

-Lack of order -Lack of privacy, loud and distracting -Lack of controlled light and temperature control Studio Front Entry

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Studio Elevations

Plans and Elevations from: http://www.studyblue.com/notes/note/n/all/ deck/957172

Photo from: http://www.ribablogs.com/?tag=modernism


3D model from: http://www.ribablogs.com/?tag=modernism

Illinois Institute of Technology Architecture studio spaces: Open floor plan

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Wentworth Institute of Technology Architecture Studios Based on my investigations of the studios:

Positive Aspects: -Open plan

-Plenty of window views -Views to all studios -Lively atmosphere -Plenty of pin-up space and storage

Negative Aspects:

-Lack of personal space -Spaces are tight and overlap -Lack of privacy, loud and distracting -Unused open space, desks shoved to one side

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Studio Diagram


http://www.wit.edu/admissions/photos/graduate.jpg

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The Boston Architectural College Based on my investigations of the studios:

Positive Aspects: -Open plan

-Plenty of window views -Views to all studios -Lively atmosphere -Plenty of pin-up

Negative Aspects:

-No personal work space, can only use desks during class time -Spaces are tight and overlap -Lack of privacy, loud and distracting -No where to store materials, tools, and work -Must bring all belongings home after each class

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Studio Diagram


https://teenlife.com/media/uploads/listings//boston-architectural-college-summer-academy/gallery%207.JPG

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Conclusions: Design Studios may best benefit from daylight, glare control, temperature control, some ability to influence internal organization, and adequate space for different types of projects in the curriculum. Also beneficial is to have a balance of public and private space and some displays of studio work by students. Students had varying reactions to fully open space; it created liveliness and provided an opportunity for interactions, but noise was an issue.

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Investigating spatial relationships


The Process of Making Dissection of the process of making Herman Hertzberger “Lessons for Students in Architecture� Design of Social Interactive Space Andy Warhol New York City Factory Studio Culture + Gathering Spaces + Community Spaces Spatial Diagrams Studio Space Analysis Conclusions


The Process of Making

The goal of this section of study is to analyze artist spaces and develop a means of describing the artistic process. Architecture and design students spend a significant portion of their day and sometimes nights in their work space; it is their second home. When spending long periods of time in such a space, it is important to feel comfortable and eager to take on tasks. Each student is different with respect to how they achieve comfort; the efficiency of the space and the interaction with their studio-mates makes students feel part of the studio community. Having an adaptable studio space addresses the varying needs of each student’s comfort. Each student can adapt his or her space to their liking and not be confined to a given space. As I develop my research and pilot studies, I started to envision my thesis project, ‘The Studios at MassArt’ as an interdisciplinary space for makers. The project aims to provide spaces that promote design and the arts, and to expand this concept to the community awareness. The building would house studios tailored for artists working in various media at MassArt, including Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Photography, Dynamic Media, SIM and other related disciplines. I plan on developing a comfortable workspace for the artists of the Fenway, equipped with all the tools they need to perform. The building could also impact the surrounding neighborhood by projecting its environment onto the street. The new construct would maintain the identity of the dense urban fabric while inviting the community to look in on the design process. Observing artists in their studio environments was important to the formulation of my ideas. Each 26

artist has his or her way of creating and making art. The collection of ideas and process an artist or designer goes through can be just as interesting as the final product. The environment artists build for themselves has a direct impact on the work they produce. Personal feedback from my surveys of students revealed that designers want to have a space that allows them to balance workspace with opportunities to interact and collaborate with others. My project, “Design for The Studios at MassArt,” to include studio space, galleries, and common space, would be a potential hub for interaction and a means of presenting the creative process to the community. By displaying the process of making and facilitating awareness of the ways in which a project develops from concept to competition, the new studio design would promote community understanding of artistic creation.


Dissection of the Process of Making Stage 1: -Observing -Researching -Sketching -Model-making -Conceptual Thinking -Writing Stage 2: -Investigating -Analysis -Sketching -Model-making -Diagramming -Programming -Testing -Studying Stage 3: -Schematic Design -Interpretation -Conclusions -Test models/drawings -Critiques, presentations, feedback -Material investigations -Detailing -Color Testing, proto-typing Stage 4: -Final product -Finished piece -Final presentation -Final project -Portfolio -Final model

After observing the various architecture studios and the data from the surveys I came up with a list of tasks that a design student conducts while making. Each of these tasks most likely repeated many times and can break into other stages. Each task can be broken down into other tasks. In a way, creating art is an art form and practice of skill in itself. Each process is complicated and the complexity is what feeds the designer. During the design process there is structure, which is reinforced by planning and thinking about the steps ahead. If the physical environment supports how actions flow from one to another, the process benefits design.

