Managing Construction March April 2023

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March/April 2023
Women In Construction: The Malta Perspective 10th May 2023

CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING

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Welcome to the fifth edition of our magazine. In 2022 the chamber focused on creating solid foundations to grow sustainably, in membership numbers, but most importantly, to disseminate our message. We concluded the year with the annual general meeting and started this year with the Partners Network event. Both events were well attended and received encouraging comments from our partners.

This year we shall be focusing on further activities to enhance the quality of the construction manager. In April, we will have another Health and Safety Course for Professionals in collaboration with BICC while we will set sail for the Communities of Practice events. The intention behind these events is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the construction manager when dealing with government entities, such as the PA, ERA, BCA, SCH, MCCAA and others. More information is available in an article by Andrei Cachia in this magazine.

The fulcrum of the events will be at the beginning of May, where our chamber will host delegates from CIOB, including CEO Caroline Gumble, for a series of events, including the opening of our premises at the Catholic Institute, visiting education institutes and the Women in Construction event. The latter is the first of its kind and a sign of commitment from MCCM towards the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion charter.

We wish you a good read, and we encourage you to contact us if you prefer to have topics discussed in our magazine.

From the left:

Clarabel Versace

Arife Kizoglu

Yasemin Aktas

Chantal Stagno Navarra

Bianca Giglio Beteloni

Who We Are

The Chamber is the voice of the construction managers at the various levels operating in Malta and beyond. We promote and expect, high standards in, quality, ethics, integrity and to be at the forefront of innovation of the local built environment. Through our input we strive to influence policies and regulations that impact the industry and their impact on the common good.

Mission Statement

To promote science and technological advancement in the process of building and construction for the public benefit.

To be at the forefront of public education, encouraging research and sharing the outcome from this research.

To make sure that advancement in the built technology is aimed at improving the quality of life of the public in general.

To enhance professionalism, encourage innovation and raise quality in construction management.

To promote high standards and professional ethics in building and construction practices.

To promote the highest levels of integrity in every decision that we take that affect others.

To respect all those affected by our decisions

TO

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Editorial
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BE THE DRIVER OF A CULTURAL AWARENESS CAMPAIGN STRIVING FOR PROFESSIONALISM IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.
Contents For instant updates follow us: Twitter:@mccm
WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION The Malta Perspective From Inception to Handover The Malta Chamber of Construction Management is proud to organise the first-ever event to showcase the attributes, input and contribution women are giving to the Maltese construction industry. Save The Date 10 May 2023 Venue The Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry Collaboration with Ministry for Public Works and Planning, Chartered Institute of Building, The Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry

Message from

THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO

Dear

Readers, Welcome to this fifth edition of Managing Construction and the first one for the year 2023.

Wow, what three months we have gone through! Following the International Built Heritage Conference in November, the AGM in December and the organisation of the First H&S Course for Professionals in collaboration with the BICC, squeezed in, many might have thought that the MCCM team would have a well-deserved rest which indeed was taken. In fact, from the very following day of the publication of the fourth edition of Managing Construction, work on this fifth edition, initiated. I am confident that you will find this edition as interesting as the previous ones.

Apart from work on the magazine, we organised the First Partners Networking Event. An event that proved to be successful not only by the participating partners but also by all those who attended the event. Apart from serving as a showcase for the services and products that are made available by some of our partners, it provided our partners the opportunity to meet our members face-to-face.

During this same event, we took the opportunity to present another batch of new members with their membership certificate and presented also the first certificates for the H&S Course for Professionals.

This event was addressed by the Minister for Public Works and Planning, Hon. Stefan Zrinzo Azzopardi and by the Opposition Representative Hon. Ing. Stanley Zammit.

Another event that we participated in, was the ‘I Choose’. This was our second participation in this event, confirming our commitment towards one of our pillars ‘’Education’’.

In this edition we will be featuring another initiative, namely ‘Communities of Practice’. The purpose of this initiative is to bring closer to our members, the public entities and their work and to show their impact on our members’ work.

Another important mention regards the next visit of Mrs Caroline Gumble CIOB CEO, in May. A busy programme awaits Mrs Gumble, highlighted by the organisation of an event held for the very first time, entitled: Women in Construction-The Malta Perspective 2023. Further details on this event will be provided in the coming weeks. Finally, coming up is the official opening of our premises in Floriana on the 10th of May, and similar to WIC 2023, more information on the official opening will be given in the coming weeks.

Wishing you an enjoyable read.

It is great news that the MCCM is holding their first ever event focussing on women in construction. I am encouraged to hear that this will be a platform for showcasing the important contributions of women across the industry.

Many of you already understand why this is such a key topic in our sector, and others, but it does bear repeating –it is imperative to help address the skills and people gap that our industry faces worldwide. Ensuring that women and other under-represented groups are welcomed into the industry is a responsibility shared by all those already in it.

I am also a firm believer that the process of creating the built environment in which we all live and work is something which needs to reflect all of society. This is just one way in which we can support delivery of high-quality buildings and infrastructure that are inclusive and accessible to all.

This is also timely, as it reflects one of three headline themes in CIOB’s new corporate plan - the skills gap. As part of addressing this, we want the industry to bring in people from a range of backgrounds, by helping to improve the perception - and reality - of working in the construction industry, championing diversity, inclusion and worker welfare.

We also want to facilitate smooth routes in the industry to continually develop the skills of modern professionals. Our new policy to encourage ethical reflection and continual learning is part of that.

Congratulations again to the MCCM for organising this event. It is much needed and I look forward to hearing about the successes to be celebrated.

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Instil professionalism, innovation and quality Continuing Professional- Development Opportunies Affiliation with the Chartered Insitute of Building Preparation for the Cosntruction Project Manager Warrant An active community willing to improve the industry Built around the busy schedules of professionals

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ERP SOLUTIONS IN CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

Due to the globalized world conditions, limited resources, specific durations and high-quality principles; investors, employers, consultants and contractors are started to monitor the projects in some strict follow ups. In this regard, it is not possible to manage the construction projects with high-budget and complex activity-structured by software of Microsoft Office, construction industry is started to need the ERP solutions.

What is ERP Solution?

As a general definition, `Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)` is a sort of an automated web-based software system that integrates activities and operations in a business such as accounting, procurement, project management, engineering / production, human resources and supply chain.

There are ERP solutions of different software companies in the market. According to small, medium and large-scale company structures and in parallel with company management, requested data can be obtained, processed and reported by creating modules of ERP solutions. The system is scalable.

aspect in accordance with scope of the project. As we all know, due to difficult construction site conditions, organizational deficiencies, intercommunication problems and similar reasons inherent in the construction industry, data and records that need to be obtained towards these goals can be skipped many times. In this regard, ERP software integrates the processes, saves the data in the requested templates, disciplines the relevant departments and maintains a smooth workflow.

Streamline Structure: Since ERP collects all modules in a single database, it contributes to data sharing between the departments in the project.

Effective Construction Project Management: ERP systemize the high number of activities, assets, resources, suppliers and contractors in a requested manner. Therefore, more precise analysis of material, machinery, manpower and production are obtained.

Reduce Administrative and Operational Cost: ERP minimizes the workforce, inventory and equipment that is used for the project. This circumstance provides significant administrative and operational savings after a certain period of time.

Custom Made Software: It is possible to shape the ERP software in line with the organizational structure of the company and project. By importing and exporting data, activities with its details can be managed and provide more effective project management. In the construction industry, ERP integrations with software such as Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project, Primavera P6 contribute significantly to the project.

Project Monitoring in Real Time: Since ERP discipline the user, the relevant data is entered up to date in software. Thus, the project executives can monitor the status of the project instantly and minimise the related risks.

Figure 1) What is ERP Solution?

Why Do We Need ERP in Construction Projects?

A construction project is being aimed to be completed in an optimum duration, maximum quality and economical

Effective Cost Management: Especially in high budget and complex projects, activity-based cost analysis can be obtained by combining the module of accounting, project management, manufacturing, human resources and machinery & equipment management. The activity budget codes created for ERP system provide more precise cost management and control, hence it makes serious contribution for profit margins.

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Mr. Ed Howell Mr. Andrei Cachia Mr. Nick Vassallo Mr. Reno Vassallo CIHAN SAHIN

In summary, ERP softwares provide useful contributions in construction projects in line with time, cost and quality

aspects. The company using ERP has to manage the software by working with correct modules in line with company organization and employees has to perform the working principles of ERP in the best manner in order to utilize in maximum.

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Figure 2) Sample Interfaces of an ERP Software in Construction Industry

Court Report

Employer’s responsibility for an accident at work is not automatic.

In a court case decided by the First Hall of the Civil Court on the 29th of November 2022 (Ref: application 437/13JRM), the court decided that the employer was not responsible for the death of their employee, and therefore dismissed the action instituted by the family of the deceased.

This case was instituted by the widow and immediate family of a builder who died on a construction site, when part of the building in which he was working collapsed. A number of legal issues arose, but what concerns us most for the purposes of this article is what the court had to say about employers’ and employees’ responsibilities where occupational health and safety are concerned. These responsibilities include that the employer is responsible for his actions towards his employees, unless it is shown that the employees did not abide by the instructions of their employer or take the precautions their employer required them to take, or that the employee was negligent in his work. All this emerges from the Civil Code, while according to occupational health and safety legislation the onus of proof that the accident occurred despite having provided a safe working environment, lies on the employer. The employer is obliged, amongst other things, to train his employees in health and safety related issues,

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Legal
Looking for a Construction Project Manager or a Site Manager? Reach out to our chamber and we will help you find the right professional for the job! E: info@mccm.org.mt W: www.mccm.org.mt T: +356 7711 6778

and also to provide adequate supervision to ensure the health and safety of the workers.

