Madeira Today - Spring/Summer 2018

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Contents Madeira Today SPRING/SUMMER 2018, Number 198 Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean VA 22102

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O BSERVAT IO NS O N T HE OVAL

Editor: Karen Joostema Design: LucidCreative.co Photography: James Kegley & Freed Photography

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2017–18

Ann Baker Boney ’79 Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, P’21 (on sabbatical) Lee Cook P’19 Parents’ Association President Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 Alex Christine Douglas ’99 William F. Dunbar P’17

8 ST UDENT STANDOUTS

CO LLEGE DEST INAT IO NS

AT HLET IC S SPOT LIGHT

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ARTS SPOT LIGHT

Anne Faircloth ’87 Mary Frediani P’11 Anne Murray Gambal ’81, P’10 Richard P. Hall

M ADEIRA: T HEN & NOW

Elizabeth A. Meehan Hewitt ’92 Page Hopkins ’81 Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 Heather Muir Johnson ’77

CO - C URRIC ULUM : ALL ACC ESS

Joy Johnson ’77 Harry Klaff P’12, ’13, ’17 Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58 Pamela J. Mazza P’15, ’19 Tim H. Meyers P’17 Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60 Elizabeth Breul O’Rourke ’73

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ALUM NAE EVENTS

REUNIONS

Reena Lawande Pande ’92 Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’70 Catherine Harris Shraga ’70 Board of Trustees President Cathy Rosenthal Stuart ’73 Alumnae Council President Anita Patel Tolani ’91 Secretary

M ILESTO NES

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C LASS NOT ES

Audrey Baxter Young ’80 Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Please send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

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GRADUAT IO N COVER STUDENT IMAGES: Sara Ridgway Heap ’60 Vice-President of the Athletic Association Megan Linh Grohowski ’19 2018–2019 Red Team Captain


I AM REMINDED OF THE BIG QUESTION I asked during my first interview in the search process at Madeira: “What is one of the major challenges of the job?”

This new generation of girls will be facing a world where many of their future jobs don’t even exist yet. The question for us is what can Madeira do to prepare them for change, for a society that is far more diverse, for the fast pace of life dominated by technology, and for whatever changes will happen that we cannot even predict?

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018

The answer: “You’ll be following in the footsteps of an iconic woman,” still resonates, not only because my predecessor was iconic, but because Madeira is the story of many exceptional women who stood out for their vision and creativity. Lucy Madeira realized students learned in different ways and built her program to develop each individual girl long before Howard Gardner’s “multiple intelligences” theory in the early 1980s. Barbara Keyser created the Co-Curriculum program and integrated the School. Betsy Griffith built an academic community and embraced diversity. The challenge I’ve had before me in following those lofty leaders has been how to preserve our core excellence while ensuring that Madeira stays on the cutting edge and is sustainable. This issue of Madeira Today focuses on Madeira then and now, what has changed, and what remains as the cornerstone of who we are. I often remind alumnae of one thing that has not changed. We are all about adolescent girls—except that today’s students were all born after 2000. This new generation of girls will be facing a world where many of their future jobs don’t even exist yet. The question for us is what can Madeira do to prepare them for change, for a society that is far more diverse, for the fast pace of life dominated by technology, and for whatever changes will happen that we cannot even predict? That has been our mission as we chart a course for the girls that come to Madeira today. What has changed? Pedagogy, for one is far more student-centered. Teaching is varied to address different learning styles and to maximize the rich eighty-minute class blocks. Learning, which is more collaborative, more in-depth, and also more complex in the world of Wikipedia and social media. Co-Curriculum, which has evolved from what most knew as “the


HEAD OF SCHOOL

Wednesday program” to a five day a week, five-week intensive internship that allows girls to truly analyze issues, become an active part of their office, and even travel to distant lands for exciting opportunities. Residential life, where we strive to replicate a homey atmosphere where students engage with caring adults on a regular basis, while also developing autonomy and independence. Athletics, which today plays a central role in what girls look for and has opened a number of opportunities for college admissions. The before and after can be likened to a makeover photo. The core, a rigorous, college preparatory education, remains. The change is in how we deliver it to prepare women who will change the world.

F R O M T H E E D I TO R Greetings from Madeira! For this issue, I wanted to take the magazine title, Madeira Today, literally. If you have been back to campus recently, I hope you’ve gotten a glimpse of the pulse, the energy, the vibe that permeates campus. It’s really impressive. Life at Madeira includes outstanding students, an impressive array of college placements, athletic championships, and achievements in the arts. The Co-Curriculum program continues its innovative evolution, with some of today’s students traveling across the country and around the world for their KAREN JOOSTEMA

five-week intensive placements.

Send comments to

In reflecting about all the excitement on campus today, we naturally looked

KJoostema@Madeira.org

back at Madeira over the decades, comparing and contrasting—what’s the same, what’s different. On the surface, many things have changed—the campus, clothing, rules, and definitely technology. But Madeira’s intrinsic core of learning, friendship, and personal growth affirmed by communal experience, remains strong. Many treasured traditions still resonate with today’s students. From honoring our yesterdays to celebrating today, and looking forward to our tomorrows—please enjoy Madeira Today.

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C URRE NT STUDENTS

what are

MADEIRA GIRLS? LEADERS & LEARNERS. ENTREPRENEURS & ENGINEERS. ATHLETES & ARTISTS. AWARD-WINNERS & ACTIVISTS. DREAMERS & DOERS.

T H E R E I S N O S I NG L E T Y P E O F "MA D E I R A G I R L ." The strength of Madeira lies in building a community that encourages each other to achieve their personal best. Madeira is viewed by its students as a journey, not a competition. Students celebrate each other’s talents, and are inspired by their peers. By preparing girls in the classroom at the same time as exposing them to real-world work, we build confidence. A Madeira girl is confident in her abilities and courageous enough to make her voice heard. Even as high school students, Madeira girls are true to Lucy Madeira’s vision of empowered exploration, and are already living Madeira’s mission of women who change the world. We celebrate the many talents and accomplishments of our impressive student body.

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


LO G Y S U M M I T O N W ECH

FUTURE

GABBY MCCLELLAN ’20

ER

OF

IN n

T

COLONIZATION OF MARS ESSAY

Gabby McClellan ’20 beat out 3,000 other entries in a nationwide search for the most creative, thoughtful, and well-presented student ideas on technology of the future with her Edge of Existence essay about the colonization of Mars and the use of targeted genome editing.