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Herman Hertzberger “Lesson for Students in Architecture” Design of Social Interactive Spaces This book looks at the relationship of space treatments by means of territory zoning, the in-between space, the street, and form interpretation. Territory zoning is defined as the way in which a user claims the space as his or her own. Techniques of building territory zoning include creating public workstations, introducing inhabitants, providing shade and a view. Allowing a space to have multiple functions encourages people to declare a space as their own. The in-between space allows for people to become territorial and to claim public space for their use. The in-between space provides for transitional needs, one example being a lobby that can change into an assembly area. Interesting ways one can establish an in-between space are built-in seating in the walls, skylights to remind one of the outside, weather and light, and providing screening to create privacy. Many cultures enjoy the energy of the street, so they allow for their front steps to be their living room at certain times of the day. This provides a place where people can communicate and interact with their neighbors and community. It is important that the spaces near the street create a sense of intimacy, but are not too close to vehicular traffic and danger. Ways to provide a view and interaction with the street include balconies, which allow for the user to hover over the road without being too close to the action. Within my chosen site along Huntington Avenue, there are opportunities to be united with the street, but separated from harm.

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Importantly, activity close to the street includes noise pollution, air pollution, and lack of privacy. A balcony also allows people to get the best of both worlds, visibility, view, light, and liveliness. I will apply these guidelines to my design project located within a Boston urban environment.

Observing the writings of Herman Hertzberger in Lesson for Students in Architecture allowed me to investigate the power of flexible space in a school environment. Also, outdoor space and balconies create a connection to the street edge. The adaptable assembly space expressed in Herman Hertzberger’s examples provided the starting point for my idea of creating an adaptable studio space for the different disciplines at MassArt. This would be a flexible space that could be changed to adapt to the needs of the student.


Adaptable Assembly Space -Througout the day the space can transform into many functions and adapt to the users preference. -Seating and balconies are provided for views into the space. -Natural light streams into the core of the space.

images from Hertzberger, Herman. Lessons for Students in Architecture. Ratterdam: Uitgeveri, 010 Publishers, 1991.

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Andy Warhol’s New York City Factory: Workspace and art studio

Andy Warhol is one of the most inspirational American artists, known for creating “Pop Art” and a leader in the visual art movement throughout the 1960’s and early 1970’s. He created his best work in his famous factory, located in Manhattan, NYC. Warhol used many media in his work, including print-making, painting, photography, sculpture, film, music and drawing. “The Factory” was a dingy, old, abandoned factory shell that Andy Warhol transformed into an artists’ studio. The same space which he used for work was also a hang out area for celebrities and artists. The factory was equipped with a lot of open floor and wall space to allow Warhol and his helpers to work on multiple pieces at a time. His work was displayed throughout the studio. The factory space inspired Warhol to produce innovative and creative work which has been an influence on many artists all over the world. He not only produced many famous works of art within The Factory, but did it in a quick and efficient manner, spawning pop and commercial art for consumption by the masses.

http://atinyrocket.blogspot.com/2010/08/andy-warhols-factory-people.html

Factory Spacial Factors: -Open Space -Artist Interaction within the studio -Multiple Pin-up Space Opportunity -Places to Relax -Gallery Space for guests as a community space within the studios -Personalization- ability to build temporary walls, relocate art, and re-make space at will

http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/the-factory?before=1342561630


http://atinyrocket.blogspot.com/2010/08/andy-warhols-factory-people.html

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After reviewing literature of “Lessons for Architecture Students� by Herman Hertzberger, I created a summary of important studio aspects and spaces. To develop the ideas further, I sketched out various diagrams, using and challenging these ideas, as preliminary conceptual thinking for my project.

Studio Culture

Studio culture is the atmosphere that the school and students construct through use and interaction. When students spend more time in studio, their designs are nurtured by and in dialogue with the studio environment. When students and faculty develop a relationship, it makes the studio a delightful workspace. In addition to interaction among students, the way in which studio is arranged may influence its culture. When the studios are built on an open plan, this allows students to view their peers at work. Also, students will be encouraged to travel through the other spaces, which can generate more conversations. When studio is the place where designers are most inspired and motivated, and have opportunity for collaboration, it becomes an interactive studio environment.

Gathering Spaces

A gathering space is a place for interaction and creative conversation. Placement and layout reflects the use of the gathering space. To welcome all users, the space must be along the path of circulation for spontaneous interaction. Each major should be equally distant from the gathering area. The assembly space must be large enough for people to gather comfortably for a longer periods of time. When the space is used frequently, it brings a sense of liveliness and a community. To make congregation space extraordinary, it should be warmed by natural light and carry views of the urban environment. 32

Community Spaces

Similar to a gathering space, the community space provides a place for congregation and interaction. A community space is more open to the public than the interior gathering spaces. A space designed for civic use is most successful when private use and public access are related spatially. A pedestrian will enter the space when given options to walk through and stop to rest. Certain components that will help draw in pedestrians are clear views into the spaces, shielding from solar glare, seating, noise barriers, and escape from the busy streets of a city. To create a flow of traffic, the community space may have layers and be broken into nodes. If someone would like to sit alone to work in private, there is a space for him or her. If a person is in a rush and walking through, there is a path for him or her. If a group of people want to collect and conference while enjoying the outside, there is a space for them. Within an urban block, outdoor community space is tight; a way to provide space for all passers-by is to make them multi-functional, and flexible to transformation according to the desires of the users.

information derived fromHertzberger, Herman. Lessons for Students in Architecture. Rotterdam: Uitgeveri, 010 Publishers, 1991.


