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M ADEIRA TODAY ISSUE 200


MADEIRA EARNS COLLEGE BOARD

AP® COMPUTER SCIENCE FEMALE DIVERSITY AWARD

Out of more than 18,000 secondary s c h o o l s worldwide that offer AP® courses, Madeira is one of only 167 schools that earned the first AP® Computer Science Female Diversity Award for expanding girls’ access in AP® Computer Science courses. “We’re honored by this recognition and proud of the achievements of our computer science students,” said Head of School Pilar Cabeza de Vaca. “Madeira has offered AP Computer Science for the past 22 years, and our alumnae include numerous senior management STEAM professionals.” Providing female students with access to computer science courses contributes to gender parity in the industry’s high-paying jobs and drives innovation, creativity, and competition. “By inviting so many young women to advanced computer science classrooms, Madeira has taken a significant step toward preparing its students for the widest range of 21st-century opportunities,” said Trevor Packer, College Board senior vice president of the AP® Program. Madeira is proud to be among the top AP® Computer Science programs worldwide in provid-


Contents Madeira Today SUMMER 2019, Number 200

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O BSERVAT IO NS O N T HE OVAL

Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22102

Editor: Karen Joostema Design: LucidCreative.co Photography: James Kegley Blake Tippens BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2018–19

ST IC KER STORIES

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FAC ULT Y: RITA COOLEY

Jaylaan Ahmad-Llewellyn ’96 Missy Baker Boney ’79 Gregory W. Brown P’19 Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, P’21 William Eric Clark P’18

LEAVING YOUR LEGAC Y

T EC H T RIP O F A LIF ET IM E

Lee Carol Cook P’18 Parents’ Association President

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Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 Alex Christine Douglas ’99 William F. Dunbar P’17 Anne Faircloth ’87 Mary Frediani P’11 Richard P. Hall

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C AM PAIGN UPDAT E

WOM EN WHO C HANGE T HE WORLD

Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 Heather Muir Johnson ’77 Joy Johnson ’77 Harry J. Klaff P’12, ’13, ’17 Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58 Pamela J. Mazza P’15, ’19 Avery Miller ’86, P’19

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Michelle Malek Olson ’86

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CO - C URRIC ULUM CORNER

Tracy G. Savage ’66 Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’70 Catherine Harris Shraga ’70 Board of Trustees President Catherine Rosenthal Stuart ’73 Anita Patel Tolani ’91 Board of Trustees Secretary Kate Wisniewski Weir ’02 Alumnae Council President

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To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

EQUEST RIAN SPOT LIGHT

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Audrey Baxter Young ’80 Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org

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AT HLET IC S SPOT LIGHT

Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60

Reena Lawande Pande ’92

ARTS SPOT LIGHT

REUNIONS 2 019

ALUM NAE EVENTS

C LASS NOT ES

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Our mission is alive and well, and Madeira women are flourishing.

LAUNCHING WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD: THIS IS OUR MISSION.

As I look back on these past nine years, I can think of so many women I have met, young and old, students and retirees, trailblazing pioneers as well as young adults just starting to explore their paths. Our mission is alive and well, and Madeira women are flourishing as change agents, whether in the world, the country, or in local communities. Lucy Madeira affirmed the importance of educating women, and she left a lasting legacy of empowering young girls to make their way in what­— even in the second decade of the twenty-first century­— is a challenging world where women’s voices need to be heard. Her vision continues to be our guiding light, and today it is as important as ever to focus on women as change agents. Our programs continue to evolve while staying true to academic rigor and personal best. Today’s Madeira classrooms reflect both traditional content that former students will remember, as well as innovative initiatives in the STEAM fields and in our approach to experiential learning. Students today have the opportunity to delve deeply into civil discourse and the importance of responsible democracy through our exciting interdisciplinary approach to teaching history and experiencing five consecutive weeks on Capitol Hill. Our students are courageously representing us in all-girls’ robotics and computer programming tournaments, and, in the process, learning the importance of trying, sometimes failing, trying again, and sometimes succeeding. Museum-focused art


HEAD OF SCHOOL

classes allow students to discover small and large exhibits of traditional and modern art and to replicate their learning both in traditional painting and in digital work. Our virtual classrooms take learners on fantastic voyages to other times and cultures, and our STEAM classes empower them to provide creative solutions to complex engineering projects. At the same time, theatre arts classes hone both acting and public speaking skills, preparing future playwrights, and lighting and sound engineers. Madeira is the future. In our classrooms are budding politicians, scientists, and tech entrepreneurs; in short, women who will change the world and join generations of others who have paved the paths ahead.

