V5 N4 Winter 1977 French Ship 'Alice' Wrecked near Ocean Park

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VOL. 5

16TH & EXCHANGE STREET, ASTORIA, OREGON 97103

NO. 4

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FRENCH SHIP ALICE, WRECKED NEAR OCEAN PARK, 1909

In the dark, 1909, besieged by deeply laden with near Ocean Park,

early morning hours of January a roaring gale, the French ship cement for Portland, struck the Washington. Her crew reached

15th, Alice, sands safety

on shore, but the ship, battered by the surf and borne down by her heavy cargo, was abandoned to the elements. Nothing of her remains today, save the sense of tragedy evoked by this photograph, taken four days after the gale.


NEW OFFICERS, TRUSTEES ELECTED

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Fred L. Barnum, formerly Vice President, was elected President of the Museum by his fellow Trustees at the Annual Meeting in November. He succeeds Ted Thompson, who will continue to serve on the Board. Ronald J . Honeyman was elected Vice President, and Charles W. Browning was elected Treasurer. Fred A. Lindstrom was re-elected Secretary. Six new Trustees were elected to four-year terms by the Museum membership: Genevieve T. Dyer; Walter Gadsby, Jr.; Edith Henningsgaard; Donald E. Hughes; Glenn L. Jackson; and Wendell Wyatt. Harry Swanson, Jr. was elected to complete the term of Clayton Morse. Retiring from the Board were Morgan Coe; Roy Hammond; Kenneth McAlpin; Max Schafer, Sr.; and John A. Sprouse. Mr. Coe and Captain McAlpin had served continuously on the Board since the Museum's founding in 1962.

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FROM THE QUARTERDECK As 1977 draws to a close, it is gratifying to look back on developments at the Museum during the year. There have been numerous very fine additions to the collections, through the generosity of the donors listed elsewhere in this issue. Attendance has continued to increase, with visitors from all 50 states, every Canadian province, and 46 other foreign countries having signed in. The membership rolls have also maintained a steady growth, helping to provide an ever-broadening base of support that is vital to the future success of the Museum. In spite of these accomplishments, however, the year has not been without its disappointments. Chief among these is that our major immediate goal, completion of the new building, has not yet been realized. The structure now stands approximately 65% complete, with most of the interior work, such as insulation, wiring, heating, plumbing, etc., still to be done. While some funds are available for further construction, several hundred thousand dollars more will be required. The need for greater space and expanded facilities for this growing museum becomes more acute with each passing month; moreover, while the project is delayed for lack of funds, inflation adds daily to the cost of completing the building. For these reasons alone it is imperative that the necessary funds be secured to finish the job, and soon. We urge everyone who cares deeply about preserving our great maritime heritage to consider how he can help. Rolf Klep, Director

MORSE MEMORIAL FUND ESTABLISHED In the last issue of this newsletter, we noted the untimely passing of our good friend and Trustee, Clayton C. Morse. As Treasurer of the Museum, he was acutely aware of the ever-increasing cost of operation and development, and of the resultant need to continually develop new sources of income and increase the return from existing sources. He was particularly concerned about assuring long-term stability through establishment of a substantial endowment and a sound deferred gifts program. In recognition of this special concern, the Executive Committee at year's end established the Clayton C. Morse Memorial Fund, a permanent endowment fund whose income will be used for Museum operations. The initial principal of the Fund comprises the numerous memorial contributions received in Mr. Morse's name from his family and friends. Any additional gifts received in his honor will be added to the Fund.

• CAPTAIN SHA VER HONORED AS MUSEUM FELLOW

A highlight of the 1977 Annual Meeting was the election of Captain Homer T. Shaver, veteran Columbia River towboatman, to the position of Fellow of the Museum. The honor was bestowed by the Board of Trustees, in recognition of the Captain's achievements and his contributions to the maritime history of the region. As Chairman of the Board of the family-owned Shaver Transportation Company, Captain Shaver can look back on more than 60 years of active involvement in Northwest marine industries. Widely recognized as the dean of Columbia River boatmen, he has long been a member of and a contributor to the Museum. When presented with a framed copy of the fellowship resolution, the Captain said that, of the various recognitions he has received, this one had particular significance for him. "I appreciate this honor especially," he said, "because it comes from my own people."