C

CAROLINE MCCULLERS ’19

RE A

ADV O

AFFECTING POLICY ON CAPITOL HILL

MO

AT

KING COLLEG A M E E:

F F O R DA B L E

Caroline McCullers ’19 used her junior year Capitol Hill internship with Congressman José E. Serrano (D-NY) to directly affect national policy. Caroline researched and presented a bill on student loan debt to Congressman Serrano and convinced him to co-sponsor the bill, known as H.R. 3572– Making College More Affordable Act.

peaceful, traditional Bulang way of life. As a globalized modern world seeps into Mangjing, a remote village in China where

INNING DOCU

ME

M RY F ILM AKER

Amy Xie ’20 wrote The Kingdom of Tea, a documentary dedicated to capturing the

-W D R A

NTA

AMY XIE ’20

AW

THE KINGDOM OF TEA DOCUMENTARY

the Bulang minority have a rich heritage, including the birthplace of the world renowned Pu’er tea, ethnic traditions are fading away. Amy’s film won an award at the United for Peace Film Festival in Japan.

» SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 5


CiCi Wu ’18 and Monica Shen ’19

NDERS

CICI WU ’18 & MONICA SHEN ’19

FO U

MOGUE MAGAZINE

INTERNA TIO

NA

SHION MAGAZI A F NE L

founded and published an international fashion magazine. Inspired by the iconic Vogue and their time at Madeira, they decided to name the magazine Mogue. They wanted to bring fashion to campus and take students into the world of fashion. CiCi and Monica are members of the Madeira Fashion Club.

ON

L CHAMPION-B A N O US ATI

SKILLS COMPET S S ITI INE

“THE AMAZING SHAKE” WINNER

KAITLIN BRITTON-WHEELER ’20 Kaitlin Britton-Wheeler ’20 won “The Amazing Shake,” a national competition helping students improve their business skills. As part of the competition, Kaitlin was asked to hold her own among impressive business leaders, and was rated on how well she gave sales pitches to executives. During the final rounds, Kaitlin met with

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Gayle King, Norah O’Donnell, Oprah Winfrey, and Barbara Corcoran before being declared the national champion.

and air conditioners to an orphanage in Vietnam, books to schools in the Philippines, and shoes to children in Africa through the non-profit they began, Help Us Help Them. Their group is run by kids and works for kids.

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018

D

Lauren Grohowski ’19 and Megan Grohowski ’19 have provided cribs

OV I

IMPR

DT A R O U N H E WO R L

LAUREN GROHOWSKI ’19 & MEGAN GROHOWSKI ’19

N

REN

LEADING TEENS TO HELP OTHERS

H E L I V E S O F C HI LD T G


URITY TASK

FO

C

RCE

Y

SEC R E B

LEADE

ETHICAL HACKING EXPERT

TRUDY PAINTER ’19

R Trudy Painter ’19 is part of a cybersecurity task force that works to solve issues ranging from networking to ethical hacking, and has participated in cybersecurity and hacking competitions. Trudy will be working as a research intern at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab this summer, researching vulnerabilities and attack vectors of onboard ship navigation systems.

TECHNOLOGY FOR ORPHANAGES

OFIT, LABUK

FOUN DER OF STE

Kalyna White ’18 took old computer parts and distributed them to underprivileged schools and orphanages with her non-profit organization, LABUkraine. Kalyna won Madeira’s 2017 PINK Award, established by Katherine Kies ’07 to recognize

RA

IN E

M

K ALYNA WHITE ’18

-PR N O N

“Passion, Initiative, and Knowledge” and help hardworking Madeira girls pursue a goal. Kalyna used the funds to further her orphanage work.

ET ATHL

MADDIE HEILBRUN ’18 & IZZY GATI ’18

AM CANS

DOUBLE DISTINCTION IN SWIMMING AND ACADEMICS

ADEMIC ALL-

ERI

I

AC & C

Maddie Heilbrun ’18 and Izzy Gati ’18 achieved the double distinction of being awarded All-American honors for both swimming and academics. Both will be swimming for Division I colleges (Harvard University and University of Kentucky, respectively). The girls were part of the state championship 2018 Madeira Swim and Dive Team.

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I found my school 8

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


A Madeira education is unique, and so is the college journey. College counselors work individually with each student to identify options that align with interests, values, and career goals. Careful planning ensures a smooth process. Madeira fosters confident risktakers and self-assessment. Identifying college options that guide each senior to the next challenge is a process and a priority.

C l a s s o f 2 0 1 8 c o l l e g e D E S T I NAT I O N S The University of Alabama

Carnegie Mellon University

Johns Hopkins University (2)

American University

Clemson University

University of Kentucky

Barnard College (2)

Colgate University (2)

Lehigh University

Bates College

University of Colorado at Boulder (2)

Macalester College

Boston College

Columbia University

University of Maryland, College Park

Boston University (4)

Drexel University

University of Miami (4)

Bryn Mawr College

Duquesne University

University of Michigan

Bucknell University

University of Florida

New York University (3)

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (2)

The George Washington University (2)

University of Pennsylvania

Georgetown University

Princeton University (2)

University of California, Los Angeles (2)

Georgia Institute of Technology (2)

Purdue University

University of California, San Diego

Harvard University

Randolph College

University of California, Santa Barbara

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

University of Richmond

Scripps College Sewanee: The University of the South Smith College Syracuse University Texas Christian University University of Toronto (2) Tulane University Vanderbilt University (2) University of Virginia (4) Wake Forest University (3) Wellesley College Wesleyan University College of William & Mary (3) Xavier University of Louisiana

CONTINUES>

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From Madeira to my destination The reasons students choose a particular college

Madeira College Matriculation 2015–2018 “Presidential Scholarship!”

are as varied as Madeira’s diverse student body.

“Lots of engineering options.”

College enrollments reflect Madeira’s personalized college process, where each student is individually guided toward

University of California, Berkeley

self-discovery of her next step.

“Best film program in the country.”

“Co-op program guarantees internships like our Co-Curriculum experiences.”

University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, Los Angeles University of California, San Diego

“Madeira community feeling on the next level.”

University of California, Santa Barbara California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

“In-state tuition.”

Chapman University University of Colorado at Boulder Loyola Marymount University The University of Oklahoma University of Redlands

The University of Alabama

Scripps College

Auburn University

University of Southern California

Centre College

Southern Methodist University

Coastal Carolina University

Stanford University

College of Charleston

Texas Christian University

Duke University

“Close to home!”

Elon University

“I will swim for a Division I swimming program.”