Spatial Digrams:

Interlocking Space Diagram: -Shared Spaces -Studio, community, and work space bleed into each other to promote interaction

Community Core Diagram: -Community space in the middle for all students -Shared studio spaces connected to community space, storage, and work space

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Spiraling Space Diagram: -Space radiates from central axis -Each studio space is adjacent to a community space

Central Gallery Space Diagram: -Gallery in the middle with views to inside of studio -Display MassArt students work for outsiders

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Central Atrium Space Diagram: -Open atrium space in the middle of the building -Allows views to studio spaces, and areas to display work in lobby below -Bring in sunlight to lower levels

Central Kitchen Space Diagram: -Kitchen is the main focus of the studio, everyone gathers to talk or work together -A lot of people enjoy spending time in the kitchen, people feel relaxed in this environment

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Conclusions: Each program has a specific needs, using the analysis from the breakdown of the design process, text research, and diagram studies can help provide solutions to meet all the users needs. These studies will set me up for the conceptual stage of the design process.

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4

Reaction to the research and investigations


Vision of the Building + Interdisciplinary Interaction Concept Sketches + Models


Vision of the building: The Studios at MassArt Through sketching in 2D and 3D, the work progressed toward developing strategies for relating the internal studio environment to community spaces. It also offers similar spatial relationships to the public at large. The goal for the impact of the building is a hub for the artist community. With its proximity to the street edge, the building will engage the interest of the neighborhood and the many students passing by. The public gathering spaces would provide a space for collaboration of ideas and events. The street level exhibition conceived as an avenue of gallery and fabrication studios offering the opportunity for social meetings and to show and encourage public dialogue. Above the busy streets of Huntington Avenue and Louis Prang, the studios could showcase the design process. At night, the studios would glow and brighten the paths leading to local museums, schools, and dormitories. Reflecting the philosophy of MassArt, the building would have a modern appeal and stand out among the other institutes in the neighborhood.

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Interdisciplinary Interaction MassArt has multiple disciplines that share studio space, exhibition space, and fabrication labs. Many of the programs have skills and needs that complement each other. When programs are separated, it makes the opportunity for interaction and spreading ideas less likely. After conducting surveys and interviews, feedback from students showed an interest in mixing different disciplinary programs. The graduate programs have small class sizes, so interaction within each department is frequent and consistent. However, not having class with students in other programs limits the possibilities of conversation and collaboration. If students had shared studio spaces with other programs and majors, it would break this boundary. Each artist possesses a set of skills that may relate to other disciplines at MassArt. For example, a sculptor may understand techniques of fabricating a piece that may be useful for a Dynamic Media Institute (DMI) student. DMI students use a collection of media including audio and visual components to create art. The DMI student would need to spend time learning the appropriate methods of using tools and materials. The sculpture student might show the DMI student specific methods helpful to his or her project. Improving upon the skill set of each student would make him or her a multi-faceted designer and artist. Having a broader perspective on creating and making will allow each student to have a richer skill set upon leaving school. Mixing skill sets and knowledge among programs and students will benefit the individuals involved, as well as the school. Students of diverse disciplines working together will maximize the potential for artistic production within the college, with the additional benefits of having a


great positive impact on the design community, as well as bring more recognition to MassArt. Collaboration of designers will bring a sense of camaraderie with MassArt and help promote this culture to the surrounding neighborhood. Providing flexible space that can be personalized, adjacent to the different shops and fabrication studios, can encourage visibility, and anticipated interaction and collaboration.

views to city + art community

access to exterior from studios

Perforated street relationship

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studio spaces are framed and displayed for the artist neighborhood to get an insight on their makings

Concept Sketches

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studio spaces are hung on shelves elevated to bring in sunlight and air ventilation


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core addresses exterior to street

concept model: studios as modules

core as interactive and flexible interior use

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Lofted Studio Plan

The diagrams demonstrate the different layout arrangements a lofted space could provide an art student.