F R O M T H E E D I TO R W E C EL EBR ATE TH E 2 0 0 TH I SS U E O F M ADE I RA TO DAY !

It has been fun combing through the archives to review past magazines. The history gleaned from the cover imagery is noteworthy. (As the current editor, I can’t help but notice how many different fonts we have used on our covers over these 200 issues!) We see glimpses of past students, teachers, and leaders. Changing hairstyles and uniforms make KAREN JOOSTEMA Send comments to KJoostema@Madeira.org

us reminisce. The arts, athletics, and academics are showcased over the decades. We observe Madeira students going to Co-Curriculum placements that, except for the fashion, resonate with today’s students heading to Capitol Hill and beyond. One constant, from the early issues through to the present, is that Madeira has always celebrated women who are leading, growing, and making an impact. It seems fitting that our feature story in this 200th issue is “Women Who Change the World.” Celebrating the women who have graced every page of our 200 issues— please enjoy Madeira Today.

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


STICKER STORIES Today’s students adorn and individualize their laptops and water bottles with decorative stickers, transforming them into ubiquitous billboards. Decked-out devices give a glimpse into the interests, personality, causes, and backstories of the person behind them, and provide great conversation starters. Check out a few of the best-dressed bottles and laptops around the Oval.

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#RITA COOLEY

FAC U LT Y H I G H L I G H T

I teach because I love to work with students and love to learn. Madeira girls are not only my students, they are also my teachers. They allow me to glance into the future and understand their aspirations, passions, and opinions. The students make me happy to come to work every day.

RITA COOLEY, a beloved Spanish teacher,

was awarded the Melville Endowed Chair in recognition of her decades of contribution to the Madeira classroom and community. She has had an impact on a generation of Madeira students. Madeira recently featured Señora Cooley on social media and it was instantly apparent how many lives she positively affected. Student and alumnae comments flooded in about what a difference she made in their lives. We’re happy to share a few.

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Leaving your Legacy P L A N N I N G F O R YO U R F U T U R E W I T H P U R P O S E & PA S S I O N

“Regardless of how young you are or the amount of money you have, the sooner LISA MCCURDY ’84 AND JULIA O’BRIEN ’69 you start the estate planning process, the better served you will be,” noted trust and estate lawyer Julia O’Brien ’69 at a Reunion Weekend seminar. “Young clients often arrive at my office explaining that ‘they don’t have very much,’ insinuating that this process doesn’t apply to them. Nothing could be further from the truth. For example, they often have young children who need to be protected.” In discussing charitable giving, Lisa McCurdy-Hankins ’84, managing partner of The Wealth Counselor, LLC, explained how new tax law has changed the way people approach their philanthropy. “The loss of many of the estate and income tax exemptions for charitable giving has shifted the focus to giving as a means to support institutions you love, versus giving as a way to receive tax benefits.” “Female clients, in particular, are looking for ways to support causes that provide meaningful benefit,” according to McCurdy-Hankins, “and the continued wealth transfer to women in the coming decades will further empower women to impact causes that are personally important.”

CREATE A FREE WILL! Recognizing that fewer than 30% of adults have a will because the process can seem scary, complicated, and expensive, Madeira has partnered with FreeWill, a no-cost will generation service, to enable alumnae to create a free will. You can read more about our Reunions estate and will planning seminar through Madeira’s planned giving website, and explore the opportunity to generate your free will today. It takes only 25 minutes! ONLINE FORM: FREEWILL.COM/MADEIRA

By 2025, 60% of billionaires will be women

Women control more than half the wealth in the US

Women will inherit $41 trillion over the next 40 years

SOURCE: THE DENVER POST, 1/8/17

SOURCE: BUSINESS INSIDER, 4/7/15

SOURCE: FORBES, 8/18/09

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Silicon Valley Alumnae Host Students for

C A L IF

OR NI

TECH TRIP OF A LIFETIME

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Building upon Madeira’s focus on experiential

learning, and leveraging its strong alumnae network of Silicon Valley STEAM executives, Madeira students and teachers traveled to

San Francisco over spring break for an amazing trip into the heart of the country’s leading technology corridor.

“The idea was to move beyond the classroom into real-world exposure to STEAM in action, with a focus on the contributions of women in high tech and biotech organizations. Thanks to Madeira’s robust alumnae and par-

ent network, we were able to arrange incredible ‘insider’ tours, workshops, and panels,” noted Patti Collins, who works in the Alumnae Office and helped

organize the trip.

