V2 N2 Summer 1974 Lightship 'Columbia' at the Portland Rose Festival

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REVIEW SUMMER 1974

VOL.2

16TH & EXCHANGE STREET, ASTORIA, OREGON 97103

N0.2

LIGHTSHIP COLUMBIA AT THE PORTLAND ROSE FESTIVAL JUNE, 1974 At 10:15 a.m. on June 6th, with an ear-shattering blast from her triple fog signal, befitting the importance of the event, Lightship No. 88 backed out into the Columbia River and turned her bow upstream. After months of preparation, the Columbi.a was underway and headed for Portland, where she would participate in the 1974 Rose Festival. River pilot Don Hughes was in command, assisted by Captain Leroy Clark. In the engine room Captains Ted Bohlman and Jim Purcell, who had done most of the work to prepare the ship's machinery for the trip, kept the old Washington diesel running smoothly. Captain Bill Barney was deck boss, and the balance of the 18-man complement was made up of Director Rolf Klep, Museum employees, trustees and Sea Explorers. The upriver trip was largely uneventful, but long-it was 3:45 a.m. on the 7th before the Lightship was finally secure at the seawall in Portland. Though still capable of more than eight knots, the 67-year old vessel had bucked a strong freshet for most of the 86-mile run. In addition,

delays were twice caused by minor mechanical problems, "anchor drills, not breakdowns," quipped Captain Hughes. During her nine-day stay in Portland, the Columbi.a was opened to the public in the afternoons, affording thousands of visitors an opportunity to tour the ship. For many it was the first time on board a sea-going vessel, and for most it was an introduction to the Columbia River Maritime Museum and its programs. Portland area Sea Explorers were on hand throughout the visit to assist the public, answer questions about the ship and Museum, stand gangway watches, and perform general shipboard duties. The return to Astoria was made on June 16th. Captains Hughes and Clark were again in the pilothouse, while Bill Gammon and Vic Stamm handled engineering duties. The trip went without a hitch. With the freshet behind her, the Lightship averaged close to ten knots over the bottom, and by 6:45 p.m. she was secure in her berth below the Museum. The Rose Festival Cruise of the Columbi.a, 1974, had come to an end.


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SPECIAL LIGHTSHIP EXHIBIT

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QUARTERDECK REVIEW The Lightship cruise was a milestone event. Not only was it successful as a public relations venture to "show the flag" in Portland, thereby increasing awareness of the Museum; it also marked the first time in nearly eight years that the Columbi,a has been underway. As is the case with many important projects undertaken by the Museum, completion of the venture depended in a large measure upon volunteer services by businesses and individuals. The labors of engineers Ted Bohlman, Jim Purcell and Al Anderson, along with extra efforts by museum employees, readied the ship. Her shakedown cruise before departure brought assistance from the Port of Astoria, Bar Pilot Ken McAlpin and the Knappton Towboat Company. The Columbia River Pilots offered the services of Captains Don Hughes and Leroy Clark. Sea Explorers helped man the ship during her Portland stay. All these contributors, plus the volunteer crews, combined to make the project a success. Construction of a new building to house the Museum's collection of nautical treasures is our largest and most important project. Support for its completion is an objective in which we are currently engaged. Its success is also dependent on the generosity of businesses, corporations, foundations and individuals. To our already attained $500,000 we need to add several hundred thousand to have our plans materialize. At the same time we must improve our membership on which a large percentage of our day-to-day operation depends. Not an easy combination but it will be done. So, if you have renewed your membership you can get a great deal of satisfaction in "owning a piece of the building"-a part of the splendid new museum structure we so urgently need. Rolf Klep, Director

Visitors to the Lightship Columbi,a during the Rose Festival were among the first to see a number of new exhibits, installed on the main deck just before the Portland cruise. A display of large photographs, accompanied by brief historical notes, depict the ship in the various configurations of her career. Nearby are plans of the vessel as she appeared in 1907 and as she is today. Photographs of early crew members, and photos and paintings of other lightships have also been added.