Studio Diagram

Lofted Studio Section

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Building form model studies: The goal is to build interior and exterior spaces at multiple vertical levels

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5

Connecting to similar building precedents


University of Michigan Art + Architecture Building University of Washington Gould Hall Cambridge, MA MIT Media Lab Brown University The Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts Goucher College, Baltimore MD Athenaeum Julliard School of Music, NYC Allice Tully Hall


south facade perspective

University of Michigan Art + Architecture Building The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP

Transparency through envelope

personal sketch

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images from http://www.millerhull.com/html/inprogress/michigan.htm


Wall Detail

studio perspective

-Transparent envelope and thin exposed structure -Views into studios and crit. spaces -Interaction between student and faculty within the framed spaces -Acts as a front door for the school and welcomes outsiders to the program

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view of main building core overlooking lobby

University of Washington Gould Hall Architect Gene Zema & Professor Daniel Streissguth Transparency to the central core personal sketch

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http://thetam.blogspot.com/2007/01/gould-hall-uw-architecture-school.html


view of main stairway and surrounding studios

-Cascading staircase crossing over Assembly hall and gathering core. -Central Atrium constructed of reinforced cast-in-place concrete. -Combination of major program elements for the school including library, digital commons, shop, visual resources collection, classrooms, and the dean’s office.

http://arch.be.washington.edu/school/facilities

open to Assembly Space below

Gould Hall Fourth Floor Plan

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image derived from : http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/portfolio/archives/1006MIT_Media_Lab/slide.asp?slide=8

view of exhibtion space

Cambridge, MA MIT Media Lab Maki and Associates, Leers Weinzapfel Associates Transparency to an internal core on the exterior wall

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personal sketch


view overlooking lobby and balcony spaces

-Overlooking studios and media labs -Circulation paths cut through activity -Natural light and views penetrating building http://edwardlifson.blogspot.com/2010/03/maki-magnificent-at-mit.html

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view of main entry

Brown University The Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts Diller Scofidio + Renfro inter-relationship through shifted horizontal planes of internal studio and performance spaces 52

personal sketch


-Encourages Interdisciplinary collaboration between creative disciplines. -Half levels split the adjacent spaces to peer views into performing studios. -Stairs connect all level and act as a gathering space for interaction.

view of performance studio space view of shifted level planes

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/Building_types_study/universities/2011/images/Granoff-Center-7.jpg

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view of south facade peering into library

Goucher College, Baltimore MD Athenaeum Nicholas Garrison Visibility from exterior, and internal access provides view to assembly. This core bordered by public uses

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personal sketch


view into mixed-use lobby space including assembly area, library, classrooms, cafe, and seating areas

-Brings in natural light into to main open spaces though skylights and clerestories. -Mix of major program elements with additional private study areas. -Flexible Assembly and lobby space for many functions. http://www.rmf.com/markets/project.aspx?PID=7

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view of main entry

Julliard School of Music, NYC Allice Tully Hall Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Building opens up to urban public edge

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personal sketch


view of street edge looking into cafe

-Peels up its facade to reveal stage to the busy pedestrian path. -Providing seating for the public to view performances. -Connecting community to performers http://www.architravel.com/files/buldingsImages/bulding181/Alice%20Tully%20Hall_2.jpg

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6

The making of a public art institute for the Commonwealth


History of MassArt: A School about Making and Engaging with the Community MassArt Building Time line Drawing Act of 1870 Existing Conditions at MassArt: Disconnection to the Shops and lack of Transparency within the studios


Beacon Street

Sketches of the evolution of the buildings of Massachusetts College of Art& Design. The shifting of the school buildings demonstrates MassArt’s transformation to a modern building style and reflection of the development of the neighborhood.

621 Huntington Avenue

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600 Rear Huntington Avenue

Information derived from Massachusetts College of Art & Design Library archives

Huntington Avenue


History of MassArt: A School about Making and Engaging with the Community

Because I am designing for the MassArt context, I was interested in the history of the schools evolution. The philosophy of MassArt from its inception was to educate the public in drawing. In the 1860’s, the Massachusetts Legislature issued a law stating that all people of the Commonwealth must have the right to learn to draw and also mandated public instruction in drawing across the state. Known as the Drawing Act of 1870, the legislation and extraordinary concept of rights gave birth to the state-funded Massachusetts College of Art The Drawing Act generated significant interest in art across the Commonwealth, as well as in the city of Boston itself, where the art-making became a more important part of our local society and culture. Starting with its first building on Newbury Street in Boston, MassArt ultimately landed at its current site along Huntington Avenue just up the street from the Museum of Fine Arts. Nearby are Wentworth Institute of Technology, Northeastern University, and two world-renowned Museums, the MFA and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. The one-mile radius around the MassArt campus is filled with a number of noteworthy resources for design local universities and museums as well as libraries and archives housing information on art and design. The Drawing Act and subsequent evolution of Massachusetts College of Art & Design supported the development of all the art institutes in the area that have had a major impact on the art world. The history of the various buildings that have comprised, MassArt is also an appealing story of transformation and growth: known as the ‘Normal School’, MassArt’s first house on Newbury Street was a building with a prominent brown stone bay facade.