University of Georgia Georgia Institute of Technology High Point University University of Kentucky Lynn University University of Miami The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Oxford College of Emory University Rhodes College Rollins College Sewanee: The University of the South University of South Carolina Tulane University Vanderbilt University Wake Forest University

Grinnell College University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Indiana University at Bloomington Kenyon College Macalaster College University of Michigan Northwestern University University of Notre Dame Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences Ohio Wesleyan University Purdue University Washington University in St. Louis University of Wisconsin, Madison

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018

The College of Wooster


I FOUND MY SCHOOL

“Traditions galore!”

“Guaranteed medical school admission.”

University of British Columbia Babson College

University College Dublin

Bard College

McGill University

Barnard College

Sciences Po–Columbia University Dual BA Program

Bentley University

University of St. Andrews

Boston University Bryn Mawr College Bucknell University Carnegie Mellon University Christopher Newport University Dickinson College Franklin & Marshall College George Mason University The George Washington University Georgetown University Howard University James Madison University Johns Hopkins University Lehigh University Liberty University University of Maryland, College Park

University of Toronto

Brandeis University

Trinity College Dublin

Brown University

Western University

Colgate University Columbia University

“The school where I could not stop smiling.”

University of Connecticut Cornell University Dartmouth College Emerson College Fordham University Hamilton College Harvard University Hobart and William Smith Colleges Massachusetts Institute of Technology The New School New York University Northeastern University

Muhlenberg College

Princeton University

University of Pennsylvania

Rhode Island School of Design

Pennsylvania State University

University of Rochester

University of Pittsburgh

Rochester Institute of Technology

Randolph College

Sarah Lawrence College

University of Richmond St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Sciences Po–Columbia University Dual BA Program

Swarthmore College

Skidmore College

Villanova University

St. Lawrence University

University of Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute College of William & Mary

“Greek life and top academics combined.”

“Far from home!”

Syracuse University Trinity College

“I can cheer on a D1 football team.”

Tufts University United States Coast Guard Academy Vassar College Wellesley College Wesleyan University Williams College

“Location, location, location.” SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 11


WINTER SPORTS RECAP

ATHLETICS ROCK CLIMBING

RIDING

The Athletic Department

The Interscholastic

is excited to share that

Equestrian Association

Rock Climbing will

(IEA) team qualified for

become a varsity sport

Regionals for the 6th

at Madeira next winter.

year in a row. 11 riders also

Student athletes will

qualified for IEA Regionals

compete locally within

as individuals. Six of these

the Washington Area

riders moved on to the

Interscholastic Climbing

IEA Zone Finals. At Zones,

League (WAICL).

Ella Stux ’21 (1st place Walk

Dr. Lee Walker, a math

Trot Canter) and Sydney

teacher and lifelong rock

Newburn ’19 (3rd place

climber, led 14 climbers

Novice Fences) qualified

this year to compete in

for the IEA National Finals.

Maideira’s first WAICL

Congratulations to Sydney

championship.

for placing 4th in the country at Nationals for Novice Fences. The Spring American National Riding Commission (ANRC) team won the Open Division National Championship. We also had students win top ribbons at several United States Equestrian Federation Premier Rated Shows this year.

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


MADEIRA SWIM TEAM STATE CHAMPS!

BASKETBALL

SQUASH

SWIM & DIVE

The Basketball team

Madeira Squash

The Swim and Dive team

finished with an overall

completed their final

ended a banner season

record of 12–11. This

season as a varsity

with a 9–1 dual meet

is the best record

sport with a record

record, 3rd place finish at

the program has had

of 5–5. The Squash

the ISL Championships,

POST SEASON HONORS:

in over a decade.

team provided a

a 2nd place at the Metro

Madeira had several

competitive force in

Prep championships, and

memorable moments

the ISL, even during

a dramatic win at the

throughout the season,

co-ed matches.

2018 VISAA state meet.

• I zzy Gati ’18 was named to the Washington Post’s First team All-Met roster. Sofie Davis ’20 received honorable mention.

including the upset

Although we are sad

Madeira won the state

against St. Stephen’s

to see the conclusion

title by 1 point, the closest

& St. Agnes School,

of Varsity Squash,

in history. The meet came

and going point for

we are thrilled at the

down to the final event

point with Independent

opportunity it has

with Madeira’s 400

School League (ISL) A

provided Madeira

Freestyle (Izzy Gati ’18,

Tournament Champions,

student-athletes for

Meaghan Doyle ’19, Sofie

The Potomac School.

several decades.

Davis ’20 and Maddie

Ninth grader Cayla

Heilbrun ’18) winning with

Williams received

a new state record. Izzy

All-ISL A Division

Gati ’18 won the 100-yard

Honors.

butterfly and recorded a team record five individ-

•T he 200-yard freestyle relay team (Izzy Gati ’18, Giovi Moriarty ’18, Sofie Davis ’20 and Maddie Heilbrun ’18) recorded the fastest time in the city. •M adeira had four All-League swimmers, five All-state swimmers and nine AllAmerican times, including all three relays. Five team records were broken this season.

ual All-American times.

COLLEGE SIGNINGS

JACEY ALBAUGH: Riding at Texas Christian University (Division I), IZZY GATI: Swim at University of Kentucky (Division I), MADDIE HEILBRUN: Swim at Harvard University (Division I), BELLA GODES: Lacrosse at Claremont Mudd Scripps (Division III)

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A RTS S P OT L I G H T

WINTER MUSICAL This February, Madeira Theater presented The Addams Family. The show was a smashing success with standout performances by Prabha Girish ’19 as Gomez Addams, Rachel Rubin ’21 as Wednesday Addams, Raegan Thornton ’18 as Morticia Addams, and Zoe Crawley ’18 as Lucas Beineke. Theresa Carr ’19 as Uncle Fester had the audience howling with laughter from the moment she entered in her bald cap and full stage make-up to serenade the moon. Every student in the cast brought the characters to life, from the overwhelmed and out of place Beineke family to the ensemble of ghoulish ancestors that helped Wednesday find love with Lucas.

A L L I E H OA N G ’ 1 9

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


ARTS

CAST & CREW O F T H E A D D A M S F A M I LY

ART MUSEUM CLASS In visual arts, students in the Art Museum class toured a variety of DC-area museums before researching and creating their own model exhibits. Highlights for the group were touring the National Gallery of Art and viewing the new portraits of the Obamas at the National Portrait Gallery.

DA N C E This spring, the Dance/Gate All School Meeting was a spectacular showcase of the arts. The ongoing collaboration between the Gate literary magazine and Madeira’s dance program was on full display in a beautiful collection of poetry, dance, and student choreography. Sophie Fouladi ’19 and Eliza Dubee ’18 choreographed a stunning finale piece with the Select Dancers to a compilation of music and spoken word.