The court further pointed out that the employer must be extra vigilant for situations which involve an element of routine, because this could be risky; workers might with time develop a false sense of security; there is the risk that they will adopt a mentality that simply because nothing ever went wrong then nothing will ever go wrong. Such a risk has to be countered by the employer because the employer remains liable and the fact that no accident ever occurred does not mean that the system is a safe one exonerating the employer. On the other hand, the employee must also look after their own safety, must work hand in hand with the employer where occupational health and safety are concerned, and also must avoid situations where they might be exposed to danger. The employee must be aware of the dangers at their place of work and must never do anything which can increase risk of causing

damage or injury to himself or to others.

The court further pointed out that one manner in which an employer shows that they fulfilled their duties, is to prove that they carried out adequate supervision. The obligation to supervise cannot be neglected, and no amount of training given to the employees will make up for neglection in supervision of the same employees, because the obligation to supervise is an intrinsic part of occupational health and safety obligations.

In the case before it, the victim of the fatal accident was actually entrusted by the employer with the supervision of his co-workers; he was also engaged to do work which he was clearly skilled to perform. These proven factors militated against the victim and his family who were seeking reparation, and in fact the court found against them, deeming that the employer could not held liable to pay damages to the family of the victim of the accident.

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Communities Of Practice

Following our first successful year which was an interesting and eventful one, the MCCM committee met to plan the events and activities for 2023.

During the first year I had the opportunity to meet a number of our members during some of our activities and a common suggestion was presented to me – that of organising events where individuals can actively participate in discussions, to share their expertise and further their own progress through a process of group learning.

Parallel to the foregoing, I came across a concept referred to as Community of Practice (COP). COP is made up of people who have a common interest, set of challenges, or enthusiasm for a particular topic and we as members of the Chamber, have Construction Project Management as our passion. Dr. Catlin Tucker, a professor in the Masters in the Arts of Teaching Program, cited scholars who proclaimed that the goal of individuals participating in a COP is ‘to deepen their learning in a process of collective learning’.

Although theory contends that COP asserts that people build their own knowledge and understanding of the world by engaging in experiences and reflecting on those experiences, it is in itself a social system. This presents the idea of fellow cohort sharing their tacit knowledge with each other to better practices. Hence, the idea developed to organise social events amongst the chambers’ members. The committee enthusiastically embraced this proposal, so Fabrizio, Chantal and I began to develop the idea with the assistance of other committee and working group members.

In order to test the waters, it was decided to hold quarterly sessions. It was also decided that 2023, should be devoted to meetings with various organisations that us as Construction Project Managers interact with on a regular basis on every project we manage.

Hence, the plan is to organise the first two sessions in April starting with the Environmental and Resource Authority (ERA). These mutual discussions will be succeeded with

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ANDREI

following discussions held with (not in a sequential order), the Planning Authority (PA), the Superintendence of Cultural and Heritage Authority (SCH), the Building Construction Authority (BCA), Transport Malta (TM), the Malta Competition and Consumer Affairs Authority (MCCAA), reps from the Ministry for Environment, Energy and Enterprise and also, one of the meetings will be focusing on the humanitarian aspect and thus, discussions will be organised with the Commission for the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD), Occupational Health and Safety Authority (OHSA) and Civils Protection Department (CPD).

Our experiences, the results we achieved in our careers and our social connections, all play a role in how we learn. With this in mind, we asked our members to come forward with a set of queries they all might have or suggestions that they would like to present to these entities so that we could present to them in preparation for to forthcoming sessions. In parallel, we started getting in touch with representatives of these entities and even set one-to-one meetings with them to explain the concept to which we were welcomed with interest and even suggestions on how these sessions can take place.

The below timeline shows the proposed forecasted months in which these COPs will be organised. The first two COPs are aimed to have discussions with ERA and the planned dates are the 3rd and 24th April, 2023.

All members together with the general public will be invited to join in these discussions which will be informative and beneficial to all. For any enquiries it is being advised to get in touch with MCCM.

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Mare Summit New Member Certificates

NETWORK EVENT

During the Partners Networking Event, we also took the opportunity to present a number of certi cates to new members that joined our chamber recently.

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Health and Safety Certificates

NETWORK EVENT

Another presentation was that for the students that recently attended and completed the H&S Course for Professionals (Construction)- a course that was held in conjunction with the BICC.

BICC Chairman Perit Charles Buhagiar was also present for this event in addition

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MARE Summit

For the second year running, the Malta Chamber of Construction Management and their international partners, the Chartered Institute of Building are going to be two of the main partners in the Mare Summit.

To celebrate this occasion, MARE Summit Director Beatriz Rodriguez Sanz and MCCM President Jesmond Chetcuti, signed a collaboration agreement in which

respective social media means and events towards the successful holding of their respective events. This years Mare Summit will be taking place between the 1st and 2nd of June at the MFCC Ta Qali.

For more information on the event itself you can log in

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Facilities

Introducing Project Management in Facilities Management

Introducing Sustainability and Sustainable Practice in Facilities Management

Businesses are becoming more environmentally focused, and interaction between their core processes is essential in adopting a sustainable approach. Facilities management is a discipline that facilitates an organization in efficiently providing its primary business. Various studies have reported on organization attempts to put sustainability into reality. Sustainability and green building practices in facility management can benefits from different aspects such as reduction in energy consumption, productivity increases, waste reduction, and many other sectors that effects the sustainability of such premises. These can be quantified and presented to an organisation’s leadership to defend sustainable practices and their positive effect on the bottom line.

considered, an organisation can develop a much clearer picture of the benefits of sustainable practices. The facility manager is in a unique position to view the entire process and is often the leader of the only group that has influence over the entire life cycle of a facility. Therefore, the facility manager often becomes the proponent of sustainable and green practices. Implement the proper financial and strategic planning tools, the facility manager can create long-lasting value to the organisation by developing, implementing, and maintaining sustainable facility practices. sustainable approach.

Sustainability is seen as a far-reaching issue now, and one which the facilities management profession cannot overlook. In a 2007 IFMA report, sustainability was identified as one of the key areas FM professionals need to develop their competencies to face the demands, challenges and opportunities of sustainable development and practices. With the increasing relevance of FM toward business success, the FM function has transformed from just a cost cutting option to a strategic link between organization’s core business and support services. Facilities management professionals are seen as being “at the forefront of organizational behaviour change and, in a position, to influence individuals working in business; government departments and public services”. The concept of sustainable facilities management has gained relevance recently to integrate FM functions with sustainability. The facilities management profession is presented with this need in two perspectives. One, because of the negative impact of existing buildings over the environment, and on the other hand, the increasing demand for technical knowledge required of facilities managers to understand the complexities of intelligent buildings and their operation.

It is important to note that many of the positive economic effects do not show up immediately. This must be taken on a long-term view of most sustainable practices and carefully evaluate green alternatives to traditional construction, operating and maintenance methodologies. Once the life-cycle cost and total cost of ownership are

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BIM in Construction Management

This article focuses on the role of BIM in project management. It gives an insight of common areas with project management and BIM.

Such common areas can consider BIM as an effective tool in project management.

The figure 1 on the opposite page shows the common areas between BIM and PMBOK knowledge areas.

1. ‘Integration’

One of the first common areas. In BIM the IPD (Integrated Project Delivery) method is what integrates all parties and information of the project.

2. ‘Scope’

in BIM the project is subdivided into different elements or volumes similar to what is done in project scope management.

3. ‘Time & Cost’

In BIM it is usually referred to time and cost as 4D and 5D.

4. ‘Quality’

Another common area which is an important aspect of project management. In BIM quality is controlled differently such as clash detection processes.

5. ‘HR’

Collaboration is how BIM considers human resource management in project management.

6. ‘Communication’

Is one important factor in BIM as much as in project management.

7. ‘Procurement’

Procurement management can be

This comparison by Saeed Rokooei, in the article ‘Building Information Modeling in Project Management: Necessities, Challenges and Outcomes’ gives a better insight of the role of BIM in construction project management. By many BIM is still associated with the design of projects, however this is not because BIM is considered throughout the whole lifecycle of a facility.

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Figure 1 PMBOK knowledge areas vs BIM role in construction project management.

An Outline of Fire Safety Requirements

SHIELD Consultants Ltd.

that most people become aware of the immense will remark about the extended repercussions that they suffered in the building or as a business.

The answer to preventing and/or mitigating these issues does not lie in any one particular instance of the building or company management; however, it is instead spread throughout the building lifetime. For it to be properly organisation even starts to operate. In fact, it needs to be planned during the design of the building or process.

Even if all of this is implemented at the design stage, it tackled. Therefore, ongoing measures of prevention and maintenance must be kept throughout to keep up with the required standard.

When an organisation aims only to cover the basic legal requirements, they are inadvertently exposing themselves to a massive potential threat. This is because the law requires the protection of the people within the building.

The law does not protect the organisations’ ability to resume business, or to minimise the extent of the damage incurred to materials or structures.

With Malta unfortunately still lagging behind on the professionals constantly face resistance when trying to implement safety measures in their clients’ buildings.

It is all too often too late when the realisation of indirect costs on the organisation and the effects of business interruption begin to manifest themselves for any remedial actions to be made.

Depending on the complexity of the building and the work carried out within it, there will be the need for a variety of solutions. Some of these will be infrastructural, others will regard equipment, but without any doubt there will be the involvement of people and management of safety resources.

The proper guidance on the type of measures to be taken is essential for anyone who needs to protect their organisation from this ever-present threat.