CAPTAIN SHAVER ACCEPTS FELLOWSHIP RESOLUTION FROM ROLF KLEP. FRED BARNUM LOOKS ON.


THE EPIC VOYAGE OF LIGHTSHIP 88

LIGHTSHIP 88 AND TENDER, DEPARTING NEW YORK BAY FOR THE WEST COAST, PASS SCOTLAND LIGHTSHIP.

Visitors on board Columbi,a, the Museum's veteran Lightship #88, often remark about her ungainly shape, noting the high bow, great freeboard, and extreme tumblehome of her hull. Our standard reply is that these vessels were not designed to make long voyages; rather, they were designed to be highly visible and to ride to their anchors with reasonable comfort and stability on exposed stations under the worst conditions. Many lightships, however, have made at least one long voyage during their careers. Launched in Camden, New Jersey, #88 was one of three lightships and three lighthouse tenders built in the East in 1907 and 1908 for service on the West Coast. All six vessels were to proceed together to San Francisco, 18,000 miles away via the Straits of Magellan. After

fitting out at Staten Island (which included equipping the lightships with bowsprits and headsails to help them along when the wind allowed) the improbable flotilla departed New York in September, 1908. Held to the speed of the slowest lightship, and required to make frequent stops for coal, they were 125 days in reaching the Golden Gate. One of the tenders, Sequoi,a, remained in San Francisco. The second, Kukui, proceeded to Honolulu. The remaining tender, Manzanita, was assigned to Astoria. With the three lightships she continued up the coast, where #92 became the Relief and #93 served as the first light vessel on Swiftsure Bank, off the Washington coast. Lightship #88 began her long career in the Northwest when she took her station off the Columbia River in April, 1909.

CONTRIBUTORS TO THE COLLECTIONS, 1977

1977 has been a particularly good year for the Museum's collections. Artifacts acquired ranged from several fine ship models to an 11-ton marine diesel engine in running order. Books, paintings, navigation instruments, documents and personal papers, relics from significant vessels, photographs, and a good deal more were measured, photographed, researched, catalogued, and incorporated G. J. Barbey T. M. Bell V. J. Benbennick Tim Boehm W. F. Brown Heinz Burmester Ina Cameron Mrs. E. S. Campbell R. T. Carruthers Mrs. I van Clark R. G. Coan Mrs. Jean Coughlin Rose Devine Douglas County Museum Genevieve Dyer T. R. Dyer

Mrs. W. R. Eckhart Joseph Ewald C. E. Francis Vera Gault H. E. Geck William Gilkerson Victor Graf Mrs. A. G. Hansen M. E. Hjorten R. J. Honeyman Valerie Howe L. C. Howell Helen Huhta Jefferson County (Wa.) Historical Society John Johnson

into the collections for exhibit, study, or other uses. Most of these artifacts were either donated to the Museum or purchased with funds that were donated for that purpose. Listed here with profound thanks are all the donors of artifacts for 1977. They have contributed not just to the extent of the collections, but to the quality of the Museum's efforts to relate and interpret our maritime heritage. R. G. Jubitz

L. E. Kern Rolf Klep A. J. L'Amie John M. MacGregor Dugald MacGregor D. D. McRae Darle Maveety Mrs. Elsa Muncy G. R. Netzel Paul Ogden Oregon National Guard H. W. Orr Edwin K. Parker Nathaniel Paschall Ruth Powers

Eino Puusti Mrs. Leslie Ragan Frank E. Ross J. D. Scarborough W. R. Schultz Mrs. Evelyn Shirk Eileen Stevens Ruth Taylor Doug Thompson Charles Trullinger U.S. Army Ray Utter Forrest White Wendell Wyatt