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MADEIRA

THEN & NOW On the surface many things have changed during Madeira’s 112 year history—hair styles, clothing, the campus, technology, to name a few. But Lucy Madeira’s forward-thinking vision of offering an individualized approach to educating young women to be their uniquely best selves, and to take advantage of the proximity to Washington, DC, remains the essence of the School’s vision today. And the unforgettable friendships formed on campus with your friends and teachers remain at the core of the Madeira experience. Whether you are a recent alumna or graduated decades ago, Madeira’s intrinsic core of learning, friendship, and personal growth, affirmed by a communal experience, make it the matchless place all Madeira girls know. Take a look at photos from generations of Madeira girls to see how Madeira fashions have evolved over the decades, the changes in residential life, and treasured traditions that have stood the test of time.

1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 16

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2018

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FASHION THROUGH THE DECADES STUDENT APPAREL

2018 “Denim was not allowed, even on weekends when we did not have to wear our uniforms.” — Mary Blair Vinson Koehl ’57

Student uniforms began, at the request of students. Long dark skirts and sailor blouses; shirtwaist dresses for dinner

circa…

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Pale green sports bloomers covered by buttoned skirts

Gray or green skirts, topped with forest green blazers, green or yellow sweaters

Pastel shirtwaist dresses replaced white shirtwaist dresses for dinner

Uniforms replaced by dress code

Casual, comfortable clothes for day and dinner

1912 1935 1949 1957 1973 1980s

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


THEN & NOW

ATHLETIC APPAREL

1914

1950 1960s

2000s

Tennis uniform

Gym uniform

Newly designed uniforms sponsored by Adidas

Field hockey team practices behind the White House

Mildred Gaines awarding a riding trophy

1918 1935

Cheerleading uniform (incuding Stockard Channing ’61)

Gym uniform

Swim team at new Hurd Sports Center

1970s 1990s

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TWO GENERATIONS OF MARYS Mary Cosby Rinehart ’57 and her granddaughter Mary Clark ’18 compare and contrast their time as boarders at Madeira. With a span

‘‘

of over 60 years between their student days, we see how life at Madeira has changed… and how some elements are timeless.

What was dorm life like? Mary Clark ’18 In the dorms, I love spending time with the girls I share a home with. We spend

a lot of time watching cheesy television and eating chips and salsa. We love hanging out in the renovated common room together. There are a lot of laughs and sometimes tears, but we are always there to support each other. Mary Cosby Rinehart ’57 In the 50s, living in the dorm was very routine. Everyone went to

breakfast, to class, and to study hall. The dorm felt like a place to sleep.

What did you wear? M ’18 We don’t have a uniform and our dress code is very relaxed. T-shirts and shorts or sweat-

pants are the typical uniform of a modern Madeira girl. M ’57 We wore bloomers all the time paired with a green jumper. For the winter, we wore a wool

skirt, green blazer with a Madeira Red or White Team patch, and knee socks. We were required to dress in a white dress for dinner.

Favorite traditions? M ’18 My favorite tradition is Founder’s Day. I love the anticipation of the big day. Girls are

always trying to scheme to figure out when Founder’s Day will happen, since the date is different each year. The day is always fun and includes dancing, bouncy castles, and field games. M ’57 Before girls left for Winter Break a singing group called “Wums and Herds” would sing while people were packing. Every night there was an “after study hall snack” of cookies and milk.

Favorite weekend activities? M ’18 My favorite weekend activities are going out to local events like the farmers market in

Alexandria and the Cherry Blossom Festival in DC. My friends and I go off campus frequently. Some are planned and others are “bolts,” where we spontaneously take bussette rides to places like Chick-fil-A or Starbucks. M ’57 We were rarely allowed to go off campus. I spent most of my time studying or participat-

ing in athletics, performance dancing, and dances with other schools. 20

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


THEN & NOW

Favorite place on campus? M ’18 The Oval is my favorite spot on campus because it is the heart and soul of Madeira. I love

it when it’s warm enough for classes to be held on the Oval. When it’s warm and sunny, I like to hang my hammock between the trees. M ’57 I loved going to the phone booth to make calls. I also enjoyed walking to the gate and

chatting with friends.

After school activities? M ’18 I’ve always loved participating in athletics. I have been doing a sport every season all

four years at Madeira. I have been a member of the field hockey, swim and dive, and lacrosse teams and I have loved every moment. M ’57 I participated in soccer, dance, and fencing. I was captain of the Red Team.

Popular technology on campus?

‘‘

M ’18 The most popular thing this year was watching vine compilations. Vine is a form of social

media that consists of humorous 6-second video clips. After the app was shut down, many people began to make compilations of their favorite clips. Madeira girls have thoroughly enjoyed watching them in the common room, sharing them with peers, and referencing them any chance they get. M ’57 Boys calling on the phone for girls.

Memorable campus “rules”?

M ’18 This year the sign-out system has gotten a complete revamp. Everyone has now trans-

ferred onto an online sign-out system called “Reach.” Now all leave requests can be completed on a smartphone, and the days of paper cards are in the past. M ’57 We could only could sleep off campus once every semester.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 21


RESIDENTIAL LIFE

Adults in dorms

THEN

NOW

1906: Mrs. Madeira (Lucy’s mother) was the original House Mother

Renovated dorms have two apartments that are large enough for families.

1931: House Mistress in each dorm

Two dorm parents live in each dorm.

1950s: Bell maids lived on 3rd floor 1968: No adults in dorm. Senior elected House Mother 1980: An adult in each dorm Energy source

Radiator heat; No A/C (some wall units)

Geothermal heating & cooling in renovated dorms

Off-campus trips

1950s: Only allowed twice a year

Many off-campus opportunities

Phones

One landline phone in Main, no dorm landline phones. Later two internal phones in dorms and two pay phones

All students have personal cell phones

Lights out

1960s: Milk and cookies before lights out

Student RAs do lights out at 11pm

Snacks

Fruit Pantry, in Sport Building, served fruits, cakes, ice cream and milkshakes (Snack bar called “Slumpies” for a time)

General Store, open in evening for snacks

Girls sent “charge home taxis” to pick up ice cream from Baskin-Robbins Dining Hall meals

Singing group

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Compulsory meals, and shirt-waist dress (or skirt) required

Dining hall always has fruit available Girls call Uber to take them to get ice cream and more Meals not compulsory; no uniform

Faculty member at every table; enforced table manners

Seating self-selected, except for monthly community dinners with students and faculty seated together

For a time, day students were not allowed to eat in dining hall (only in Fruit Pantry)