This building was succeeded by a larger warehouse on Longwood Avenue in the Medical District. Brick was the main material also existing in its third home in the Kennedy Building. The purchase of the Tower Building (which was formally Boston State College) was a change of style moving into a modernist design. The building’s character and style is dramatically different from the previous buildings of the school. Built in the late 1970’s it has a more modern look and dominates the street edge along Huntington Avenue rising 13 stories. Despite its impressive presence, there are many problems with this structure and layout. However typical of a creative attitude, students and faculty have used some of these layout flaws to their advantage. The school is packed with many pockets of irregular shaped spaces in the hallways and lobbies of the Tower Building. These accidental spaces function as gallery spaces, exhibition spaces, and installation spaces. The frequent reminder of these “art pockets” are a powerful reminder of who we are and what we do with our creativity. In 2012, MassArt opened a large dormitory erected across the street from the Tower Building. With footprint restraints of the passing sewer pipelines below, the building had to rise twenty-two stories. The new building towers over its surrounding neighbors and makes a significant change in the skyline. It stands out in the neighborhood and the city with bright metal cladding of orange and brown with lime green highlights in some of the fenestration.

Information derived from: http://inside.massart.edu/library/about_the_library/history.html

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History of MassArt derived from: http://inside.massart.edu/Academic_Resources/Academic_Catalog_2012-2013/About_MassArt/History_of_MassArt.html


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Existing Conditions at MassArt: Disconnection between shop environment and studios Even with a strong creative ethos at its core,

the graduate studios and buildings are not ideal for art and design students. The students and faculty have developed creative ways to adapt to the spaces as best as possible by using the hallways, smaller conference spaces, and in-between areas to house critiques and display work. Below, each of the program’s current constraints are described. These set the stage for their resolution in the programming and design chapters that follow. The existing architectural graduate studios are set within an odd shaped floor plan, dividing the personal work spaces into uneven forms. The Master’s of Fine Arts studios are organized in a long rows blanketed by out-dated, fire proof curtains hiding all work and view. The spaces are separated by non load-bearing partitions from floor to ceiling, giving each student approximately an 8’x8’ pocket. The spaces have enough room to personalize to a great degree, bringing individuality to the plain white walls. The MFA studios are pulled from the outer wall, losing the opportunity to absorb southern light to overlook the busy context of Huntington Avenue. Some students may enjoy such privacy in the cubicles with the curtains pulled shut, but it is difficult to see these as positive work spaces. Indeed, many of the MFA studios are used for storage only. The Dynamic Media Institute (DMI) studios populate a corner of the Tower Building. The space opens up to a large work area shared by a half a dozen students. The open area is draped with the students’ work, personal tools, and equipment.

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This section of the graduate students gives a clear insight in the makings and interest of the students. While working for the MassArt graduate admissions office, one of my duties is to give tours to prospective students. When guiding these students through the graduate studios, their reaction to the open DMI studios is much more positive in comparison to their reactions to MFA studios. In the DMI studios, these students are able to experience a richer studio atmosphere and culture by having opportunities to view their fellow students at work. Behind the curtains of the MFA studios, many beautiful student pieces are hidden from view. Continuing down the hall from the DMI studios, one enters the Architecture program: architecture studios maintain the open plan layout from DMI but are separated by half-wall partitions repeating down the north side of the building. Hugging the edge of the exterior rim brings in a good natural light source into the personal work spaces. The architecture studios lead into a triangular dead end filled with desks, faculty offices, and storage closets. Shared between the DMI and Architecture studios is a flex space, arranged with walls for pin-up. This open area is filled with old models and projects, as well as recycled couches. It is less than adequate as a space for hosting critiques and class gatherings. In between the MFA and Architecture studios is a fabrication lab equipped with many tools for making and building. The space has a window looking out into the main circulation path, framing the workers inside. For most people passing by, it attracts attention by offering a view of the students at work. On the other side, the student at work is not distracted by the extra attention because of the interior noise and focus on


the task at hand. Students more typically work in the darkroom or specialized shops to produce their work. Due to the lack of ventilation caused by non-operable windows and no proper HVAC system, the space can be dangerous; over-exposure to hazardous pores developing in the air can be a major problem with this set-up. Storage and trash removal areas are located in the spaces at the edges of the student work, exhibition, and lab areas. Since these two utility areas are inadequate with respect to size and placement, they will interfere over time with circulation paths, installation space, and personal work spaces. Art students produce an amount of waste when making; thus, having efficient disposal and storage facilities is essential. With the current lack of flexibility there are no areas for paint sinks and hazardous waste removal spots for painting students. The graduate painting department is in a separate building, disassociated from the graduate student studios. The painting and photography studios are located in the Kennedy Building, which shares similar spatial incompetencies. The painting studios are open plan, separated by moveable partition walls. This unorganized set of spaces makes it difficult for students to store their belongings and materials, disrupting circulation and access paths. The spaces within the Tower and Kennedy Building lack temperature and air control, making the micro-climate uncomfortable during all seasons. The students fill the spaces and adapt to these inefficiencies, but the lack of interaction and collaboration can be easily blamed on the existing conditions and closed layout of the studios and facilities. A flexible layout for the studios would enhance the interaction and increase shared experience of its students and faculty. This would develop a stronger link between the various consistencies of the broader art community.

plan diagram

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7

Observing the impact of the site and neighborhood


Site Analysis Site History Site Sketches + Photos Site Maps + Models Sustainable Strategies