According to the National Science Foundation, although female student

achievement in math and science is on par with their male peers, women remain underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce. While women make up half of the US college-educated workforce, they account for only 29% of the science and engineering workforce. Madeira recognizes the importance of having women more proportionately represented in technical jobs. The School hopes to endow the Co-Curriculum program as part of the All the Difference Campaign, which could bring the financial means to establish a five-week tech internship with housing in the Bay Area, and better prepare future Madeira technology leaders. Microsoft’s research, “Closing the STEM Gap,” shows that women are more likely to pursue computer science and technology fields if they are given the opportunity to explore them in high school — something Madeira does exceptionally well through Co-Curriculum internships. Role models matter. A recent study by University of Massachusetts concluded that when female students are exposed to women STEAM experts in the classroom, the students were more confident in their abilities and participated more in class. By leveraging our strong alumnae network, providing STEAM-related Co-Curriculum internships, and promoting female mentors for our students, Madeira is leading the way in increasing access for women in technology fields.

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DAY 1 Toured exhibits showing how design has transformed the world.

“The girls especially enjoyed the car driving simulations. The Autodesk Gallery was great for generating ideas.” — Stacy Tippens, Madeira Educational Technology Specialist

Saw robots that perform endoscopies in an innovative space, which gave us great ideas for Madeira’s future STEAM building.

“My favorite visit of the trip was to Auris Health because it married my two interests, medicine and robotics, very nicely. I was able to ask several very technical questions and the employees were engaging and answered every single one of them.” — Maria Lyons ’20

medical field.” — Alika Mattheisen ’21

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

et

si d

to see how computer science can improve the

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“Auris Health was excellent. It was amazing

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DAY 2 Participated in a workshop on female empowerment.

“Google’s female employees introduced a new hashtag “#IamRemarkable” to jumpstart the conversation about female empowerment, promoting yourself to eliminate imposter syndrome, and helping in salary negotiations.” — Emily Dowd, Madeira Librarian

“Google’s atmosphere is very vibrant and almost carnival-like. It is definitely a place that fosters innovation and creativity.” — Stacy Tippens,

Learned about how X, a subsidiary

Madeira Educational Technology Specialist

of Google, takes "moonshots," tackling the world's huge problems by applying radical solutions and developing breakthrough technologies.

“I loved touring X! Being in the space you could feel how innovative it is. I loved that X searches for solutions to big problems and is trying to help humanity. It was so inspiring.” — KC Jordan ‘20

“X is all about moonshot ideas and we were able to see projects at each stage of development, which I think is hugely important for our students. To realize that not everything needs to be perfect the first time and that there are enormous benefits from struggling and learning, is significant.” — Emily Dowd, Madeira Librarian

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Explored how the Stanford d. School teaches the creative process and leverages its unique space.

“It is critically important for Madeira to continue to expand learning opportunities for its students so that they are always looking beyond traditional jobs. The working world is changing rapidly, and we will need women to be proficient in a variety of disciplines so they can be leaders in solving the huge problems we face. I'm thrilled to see curious and engaged Madeira girls here in Silicon Valley.” — Emi Kolawole ’00, Host Toured art galleries in the Steve Jobs Building, viewing production art for Incredibles 2 and

Toy Story 4. Screened short films in the main screening room, including a visit from the producer of Bao , Becky Neiman-Cobb, who,

DAY 3

with director Domee Shi, had recently won the Oscar for Best Animated Short Film. Also worked with female build engineers and modeling artists.

“The excellent computer science exposure that these Madeira girls have gives them the foundational understanding to be curious. My colleague noted how refreshing it was to speak with a group of girls who were more interested in what she did as a software engineer than in the artistic disciplines that most others focus on.” — Holly Lloyd ’85, Host “I loved Pixar. It was amazing to tour Pixar because you grow up watching these movies and, all of a sudden, you’re in the building where they were made and meeting the creators!” — Mia Stewart ’21

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


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Spoke with a panel of Berkeley graduate

G ui de d

students who talked about their experiences in the newly focused School of Information.