E. K.

NEUBAUER WITH COLUMBIA MODEL

Highlight of the exhibit is a superb model of Lightship No. 88 as she appeared when she first assumed her station off the mouth of the Columbia River in February, 1909. The replica was built to 1/8" scale by Edward K. Neubauer of Milwaukie, Oregon from copies of original plans obtained from the Coast Guard. With her wooden masts, stem-mounted cathead for raising the mushroom anchor, and peaked-roof lantern houses, the 1909 version presents an interesting contrast to the lightship of today. On loan from Mr. Neubauer, the model can be viewed on board the Lightship through the summer months.

DESTROYER BRIDGE ACQUIRED

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The makings of a first-rate Navy exhibit were acquired recently in the form of the entire bridge and pilot house of the USS Knapp (DD 653), a destroyer dismantled in Portland early this year by Zidell Explorations, Inc., who donated the structure to the Museum. Barging to Astoria was contributed by Shaver Transportation Co., offloading by Coast Marine Construction Co. and Heavy Hauling Co. The bridge will eventually be a walkthrough exhibit in the new building, offering future Museum visitors a glimpse at the nerve center of a WW II warship.


THE LIGHTSHIP CRUISE

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In her heyday, Lightship No. 88 took things in stride. While on station off the mouth of the Columbia River and at Umatilla Reef she rode out the worst weather the North Pacific could muster-and her crew thought little about it. Last month, though 67 years old and inactive for a long period, she remained as willing as ever, and her Portland cruise came off with flying colors. Characteristically, she took it in stride. Her crew, however, was very proud.

10 : 00 A.M. JUNE 6TH. DEPARTING FOR PORTLAND, THE COLUMBIA BACKS OUT INTO THE STREAM.

ROSE FESTIVAL VISITORS TOUR THE SHIP .

A SEA EXPLORER TRAINING VESSEL ESCORTS THE LIGHTSHIP TO THE MOUTH OF THE WILLAMETTE ON THE RETURN TRIP.

CAPTAIN HUGHES MARKS PROGRESS ON THE DOWNRIVER RUN.

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CURATOR NAAB TIES BACK EXHAUST FLAPPERS ON THE STACK. TRUSTEE R . T. CARRUTHERS LO OKS ON .

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6:30 P.M. JUNE 16TH. AT THE END OF THE CRUISE, THE COLUMBIA APPROACH ES HER BERTH AT ASTORIA .


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PRIZE-WINNING SHIP MODEL

BLUE CHIP

Nearly 50 models, submitted by builders from throughout the Northwest, were entered in the First Annual Ship Model Competition, held at the Museum on May 11th. Grand prize went to Robert C. Lacalli of Seattle for his excellent 1/8" scale model of the full-rigged Downeaster St. Paul, while Michael Stevens, Portland, took top honors in the junior division with a replica of the Cutty Sark. Mr. Lacalli chose a good subject. Built at Bath, Maine in 1874 by Chapman and Flint, the original St. Paul was typical of hundreds of wooden ships and barks produced in New England yards during the last thirty years of the 19th century. With fuller lines than the clippers which preceded them, and with less lofty rigs, the "Downeasters" were able to carry substantial cargoes without sacrificing all of the clipper's speed. Many regard the era during which they were produced as the finest period of wood shipbuilding in America. The St. Paul was well known in the Northwest. From 1901 until 1924 she was operated by various packers in the Alaska salmon trade. During the thirties she earned a new lease on life as a floating marine museum at Seattle. Finally, in 1940, she became part of a breakwater at Royston, B.C. Mr. Lacalli's fine model of this handsome ship will remain on display at the Museum for an indefinite period.

One of the primary purposes of the Museum is to collect and preserve for future generations the physical reminders, words and ways of a maritime heritage which is rapidly becoming obscured. That effort is financed largely with funds obtained from memberships. An expanded membership will result in a greater return today and in generations to come. Invest in the future. Become a member.

QUARTERDECK REVIEW OF THE

COLUMBIA RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM ASTORIA, OREGON 97103

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* NAAB Curator Michael Naab spent most of April on the East Coast visiting some three dozen maritime and other museums from Newport News, Virginia to Bath, Maine in order to observe exhibit techniques, administration, education programs, etc., as practiced in a wide variety of institutions. The project was sponsored by the National Museum Act (administered by the Smithsonian Institution). Mr. Naab returned from his tour with a store of fresh ideas which will no doubt be reflected in future museum operations, and in planning exhibits for the new building.

Non-Profit Organization U.S. POSTAGE

PA ID Astoria, Oregon Permit No. 209


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