Health and Safety

Safe Systems of Work

SAINT JAMES WEIGHT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

In this edition we continue to look at Safe Systems of Work (SsoW), which require five (5) main elements

1. Stage 1 - Planned Work – Safe work must be planned. Turning up for work and just getting straight into the job is not good enough. Construction work can be complex, involves hazards that create high risk and accidents are unforgiving. Works need to be planned ahead, coordinated between all parties in a method that ensures safety of workers during execution. Stage 1 involves a detailed Method Statement drawn up by competent persons and validated by experts with experience of executing work safely.

obvious but the absolute majority of accidents result from failed controls. The SWMSRA must list all safety measures and controls on the basis of Stage 3. The persons responsible for the Safe Systems of Work must then implement these controls, throughout the planned works, based on Stage 1.

5. Stage 5 - Risk and Emergency Management. Construction work involves risk of incidents and accidents. The SSoW shall also include measures to be taken in case of emergencies occurring during the works process.

This is a high level overview of a SSoW. In future editions we will look at each Stage in more detail.

2. Stage 2 - Responsibilities: This involves formally assigning all responsibilities for the works, including:

• Competent persons taking responsibility for the Safe Systems of Work

• Competent supervisors and their deputies in case of their being away from the works

• Technically competent workers

• Other Workers executing the works

3. Stage 3 - Hazard Identification and Risk Assessments: A comprehensive HAZID and RA process is conducted in direct relation to the Method Statement. Hazards, dangerous work and risk resulting directly from the planned works are identified and thoroughly evaluated in order to determine risk levels and the essential controls. This is both a legal requirement and an indispensable element of safe work.

4. Stage 4 - Safety measures and controls. Work cannot proceed unless in safe conditions. This sounds

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John Schembri, MSc.[Sy&RM]; L’cstr; PgC.[OHS]; P’mth; SIRM; CBCI

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

Early in my career in the port sector, I spent a lot of time working on-board cargo vessels tallying and checking conventional and containerized cargo. I've experienced shipping agents and foremen put pressure on stevedores in physically demanding work operations that were hazardous in ship’s holds. Stevedores took lots of chances and efforts because agents and the port operator thought that risks and long hours (occasionally with additional financial incentives) were necessary to complete cargo operations under strict tight schedules. Nevertheless, I’m thankful to be injury-free and realize that my 25 year port work experience paved the way for my career in health and safety.

Construction companies and contractors are also under great pressure to meet schedule targets. In the spirit of competitiveness, it has become a routine phenomenon setting unrealistic deadlines that cannot be met. If the construction industry lets this mentality persist and fester,the adoption of occupational safety measures is frequently pushed to the side as deadlines take precedence, which ultimately lead to a dangerous workplace that is prone to accidents.

Nepal, et al. define schedule pressure

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short-cuts and lose motivation. Additionally, even though it might not be intended, increased timetable pressure might result in a rise in work defects; a quality problem which worsens construction performance and an inherent impact on the safety of the worker.3

In many cases, it is at the expense of a great effort from the client or developer that deadlines are met, forgoing fundamental health and safety rules and procedures in favour of compliance with deadlines. If projects are delayed, they will invite the additional cost. All project participants, starting from the design phase and continuing through all construction project phases, must be aware of their responsibilities and should work together effectively to address this culture norm.

MORE INFORMATION +356 21692917 INFO@ANDREWVASSALLO COM TARXIEN ROAD, GUDJA

Planning and Management

Planning is the first step in meeting deadlines. To complete a project successfully, effective planning is crucial. The quality and contract terms for the construction project must be met within a time-frame but safety must not be a subcategory of project productivity and quality. Lack of capabilities, poor site management, insufficient equipment, improper instructions and practises, adverse weather etc. are significant factors that contribute to delays and slow down project progress. Management team must consider these aspects and focus their efforts to overcome lost time and delays without compromising workers’ health and safely.

Communication and coordination are essential.

Encouraging workers and sub-contractors to participate and provide information in meetings with managers is another effective way to deal with deadlines. The objective is to complete the work safely and on schedule.

Design stage

Design complexity must be taken into consideration if projects are met with stringent timelines. There can be risk errors in the design process, omissions, liabilities, insufficient material, costs, client change orders, misinformation in work methods, reworking and disorganization. Depending on the complexity of the tasks, an accelerated pace of work can lead to stress and tiredness.

Human Resources.

We simply cannot ignore under-manning. It is a major problem either due to labour shortage or cost-cutting. This will mean extra workload and long hours. Studies have shown that workers who were exposed to long durations of work may experience fatigue, cardiovascular illness and other health related concerns, which led to safety-related incidents. All health hazards must be closely monitored. A typical reaction to approaching deadlines is to strengthen human resources, skills, assess workplace hazards earlier and organise a roadmap of prevention measures to be implemented were tight deadlines and even tighter margins are present.

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It is a system that is intended to allow the MCCM to welcome members from across the Construction Management community
2 Nepal, M.P., M. Park, and B. Son. 2006. Effects of Schedule Pressure on Construction Performance. In Journal of Construction Engineering and Management. 132, 3 Ibid. pp. 183.

Ethics in Construction

Construction: A stressful environment?

“What are the costs of unethical practices? What are poor ethics? Why are good ethics important? What shouldn’t be considered unethical? Are there ever legitimate reasons for acting unethically?

A study by PwC of public contracts in 8 countries in the EU in 2010 identified the direct loss due to corruption accounted for 18% of project budgets, 13% was due to corruption and 5% to mismanagement. Imagine, for every Euro spent 18 cents disappeared. A one million Euro project costs 200,000 Euros extra.

It seems the problem has worsened. The EU anticorruption report estimated the annual direct cost of fraud at 120 billion Euros in 2014.

“Corrupt practices occur throughout the various construction project phases and can be perpetrated by any project stakeholder.”

Unfortunately, corrupt practices occur throughout the various construction project phases and can be perpetrated by any project stakeholder. This corruption is due to direct and deliberate corrupt practices, as well as mismanagement, and incompetence.

Contractors and the construction industry are often viewed as unethical. Regrettably, there are unethical Contractors, but equally, some Clients also engage in unethical practices, and certain Construction Professionals act unprofessionally.

But not all Contractors and Clients are unethical.

What are unethical practices?

Poor Ethics can be a deliberate act of committing fraud, which includes not paying for services rendered, paying or accepting bribes, theft and falsifying documents.

It’s deliberately taking advantage of another project stakeholder, maybe the Client, Contractor, Subcontractor, Supplier, Employee, Neighbours, or Taxpayer to benefit you or your company. This includes discrimination, one-sided contracts, and supplying inferior products.

Poor ethics can also be an act of negligence due to laziness and not carrying out your required duties, a lack of diligence, not acting to correct something which is wrong – turning a blind eye, or failure to apply or comply with specifications and legislation.

How do we define ethics

Being ethical is about how Contractors deal with the Client, how they deal with their Employees, and how they treat their Suppliers and Subcontractors. It's about how Clients treat their Contractors and other project stakeholders.

“Ethical behaviour is about being honest and fair in all your dealings.”

Ethical behaviour is about being honest and fair in all your dealings. It means not compromising safety or quality. It means complying with the conditions of the project and paying what is due and fair. It’s also about only claiming what’s due and fair.

What should not be viewed as unethical

Sometimes Contractors and Clients are wrongly accused of poor ethics for the following: Submitting variation claims (change orders) for delays or extra work or changes, where the Contractor is entitled to claim, and these are a fair reflection of their entitlements. Making a large profit on a project where these have been earned. Deducting monies from Contractors, Subcontractors or Suppliers, for reasonable valid reasons. Applying the terms of the contract in a fair manner, even when this costs one of the parties.

The consequences of unethical behaviours

“Ultimately poor ethics, fraud, and corruption costs somebody. It’s often you and me.”

Unethical behaviour leads to loss of reputation, which impacts future work. It can lead to large monetary fines, even jail time. It could result in Contractors being barred from certain Clients and projects.

Contractors avoid pricing projects for Clients with a reputation for unethical behaviour, or, add additional monies to compensate for problems they know they’ll encounter with the Client. Some Contractors deliberately take shortcuts or use inferior products to compensate for unfair treatment. Ultimately the Client pays more for their projects or gets a poor quality project.

In the same way Contractors who treat their Subcontractors and Suppliers unethically may find it difficult to find Suppliers and Subcontractors to work for them. Or their Suppliers and Subcontractors are unwilling to put maximum effort into the project.

Contractors who mistreat employees inevitably find productivities on their projects are bad, which costs them money. On occasion unhappy employees have deliberately damaged equipment, materials and completed work, or stolen from the project. (There are many stories of disgruntled workers deliberately blocking plumbing pipes?)

“Unethical behaviour is contagious.”

Unethical behaviour is contagious. People who witness unethical acts assume this is acceptable behaviour. People who are dealt with unethically often respond in an unethical manner. People who are unethical are often blind to other’s unethical behaviour.

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Ultimately poor ethics, fraud, and corruption costs somebody. It’s often you and me. It’s sometimes everyone!

There are no excuses for poor ethics in construction

I’m only following orders. Everyone does it. They aren’t treating me/us fairly so it’s ok to get them back. I’m too busy. Nobody will notice. It won’t make a difference. They’ve got so much money, or they are making money. I’m not paid enough, or we aren’t paid enough, or we’re losing money. We’re behind schedule. None of these justify poor ethics and fraud.

Conclusion

“We don’t have to engage in unethical behaviour to be profitable.”

I’m sure we have all been guilty of being unethical at some stage – but is this the way you always operate?

We don’t have to engage in unethical behaviour to be profitable. In fact, companies that act in an ethical manner, who employ ethical people, who deal with all their stakeholders in an ethical manner, are often more profitable than companies that are not ethical.

“Make the decision to be ethical in all your actions today.”

Conducting business in an ethical manner takes a conscious decision. It takes leadership. Make the decision to be ethical in all your actions today. Take the lead.