“The girls loved the vibrancy of the Berkeley campus. The entire school is organized around the human side of computer science and seems to be geared toward women, which was cool to see.” — Stacy Tippens,

CLAYM A N IN S T IT U T E F OR GE N D E R

Madeira Educational Technology Specialist

RE S E A RCH AT S TA N F ORD U N IV E RS IT Y Participated in a workshop focused on women employed in predominately male fields and practiced negotiation skills. Discussed “imposter syndrome” (where people doubt their accomplishments and fear being exposed as a fraud).

“I thought our visit to The Clayman Institute was important. The group we met with talked to us in-depth about what it’s like as a woman working in Silicon Valley. It can have its challenges, which is why Madeira’s mission is so important.” — Maria Lyons ‘20

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DAY 4 Met with women in the innovation department and female engineers who spoke of their mission to bring the internet to as many people as possible.

“I loved Mozilla because you can clearly see that the company has a distinct reason for existing and everything they do is striving for that goal. For Mozilla, it’s all about maintaining an open Internet, and it was very inspiring.” — Heston Friedrichs ’21

Attended a lunch-and-learn session organized by the Oracle Women's Leadership (OWL) team, including a panel discussion with women in various technical roles within Oracle's product development organization.

“The students were so engaged — excitedly talking about their interests in technology and how glad they were to see a large, established, tech company ‘up close.’ The panelists noted how impressed they were with the questions asked by the students.” — Lisa Feldman Goldstein ’85, Host

“Oracle had a very different feel from the rest of the companies we visited. Instead of wearing jeans, everyone was in business attire. It felt more “DC-like,” and the girls appreciated the contrast.” — Stacy Tippens, Educational Technology Specialist

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


Participated in a “Women in Tech” roundtable with 15 female engineers, marketing professionals, and designers. Shutterfly made snail magnets for the Madeira group, which gave the visit a very personal touch.

“Shutterfly stood out to me because the ratio of female to male employees was the largest out of all of the other firms. There were female employees everywhere, from engineering to design to marketing. It was great to see!” — Alika Mattheisen ’21

» The Madeira connection opens doors, and our inspiring Silicon Valley alumnae welcomed current Madeira girls for this unforgettable trip. For many students, the trip helped to clarify an area of focus. “This trip solidified my career interests in medicine and robotics and my desire to go into veterinary science,” said Maria Lyons ’20. The exposure and interactions with women who work in male-dominated fields helped the girls see new possibilities and broadened their views about their capabilities. Heston

THANKS! With appreciation and thanks to the Madeira network that helped arrange and lead the incredible Silicon Valley insider experience!

Sara Akbar ’92 Mark Davis P’21 Lisa Feldman Goldstein ’85 Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 Emi Kolawole ’00 Holly Lloyd ’85 Knute Miller P’04 Katie Barnett Stratton ’97 Clia Saltzman Tierney ’85 Peggy Minis Trethewey ’63

Friedrichs ’21 noted, “I knew I wanted to study computer science, but it’s such a massive field that it can often feel overwhelming. This trip convinced me that I want to be a soft-

“Meeting these

ware engineer and use computer science to effect positive change in the world.”

inspiring alums

Experiencing firsthand the interdisci-

gave me hope

plinary nature of STEAM careers, Mia

that I could one day work in these fields.” — KC Jordan ’20

Stewart ’21 was inspired to embrace those cross disciplines. “The STEAM trip inspired me to infuse more computer science into my art, and showed me that I can dip my toe into the technical fields to help my design and art.”

Experiential learning continues to expand at Madeira. Tapping into its impressive alumnae network boosts Madeira’s bold mission of launching women who change the world by showcasing current change-agents and inspiring today’s students to explore their future.

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CAMPAIGN FINAL YEAR!

RAISED:

$40M

RESIDENTIAL LIFE

RAISED:

ATHLETICS

Overall Campaign Progress * Overall progress and goal include Madeira Fund 16

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

$1.7M

$69.8*


Help us check the last two boxes!

RAISED:

$14.5M

RAISED:

$1.3M

GOAL: $26M

GOAL: $5M

STEAM

CO-CURRICULUM

GOAL: $85M*


WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD

THE ARTS BARBARA BABCOCK MILLHOUSE FOUNDER | REYNOLDA HOUSE

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The driving force behind the establishment of Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Barbara is the granddaughter of tobacco magnate, R.J. Reynolds and Katherine Smith Reynolds. In 1967, Barbara converted her family home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina into an art museum. Under Barbara’s leadership, Reynolda House has become one of the nation’s premier American Art museums. She sought paintings that were the best examples of work by significant American artists, including Cassatt, O’Keeffe, Calder, Stella, and Johns. In 2018, Barbara received the North Carolina Award, the state’s highest civilian honor, for her contribuIMAGE COURTESY REYNOLDA tions to the arts and culture HOUSE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART ESTATE ARCHIVES, AFFILIATED of North Carolina. WITH WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY.


