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LUPANDINA, MARIYA UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO Selected Works (2013-2018)


WEBSITE

lupandinamariya.cargocollective.com

PHONE

+1(857)389-9467

EMAIL

MARIYA LUPANDINA Recent graduate, with more than a year of work experience, searching for an entry level designer position. Interested in sustainable coastal development, integrating indigenous ecology within the urban context, and the design of temporal architecture to meet the needs of displaced populations.

lupandina.mariya@gmail.com

EDUCATION NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 2018

GPA 3.89 University Scholars Program, Full-tuition scholarship Honors Program, Deans List, Huntington 100 Recipient Faculty Design Award Recipient, 2017; Mardges Bacon Book Award, 2018; Alpha Rho Chi Medal, 2018; Northeastern School of Architecture Portfolio Prize Finalist, 2018. CAMD Scholarly and Creative Achievement Award, 2018.

EXPERIENCE TEACHING ASSISTANT Spring 2018

Assisted an advanced graphic representation class; provided software support for Rhino and Adobe Creative Suite and taught tutorials.

INTERN Jan - August 2018

Worked on a master planning project for the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, this project focused on improving the museum’s workplace, collection storage, and public amenities; learned Revit and improved Adobe Creative Suite and Sketch Up skills.

INTERN Jan - July 2016

Contributed to multiple residential projects; completed design drawing sets, renderings, and 3D models; produced material for meetings with the city and with clients; visited construction sites; improved skills with AutoCAD, Photoshop, and Sketchup.

PROJECT MANAGER Summer 2014,

Coordinated an elementary school nutrition program for a local NGO; focused on branding and accessibility; designed and generated content for the program’s curriculum guide; designed the program’s website using Wordpress.

DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT Jan. - May 2015

Worked for the college’s marketing department; engaged the university’s audience through multiple digital media channels; produced graphics for college purposes; drafted copy for the college’s website.

Northeastern University Boston, USA

Ann Beha Architects Boston, USA

Peters und Wormuth Architekten Berlin, Germany 2015 Daily Bread Project Ottawa, Canada

Northeastern University, CAMD

RESEARCH ETC. BSA SYRIA INITIATIVE May 2017 -

Assisting the production of a publication that documents the construction process of a playground in a Syrian refugee camp in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon; the intent of the publication is to advertise the project’s progress while developing a resource that would aid the easy reproduction of the project in other locations.

THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT: INDIGO Sept. 2013 - Present

Working with a group of Northeastern students to advocate for the value of inclusive design in Boston’s playgrounds; developing a scorecard to quantify the quality and inclusivity of playgrounds; working with Boston’s Parks and Recreation Department to implement inclusive design strategies.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT 2014 - 2016 Harvard University, GSD

Assisted doctoral candidate with research on Soviet Architecture between 1918-1932; translated primary documents and synthesized information.

SCHOLARS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH GRANT 2014

Studied and catalogued urban spaces in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo; created a film and supporting booklet to explore the changing quality of public spaces, as private places become increasingly fortified.

LANGUAGES

SKILLS

English - Fluent Russian - Fluent French - Proficient German - Competent

Acrobat AutoCAD ArcGIS Illustrator InDesign

Present Boston Society of Architecture

Northeastern University

Northeastern University, Brazil

Maxwell MS Suite Premiere Photoshop Revit

Rhinoceros 3D SketchUp V-Ray Watercolor Wordpress


DAN ADAMS Northeastern University, Professor Position: Director, School of Architecture Phone: 617-373-4637 E-mail: da.adams@northeastern.edu

NILS PETERS Peters und Wormuth Architekten, Previous Employer Position: Project Architect Phone: 617-226-1628 E-mail: jm@annbeha.com

JACQUELINE MOSSMAN Ann Beha Architects, Previous Employer Position: Project Architect Phone: 617-226-1628 E-mail: jm@annbeha.com

SAM CHOI

Northeastern University, Professor Position: Associate Professor, School of Architecture Phone: (857) 756-3504 E-mail: sa.choi@northeastern.edu

REFERENCES


The following pages include a selection of my favorite projects from my time as an undergraduate architecture student. Thank you for taking the time to look through them.