Day students and boarders can eat three meals a day together

Wums and Herds, Singers, Vocal Arts, Madrigals

Sweet Ti and Glee

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


TIMELESS TRADITIONS

THEN & NOW

Madeira is woven with the rich threads of tradition. These traditions create instant bonds among alumnae that transcend years. Some traditions have continued since the School’s early days and others are newer. All remain indelible memories. Strawberries and ice cream

Tradition based on Lucy Madeira’s favorite dessert 13 Roses

Carried by every graduate to commemorate the original 13 boarding students Senior Clubhouse

Since Greenway was built, it has been at the end of the Oval Founder’s Day

Began as Miss Madeira’s birthday celebration on May 19. Strawberries and ice cream served. Now a surprise date, carnival-like atmosphere Red/White Team

Assigned to all new students since 1929. Uniform blazers had insignia noting Red or White team Junior/Senior themed party

Secret themed party given by juniors for seniors since 1940s Affirmation

Began in 1974 as a final performance by the seniors the evening before graduation Shakespeare Festival

Began in 1916 and continues today as part of sophomore class curriculum Halloween Parade

Since early 1990s students and faculty dress up Graduation in outdoor amphitheater

Began in 1934. Continues today Great teachers and lifelong friendships

An indelible part of the Madeira experience, from its founding to today SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 23


FAST FACTS 1906–07

1931–32

1956–57

1982–83

2004–05

2017–18

Students

28

170

213

336

311

321

Boarding / Day %

46% / 54%

75% / 25%

72% / 28%

63% / 37%

53% / 47%

52% / 48%

Graduates

2

27

61

104

75

79

Faculty

8

21

30

41

50

70

Boarding / Day Tuition

$700 –800 $200

$1,800 $400

$2,500 $700

$7,765 $4,730

$34,800 $24,300

$59,990 $45,710

PUBLICATIONS THROUGH THE YEARS

Top to bottom, left to right: Spectator, 1985 (with editor Avery Miller ’86) Miss Madeira’s School, 1906 The Tatler, 1945 Spectator, 1965 Madeira Today, 1965 The Gate, 1966 Madeira Today, 1975 Spectator, 1979 Madeira Today, 2018 24

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CO - CURRICULUM INNOVATION

THEN & NOW

What began in 1967 as a radical idea to give girls access to real-world experiences has evolved over its 50 year history. True to Lucy Madeira’s objective of carrying students into the wider Washington, DC community, the Co-Curriculum program takes advantage of the School’s proximity to the nation’s capital. What for many years was known as the “Wednesday Program,” with day long, once a week internships for the whole school year, has evolved. Girls still intern on Capitol Hill and throughout the local community. But the program is no longer

1960s 2018

confined to Wednesdays. Today, sophomores, juniors, and seniors each spend a five-week module dedicated solely to a Co-Curriculum placement. The focused period has opened up new possibilities, including immersive work, completion of meaningful projects, and remote placements.

With a glimpse of life at Madeira over the years, we see Lucy Madeira’s ideals shine through girls whose voices echo—around the Oval, across our communities, and throughout the world. We are proud to honor our yesterdays, celebrate the School today, and ensure Madeira’s tomorrows.

If you have stories or photos to share from your time at Madeira, please send to: communications@madeira.org, or Madeira Communications, 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22102 SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 25


ALLACCESS Co-Curriculum Offers Unparalleled Access for All Madeira Students Over the past 50 years, Madeira’s signature Co-Curriculum program has had a profound impact on our graduates. By granting over 12,000 internships, Madeira has given its girls unparalleled access to the real world. As valuable as they can be, internships are not always accessible to all. Because CoCurriculum is not limited by financial aid concerns, differences in political ideology, personal background, or previous experience, Madeira proudly stands out as a place that opens doors and offers access to internships for all its students.

CO-CURRICULUM TODAY Madeira’s academic schedule divides the year into seven different blocks (called “modules” or “mods”) of five weeks each. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors devote one entire module each year to their Co-Curriculum internship. With five sustained weeks to devote to real-world work, new possibilities have opened in the ever-evolving program. Remote placements, for example, are now a viable opportunity for some girls. And instead of the “Wednesday Program,” today’s girls focus on a project or issue for a dedicated five-week time period, allowing for more depth and “start to finish” projects. Here is what a few of our current students have done in their five-week Co-Curriculum module.

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REMOTE PLACEMENTS SOLIDIFY COLLEGE AND CAREER ASPIRATIONS

Shadowing a Surgeon in Oregon | Marina Akhavein ’18 Marina Akhavein ’18 gained both academic and real-world experience during her senior year remote Co-Curriculum placement shadowing a surgeon at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). She plans to study medicine in college and wanted the experience of working in a hospital. “My experience at OHSU was amazing. The exposure educated me in the field of medicine, and the placement has definitely impacted my career decision.” It was not only the hospital internship that educated her, but also living and working 3,000 miles from Madeira’s campus. A typical day for Marina included waking up at 5:30 a.m. to be at the hospital by 7:00 a.m. She completed initial rounds and then was in surgery all day, followed by late afternoon post-op patient visits. Her colleagues did not think of Marina as a typical high school student. She noted, “Everyone thought I was a medical student. I was treated with so much respect.” Marina would definitely recommend remote placements. “They teach you to be independent. I was not coming back to Madeira every day where I could always rely on someone else to coordinate day-to-day logistics. They truly are real-world experiences.”

Making an Impact in Mozambique | Elliott Jordan ’18 Elliott Jordan ’18 had an unforgettable senior year Co-Curriculum remote placement in South Africa and Mozambique. Working for Pro-Vision International, a non-profit community partner, Elliott’s assignment was to build a hurricane shelter in Mozambique. She chose the placement because it took her interest in environmental engineering and applied it to real-world problem solving. A typical day for Elliott started at dawn. She helped tear down the old structure where the shelter would be built while salvaging the materials, such as steel and roofing, for reuse. From designing the project and obtaining the materials to building the structure, Elliott was able to participate in the entire process. A female working in construction and engineering is not the norm in the Mozambique village where Elliott was living—to the point where people would routinely take photos of her. She credits Madeira for preparing her for both the technical aspects, and to have the confidence to deal with challenging situations. “Madeira always gives you a seat at the table, teaches you how to build the seat, and provides you with the equipment to do just that.”