Madeira’s mission of launching women who change the world was bold when it was first stated, and that boldness continues today. Changing the world holds different meanings depending upon one’s perspective. It means the scientist working to find effective cancer cures, the mom who volunteers in her local community, the trailblazer leading social change, and the artist bringing joy to a large number of people. Change happens in many different ways all around us — it is the sum of many incremental changes which, ultimately, change the world. We are thrilled to feature some of the many Madeira graduates who have changed the world in unique and remarkable ways. We hope that these stories inspire and reinforce the notion that Madeira women are truly changing the world.

SCIENCE

MEDIA



HELEN THOM EDWARDS PHYSICIST | DEVELOPED TEVATRON PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

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Helen was a physicist and recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship (1988). She was instrumental in the development of the Tevatron, the first high energy accelerator based on superconducting magnets. To all who knew her, Helen was a force of nature. Her colleagues note her forward-thinking vision, her determination to get things done, and her penchant for coloring outside the lines when it came to solving problems. Her deep understanding of physics and keen intuition were evident to everyone who knew her. Helen passed away in 2016.



KATHARINE MEYER GRAHAM PUBLISHER | THE WASHINGTON POST

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Katharine Meyer Graham ran The Washington Post for more than two decades and under her tenure as Editor, the Watergate scandal unfolded. Her memoir, Personal History, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1998. Her daughter, Lally Graham Weymouth, is a Madeira girl too, class of 1961. Katharine passed away on July 17, 2001.

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THE ARTS 

A photojournalist, Ami has traveled to more than 80 countries witnessing and documenting both violence and civil unrest, as well as the world’s natural beauty. Her work has appeared in galleries and museums and has been published in a variety of publications, including National Geographic, Newsweek, Time, and Smithsonian. Ami is the recipient of many prestigious honors, including the National Press Photographers Association’s “Magazine Photographer of the Year” Award and was named by InStyle as one of “50 Badass Woman who are changing the World.”

AMI VITALE PHOTOJOURNALIST



BLAIR BROWN ACTRESS | CREDITS INCLUDE FRINGE & ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK

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Blair is an actress who has appeared in films, television roles, and theater. As a young actress, she appeared at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. In addition to her roles in Fringe and Orange is the New Black, she has appeared as the leading actress in Altered States (1980), Continental Divide (1981), and Strapless (1989). She has also appeared in the Broadway play Copenhagen. Most recently, she has appeared in the television series Jack Ryan.

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019



ROSSANA LACAYO PHOTOGRAPHER & FILMMAKER | FOUNDED GOTA FILMS IN NICARAGUA

Rossana is considered a pioneer of Nicaraguan cinema by the Nicaraguan Cultural Institute. In 2003 she founded Gota Films, an independent film company. Most of her films aim to fight machismo and inequalities for women living in Nicaragua and Central America. Rossana was named “Best Filmmaker of the Year” by the Nicaraguan Association of Artists, and recently completed her first fiction film, Transitory Insanity.

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP 

SUE LUANGKHOT HOPPIN FOUNDER & PRESIDENT, NATIONAL MILITARY SPOUSE NETWORK

Before founding the NMSN, Sue served as the first deputy director of spouse outreach for a military-affiliated non-profit with 375,000+ members. She is a recognized expert on military spouse and family issues and has spoken to audiences nationwide. She is also the co-author of A Family’s Guide to the Military for Dummies.



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NANA AMOAKO-ANIN

MONICA KANG

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & FOUNDER | TOUCH A LIFE & BLISS YOGA ACCRA

 OUNDER & CEO | F INNOVATORSBOX

Nana Amoako-Anin has had a varied career that has led her to change the world in several ways. She first worked as a public school teacher in New York City. She then graduated from law school and worked in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, where she focused on child endangerment, domestic violence, and family law. In 2013, AmoakoAnin relocated to Ghana where she launched a yoga studio and was appointed the Executive Director for Touch a Life, an organization that provides long-term rehabilitative care for children rescued out of human trafficking and slavery.

Monica is transforming today’s workforce by teaching the power of creativity in a tangible, practical, and relatable way. Her work has been recognized by The White House, Ashoka Changemakers, National Minority Supplier Development Council, and Women’s Business Enterprise National Council. She is the author of Rethink Creativity: How to Innovate, Inspire, and Thrive at Work.