Ask yourself these questions:

“Would I be happy if someone did this to me, or treated me in this way?”

“Am I proud of my projects?”

“Do I always do my work diligently?”

“Are my actions always ethical?”

Bio

Written by Paul Netscher, a construction professional with 30 years’ experience and author of several practical construction management books, including; ‘Successful Construction Management: The Practical Guide’ and ‘The Successful Supervisor and Foreman’, and ‘Construction Management from Project Concept to Completion’. Visit www.pn-projectmanagement.com for more articles and information

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First Partners Networking Event January 2023

Adam Burton (Universal) Alex Sakota (Simprolit) Roberto Bugeja (Solid Base) John Schembri (Shield Consultants) Bonamy Mercieca (FCM Bank) Andrew Farrugia (JMV)

We had an incredible experience at the first Partner Networking Event hosted by the Malta Chamber of Construction Management last January.

As a proud partner of MCCM, it was a privilege to connect and engage with professionals in the industry while also getting insightful and educational takeaways from the partners’ presentations. Moreover, we got reached by the members after the presentation of the new edition of MARE Summit, which was really well received.

We had the opportunity to share some time and drinks with our clients and partners as well as connecting with other professionals in a really friendly atmosphere.

As event planners we want to congratulate MCCM for the excellent organizing and for establishing a fruitful platform for growth and collaboration in construction.

Beatriz Rodriguez Sanz – MARE Summit

Andrew Magri Overand (MacMed) Mario Attard Trevisan (MatuSurv) Mark Scicluna (MIB Brokers) Ami Baird (Ably Resource) Beatriz Rodriguez Sanz (MARE Summit) Andre Grech (IBS)
“ ”

A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training.

Introducing Project Management in Facilities Management

The challenges set up by the Long-Term Renovation Strategy require a new mindset for professionals of Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sector (AEC). Overcoming a silo mentality, seeking a life-long learning approach, and a multi-disciplinary knowledge is now recognised as an opportunity of competitive advantage rather than a mere obligation. In the current knowledge economy, information is the currency of wealth.

This

Indeed, the new European Bauhaus is calling for a cultural rather than a mere technical-ecological transition in the field of built environment with challenging goals that should be also equitable and socially just.

Building is an act of culture. This statement stems from the rationale of Baukultur, a uniquely coined German word, meaning the ‘culture of building’, defined as ‘the coordinated system of knowledge, rules, procedures, and habits that surrounds the building process in a given place and time. This word implies that good planning and building activities combine high design and construction standards with a holistic view of social, economic and environmental aspects and it has an emotional and aesthetic dimension. In a recent paper I submitted to the Kaunas Technical College conference I have emphasized that savings of up to 30% can be achieved in the cost of construction where

integrated teams promote continuous improvement over a series of construction projects, as estimated by the United Kingdom’s Office of Government Commerce.

All the institutions are also supporting this transition: from the religious field with Pope Francis encyclical letter “Laudato Si: On the care of our common home” to the financial sector, where BlackRock’s CEO Larry Fink claimed that 100% of their active and advisory portfolios are now Environmental, Social and Governance Factors (ESG-integrated).

For this reason, an overhaul educational and training programme for AEC professionals and students is necessary.

How can this become actionable even locally?

I believe that in today’s already deviant professional practices this must start from the establishment of mandatory Continuous Professional Development courses, especially for veterans. These activities should not be always arranged in a traditional (sometimes boring) way but in my opinion, we could conceive them in more engaging ways. For example, we can get inspired by the topic of gamification (meaning adding rewards when completing the course); blended learning methodologies (included distance learning), and Project Based Learning (learning by doing) as innovative and interesting educational approaches.

is especially valid for the AEC stakeholders working in an industry lacking in innovation as well as productivity worldwide.
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Interior Design

Preparing your outdoors for 2023

As the summer of 2023 approaches, many people are looking forward to spending more time outside in the sunshine. However, before you can fully enjoy your outdoor space, you may need to do some preparation work. Here are some top trends for preparing your outdoors for summer 2023.

Sustainable Landscaping

In 2023, sustainability is expected to be a hot topic. Consider using native plants that require less water and fertilization. This will help reduce your water bills and also have a positive impact on the environment. Also, try using recycled materials in your hardscaping to reduce waste.

Outdoor Entertainment

In 2023, outdoor entertainment is expected to be a trend that will continue to grow. Consider adding a fire pit, a grill or an outdoor kitchen to make your outdoor space more inviting. Investing in comfortable outdoor furniture, such as a couch or comfortable chairs, will make your space more inviting for your guests.

Smart Lighting

Smart lighting will be a trend in 2023 that will make your outdoor space more functional and easier to use. These lights can be programmed to turn on and off at certain times or in response to motion. This will allow you to use your outdoor space at night without worrying about fumbling for a light switch.

Mosquito Protection

Mosquitoes can ruin an outdoor gathering, but in 2023, mosquito protection will be easier than ever before. Consider installing mosquito-repelling lights, or use a natural insect repellent to keep mosquitoes at bay including certain plants.

Vertical Gardening

In 2023, vertical gardening will be a popular trend that allows you to maximize your outdoor space. Vertical gardens can be built from a variety of materials and can be used to grow vegetables, herbs, and flowers. This is a great way to add a touch of greenery to a small outdoor space.

In conclusion, summer 2023 trends for outdoor spaces will focus on sustainability, entertainment, smart lighting, mosquito protection, and vertical gardening. These trends will help make your outdoor space more functional, comfortable and enjoyable for you and your guests. So, start planning now and get ready to enjoy the great outdoors in 2023.

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A Net Zero Economy

The Role Economic Players – Part 4

Malta, as an island nation, is clearly dependent on its building industry for economic growth and development. However, this industry has also been a significant contributor to the country’s carbon footprint and a high consumer of Malta’s natural resources. To address this challenge, Malta has set a goal to decarbonize its economy, which includes the building industry, as part of its Low Carbon Development Strategy.

The Malta Low Carbon Development Strategy outlines the key actions and initiatives necessary to transition to a low-carbon economy, including the building sector. To achieve this, Malta must repurpose its building industry to reduce its carbon footprint and improve economic resilience while focusing on the reimagined economy we need to be accountable to future generations.

One of the key actions that Malta needs to adopt aggressively and decisively are the design and implementation of resource-efficient buildings through consistent and robust regulations. These regulations will ensure that new buildings are constructed with materials and technologies that reduce their energy consumption and carbon emissions while retrofit work will be repurposed with similar ambitions. This will not only reduce Malta’s carbon footprint, but also improve the resilience of its building stock to extreme weather events and rising temperatures, while lowering operational cost and improve competitively.

Another important initiative is the promotion of further

renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, to meet the energy needs of buildings. This will not only reduce carbon emissions, but also continue to create new economic opportunities and jobs in the renewable energy sector.

To further support this transition, Malta also needs to invest in training, retraining and capacity building for its construction workforce while supporting the development of our local social capital. This will ensure that workers have the skills and knowledge necessary to support low-carbon building technologies to support the shift towards our committed ambitions.

Finally, Malta needs to work closer with the private sector to incentivize investment in low-carbon building technologies and practices. This includes providing tax incentives and other financial support to address existing market failures. Responsible economic reform will need to take this into account.

In conclusion, Malta’s building industry has a critical role to play in the country’s transition to a low-carbon economy. We have a lot to do and the transition is urgently necessary. By repurposing the building industry to reduce its carbon footprint and improve economic resilience, Malta will enable a thriving population set on true sustainable values that drive longer term wellbeing. The Malta Low Carbon Development Strategy provides a roadmap for this transition and lays the foundation for a sustainable and resilient future.

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Green Leases

Green leases are agreements that aim to ensure the sustainable construction or retrofit, usage, operation and maintenance of a property. In several countries uniform standards that can serve as a reference framework for green leases already exist, however, as there is no common European standard or definition of a ‘green lease’, relevant clauses will to a certain extent depend on the purpose of the lease and the circumstances of each individual case.

Both tenant and landlord can initiate the process to engage in a green lease agreement through a Request for Proposal (RFP), to obtain more information on the possibility of the integration of sustainable practices, that can benefit both parties.

Clauses that might be incorporated in these agreements include the use, supply and management of the property. Examples of such provisions include the separation of waste collection by the tenant in specific facilties provided by the landlord. For properties still under construction, the owner would be expected to engage with sustainability professionals to plan and foresee for the sustainable use of the property. Storage rooms for bikes/e-bikes, scooters and other sustainable mobility vehicles can be planned, in addition, to car park spaces with e-supplies facilities. The design of such properties should prioritize the exploitation of renewable energy, battery storage and any other requirements to accommodate other equipment that is classified as energy efficient.

Financial institutions can incentivize their corporate clients to engage in such leases by offering advantageous rates of interest, extended grace periods and insurance products including green discounts. These are just few features of a financial product that can be designed to support corporate clients during their sustainability journey.

Common commercial leasing practices often suffer from

what is known as the principal-agent problem. In many commercial lease structures, the party expending capital may not necessarily benefit from all the value added features attributed to a green building and this is where financial institutions have an important role to play.

To incentivize investments in green buildings, a green lease can be a powerful tool for reducing operating costs, increasing property values, and achieving sustainability goals for both sides of the equation. In the next feature, I will explain in more detail the design of such agreements and the role that financial institutions can play to reaching sustainability goals.

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MCCM Interview

Porie Saikia FAIA, FCIOB, RIBA, Chartered CM

How did you get to know about MCCM?