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10 Architecture to Promote Animal Habitat / Fall 2016

28 Work Experience / Spring 2016 & 2017

44 Speculative Innovation Building / Fall 2017

54 Fort Point Node / Spring 2018

72 Olmsted & The Emerald Necklace / Summer 2017

80 Other Projects

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT / FALL 2016 The project began with research and field work on the topic of urban bird habits in East Boston. It ended as a master plan designed to support bird habitats. In this case, birds are an indicator of conditions suitable to support an ecosystem. Birds are the optimal indicator because their presence is relatively easy to detect.

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

The above map represents three walks through East Boston. Noted are bird sightings, their species, and a rough estimate of how many birds there were. From this, I postulate some reasons for the location of clusters and the diversity of species. My hypotheses are based on my readings of Richard Forman and others, as well as my own deductive reasoning. For example, where there is bread there will be birds.

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BIRD SIGHTINGS


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

500’

walking trajectory

range of domestic animal disturbance

land use boundaries

noise disturbance

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

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snowy egrets

wild turkey

snowy egrets, a gray heron, & a double-crested cormorant

sparrow

BIRD SIGHTINGS


feral pigeon

common gull (teenager)

european starlings

URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

european starlings

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

The master plan proposes to transform paved parking into a saltwater tidal marsh with buildings and amenities (i.e. a splash pad) standing on stilts above the landscape.

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SITE AXON


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

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1. juniperus virginiana 100

2. picea sitchensis

3. pinus strobus

4. quercus rubra 5. castanea mollissima

6. acer rubrum

7. betula nigra 8. salix x pendulina 9. malus sargentii 10. prunus avium

80 60 100

90

80

40

70

50

70

60

20

40

25

20 20

11. lonicera empervirens

100

ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

25

50

12. apios tuberosa

50

13. clematis virginiana

60

40

15. clematis virginiana

14. v. labrusca

30

16. parthenocissus quinquefolia

40

18. fallopia baldschuanica

17. parthenocissus tricuspidata

19. celastrus scandens

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20. parthenocissus tricuspidata

80 60 40 55

55

55

20 20

20

20

6

100

21. vaccinium angustifolium

6

20 6

22. viburnum trilobum

23. ilex verticillata

20

40

6

24. rhus typhina

25. amelanchier canadensis

50

100

80

80

60

60

40

40

20

20 15

12

2 3

12

25

15 12

15

20

27. spartina cynosuroides

26. saccharum ravennae

20

25

50

28. sorghastrum secundum

29. panicum virgatum

6

15

30. phragmites australis subsp. 31. muhlenbergia americanu capillaris

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14

10

10

15

maximum height/diameter (ft.)

These plants were chosen for their resilience. They thrive in dry and wet conditions, and will adapt to change in tidal cycles. Additionally, all of the species are native to New England.

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20

SELECTED PLANT SPECIES

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5


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. foliage (shelter/nesting)

bloom (pollination)

fruit (food source)

aesthetic

Beyond being resilient, these plants provide fundamental support to indigenous animal species and add interest to the architecture. For example, covering a building facade in Porcelain Vines (#20) provides small birds with shelter for nesting in the spring and summer. In the late fall and winter, the vines produce vibrant blue-purple berries, changing the facade’s color from green to a fantastic shade of blue and providing a food source for small animals.

PLANT PEAK PERFORMANCE

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

A

The master plan organizes small townhouses along the southern edge of the site and taller buildings along the north to avoid shading the landscape. Additionally, the tallest buildings are set at the western edge, to block some of the noise from Route 1A. A boardwalk connects all of the buildings.

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SITE PLAN


A

URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

200’

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LONGITUDINAL SECTION (A-A)

ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016 200’

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ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

above landscape vs. within

at level with vs. below canopy

above canopy

in between pots

within pot

within vs. outside vine canopy

room sized pop out

occupiable pop out

french balcony

Although potentially perceived as mundane details, the diagrams above illustrate how plants and plantings can define and control a person’s experience of space. The diagrams highlight possible landscape-building-person interactions.

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LANDSCAPE-BUILDING INTERACTIONS


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

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WITHIN THE MARSH


ARCHITECTURE TO PROMOTE ANIMAL HABITAT

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WITHIN THE ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES CENTER


URBANISM STUDIO / FALL 2016

Architecture can act as scaffolding to support wildlife ecosystems by incorporating birdhouses, nesting platforms, and structures to buttress plant growth. In the process, it could sequester CO2, filter water, and improve an individual’s overall health. Additionally, living within these systems could be a learning opportunity for the residents.

ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES

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WORK EXPERIENCE The pages that follow display a number of projects I contributed to during my co-op terms.

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RHEINPFALZALLEE 9

9 4m

4m

RHEINPFALZALLEE 9 A residential project located in a suburb of Berlin. This design drawing set was completed for a meeting with the client. Design decisions made in collaboration with employer, drawings completed independently.

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SOUTHWEST ELEVATION AND SECTION A-A


CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

4m

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FACADE OPTIONS / SOUTH ELEVATION


RHEINPFALZALLEE 9

A

A

4m

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN


A

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UPPER FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS

CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

A

4m


BRITZERDAMM 5

MICRO APARTMENTS These exterior views were presented at a meeting with the developer of a microapartment project in downtown Berlin. These apartments were designed to house university students and low-income households. Perspectives completed independently.

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RENDERING I


CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

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RENDERING II


20 RUE D’ANJOU

20 rue d’Anjou

MANSARDE In addition to renovating an attic, a client was interested in adding a floor to an apartment building located in the 8th arrondissement. The following drawings were presented to the city to appeal for a variance on the height restriction established by Haussmann. Drawings completed independently.

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LOCUS PLAN


CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

2m

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EAST ELEVATION


20 RUE D’ANJOU

2m

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ATTIC PLAN


CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

2m

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SECTION C - C


20 RUE D’ANJOU

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VISUALIZING THE BUILDING WITH THE ADDITIONAL FLOOR


CO-OP SPRING 2016 / PETERS UND WORMUTH ARCHITEKTEN

2m

From the elevation one can tell that, even with the addition, the building is still lower than those in its immediate surroundings.

SOUTH ELEVATION

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NMAH MASTER PLAN

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY During my eight month co-op at Ann Beha Architects, I spent the majority of my time working on a master plan project for the Smithsonian. The focus of the master plan was to improve collection storage, the workplace, and public amenities. Since the master plan is a federal project, I am not permitted to show any of the design work until the project is complete and published.

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Offices (3)

Dibner Rare Books Library

Stacks

Reading Room

Reading

Storage

Reading

Reading

Reading

Work Room

Satellite Library

Satellite Library

Satellite Library

Satellite Library

NMAH LIBRARY ADJACENCY DIAGRAM

Work Stations (6)

Kitchen/ Copy

CO-OP SPRING 2017 / ANN BEHA ARCHITECTS

Meeting Room

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SPECULATIVE INNOVATION BUILDING / FALL 2017 The following project began with an investigation of the logic behind Juniya Ishigami’s Kanagawa workshop project. In the pages that follow, his strategies are altered and applied to a speculative innovation building designed for a lot in Cambridge, MA. The goals of the project are to define the innovation building typology and to devise a system that achieves flexibility within the building.

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40’

46

UPPER FLOOR PLAN

SPECULATIVE INNOVATION BUILDING


FALL 2017 / OPTION STUDIO

40’

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN


SPECULATIVE INNOVATION BUILDING

Modification of the original Kanagawa structure.

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COLUMN CONFIGURATION


FALL 2017 / OPTION STUDIO

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50 distance from main main circulation

distance from main main circulation

column density

column density

column density

ceiling height

SPECULATIVE INNOVATION BUILDING

platform size

ceiling height

distance from main circulation platfrom size

platfrom size

degree of privacy

DEGREE OF PRIVACY ceiling height


FALL 2017 / OPTION STUDIO

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distance from circulation cores

OFFICE SUITE

INFORMAL MEETING AREA

INFORMAL MEETING AREA

CLASSROOM

KITCHENETTE SPECULATIVE INNOVATION BUILDING

PRIVATE OFFCE MEETING ROOM OFFICE SUITE

INDIVIDUAL SEATING*

WORK SPACE

CAFE KITCHENETTE CLASSROOM MEETING ROOM RESTAURANT* WORK SPACE 3D FABRICATION STUDIO

LAB

WORK SPACE MEETING ROOM OPEN OFFICE CONFERENCE ROOMS

platform size

COMMERCIAL* WOODSHOP

LAB EVENT SPACE DAYCARE LOBBY

GROUP SEATING EXHIBITION SPACE

ceiling height

community

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co-working

office

THE SPECULATIVE PROGRAM’S SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS

column density

GROUP SEATING


Brookings Institution

FALL 2017 / OPTION STUDIO

Cambridge speculative innovation building

The Brookings Institution report on Innovation Spaces is used to tease out the essential qualities of this emerging building typology. One of these characteristics is the organization of space to promote interaction between different types of users.