“Madeira always gives you a seat at the table, teaches you how to build the seat, and provides you with the equipment to do just that.” SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 27


INTERNATIONAL

STUDENTS NEVER DREAMED OF DIRECT GOVERMENT ACCESS

From Russia to D.C. | Alexandra Andrianova ’19 Current International Student

Alexandra Andrianova ’19 was amazed at the differences between the governments in her home, Moscow, Russia and in the United States. “Government is a lot different in the U.S. than in Russia. It’s much more organized. People have their voices and their freedoms. I greatly enjoyed my experience,” Alexandra shared. “In my opinion, the people’s desires don’t matter in Russia. The elections don’t make sense. Protesting, for instance, is not a thing in Russia. You can’t just go out on the street and protest. It’s very dangerous. When I was working on Capitol Hill, I was amazed to see the tourists that walk through the buildings. It’s very cool.” Alexandra specifically sought out Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) because the Senator’s work on the cybersecurity committee is of great interest to her.

“In China… you can never talk to your representative. You can’t call them. You can’t go visit them. You can’t request a tour.”

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From China to Capitol Hill | Monica Shen ’19 | Current International Student Monica Shen ’19 is from Jiaxing, China, and her Co-Curriculum internship gave her a view of government she never would have experienced in China. In traveling across the world to attend Madeira, Monica was able to gain a new perspective by working inside the U.S. government. Monica discussed the stark contrast between the two governments. “Everything is different between the two. In China, the officials are selected by the government, not the people. It’s fascinating to see the representatives in the United States interact with their constituents. In China, that’s not the case. You can never talk to your representative. You can’t call them. You can’t go visit them. You can’t request a tour,” Monica says. Monica enjoyed a first-hand view of how the U.S. government functions when she interned with Congresswoman Diana DeGette (D-CO). Her favorite job was to collect signatures from other members of Congress. “I visited over 200 offices, and really enjoyed walking into each different office and getting a feel for that representative.”

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


ALUMNAE RECOGNIZE CO-CURRICULUM’S IMPACT

Co-Curriculum Launched My Political Career Janelle Irick Bynum ’92

Janelle’s career was heavily influenced by her Co-Curriculum internship, an experience that she might not have had at other schools. “Internships are typically reserved for people who are either lucky or wealthy and in college. For me, as a young, black woman, a Capitol Hill internship was a profound gift. At the time, African American women were not in the halls of government. Access to the federal government was limited, and it was a gift from Madeira for me to be able to experience our government firsthand.” Janelle recently won a seat in the Oregon State Legislature after a hard-fought contest. She credits her Co-Curriculum experience with helping her win such a difficult race. “People would ask me: what makes you think you can win? I think that it was a deep understanding about the system of how the government works. Having had the experience in Washington D.C. and understanding that it can be a bare-knuckled kind of place, I was mentally prepared for the race we had to run. I understood what it was going to take to win.” Working in government was not a career path Janelle had originally envisioned for herself when she was younger. But when she arrived at Madeira, Janelle had the opportunity to intern in the United States Senate, which set her on course for her career in politics. “The biggest thing that I learned working for Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) was that I knew that the Capitol was a place where I belonged. People often feel as though government is not accessible to them. But having that experience, including seeing how people arrive at their opinions and how the process worked, inspired me greatly.”

Access for All to Lifelong Skills | Lena Badr ’11

“Having had the experience in D.C. and understanding that it can be a bare-knuckled kind of place, I was mentally prepared for the race we had to run.”

Lena Badr ’11 credits Madeira’s Co-Curriculum program for giving her excellent professional experience, teaching her the valuable lesson of helping others in need, and solidifying confidence in herself, especially when confronted with male-dominated work environments. Lena cites junior year on Capitol Hill as her most difficult, because it was her first experience in a professional environment. She was the youngest intern in Senator Richard Burr’s (R-NC) office, which forced her to learn to adapt and persevere, a lifelong skill that would stay with her. As a senior, Lena shadowed wildlife biologist Vicky Monroe, who managed a group comprised mostly of men in a field that is heavily male dominated. “Seeing her in action gave me the confidence throughout my time in engineering in college and at work when I led a team (also mostly men) of my own.” Lena understands that internships are not always accessible to all. For example, students on financial aid may not normally have the luxury of gaining valuable work experience through an unpaid internship because they need to focus their time on paid positions to help contribute toward family expenses. Co-Curriculum at Madeira takes this burden away by providing valuable internship experience to every student, regardless of financial aid status. “Overall, I could not be more thankful and a bigger advocate of the Co-Curriculum program. The chance to give anyone, especially girls, an upper hand in the professional world with a resumé in their teens is absolutely amazing. I view the Co-Curriculum program as one of the most integral parts of my education at Madeira. In fact, Madeira without Co-Curriculum just isn’t Madeira to me.”

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CO-CURRICULUM ENDOWMENT ENSURES PROGRAM’S FUTURE

12,000 INTERNSHIPS!

A CHANGING WORLD MEANS AN EVER-EVOLVING CO-CURRICULUM PROGRAM Two guiding principles have influenced how Co-Curriculum has evolved and will continue to impact the future: preservation and innovation. The School wants to retain the essence of

what has made the program transformative, while continuing to innovate within the tradition. Recent innovations include the implementation and expansion of remote placements, across the country and around the world, as well as more robust academic integration, such as the complementary relationship U.S. History classes have with Capitol Hill Co-Curriculum placements. Students choose a topic of interest for their history research paper, select a Capitol Hill office that has a connection to that topic, and use the junior year Co-Curriculum placement to research the topic. Efforts to prepare and coach students in important skills for the working world include Resumé 101 and creating LinkedIn profiles for networking. An emerging program is the “STEAM Experience” in Silicon Valley, which allows students to see firsthand and behind the scenes the latest in technology, engineering, and graphic design.

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


Why endow Co-Curriculum? To maintain Madeira’s commitment to the life-changing impact of the Co-Curriculum program for all future Madeira students, the All the Difference Campaign seeks your gift toward the $5 million goal of underwriting the program to ensure that Co-Curriculum continues in perpetuity at the School. Drawing from a restricted endowment to fund Co-Curriculum gives the program flexibility to generate new initiatives, and ensures that, even in challenging financial years, the School can avoid any interruption to the Co-Curriculum program and give each girl valuable internship experiences. Co-Curriculum has been a true differentiator for Madeira for over 50 years, and an endowment ensures this unique professional opportunity will always be part of the Madeira experience.

“I appreciate Madeira for providing Co-Curriculum opportunities for a hands-on learner like me. I learned a ton and gained tremendous confidence from those experiences.” — SAGE WHEELER ’83

14

Co-Curriculum buses have driven the equivalent of 14 laps around the world to get girls to and from their placements since the program began.