As a member and an international ambassador of Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) I take an active interest in CIOB’s new ventures and relationships with international associations and organizations. Following the current CEO Carolyn Gumble’s international activities, I came across her recent trip to Malta to meet with MCCM. Since I was coming to Malta on vacation, I asked Carolyn about MCCM who in turn e-introduced me to the MCCM President Jesmond Chetcuti. I was delighted to meet with Mr. Chetcuti and yourself in Valletta two weeks ago, and much appreciated your spending time discussing the built environment issues and prospectives in Malta.

What is your profession back in New York?

I am an architect by profession licensed in the United States and in the UK. I am also a Chartered Construction Manager with CIOB. I have been in the built environment industry for over four decades, working across the globe in various capacities from designer, builder, advisor, consultant and mentor, in both private and public sectors. I am currently working at the transportation & infrastructure arena focusing on environmental sustainability, energy efficiency and

climate resiliency.

What was your first impression of the building and transport infrastructure on these islands?

For an architect, Malta’s architecture with its origins in prehistory, and some of the oldest free-standing structures on Earth, is most fascinating. I came to Malta to see these up close, to touch them and to marvel at them- which not only met but exceeded my expectation. I am genuinely impressed by Mata’s effort in heritage and preservation while it is keeping in stride with the modern times with sustainable development efforts such as the Smart City agendas and carbon neutral programs. As for transportation infrastructure, I found public transport to be surprising efficient. An avid user of public transit, I took buses and ferries everywhere I went in Malta and Gozo.

Malta is committed towards achieving the objectives the EU’s 2030 Energy & Climate Framework & the decarbonization of Europe by 2050. Do you think Malta can adapt to climate change?

Absolutely. From my understanding Malta, which generates less than 0.1 % of the EU-27's total greenhouse gas (GHG)

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pemissions, has already reduced its emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2012. However, given the country’s demography and its rising GDP, it may be difficult to continue the pace. This does not mean that Malta will not get there any later and most EU countries. In fact, in my opinion, Malta will be an exemplary leader in this effort since there is a great awareness among the Maltese public about being sustainable and contributing towards net zero. Public awareness is crucial and much more effective while implementing policies and regulations.

Malta has limited mitigation potential in view of its service-based economy [mainly transport & agriculture] & its limited geographical area which restricts options for enhancement of land-based carbon sinks. It is therefore making use of options that fall under the Effort Sharing Decision. Do you think that carbon offsets and intra EU transfers are a possible solution for Malta to reach its commitment?

Carbon offsets and intra EU transfers can happen in many different ways and not always such that a country is restricted due to its geographical limitations. In addition, at the United Nations, 43 of the world's smallest island and low-lying coastal countries, representing the Member States most susceptible to change in climate, forged a coalition called the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), which has been working on developing a platform on carbon offsets among other climate related issues. I do believe that coming together with similar obstacles in achieving the commitment is the collective effort needed especially for small island nations.

What is your opinion on integrated photovoltaic systems? Do you think that such installations could possibly work for our island when taking into consideration the architectural nature of our buildings?

Photovoltaic (PV) connected systems are experiencing rapid market growth, due to the continually downward trend in PV cost together with government supported programs. Renewable energy portfolios of projects in regions such as Italy that is similar to Malta, has experienced maximized return with minimized investment risk.

Additionally, although energy and CO2 reduction potential can be reached through consumer-oriented policy measures, educating the general public towards behavioral change can result in energy efficiency and continued/extended use of low-emission energy. If the focus of energy policy is equally on businesses as well as on private households, which possess immense unused potential for energy reductions (and climate protection), the reduction of carbon footprint can be achieved twice as fast.

Talking about architecture, building design and construction, one of the important area to focus on is embodied carbon. Construction materials used worldwide that embody carbon is very extensive. For example, cement — the key ingredient that gives concrete its strength — is one of the largest emitters of CO2 in the built environment. Since concrete is the most abundant human-made material in the world, cement production creates ~7% of the world’s CO2 emissions and is the largest contributor to embodied carbon in the built environment.

Porie Saikia FAIA, FCIOB, RIBA

New York

February 6, 2023

BIO:

Porie Saikia FAIA, FCIOB, RIBA, Chartered CM

Porie Saikia is a Registered Architect (RA) in NY, USA, Chartered Architect of Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), and a Chartered Construction Manager at CIOB, UK. She has been elevated to a Fellow at the American Institute of Architects (FAIA) 2020, and a Fellow at the Chartered Institute of Building of UK (FCIOB) in 2010.

Throughout her career, Porie has demonstrated exemplary leadership by driving design excellence in civic architecture and championing innovative project delivery to enhance the built environment experience, benefiting millions in the New York region and the world. Her advocacy for a sustainable built environment is reflected in the various positions she has held in the industry and evidenced by receipt of the Gerstner Medal from Prague and the Nelson A. Rockefeller Excelsior award in New York.

Currently as the Senior Director, Environment, Energy, Climate & Sustainability at the MTA NY, she is responsible for taking forward the vision for Environmentally Sustainable MTA across its five agencies, developing strategies for Renewable Energy, GHG Reduction and Energy Efficiency. Porie also teaches Construction Management at the PRATT Institute of New York.

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Materials

Smart ways to safeguard your property

Waterproofing is a means of preventing water from entering your property. Keeping a building dry, allows for reduced humidity within and is essential for retaining a building’s structural integrity and aesthetics.

It has become ever more vital to also consider the performance of a building’s thermal efficiency. Poor thermal protection of the building envelope must be addressed. That includes all areas connected to the external environment such as facades, shafts and especially roofs.

When considering different building envelope products, it’s important to understand that energy radiates from all objects. The sun radiates energy primarily on the visual spectrum and near-infrared. There are 3 methods of energy transfer that affect energy efficiency in the building envelope. These are:

• Conduction, which is countered using an insulation R-value;

• Convection, which is countered with an airtightness layer;

• Radiation, which is countered with a radiant barrier. Indeed, solar reflective white paints contain additives that generally deliver near-infrared deflection performance better than other products such as shiny metallic surfaces and Low-E films.

Solar reflective paints work by deflecting the sun’s radiant visual energy. Earth receives energy from the sun in the form of solar radiation with varying radiation wavelengths along the electromagnetic spectrum. The sun emits strongly in the visible light range, but it also produces ultraviolet and near-infrared radiation.

High solar reflective paint helps keep heat out of buildings. Should that building not have any insulation, a real solution for improving the performance of a roof includes using a solar reflective paint. High solar reflectance also improves comfort during a hot day. Indeed, they offer better durability over standard white paint and therefore add significant value to an asset.

Weber Dry Reflex-P is Saint-Gobain’s Solar Reflective Paint with a Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) that has been tested and certified according to 103, ASTM E1980-11. It also carries LEED certification since it contributes to the satisfaction of the SS Credit for the reduction of the heat island effect, according to the LEED v 4.1 Protocol.

This high-performance, single-component paint, is water based and contains special pigments and ceramic additives which confer high solar reflectance properties when applied over liquid membranes, to concrete, cement, wood and metal surfaces, and in particular over already laid carpet membranes, in so doing extend their life.

With 10,000 people in 60 countries, supported by almost 200 production units, Weber is the brand that cares about building better for people and the planet by offering proven solutions that deliver improved sustainability and high performance.

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Thanks to a very high reflectance and high emissivity, Weber Dry Reflex-P reduces the temperature on the external surface, contributing to better living comfort and energy saving in buildings. It also improves the performance and efficiency of photovoltaic panels.
PERFORMANCE
SUSTAINABILITY

Procurement in Construction

Discretionary Procurement Systems

During the past articles, on procurement in construction, we addressed various categories of Construction Procurement Systems: Traditional, Integrated and management-oriented systems. The client may have the discretion to use any of the systems, either individually or in combination or even a bespoke system of his/her own making, but with the chosen system(s) being implemented within a specific setting controlled by the client.

A discretionary system is, therefore, an administrative and cultural framework into which any procurement system(s) can be incorporated, hence allowing the client to carry out the project by imposing a very specific management style, or company culture, while at the same time enabling him/her to use the most suitable of all of the available procurement methods.

Partnering

Partnering is considered a fundamental withdrawal from the traditional procurement methodology in terms of management of the supply chain bond and construction procurement. During the last couple of decades, partnering and other associated methods of collaboration were regarded as a means of addressing the fragmentation within the construction industry that has troubled the efforts to improve project performance for many years.

Partnering originated in the USA at the beginning of the 1980s as a cooperative technique aiming to decrease the mounting disputes between construction stakeholders and the associated costs.

Partnering may be described as a procurement system that relies on trust cooperation and collaboration, which helps innovate construction projects at both organisational and inter-organisational levels, improves communication between project team members, mitigates competition, reduces transaction costs and information irregularities, and

alleviates tense working atmosphere. The system is dependent on “cooperation and teamwork, honesty, trust, equity and equality between the various members of the supply chain”.

Partnering Process (Masterman, 2002)

While the RICS (2012) report showed that the use of Partnering increased from 0.6% to 1.0% between 2001 and 2010, the CIOB (2010) report, found that, when dealing with big-scale value projects, partnering is regarded as appropriate and more effective:

• 17.6% for projects of a value under £5 Million.

• 24.1% for projects of a value between £5 Million and £50 Million.

• 29.3% for projects of a value over £50 Million.

The following are some common goals and benefits found in healthy partnering:

• Parties seek “win-win” solutions.

• Long-term relationship (Strategic Partnering) is based on value, trust, honesty and long-term commitment.

• Common problem-solving and avoidance of blame.

• Common benefits and profit sharing.

• Continuous improvement, training and learning from past mistakes

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FIRST WORKSHOP INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOPS COMPLETION HANDOVER & FEEDBACK FIRST WORKSHOP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PROJECT USING CHOSEN PROCUREMENT METHOD PARTNERING CHARTER Incorporating mutual objectives CLIENT + CONSULTANTS + CONTRACTORS + SUB-CONTRACTORS + SUPPLEIRS P A R T N E R S

• Common needs and objectives of all partners.