SOCIAL STRUCTURE

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FORT POINT NODE / SPRING 2018 The next pages include representation of the studio project completed during my final semester. The project aims to provide the Seaport with new public amenities while also developing strategies to “live with water” as sea levels rise and the neighborhood begins to flood at regular intervals. Additionally, the building will provide much needed resources for the neighborhood’s existing artist community. With my studio partner, Katie Reilly.

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FORT POINT NODE

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE THROUGH PLAYSCAPE (A-A)


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

playscape in dry conditions

playscape in wet conditions

PLAYSCAPE FUNCTION AS A WATER RETENTION BASIN

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FORT POINT NODE

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gray water system from roof

porous poured rubber and paving

rain garden at ground level

stair built on top of dirt excavated to form playscape

DETAILS ILLUSTRATING THE PROJECTS CAPACITY TO LIVE WITH WATER


2

B

B 3 1

SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

4

A

A

50’

SITE PLAN AT SUMMER STREET

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60

SITE MODEL

FORT POINT NODE


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

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FORT POINT NODE

The strategy aims to ceremonially connect the elevated Summer St. to Congress St., and to provide a purposeful pedestrian path to and across the site by adapting the historic back of house typology into a mixed-use public space. In this case, when the back alley is not used for loading, it becomes a beer garden.

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE THROUGH COURTYARD (B-B)


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

The project integrates amphitheater seating to physically and visually connect Summer St. to Boston Wharf Rd. Additionally, an exterior passage cuts through the ground level of the building, linking the front and back ends of the site and establishing a secondary pedestriam route between Congress St. and Boston Wharf Rd. This passage is also a setting for exhibting the work produced by the building’s users.

PERSPECTIVE VIEWS (1 & 2)

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FORT POINT NODE

shared/rent ceramics studio space

kiln room

shared/rent ceramics studio space glaze room

kitchenette/ lounge

5

The building’s regular grid structure and large spans allow for a wide variety of spatial layouts and accommodating many different program types, including large open ceramics studios and small robotics workshops.

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TYPICAL PLAN I (5)


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

archive administrative office

conservation lab

object viewing room

archive meeting room

archive archive administrative office

archive administrative office small robots lab

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TYPICAL PLAN II (6)

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FORT POINT NODE

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SOUTHWEST AXONOMETRIC VIEW


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEWS (3 & 4)

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FORT POINT NODE

30’

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SUMMER STREET AND ALLEY ELEVATIONS


SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

The project employs a double skin facade with a concrete thermal mass within the cavity and evacuated tubing on the exterior. This system passively heats the building and supplies the building with domestic hot water.

WALL SECTION

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FORT POINT NODE

The building’s structural and comfort systems are intended to be resilient in the face of climate change and the neighborhood’s changing needs.

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PEEL AWAY AXONOMETRIC


CLT arrangement enables the building systems to run in both directions.

4

Concrete column to CLT connection.

7

Evacuated tubing supplies domestic hot water and provides shading.

8

In the summer, honeycomb inserts between the panes of glass shade the thermal wall to prevent it from overheating.

9

This facade system accommodates multiple facade adaptations. The glazing panels can also be replaced individually, if damaged & as technology advances.

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Concrete beam in between columns provides lateral stability.

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Concrete for the base was chosen for its long lifespan and durability.

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CLT and glulam were chosen for the interior structure because of their carbon sequestering capacity and efficient use of raw resources.

SPRING 2018 / COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

1

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OLMSTED & THE EMERALD NECKLACE An exercise in representing qualitative and quantitative data.

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OLMSTED & THE EMERALD NECKLACE

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FAIRSTED, OLMSTED’S BROOKLINE HOME


REPRESENTATION STUDIO / SUMMER 2017

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OLMSTED & THE EMERALD NECKLACE

“The Riverway required so much work...in the end, almost nothing if its original landscape remained... but the city gained improved sanitation and a great linear park.” “How nice...”

Fredrick Law Olmsted reminiscing at Fairsted, his Brookline home.

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VIGNETTE A


“Do you remember when I decided to put islands in the middle of Levett Pond to provide shelter and seclusion for nesting birds? What a great idea.”