Site Analysis In a layered urban environment surrounded by art institutes and design schools that offer the potential for interaction and idea exchange, MassArt shares program resources through the College of the Fenway; these include libraries, student center, gym facilities, and gathering space. My site is within the heart of this design community. Fenway is an evolving neighborhood with tremendous potential. Even though each university within the area shares resources, a working collaboration is nearly absent. Each institute is separate and there is no common space for students to come together and shar their knowledge of design and to create an opportunity to work together. The goal of my design is to create a house of collaboration, interaction, and creativity. I chose my site to be located along the corner of Huntington Avenue and Louis Prang Street. This site is surrounded by a rich context of student housing, museums, green spaces, ball fields, and art and design campuses. Thousands of people come from all over the world to visit the Museum of Fine Arts, Gardner Museum, and take courses at Northeastern University, Wentworth Institute of Technology, MassArt, and The Museum School. This is a perfect location for students, artists, designers, and creators of many kinds to live together, work together, and inspire each one another. Bringing the groups together has powerful implications for the schools and the public. The site I chose has gone through many changes over the years. Originally, it was a gas station. The gas station felt out of place, surrounded by brownstone buildings. Physically, the station represented a break in an otherwise continuous street façade. A couple years later the lot was purchased by Wentworth. The site was cleared and reappeared as a small green space. That green space exists 64

today; it is a 40,000 square-foot triangular lot fenced in from the sidewalk along Huntington Avenue. This garden has two short paths, curving into the sidewalk from a quieter side road Louis Prang Street. Though disappointed by the minimally designed new green space, it was an improvement over a lackluster gas station. I felt the space should have been opened to its surroundings to allow for more movement within for pedestrians passing by. The space is also adjacent to Evans Way Park, which is a block from the site. This park is surrounded by the WIT dormitory, MassArt, and The Gardner Museum. Evans Way Park attracts people congregating on its benches or along the grassy spaces under a canopy of trees. The space is comfortable and open on all its edges, and people feel welcome to pass through. The paths cutting through Evans way Park lead to the Fens; a larger city park. The Fens is an urban park providing sports fields, ponds, and gardens with many winding trails. The Fens creates a separation and respite from the noisy streets of the Fenway neighborhood. My goal for my site is to connect it to the neighborhood, Huntington Avenue “The Avenue of the Arts�/Huntington Avenue and to follow the street continuity.


map derived from: Google Earth

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Fenway Area 1838

SITE

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map from: http://runningahospital. blogspot.com/2012/10/fenway-and-longwood-1838-and-2012.html


Fenway Area 2012

SITE

The Fenway Area has gone through a strong transformation in development from the beginning settlement; from landfills over the water ways to fill the spaces with residential housing, art institutes, colleges, commercial buildings, roadways, and pedestrians paths.


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section analysis

section analysis

section analysis analysis section

Program surrounding core

site analysis

site analysis analysis site

Display Shelves Section Sketch

Context Sketch

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Site Photos

point of vision

view from center of site, looking toward the corner of Louis Prang and Huntington Avenue

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North view looking across site toward firestation along Huntington Avenue


The views of the site and the surrounding area are shown in the two panoramic views. The views reveal the context of this urban neighborhood. The site’s faces a high traffic street edge along Huntington Avenue. The site also faces a Wentworth Dormitory with college students at multiple levels and pedestrians. At the street The form and location allows for many opportunities to enhance the use for the people visiting and living in the district. The site is now a quiet green space rarely used because to it’s closeness to the street, and Evans Way parks.

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Sketch models reacting to site context and triangular form

72


GoogleEarth


Initial Concept Models to develop facade permeability

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Map indicating building heights adjacent to the site

proposed

GoogleEarth

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Sustainable Strategies: Climate Investigations

Wall Section from: http://swfsc.noaa.gov/textblock.aspx?id=17431

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Diagrams from: http://designcoalition.org/ kids/energyhouse/sunpaths.htm


Indicated by the summer wind rose the strongest breezes are blocked by the adjacent buildings creating a wind barrier for the site. The wind is channeled along Huntington Avenue creating an opportunity for natural ventilation along the southern side of the building. Trees are planted along the northwest side to act as a natural barrier. The prevailing winds indicated in the winter wind rose are coldest along the northeast side of the building in my proposal. The main entrance of the building is on the southwest side preventing the winter winds to flow toward the doors making it easier to enter and exit the building and more pleasant to gather outside the entry.