• Decreased costs and increased profit.

Public-private partnerships (known also as PPP or Triple-P)

Public-private partnerships involve collaboration between a government agency and a private-sector company that can be used to finance, build, and operate projects, such as public transportation networks, parks, power plants, and convention centres. Financing a project through a public-private partnership can allow a project to be completed sooner and/or make it possible.

PPPs were first developed in the UK in the 1990s with the aim that private sector companies might be more efficient at providing certain services than public authorities and so could deliver better value for money projects for the taxpayers.

PPPs can cover a range of partnerships to deliver policies, services, buildings or infrastructure, from hospital catering to maintenance and underground transportation. Partnerships can either be with central or local government, with typical contract periods of 20 to 30 years, or longer.

The three main categories of PPP are:

Concession contracts, where a private sector company provides a concession on behalf of a public authority, for which the public pays them (such as a toll road / Bridge / Tunnel).

Private Finance Initiatives (PFI), where a private sector company finances and provides a public service that might include construction, maintenance and operation, for which they are paid by a public authority.

Institutional PPP is where a joint venture company is

established jointly by a public authority and a private company to provide a public service.

PFI is the most common form of PPP and is one of the three procurement routes preferred by the Government Construction Strategy for central civil government projects, in the UK. Generally, it is only suitable for large-scale projects, i.e., those with a capital cost of over £20 million, such as hospitals, schools etc….

References:

• Cartlidge, D. (2009). Quantity Surveyor’s Pocket Book. Oxford: Elsevier.

• CIOB. (2010). Procurement in the Construction Industry. Retrieved from https://www.ciob.org/industry/research/ Procurement-Construction-Industry

• Masterman, J. W. E (2002). An Introduction to Building Procurement Systems (2nd ed.). Oxon: Taylor & Francis.

• NEDO. (1988). Faster Building for Commerce. London: HMSO.

• RICS. (2012). Contracts in Use. A Survey of Building Contracts in Use during 2010. London: Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors Publications.

• Office of Government Commerce. (2007). Achieving Excellence in Construction Procurement Guides 06. Retrieved from http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100503135839/http:/www. ogc.gov.uk/documents/CP0066AEGuide6.pdf

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Windows and Doors as part of Decarbonisation

Introduction

Climate change has been addressed for decades, and various governments and groups have dealt with it independently for many years. We have seen growing awareness in the previous decade as a larger community suffers the repercussions, and the feeling of urgency has grown tremendously.

Like any other European nation, most buildings in Malta were built before 1990, resulting in a weak building envelope that uses much energy for cooling and heating. High-performance windows and doors paired with glass types based on orientation are one factor that helps to decrease energy usage.

As of 2015, nations with climates similar to Malta's, such as Cyprus, Greece, and Spain, had amended their

construction laws. Regarding windows and doors, Cyprus imposed a maximum of 2.9 W/m2K for restorations and new structures, followed by 3.2 W/m2K in Greece, 3.0 W/m2K in Italy, and 2.5 W/m2K in Spain, according to their different areas. On the other hand, Malta has raised its U value rating to 4 W/m2K. A lower U value indicates the material is more insulating than one with a higher U value.

Hotel Case Study

Hotel businesses are under totalitarian mandates to minimise their carbon impact. The first and most important milestone is to reduce their carbon footprint by 90% by 2050 in accordance with the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Still, more importantly, residents are requesting the carbon footprints of such establishments, mainly corporate clients, who must report all of their environmental impacts, even when travelling.

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Interior Design

Preparing your outdoors for 2023

A hotel will replace more than 400 apertures as part of a sustainability update. Today, the apertures are constructed of basic aluminium, and while the quality of the profiles is decent, the U Values are high, 5.5 W/m2K.

Given that the area of the glass is greater than that of the profile, the values of the glass are more crucial than those of the profile, while the profile must help to improve acoustics, water resistance and air permeability.

The hotel must increase the efficiency of its windows by at least 30% to meet the ultimate objective of 66% by 2030. Because of the square area, the suggested apertures must have a Ug value of 1.0 W/m2K. The Uw value was set at 1.4 W/m2K, meaning providers may use whichever material they choose as long as they achieve the 1.4 W/m2K target.

When all planned features are combined, the establishment's overall energy efficiency will rise by more than 70% from the windows. The corporation will save more than €50,000 in energy consumption.The most crucial aspect, however, is that the hotel would save about 1144 tonnes of CO2.

Conclusion

While numerous aspects of decarbonisation can be considered, from cement formulations to heating and cooling technologies and Passive House systems for low operating consumption, retrofitting may be a challenge. Given that the majority of buildings in Europe require extensive upgrading, high-performance windows and doors make a direct contribution.

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Quality in Construction

The Importance of Site Investigation before Construction

The Importance of Site Investigation before Construction

In recent years Malta saw a shift towards commissioning a site investigation before a project actually commences. This shift was driven partially by the fact that in the recent past there were a number of accidents which involved third parties that might have easily been avoided with a proper site investigation and proper guidance by professionals that can properly interpret the investigation document and relate the findings to what there is on site.

economic constructions. In a very broad sense, the ground investigation is understood to include not only the underlying rock or soil, but also the ground water regime or any other underlying conditions that might be relevant. A site investigation on the other hand will give a broad understanding of the construction methods used for neighbouring buildings so that decisions on the way forward on how to construct the building in question can be taken.

The need to carry out a site investigation

Thus, this investigation inherently gives a better understanding to the architect and the engineers responsible for the new construction and guide them towards the right choices that would enable safe and

The characterisation of the ground conditions whether it is a greenfield site or a site that has already been developed will include geotechnical, geo-environmental and structural issues. The investigation of all these will result in an economic, cost-effective design without a lot of site disruptions that may develop if these issues are not studied beforehand. The investigation should allow for a comprehensive risk assessment of the conditions of the site to be made. The risks to be identified may include risks related to health, engineering, financial and regulatory which may all arise from unforeseen ground conditions and liabilities.

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The main purpose of a site investigation is to properly identify issues that are relevant to the site in question and to understand better the specific ground conditions that will ultimately affect the development being proposed.

The main objectives of a Site Investigation

The main objectives of a site investigation are the following:

1. To determine the suitability of the site and the surroundings to the project being proposed and to try and understand better the engineering challenges at hand.

2. To obtain all the necessary design parameters to be able to do the necessary geotechnical and structural design.

3. To understand better the potential ground and ground water conditions that would affect the construction. To also get a better understanding of how the neighbouring buildings are constructed and how this might affect the construction of the structure being proposed.

4. To understand better if there is any risk of contamination in the ground and if there is to understand what kind of contamination one is dealing with. This does not only have an environmental effect but also an effect on the kind of materials chosen for the project.

5. To understand if there are any materials present on site that can actually be used in the project itself.

6. To understand better how the proposed design affects the adjacent structures and possibly the ground water.

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QAQC on Asphalt Works

Safety First, Deadlines Before?

QAQC ON asphalt WORKS

Asphalt is produced in a plant that Heats, Dries and Mixes Aggregate, Bitumen and Sand into a composite mix. It is then applied through a paving machine on site as a solid material at a nominated or required thickness, relative to the end use.

It is a binder mixed with an aggregate creating asphalt cement that binds the stone, sand, and gravel, resulting in the pavement for our roads, highways and airfields. There is more thought that goes into asphalt mix designs than do concrete ones. Determining an optimum asphalt blend involves various laboratory tests, calculations, and determinations to find the optimum mix proportions. It is important for a mix to have the correct proportions. Following tests are performed to evaluate the quality of

Asphalt Site Sampling and Temperature Monitoring

•Binder content

Quantitative determination of the asphalt binder content of HMA mixtures and pavement samples is necessary for many reasons, including: quality control, specification acceptance, and mixture evaluation studies. HMA that has too much asphalt binder can experience problems such as bleeding, lowered skid resistance, and lowered resistance to permanent deformation (rutting and shoving.

•% Air voids

Asphalt consists of four main materials: bitumen, aggregate, fillers (fine particles) and air. Asphalt without sufficient air entrapped in the layer will deform under traffic and result in a rutted and rough surface.

•Asphat Coring

Asphalt core cutting test to determine the thickness of the asphalt layer, compaction and other properties.

•Asphalt Softening Point Test:

The determination of softening point helps to know the temperature up to which a bituminous binder should be heated for various road use applications.

all asphalt is created the same, engineers need to predict how well an asphalt mixture will perform in addition to the maximum load it can support

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•Particle Size Distribution

Portion of aggregate on specified sieves expressed as cumulative percentages by mass passing those sieves.The test is applicable to aggregates recovered after binder extraction.

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Compaction of Asphalt Thickness of asphalt check

Structures

Raft Foundation

Raft foundation is the monolithic RCC slab of uniform thickness provided throughout the entire area below the superstructure, which supports walls and columns. Thus, it acts as a structural mat.

The compensated foundation is that foundation in which the weight of the building is approximately equal to the full weight of soil excavated for the foundation.

Types of Raft foundation

The raft foundation is generally divided on the basis of two categories. They are on the basis of support and on the basis of structural component.

A) On the basis of support:

1. Raft on soil: The raft foundation is directly erected over the top layer of excavated and compacted layer of soil.

2. On pile: In this, the raft foundation is constructed over the cap of the pile foundation. The soil which is very fragile on top and over which massive structure is needed to be built, at such conditions raft is built over the pile.

B) On the basis of structural component:

1. Flat plate: It is a single slab foundation of uniform thickness provided throughout the area covered by the structure. This kind of mat foundation is used when loads from the superstructure are comparatively low. Also, used when the spacing column is small.