REPRESENTATION STUDIO / SUMMER 2017

“Jamaica Pond is definitely a natural sheet of water, with quiet, graceful shores...it required so little modification...I even kept all of the existing planting.”

“The Back Bay Fens really was mostly a sanitary improvement to clean out the waste dumped by the neighboring mill company.”

VIGNETTES C THROUGH D

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POLICEMEN

7:33 PM

MANY GOLFERS

PEOPLE

ANOTHER PICNIC

ANIMALS

PEOPLE HAVING A PICNIC MANY, MANY RUNNERS

OLMSTED & THE EMERALD NECKLACE

Perkins St. BUNNIES

EXPERIENCED SENSE OF NATURE

TOOK BIKE DOWN STAIRS STOPPED AT A STREET LIGHT

Route 9

VERY SHALLOW WATER

WAY FINDING DIFFICULTY

Brookline Ave.

STOPPED AT A STREETLIGHT STOPPED AT A STREETLIGHT

RIGIDITY OF PARK INFRASTRUCTURE

Intersection of Comm. Ave., I-94, & Fenway Dr.

DIRECTION TRAVELED

BREAK IN PARK SYSTEM

MORE

0

GEESE CROSSING, TRAFFIC STOPPED ARGUING COUPLE

STOPPED AT A STREETLIGHT SWANS VIEW OF STATE HOUSE LESS

The map above describes my bike ride through the Emerald Necklace on a warm afternoon in July.

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Arlington St.

EXPERIENCE MAP

3:18 PM


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HOLE GOLF COURSE

15,000

WOODY PLANTS

2,201,488,000 L IN JAMAICA POND

BALL FIELDS

REPRESENTATION STUDIO / SUMMER 2017

3

80+

UNIQUE PLANT SPECIES

existing

landscaped

# OF WATER BODIES

native

non-native

# OF PLANT SPECIES

nature related

not

# OF FEATURES

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OTHER PROJECTS The following section contains work from several projects that were completed outside of my studies and work experience.

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big rib 250 x 270 cm

small rib

IDeA COMPETITION / WINTER 2017

230 x 116 cm

90 cm dowels 110 cm

cap

30 diameter

rubber stopper

fix dowels to ribs

BERLIN MOBILE MARKET This is a portion of our entry for the 2017 IDeA Competition. To promote the integration of the refugee population in Berlin, we presented a design for a stand that would travel through out the city. The design features a modular system of ribs that can be assembled in a number of ways to suit a variety of activities. Submitted in collaboration with friend and classmate, Isabella Pria.

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point

contained

passage

market stand

axon

IDeA COMPETION / WINTER 2017

section

plan

elevation

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THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT: INDIGO / WINTER 2018

BOSTON PLAYGROUND QUALITY ANALYSIS These maps describe Boston’s playground quality. The maps use data collected via the scorecard developed by The Playground Project: INDIGO and are processed using ArcMap. The map on the left describes an individual’s accessibility to audible play elements. The map on the right describes the percentage of shaded play equipment. The circles delineates a 10 minute walking radius. Maps built in collaboration with TPPI colleague, Monisha Reginald, graphics done independently.

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AVERAGE NUMBER OF AUDIBLE PLAY ELEMENTS


THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT: INDIGO / WINTER 2018

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AVERAGE SHADE SCORES


THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT: INDIGO / WINTER 2018

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edgerly road playground

downer ave. playground

carter playground

monsignor reynolds playground

TPPI COLLECTING DATA


titus sparrow park

marcella playground

deer street park

THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT: INDIGO / WINTER 2018

fallon field playground

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BSA SYRIA INITIATIVE / SUMMER 2017

BSA SYRIA INITIATIVE This documentation was completed for a playground that was built at a Syrian refugee camp in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The intention of this documentation is to show the relationship of the camp to the surrounding area and to highlight how the surrounding settlements could benefit from this new civic space. These maps were made in collaboration with my BSA Syria Initiative colleague, Noora Aljabi.

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REGIONAL MAP


BSA SYRIA INITIATIVE / SUMMER 2017

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SITE


Undergraduate Portfolio, May 2018  

Selected works from my time as an undergraduate architecture student

Undergraduate Portfolio, May 2018  

Selected works from my time as an undergraduate architecture student

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