Life-changing Impact For more than 50 years, Co-Curriculum has allowed girls to be part of the steady emergence of women in local communities as well as the corridors of power. From the immediate locales of McLean to front row seats on Capitol Hill for historic events like the first female Supreme Court Justice, Secretary of State, Vice-Presidential candidate, and Presidential candidate, Madeira girls have been there. They venture beyond Madeira’s gates to experience real-world work and build an impressive resumé. That real-world experience has spawned passion-filled engineers, activists, writers, doctors, politicians, and more. Gaining this experience as a high school student is a lifelong benefit for all Madeira girls.

20K

The Sophomore class has served

20,000 community hours this year.

5

The number of steps walked by a Capitol Hill intern is equivalent to 5 marathons.

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A LU M N A E E V E NTS A CELEBRATION IN NEW YORK JANUARY 25, 2018, NEW YORK, NY Hosted by Laurinda Lowenstein Douglas ’76 1. Host Laurinda Lowenstein Douglas ’76 & Bambi Putnam ’72 2. A li Matthews ’13, Sam McCLain ’13, Laine Funkhouser ’13, & Caroline Ruffing ’13 3. Adiya Taylor ’12, Maddie Stearn ’13, & Alexis Osei ’12 4. Jessica Dawson ’90, Reena Srivastava Pally ’90, & Madeira Trustee, Reena Lawande Pande ’92

MA D E I R A I N VE RO B E ACH FEBRUARY 8, 2018 VERO BEACH, FL Hosted by NH Senator Sylvia Bravo Larsen ’67 & Robert Larsen 1. S ylvia Bravo Larsen ’67 & Martha Taylor Hayne ’58, P’86 2. M artha Taylor Hayne ’58, P’86 Eileen & John Hill, P’19

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018

CO CKTAI L S, CONV ERSATION, & CELEBRATION! JANUARY 31, 2018, LOS ANGELES, CA Hosted by Sue & Whitney Ganz P’05 1. Louise Holland Peterson ’75, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Hosts Sue & Whitney Ganz, parents of Taylor Ganz ’05 2. Madeira Trustee Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 & McDowell May Winn ’89 3. Merritt Johnson Morris ’99, Sharon Momenian-Schneider ’98, & Betty Momenian Dinarte ’96 4. Jane Soyster Gould ’74, Mollie Thomas ’16, & Josey Dunbar ’17


M A D E I R A CO N VEN ES I N ATL AN TA FEBRUARY 22, 2018, ATLANTA, GA Hosted by Charlotte Herndon Cahoon ’83 1. Anne Mobley Hassett ’83, Charlotte Herndon Cahoon ’83, & Cynthia Lawrence Ziegler ’83 2. Nick Owen, Cynthia Lawrence Ziegler ’83, Holland Williams ’83, & Alison Mayer ’83 3. Christine Jepsen Ahern ’87, Sister Smith ’84, & Cynthia Lawrence Ziegler ’83 4. Caitlin Alderfer ’07, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, & Kiyah Crittendon ’10

CONV ERSATION, CELEBRATION, & LUNCH! APRIL 5, 2018, PALM BEACH, FL Hosted by Peggy Minis Trethewey ’63 & Peter Trethewey 1. P ilar Cabeza de Vaca, Jenny Jerome Walcott ’59 & Peggy Minis Trethewey ’63 2. K at Moore ’00 & Gina Melin Robichaux ’84

C E L E B R AT E MADEI RA I N RI CH MO N D APRIL 11, 2018, RICHMOND, VA Hosted by Mary C. Frediani, Madeira Trustee, P’11 1. Andy Pitzer P’13, ’17 & Elizabeth Bunting Pitzer ’86 2. Judith Wall Guest ’83 & Amanda Travers Nisbet ’82 3. Amy Porter Stroh ’84, Tim Messier & Host Mary Frediani P ’11

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 33


A P R I L 2 6 – 2 7, 2 0 1 8

Reunion Weekend

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 35


REUNION CLASSES

’58

’63

FRONT ROW (L-R): Eleanor

McGowin Adams, Linda Clark Waterman, Midge Cochran Johnson, Margaret Bodine Wallis; Susan Howe Thorn, Suzy Moorhead Spencer, Evie Ellinger Allbright, Anne Skae BACK ROW: Elizabeth Frazier McCallie, Joan Hulme Perera, Sarah Abernethy Snyder, Louise Stillman Lehrman, Heddy Fairbank Reid, Elliott McElhinney Krash, Adele Gignoux, Gael Yatsevitch McKibben, Ann Bradley Vehslage, Wendy Whitney Makins, Lynde Sudduth Karin, Leslie Meek Fitch

’68

Penny Moorhead Grayson, Kim Koontz Nash, Carliss Baldwin, Sarah Hedges Richardson, Greer Hardwicke, Sydney Pool, Lee Neill MacCallum, Debbie Dunklin Tipton, Lonsdale MacFarland Green, Kim Baldwin 2ND ROW: Clare Happel Scurry, Melissa Harrington Leavy, Sara Walker Woodard, Warren Moore Miller, Ann Barton Brown, Polly Talbot Donald BACK ROW: Sally Castleman, Taffy Kneipp Willis, Betsy Buckman, Nancy Marshall Athey, Lynne Battle, Joan Humphreville Fizgibbon, Laura Roberts Estes, Mandy Haynes-Dale, Clelia LeBoutillier Zacharias, Susie Blaisdell, Sam Coxe Ankarcrona, Anne Bennett FRONT ROW (L-R):

MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018

FRONT (L-R): Priscilla

Van Buskirk, Tea Beyer, Katherine Nevius, Silvia Anglin Roberts BACK ROW: Reed Sutherland, Marina London, Terry Meyer Prendergast, Jane McAllister, Chipper Shryock

’83

’78

36

Alice Hector, Fran McCrea, Betsey Dickson Kennedy

’73

50TH REUNION

Laura Blakeslee

L-R:

FRONT: (L-R): Peggy

Gibbs Foley, Elizabeth Marshall Taylor, Julie Cafritz, Paula Weinstein Simon, Dede Brown Duncan 2ND ROW: Heidi Glikbarg Feeney, Alison Helbronner McDonald, Ceci Mermel MacCallum, Anne Mobley Hassett, Brenda Slaughter Reynolds, Athena Koulizakis, Mary Higgins Bell, Louise Massey, Leslie Basie 3RD ROW: Isa Catto Shaw, Annmarie Rothe, Robbie Oxnard Bent, Susan Kassing Daly, Stephania Bell, Liz Woodhull Perkins, Deanne Johnson-Anderson, Liz Turner Rutkowsky, Leslie Absher BACK ROW: Paige Lucas Walker, Kimberly Ablard McGowan, Allie Mendelsohn, Holland Williams, Gina Melin Robichaux ’84, Alison Mayer, Stephanie Wight Dreyer, Judith Wall Guest