2. Flat plate slab thickened under column: the slab thickness under the column base is provided more in order to reduce the negative bending moment and diagonal shear in the foundation.

3. Two-way beam and slab: in such mat foundation, beams are provided along the joining the base of the column in all directions, and above the beam, the slab of uniform thickness is provided as a mat.

Such a beam is generally called inverted beams, and the column is located at their intersection. Such foundation provides enough strength when column

spacing is large and suitable when the column is not equally loaded eccentric loading over the structure.

4. The rigid frame (Box structure frame): In such a foundation, the box structure is provided along with the basement wall as stiffener forming a hollow compartment in the mat.

The boxes are cellular or like a rigid frame having slabs, basement shear walls. Such kind of mat foundation is used for high bending stress reduction. And also such a foundation reduces settlement and helps to control upthrust.

ADVANTAGES OF RAFT FOUNDATION

• The raft foundation is shallow so it doesn’t require more excavation.

• Raft foundation can provide the provision of a basement compartment in the building.

• Raft foundation is extremely advantageous to the soil which has less bearing capacity.

• Raft foundation has a larger base area so reduces the pressure intensity to ground strata.

• Raft foundations are economic in the sense that the slab of raft can be directly used without any other concrete work.

• Raft foundation reduces differential settlement.

DISADVANTAGES OF RAFT FOUNDATION

• It is costlier than individual foundation

• The unnecessary area where there is no significant stress, there also the reinforcement is used.

• There is a probability of uplift of structure when the groundwater table rises making nearby soil with more pore water pressure.

• Waterproofing and proper management of water in the basement is difficult.

• Edge erosion can occur.

44

Education

I Choose - January 2023

For the second time in less than a year, our chamber was present for another edition of the I Choose Career Fair.

This event is organised by the Education Division within the Ministry for Education with the scope to provide students and their parents with an overview of prospective careers.

Since that one of the main pillars on which our chamber is

built is education, we feel it is our duty and obligation to attend such events in order to inform the next generation about the prospects the construction industry may offer, particularly at the managerial and supervisory level. Following the success of last year's event, which was held in one of Floriana's major hotels, this year's event was held between January 30 and January 31 at the MCCF in Ta Qali, a significantly larger location.

45

Courses

MFMAC

Delivered by seasoned Facilities professionals that climbed the corporate ladder, our academy delivers the theoretical base for a rewarding career in this exciting ever-changing field. Our academic objective is to support the facilities industry ranging from residential, commercial, and public buildings through accredited courses at different academic levels. MFMAC is the natural home to leading practitioners, academic experts, and technical experts in vast array of disciplines, all converging under Malta’s First recognised Facilities Management Academy

BSc (Hons) in Facilities Management – Accredited with 240ECTS are an excellent choice for both existing and potential professionals within the facilities sector. This course will help the participants master the skills required to embark on a successful journey as a facilities manager and other related professions such as Head of Engineering, Head of Operations or COO.

Learners will gain a comprehensive overview of the facilities industry and a solid understanding of the techniques available to deliver effective support services for any organisation. This facilities management course will equip students with the skills and practical knowledge to understand this multi discipline industry.

Intake start March 2023

MQF Level 4 – Diploma in Facilities Management

Proceeding to MQF Level 5

Undergraduate Diploma in Facilities Management

Proceeding to MQF Level 5

Undergraduate Higher Diploma in Facilities Management

Proceeding to MQF Level 6

BSc (Hons) in Facilities Management

Visit: www.mfmac@org

IDEA ACADEMY

A Certificate in Site Management (MQF 5) is for those with relevant experience but with an O-level standard of education. The course covers construction project processes, legal aspects, management skills, health and

safety legislation, and environmental and sustainability issues.

The B.Sc. in Construction Project Management (Top-Up) (MQF 6) is ideal for those with a higher diploma (MQF 5) in a subject related to the construction industry. Those who have a Certificate or Diploma may opt to exit this course at an earlier stage and obtain a Level 6 Award in Construction Project Management.

The B.Sc. in Quantity Surveying (MQF 6) is designed to equip students with the necessary knowledge in cost planning, procurement processes and the management of construction projects. As the demand for this skill increases, there is a wide range of job opportunities.

The M.Sc. in Construction Management (MQF 7) is for construction and civil engineering professionals who would like to advance in their careers with the necessary tools and the latest industry knowledge.

Find out more here: mt.ideaeducation.com

SHIELD CONSULTANTS LTD

Safe Systems Of Work – Half Day Course

Safe Systems of Work [SSoW] are a mandatory requirement under the OHS Laws of Malta, under OHSA Act XXVII/2000 and related Subsidiary Legislation. Professionals in all fields of activity need to understand how SSoW and their respective roles in ensuring that work of all kind is planned effectively and safely executed. This course is designed to provide an effective introduction into SSoW for professionals across the construction industry, covering the five elements of a SSoW as SHIELD

Professional Practices:

• Planning

• Responsibilities

• HAZID and RA

• Implementation of Controls

• Risk Management and Emergency Preparedness

This Course is for: OHS professionals; Site Foremen; Planners; Architects; Site Supervisors; STOs

Venue: SHIELD Consultants Ltd and/or online

Duration: 4hrs

46

Passive House Details Solutions for High-Performance Design

Passive House Details introduces the concepts, principles, and design processes of building ultralow-energy buildings. The objective of this book is to provide design goals, research, analysis, systems, details, and inspiring images of some of the most energy-efficient, carbon-neutral, healthy, and satisfying buildings currently built in the region. Other topics included: heat transfer, moisture management, performance targets, and climatic zones. The book is a visual catalog of construction details, materials, and systems drawn from projects contributed from forty firms. Fourteen in-depth case studies demonstrate the most energy-efficient systems for foundations, walls, floors, roofs, windows, doors, and more.

Link to buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Passive-House-Details-Solutions -High-Performance/dp/1138958263

Building Performance and Evaluation Guide

This Guides describes what Building Performance and Evaluation (BPE) is, and what benefits can come about from analysing and understanding a buildings’ performance gaps –from reduced carbon and energy usage, to improved asset efficiency, through to the development of evolving interventions which can be employed by building owners and operators.

Importantly this Guide supports a holistic approach to BPE, i.e. that it is not just applicable to buildings after they are built, it can be applied during design as well with various desk-based assessments. It goes into detail about what comparisons can be made of the data (as-designed vs as-built, energy usage vs national/ international standards, pre intervention vs post, new build vs retrofit etc.) which all empower decision-makers as to possible interventions.

The content of the Guide is structured around the project life-cycle and covers topics such as:

- management tools and methodologies (BIM, Soft Landings…)

- desktop assessment methods (SAP, BREEAM, LEED, PHHP)

- modelling (whole-build or elemental and hygrothermal)

- testing of installed systems during commissioning

- pre-occupancy (equipment, thermography, building forensics…)

- post-occupancy (POE, smart meters, heat transfer coefficient…)

- life-cycle analysis for extraction, deconstruction, recycling

There are a number of illustrations and diagrams used throughout to provide examples and each chapter has ‘in brief’ summary page for ease of use.

For further information, please visit: https://www.ciobacademy.org/product/building-performance-and-evaluation-guide/

CIOB members will receive a 20% discount, and for non-members the Guide is £40.

47 Publications

Education & Development CPDS

Maintaining Our Mental Health

Lou Banks, Culture Consultant for Rising Vibe, will walk you through positive steps and changes which will give you coping mechanisms to recognise small changes which can be made to manage your day to day environment, which is particularly important during the current Covid- 19 pandemic.

https://www.ciobacademy.org/product/maintaining-our-mental-health/

Introduction to Demolition in Construction

In this webinar Tim Whittle, SHEQ Co-ordinator from the Wring Group Ltd, gives an overview of the Demolition Sector within the construction industry.

He covers health and safety as well as professionalism and technology and the challenges and risks involved in the industry. He also talks about how the uptake of Modern Methods of Construction impact and affect this sector.

https://www.ciobacademy.org/product/introduction-to-demolition-in-construction/

Rainscreen insulation and cladding retrofit

This CPD sponsored by Rockwool explains how rainscreen cladding can be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way to upgrade a building, and the specification factors to consider shorturl.at/ayST4

48

Opinions

Having been one of the Partners who attended, what are your thoughts on the first Partner Networking Event hosted by MCCM last January 2023?

It was such a pleasure representing Central Mediterranean Business School at the MCCM Partner Networking Event this January. It was a wonderful opportunity to meet fellow partners and come together to share best practices, discuss challenges, and explore ways to collaborate. I believe that the event was able to provide a platform for partners to connect with one another, learn new ideas, and spark collaborations. It was great to see the enthusiasm and expertise shared by the attendees, as well as the commitment that MCCM always exemplifies. I'm excited to see what our ongoing collaborations can achieve!

I would like to congratulate the MCCM for the networking event. It was worthwhile listening to exceptional speakers from all sectors involved to realise a turnkey construction solution. From early stages of planning, finance,site investigation, frame structure, health and safety just to mention few till realization of the project.

High accurate technologies and innovative services were launched by brief and in depth presentations.

Hope you continue with same courage to develop the domestic and international standards of construction industry.

The first Partner Networking Event hosted by MCCM in January 2023 was a fantastic opportunity to highlight the key partners of MCCM and showcase their market leading services and/or products. Events such as these are crucial in ensuring awareness of the latest technologies and services on offer, allowing MCCM members to make informed decisions during their working career. By fostering strong connections and partnerships over time, Malta’s construction industry can become world-leading and the pride on the nation. I look forward to working with the members and partners of MCCM to improve worker safety and reduce the environmental impacts of industry.