NEW MEMBERS, INCREASED MEMBERSHIPS (*)

SPONSORING Mr. & Mrs. Harold W. Dahlgren * SUSTAINING Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence M. Dean * Mr. & Mrs. Stan Grimberg Mrs. Lyle B. Kingery, Portland Ocean Foods of Astoria * Mr. & Mrs. Harry R. Swanson, Jr. * SUPPORTING Mrs. R. T. Carruthers * Mr. John Dierdorff, West Linn * Mr. John R. Gatewood, Portland * Mr. & Mrs. W. R. King

CONTRIBUTING Mr. Robert H. Atkinson, Portland Mrs. F . Sidney Burt, Seaside Mr. & Mrs. Alf E. Dahl, Walnut Creek, CA * Mr. & Mrs. Walter Gadsby, Jr., Portland * Mrs. Harold Gill, Portland Mr. Hiram C. Johnson * Mrs. Jane R. Kendall, Portland * Klipsun Club, Telephone Pioneers Mr. & Mrs. Edwin L. Luoma * Mr. & Mrs. Charles 0. Sturdevant U.S. National Bank - Astoria *

ANNUAL Mr. Courtney Arthur, Salem Mr. Martin Brill, Longview, WA Capt. Dexter G. Flint, Oakland, CA Mr. Frank L. Harding, Salem Mr. Ronald C. Honeyman, Bellevue, WA Mr. Maurice J . Mitchell, Spokane Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Starzel, Denver Mrs. George M. Wilhelm, Boise Mr. A. Scotty Wilson, Sun City, AZ STUDENT Joseph M. Greeley, Esq.

MEMORIALS

ARTHUR S. DEMPSIE Mr. & Mrs. J. Dan Webster ROBERT M. FOOTT Mr. & Mrs. Ernest E. Brown JEAN PAULSEN FRENCH Ms. Louise Larson JANE MAY GUNDERSON Mr. & Mrs. Rolf Klep PETER N. ILIINSKY Capt. & Mrs. H. T. Bohlman

MRS. MAGDA LIEN Mr. & Mrs. Osmund Fairfield Ms. Esther Fisher Mr. & Mrs. Ray Hughes Ms. Ann Ranta Jordan Mr. & Mrs. Peter McCoy Mrs. Alice Ranta Mr. & Mrs. Keith Ranta & Family Ms. Mary Alice Ranta Mr. Rudy Ranta Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Secrest Mr. Douglas Thompson PAUL M. LUND Mr. & Mrs. Roy A. Duoos Mr. & Mrs. Trygve Duoos

DOUGLAS KING Mr. & Mrs. Eben Carruthers

COLUMBIA RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM 1618 EXCHANGE STREET ASTORIA, OREGON 97103

CLAYTON C. MORSE Bioproducts, Inc. Mrs. Marilyn M. Kessler Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Mittet Mrs. Clayton C. Morse Mr. Richard K. Morse Mr. & Mrs. J. Dan Webster ERNEST E. ROV A Mr. & Mrs. Rolf Klep Mr. & Mrs. Michael Naab SPECIAL GIFTS

MR. & MRS . RONALD J. HONEYMAN 54th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Mr. & Mrs. R. C. Honeyman

Non-Profit Organization U.S . POSTAGE

PAID Astoria, Oregon Permit No. 209

QUARTERDECK REVIEW Published four times yearly by the Columbia River Maritime Museum, a non-profit institution funded by admission fees, a membership program, and private contributions. Fred L. Barnum, President Rolf Klep, Director Michael Naab, Curator & Editor Museum members receive a free subscription to Quarterdeck Review, free admission to Museum facilities, and other benefits. Student $2.50 per year Annual . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 per year Contributing. . . . . $25.00 per year Supporting . . $50.00 per year Sustaining . . .. . _. . $100.00 per year Life. . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000.00 or more


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