’88 Shelley Sapone Robinson, Carolyn Gold Aberman, Henrietta Wiggins Muller, Erin Tyndall Hawthornthwaite, Nancy Rodwell Tuohy 2ND ROW: Brooke Stroud Carnot, Anita Stein, Gaither Smoot Deaton, Luciana Miro De Gonzalez-Revilla, Sadie Quarrier, Eleanor Harrison Bregman, Jennifer Eisenberg Grosswald, Ayse Uzer Crowley, Mary Dempsey Lembke BACK ROW: Elen Ivorian-Jones Rogers, Gussy Reese, Harriet Evans Gaddy, Floramay Ervin Racz, Boo Lively, Mena McGowin Morgan, Tanya Vaughn McDonald FRONT ROW (L-R):

’93

25TH REUNION

Sue Bhukkanasut, Carla Perez-Colon, Mary Carter Scott, Darby Brooks Heckel, Katie Winder Garrison, Madeleine Haeringer, Vallery LaBarre 2ND ROW: Holly Hadley, Maryetta Anschutz, Ashley Redfearn Neswick, Stacey Armstrong Driscoll, Taylor Gifford, Allison King Lindy BACK ROW: Daisy Prince, Jody Stagg Robbins, Helen Farkas Flor, Katie Wilson Hart, Lauren Byer Burke, Amy Gardner Nordstrom, Kisha Salter, Avemaria Smith, Torri Eubanks, Merritt Stembler Groeschel, Tiffany Tyler Steadman, Sanam Vakil FRONT ROW (L-R):

’98

’03

Meredith Roberts, Joanna Claustro-Hurlburt, Ruth Kanthula, Michelle Tucker May, Mariama Black Smith, Tayte French Lutz, Lauren Sickles, Meggan Joels Cividanes, Devika Sen Gupta 2ND ROW: Susmita De, Jennifer McLaughlin Scott, Caroline Covington Duffie, Amy Arenstein Jackson, Jenny Park Casey, Melanie Schreibstein Morin, Alana Malick Ritenour, Amanda Forgason Dempsey, Victoria Hargis Bruton, Sharon Momenian-Schneider BACK ROW Elaine Walker Trull, Anna Coyne, Laura Knisely Geisel, Liz Chalmers Castaneda, Camille Fox Lefere, Katherine Rowbotham Murphy, Gwendolyn Davis, Lori Manning, Hilary Wynne, Megan Krause Belniak FRONT ROW (L-R):

’13

’08 Alani Kravitz, Claire Healy 2ND ROW: Emily Dillinger, Lily Sehn, Katherine Jenkins, Jasmine Khan, Arielle Andreano BACK ROW: Margaret Douglas, Angela Dean Bennett, Emma Little, Carla Burford, Eliza Shaw, Miden Wood FRONT ROW (L-R):

Rachelle Rahme, Vahideh Rambaud, Kate Yohay, Maya Melhem Wilson, Ariel Hopkins Warner, Luvean Myers (L-R):

FRONT ROW (L-R): Anna

Merod, Kelsye Little, Maura Deegan, Chelsey Foster 2ND ROW: Grace Johnson, Erica Glaser, Meredith Krieg, Naaila Phoenix, Michelle Kain, Debbie Druckerman BACK ROW: Sam McCLain, Claire Butler, Lika Kumoyo, Grace Callander, Ashley Hadjis, Laine Funkhouser, Ali Matthews

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 37


REUNIONS 2018

THE WINNERS THE FESTINA LENTE CUP for the highest participation level

’58

for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the CLASS OF 1958.

’68 THE MADEIRA CUP for the most dollars raised for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the CLASS OF 1968.

RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 LOUISE WHEELOCK WILLSON ’48, OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER AWARD JOAN HULME PERERA ’58 has

enthusiastically held the role of class agent for countless years, and always rolls up her sleeves to help with her class reunions and regional events. She goes the extra mile to share relevant campus news with her classmates and never forgets to remind them why Madeira’s mission is so important. Without her inspirational voice, Madeira and the class of 1958 would not be the success it is today.

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MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2018


M I L E S TO N E S BIRTHS 1996 A son, Rhy Seren, on February 2, 2018 to Jaylaan Ahmad-Llewellyn 2000 A daughter, Mary Emmaline, on November 20, 2017 to Catherine Ickes Rottinghaus

A daughter, Lillian Jean, on January 31, 2018 to Carolyn Weger

2002 A son, Barrett Jeffrey Weir, on February 7, 2018 to Kate Wisniewski Weir

D E AT H S 1941 Vivien Elmslie, April 4, 2017 Anne Hale Johnson, January 18, 2018 1942 Sally Whitney Pillsbury, February 5, 2018 1943 Mary Elizabeth Simmons Ford, January 12, 2018 1946 Phyllys Betts Fleming, March 12, 2018 1947 Dora Shaw Neidecker, January 7, 2018 1948 Signa Lynch Read, February 24, 2018 Hannah Daniel Scanlon, January 13, 2018 1950 Sally Strayer De Witt, February 22, 2018

A N N E H A L E J O H N S O N ’4 1

Anne passed away on January

1952 Katrina Seipp Chamberlin, December 21, 2017

18, 2018 in Bethesda, MD.

1953 Ceci Dickson Banner, October 9, 2017

Anne was a boarding student

Sandra Fitzpatrick Johnson, January 16, 2018 1956 Caroline Hibbard Buckler, December 27, 2017 1958 Martha Rulon Frazier, March 14, 2018 1961 Barbara Ruth Lindsay, January 15, 2018

from Rochester, NY and a member of the Red Team. A champion of Madeira, Anne held many volunteer positions, ranging from serving on

1963 Priscilla Pace von Matthiessen, December 6, 2017

Madeira’s Board of Trustees

1969 Josephine Ingrid Raysor, April 2018

to acting as a Class Agent

1976 Catherine Bedell Reynolds, December 11, 2017

as well as Reunion Committee

1980 LeeAnn Fisher Fuerniss, June 15, 2017 1982 Anne “Wendy’ Pepper, November 12, 2017

Member. Anne was awarded Madeira’s Alumna Recognition Award on May 13, 2016.

1992 Buckley Kuhn Fricker, December 22, 2017

FA C U LT Y/ S TA F F Nancy Brock Beck taught dance from 1943–1946 died in February 2018. SPRING/SUMMER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 39