“We would like to thank the President and dedicated committee for having invited us to exhibit at the MCCM’s first ever Partner Networking event and congratulate all the excellent professional members receiving their awards that day. We are equally grateful to have been provided with an opportunity to present an overview of our Group, outlining the focus we have been placing on ensuring that the brands we represent in Malta remain at the forefront of their market segments, not only in name, but in real terms, by constantly bringing to market technologically advanced building materials that meet all legislation and solve tomorrow’s problems today. We were indeed truly inspired by the attendees’ engagement throughout the event.

Thank you MCCM ! “

First of all, I would like to thank MCCM for the opportunity of being part of the Partner Networking Event. In my opinion the Event was highly successful and presented a wide range of products, most of which are very useful. A recommendation for the future would be to present less products but enter into greater technical detail of presented products. The reason for recommending this is that the target audience was one which has a good technical grasp of construction and its products. This would raise awareness and appreciation of innovative products.

The Networking Event in January was an excellent opportunity to meet other MCCM partners; it was a great success and a credit to the Chamber. I particularly enjoyed the presentations which enabled each company to showcase their products and services. As with all events hosted by MCCM, this networking opportunity was well organised, welcoming and a great chance to meet with other like minded professionals. Not only did attendance solidify existing relationships, but new points of contact were created; Ably will be engaging the services offered by a number of those companies. Thanks again to the Chamber; a great event and we look forward to seeing you again next time!

Good networking event. A bit more time for networking with attendees would have been ideal. Good initiative by MCCM.

49

Events 2022

MALTA CHAMBER OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Events in programme for the coming months

3rd & 24th April Communities of Practice - ERA

18th, 20th, 25th & 27th April H&S Course for Professionals

9th May 10th May Official Opening of the MCCM offices Floriana

CIOB CEO to visit Local Educational Institutions

10th May Women in Construction 2023 - The Malta Chamber of Commerce

11th May

CIOB CEO to visit Public Officials and Gozo

1st & 2nd June MARE Summit at MFCC Ta’ Qali

Malta Chamber of Construction Management would like to thank its Partners

50

Articles inside

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

1min
pages 42-43
Quality in Construction article cover image

Quality in Construction

4min
pages 40-41
Interior Design article cover image

Interior Design

1min
page 39
Apertures Materials article cover image

Apertures Materials

1min
page 38
Procurement in Construction Discretionary Procurement Systems article cover image

Procurement in Construction Discretionary Procurement Systems

3min
pages 36-37
THE article cover image

THE

2min
page 34
MCCM Interview article cover image

MCCM Interview

4min
pages 32-33
Green Leases article cover image

Green Leases

1min
page 31
A Net Zero Economy article cover image

A Net Zero Economy

1min
page 30
VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER article cover image

VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER

1min
page 29
A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training. article cover image

A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training.

1min
page 28
Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment? article cover image

Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment?

4min
pages 24-25
Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

2min
pages 22-23
Health and Safety article cover image

Health and Safety

1min
page 21
BIM in Construction Management article cover image

BIM in Construction Management

3min
pages 18-19
Facilities article cover image

Facilities

1min
page 17
MARE Summit article cover image

MARE Summit

1min
page 16
Second Annual General Meeting article cover image

Second Annual General Meeting

1min
pages 12-13
FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS article cover image

FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS

4min
pages 9-11
CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER article cover image

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER

1min
page 8
BENEFITS article cover image

BENEFITS

1min
page 6
Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO article cover image

Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO

1min
page 6
Editorial article cover image

Editorial

1min
pages 3-4
Opinions article cover image

Opinions

2min
page 49
Education & Development CPDS article cover image

Education & Development CPDS

1min
page 48
Courses article cover image

Courses

4min
pages 46-47
Concrete Frame Structure vs Masonry Structure Structures article cover image

Concrete Frame Structure vs Masonry Structure Structures

2min
page 44
Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

1min
pages 42-43
Quality in Construction article cover image

Quality in Construction

4min
pages 40-41
Interior Design article cover image

Interior Design

1min
page 39
Apertures Materials article cover image

Apertures Materials

1min
page 38
Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems article cover image

Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems

2min
pages 36-37
THE article cover image

THE

2min
page 34
MCCM Interview article cover image

MCCM Interview

4min
pages 32-33
Green Leases article cover image

Green Leases

1min
page 31
A Net Zero Economy article cover image

A Net Zero Economy

1min
page 30
VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER article cover image

VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER

1min
page 29
A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training. article cover image

A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training.

1min
page 28
Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment? article cover image

Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment?

4min
pages 24-25
Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

2min
pages 22-23
Health and Safety article cover image

Health and Safety

1min
page 21
BIM in Construction Management article cover image

BIM in Construction Management

3min
pages 18-19
Facilities article cover image

Facilities

1min
page 17
Mare Summit article cover image

Mare Summit

1min
page 16
Second Annual General Meeting article cover image

Second Annual General Meeting

1min
pages 12-13
FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS article cover image

FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS

4min
pages 9-11
CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER article cover image

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER

1min
page 8
BENEFITS article cover image

BENEFITS

1min
page 6
Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO article cover image

Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO

1min
page 6
Editorial article cover image

Editorial

1min
pages 3-4
Opinions article cover image

Opinions

2min
page 49
Education & Development CPDS article cover image

Education & Development CPDS

1min
page 48
Courses article cover image

Courses

4min
pages 46-47
Concrete Frame Structure vs Masonry Structure Structures article cover image

Concrete Frame Structure vs Masonry Structure Structures

2min
page 44
Equality, Diversity And Workplace Summary article cover image

Equality, Diversity And Workplace Summary

1min
page 42
Quality in Construction article cover image

Quality in Construction

5min
pages 40-42
Interior Design article cover image

Interior Design

1min
page 39
Apertures Materials article cover image

Apertures Materials

1min
page 38
Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems article cover image

Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems

2min
pages 36-37
THE article cover image

THE

2min
page 34
MCCM Interview article cover image

MCCM Interview

4min
pages 32-33
Green Leases article cover image

Green Leases

1min
page 31
A Net Zero Economy article cover image

A Net Zero Economy

1min
page 30
VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER article cover image

VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER

1min
page 29
A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training. article cover image

A renovation wave based on quality education and vocational training.

1min
page 28
Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment? article cover image

Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment?

4min
pages 24-25
Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

2min
pages 22-23
Health and Safety article cover image

Health and Safety

1min
page 21
BIM in Construction Management article cover image

BIM in Construction Management

3min
pages 18-19
Facilities article cover image

Facilities

1min
page 17
MARE Summit article cover image

MARE Summit

1min
page 16
Health and Safety Certificates (network event) (BICC) article cover image

Health and Safety Certificates (network event) (BICC)

1min
page 15
Second Annual General Meeting article cover image

Second Annual General Meeting

1min
pages 12-13
FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS article cover image

FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS

4min
pages 9-11
CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER article cover image

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER

1min
page 8
BENEFITS article cover image

BENEFITS

1min
page 6
Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO article cover image

Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO

1min
page 6
Editorial article cover image

Editorial

1min
pages 3-4
Opinions article cover image

Opinions

2min
page 49
Education & Development CPDS article cover image

Education & Development CPDS

1min
page 48
Courses article cover image

Courses

4min
pages 46-47
Equality, Diversity And Workplace Summary article cover image

Equality, Diversity And Workplace Summary

1min
page 42
Quality in Construction article cover image

Quality in Construction

5min
pages 40-42
Apertures Materials article cover image

Apertures Materials

2min
pages 38-39
Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems article cover image

Procurement in Construction Management Procurement Systems

2min
pages 36-37
THE article cover image

THE

2min
page 34
Interior Design article cover image

Interior Design

1min
page 33
Green Leases article cover image

Green Leases

1min
page 32
Integrating Photovoltaic Installations into our buildings Sustainability article cover image

Integrating Photovoltaic Installations into our buildings Sustainability

1min
page 31
A Net Zero Economy article cover image

A Net Zero Economy

1min
page 30
VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER article cover image

VALLETTA DESIGN CLUSTER

1min
page 29
NETWORK EVENT article cover image

NETWORK EVENT

2min
pages 26-28
Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment? article cover image

Ethics in Construction Construction: A stressful environment?

4min
pages 24-25
Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety article cover image

Safety First, Deadlines Before? Health & Safety

2min
pages 22-23
Health and Safety article cover image

Health and Safety

1min
page 21
BIM in Construction Management article cover image

BIM in Construction Management

3min
pages 18-19
Facilities Introducing Project Management in Facilities Management article cover image

Facilities Introducing Project Management in Facilities Management

1min
page 17
MARE Summit article cover image

MARE Summit

1min
page 16
Health and Safety Certificates (network event) (BICC) article cover image

Health and Safety Certificates (network event) (BICC)

1min
page 15
Second Annual General Meeting article cover image

Second Annual General Meeting

1min
pages 12-13
FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS article cover image

FINANCING REAL ESTATE PROJECTS

4min
pages 9-11
CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER article cover image

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP BOARD CIOB EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION CHARTER

1min
page 8
BENEFITS article cover image

BENEFITS

1min
page 6
Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO article cover image

Message from THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIOB CEO

1min
page 6
Editorial article cover image

Editorial

1min
pages 3-4
Chamber Membership Board article cover image

Chamber Membership Board

1min
page 8
Facilities article cover image

Facilities

2min
page 17
Procurement in Construction article cover image

Procurement in Construction

12min
pages 36-41
Finance article cover image

Finance

2min
page 9
Editorial article cover image

Editorial

2min
page 3
Equi / Diver / Inclu Report Summary article cover image

Equi / Diver / Inclu Report Summary

4min
pages 42-43
Message from: The President and the CIOB CEO article cover image

Message from: The President and the CIOB CEO

3min
page 6
Agreements: Heritage Malta article cover image

Agreements: Heritage Malta

1min
page 16
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