Wind Rose: Summer

SW Winds blocked

proposed entry channeled to corner of site Wind Roses derived from Climate Consultant

Wind Rose: Winter

Coldest Winter Winds

Site Map derived from Google Earth

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Sustainable Site Sketch

78


Sustainable Wall Section Sketch

Main Entrance: Solar and Ventilation Study Section at Level 2 & 3

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8

Programmatic Elements to encourage collaboration


Studio Space Design Criteria Program Details Program Adjacency Matrix Diagramming Program Relationships Program Sketches


desk

STUDIO NEEDS STUDIO SPACE DESIGN CRITERIA

trash removal ARCHITECTURE/INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

-Trash and recycling adjacent -Salvageable materials stored neatly in -Adjustable for Drafting racks and shelves -Drawers for storage for tools -Prevent clutter and waste -Space for model building -Proper disposal of food to prevent -Place for laptop pests PAINTING -Proper disposal of hazardous materials -Space for easel and chemicals -Drawers and shelving for tools and materials -Individual and community trash bins -Messy desk to store paints, brushes, and rags -Clean area for other tools and belongings

SCULPTOR

visibility

-Drawers and shelving for tools and materials -Views to other studios and other -Open space for installation students work -Wet/Dry area -Still provide privacy options with a moveable walls and screens DMI/SIM -security and safety -Desk space for drawing and sketching -Views to your neighbors -Space for audio/video equipment -Views to the other majors -Space for model making -Place for laptop

PHOTOGRAPHY

-Desk space for creative tasks -Drawers and shelving for equipment -Space to display photos -Place for laptop

studio culture

-Students should make an effort to work in studio frequently -Meet and greet fellow students -Give classmates advice and critiques of their work

proper lighting

installation area

pin-up space

storage

-Sunlight -Task light -Ceiling lights

-Blank wall to put up work and inspiration -Shelving to display models and work -Help inspire yourself and others

80

-For large and small projects -Open floor space and tables -Encourage interaction with other students

fabrication lab

-Wood and metal shop -Proper machinery -Well lit and ventilated -Hand tools and equipment available -Kept clean, machine work properly and in the proper place -Large enough space for multiple students to use at the same time

gallery space

-Exhibition space for to pin-up work -Space for presentations and shows, formal or casual -Visible and open to school and public -Proper lighting, track lighting -High ceilings

community area -Comfortable and adjacent to studio spaces -Proper seating options and tables -In between main spaces -Properly placed away from personal spaces due to noise -Views to outside and nature -Relaxing colors -Place to eat or read

kitchen

-Place to store and cook food -Sink, refrigerator, stove, microwave, coffee pot, cabinets, trash can, dish-Tool and machine storage -work storage using racks, shelves, bins, washer, cleaning materials drawers, and closets -material storage for new and recycled

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Based on current and projected student bodies in the graduate desk program at MassArt, equipment requirements for each department, specialized ARCHITECTURE/INDUSTRIAL and data from research and site analysis, the following programDESIG was developed. spaces -Adjustable for Drafting -Drawers for storage for tools DARK ROOM -Space for model building -For-Place movie, audio, photography for laptop production PAINTING

-Space for easel COMPUTER LAB -Drawers and shelving for tools and mate -Equipped with programs needed for -Messy desk to store paints, brushes, and each major -Clean area for other tools and belongin

SCULPTOR AUDIO STUDIO -Drawers and shelving for tools and mate -Proper equipment -Open space for installation -Sound proof walls and floors -Wet/Dry area DMI/SIM PAINT SINKS AND DRAINAGE for drawing and sketching -For-Desk chemical disposal space and clean up -Space for audio/video equipment -Space for model making SPRAY ROOM -Place for laptop -proper set up and ventilation PHOTOGRAPHY

DRY-Desk AND WET AREA space for creative tasks -Drawers and shelving for equipment OUTDOOR SPACE -Space to display photos -Patio -Place for laptop -Place to smoke -Deck -Balcony -Green space -Sunlight -Green roof -Task -Outdoor exhibition light -Ceiling lights -Courtyard -Garden -Place to eat or read

proper lighting

pin-up space

-Blank wall to put up work and inspiration -Shelving to display models and work -Help inspire yourself and others

81


PROGRAM DETAILS: -electrical Entry/Lobby: 3000SF -trash disposal -circulation desk -loading area -seating area Assembly Space Balcony -elevators -gathering areas -stairs -circulation -circulation -grand stair -sign age -railing -mapping Wood shop: 2550SF Exhibition Space/Gallery: -miter saw 2990SF -table saw -partition walls -ban saw -sitting areas -planar -LED lighting -sub-structure to hang pieces -drill press -vices -gathering areas -hand tools -circulation -worktables Assembly Space -waste disposal -stage -chalkboard -seating area -sound/light system-speakers, -material storage -tool storage dimmers -office -circulation -spray booth -podium -air vents/exhausts -projector screen -fabrication area -plug-in outlets -installation space Art Store “Made” Store: -safety equipment 1600SF Metal shop: 2000SF -check-out counter -welding tools/equipment -shelving/display cases -worktables -lounge area -angle finders/levels -track lighting -sub-structure to hang pieces -bead rollers/roller forming -brakes and shears -signage -grinders and polishers -check-out line -ironworkers and presses -art supplies -shaping station -books -materials made by students -punches and drill presses -cold saws Mechanical: 3000SF -band saws -HVAC -manuel benders -boiler -safety equipment -plumbing

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Café: 2100SF -display/serving counter -cash register -kitchen -seating area -cooking equipment -refreshment stand -rest rooms Painting Studios: 3050SF -easel -paint sink -tool box -table and chairs -gallery space -gathering space -kitchen -hazardous waste disposal -air vent -track lighting -shelving -equipment storage -exhibition space -rest rooms Photography Studios: 2350SF -adjustable desk/chairs -pin-up space -dark room -equipment storage -equipment rental -track lighting: warm/cold lights -photo stand -gallery space -gathering space -exhibition space -shelving -digital lounge

Sculpture Studios: Architecture Studios: 3000SF 3200SF -wet/dry areas -drafting table/ -sinks adjustable desk -material/equipment -table/chairs: storage place for laptop -gallery space -pin-up space -track lighting -shelving -pedestals -material/equipment -gathering space storage -exhibition space -model making table -shelving -gallery/exhibition -digital lounge space -rest rooms -digital lounge -installation space -gathering space -desk/chairs -toolbox -waste disposal -rest rooms -air vent -waste disposal -toolbox Art Ed Classroom: DMI Studios: 3200SF 1040SF -sound/audio room -desks/chairs -visual room/equipment -teacher lounge -material/equipment -gallery/exhibition storage space -gallery space -filing cabinets -track lighting -shelving -gathering space -material/ -exhibition space equipment storage -shelving -digital lounge -desk/chairs -gathering space -digital lounge -rest rooms -installation space -waste disposal -rest rooms Public Space: 2000SF -waste disposal -seating -toolbox -open space Outdoor space: 2000SF -trees/vegetation -balconies -sunlight/shade -patio space -adjacent to -exterior decks/space pedestrian path -grass/paving -lighting


Within this study I have listed all the shops, fabrication studios, public space, and exhibition space that each program would need to perform. Based on the 1. surveys and interviews 2. studio tours 3. precedents studies I compiled the matrix to get an understanding of the needs of each major. Arranging the studios adjacent to each of the shops creates efficient working environment. The needs of the students are met and can be a tool and resource for collaboration and interaction. This is a base for configuring the studio spaces.

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A.

B.

C.

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Diagramming Program Relationships A. The adjacency of certain program elements influences the atmosphere of the building. The Graduate Studios Building includes an assembly space, student center, and gallery spaces; these spaces share visual and formal association to enhance the user’s experience. The philosophy of the design is to promote interdisciplinary interaction by sharing work spaces and common areas. Each graduate program at MassArt has a required list of spaces that are needed to produce work. The studio spaces border the major shops they use in common, linking the uses of each programs together. The proximity of the students’ personal work spaces and the joining fabrication studios make the work environment efficient and enjoyable. B. The shops rise up to two to three story cores, stacked with the students’ studios encasing the common work areas. The lofted studios along the shops are open to bring in natural light, streaming to the tiered balcony spaces. The energy of the students working produces a lively atmosphere for visitors and graduate students. C. The circulation avenue is a path for the public to move through the building and get a glimpse of the workings of the school. The circulation path flows next to the artist studios, assembly halls, gallery spaces, and model shops. The interior relationships of views and interaction spill to the outside to and the street level. Thus, the action and movement inside is projected to the outside. The circulation avenue bleeds into the open shops, projecting out over the lower spaces. D. The assembly hall hugs the triangular corner of Huntington Avenue and Louis Prang Street. The direction of the pedestrians approaching the building hits the sharp angle of the assembly space. This privileged perspective creates a window looking into the space; during presentations, the space lights up the corner like a pointed lantern. Being close to the high


D. traffic of pedestrians would be a useful resource to endorse events for visiting artists, artist shows, and lectures. The assembly space jumps up two stories, revealed by a curtain wall system wrapping around the bend of the structure. The space can transform from formal events to open exhibition shows by the addition and removal of spatial arrangements. The studio spaces pop out into the lofted area over the assembly hall, viewed from the lower exhibition and exterior pedestrian path. E. The student center and cafe is elevated at the uppermost level of the building. The circulation avenue leads the community and student population vertically. The stream of moving people winds through the art-making of the graduate studios and culminates at the common student center and gathering space. The passage of people is similar to that of a museum and gallery show, with viewers cycling through. The student center sits at the top of the structure, overlooking the urban neighborhood. The open space is divided by the column grid which delineates uses allocated as lounge spaces, study areas, gathering spaces, and cafĂŠ. The spaces brings together an array of students from MassArt and the nearby universities, as well as faculty members and the public. The lofted volume sitting at the top provides an area for MassArt students to escape from the stresses of studio and the busy shops. A place to get a bite to eat and a cup of coffee is essential with the many hours at school and during finals and reviews.

E.

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Program Section Sketch

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Within this diagram the transparent rectangles illustrate the intertwining and overlapping of spaces. When the forms intersect the open space is sectioned into smaller spaces.

Spatial Relationships Diagram

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Thesis Book_Mark Riemitis_Part One  

Showcasing Designers at Work

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