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SOCIAL CHANGE 



DR. LINA ABIRAFEH

Lina was listed as one of the Gender Equality Top 100: The Most Influential People in Global Policy (and was one of only two Arabs to make the list in 2018). Over her career, Lina has focused her research on gender-based violence prevention and response. Lina has also worked with many UN agencies and NGOs in developing countries. She is the author of Gender and International Aid in Afghanistan: The Politics and Effects of Intervention (2009).

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | ARAB INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN, LEBANESE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

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SCHROEDER STRIBLING CEO | N STREET VILLAGE

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Under Schroeder’s leadership, N Street Village—a community that empowers homeless and low-income women to achieve stability and make meaningful gains in their housing, income, employment, mental/ physical health, and addiction recovery—has grown significantly. Her professional career has focused chiefly on anti-poverty programs, women's mental health and addiction issues, and services and policy to support those with major mental illnesses.



JEANNE SMOOT ACTIVIST | LAUNCHED TAHIRIH JUSTICE CENTER’S FORCED MARRIAGE INITIATIVE

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

A Harvard Law graduate, Jeanne has helped draft and enact new laws to improve protections for women and girls fleeing violence, including Violence Against Women Act provisions to prevent the abuse and exploitation of “mail-order brides” and historic reforms to end child marriage in several states. Jeanne is the principal author of Falling Through the Cracks: How Laws Allow Child Marriage to Happen in Today’s America, the first comprehensive analysis of provisions in all 50 states that leave children more vulnerable to forced marriage and other lifelong harm. The Professional Women in Advocacy Award for Excellence was bestowed upon Jeanne in 2017.


GOVERNMENT 

ALICE MITCHELL RIVLIN ECONOMIST | FOUNDING DIRECTOR, CBO | FEDERAL RESERVE VICE CHAIR

’48

A trailblazing economist, Alice was Founding Director of the Congressional Budget Office, which changed how policy was made by performing detailed financial analysis of proposed legislation (something that had not previously been in place). As one of the nation’s most influential economists and policy experts, Alice served as Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve and Head of the White House Office of Management and Budget. She received the MacArthur Foundation Genius Award in 1983, and had a 60-year affiliation with the Brookings Institution, where she was known to have “a hard head and a soft heart.” Alice passed away May 14, 2019.



MARTHA GAINES WEHRLE WEST VIRGINIA STATE SENATOR



Martha was a West Virginia State Senator, a civic leader, and beloved benefactor in West Virginia. She served in the West Virginia House of Delegates for 14 years before being appointed to her Senate seat. Martha passed away on October 31, 2007.

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CLARA LÓPEZ OBREGÓN MINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT IN COLOMBIA

Clara studied economics at Harvard and has gone on to have a successful career in politics in her home nation of Colombia. In addition to her current role as Minister of Employment, she has served as Acting Mayor of Bogotá, Auditor General of Bogotá, and has run for President of Colombia.

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MEDIA 

LINDSAY MANNERING EDITOR | HELPED LAUNCH BUSTLE DIGITAL GROUP

’00

In 2018, Lindsay was named one of Folio’s Top Women In Media. She is an experienced editor and helped launch Bustle, the largest women’s website on the internet. At Bustle Digital Group, Lindsay oversees editorial content for four brands, and leads a team of over 50 editors and 200 writers. Before joining Bustle in 2013, Lindsay worked at The Huffington Post and CafeMom.



WHEMBLEY SEWELL EXECUTIVE EDITOR | CONDE NAST

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

Whembley is an Executive Editor at Conde Nast, with an award-winning career as a multimedia content producer. She formerly oversaw social growth and digital innovation at Teen Vogue, Refinery29, and Seventeen Magazine, and was recently named executive editor of them, a next-generation community platform.


SCIENCE  

DR. MONA HAGYARD SOLAR PHYSICIST | DIRECTOR OF NASA SOLAR VECTOR MAGNETOGRAPH FACILITY

’52

Pioneering space science expert Dr. Hagyard was Team Leader of Marshall Space Center’s Solar Observatory, directing day-to-day operations. Like other female scientists of her time, Hagyard used only her initials when seeking employment (to delay the reveal of her gender). Her groundbreaking research in solar magnetic fields spanned the Apollo program in the 60’s, Skylab in the 70’s, and the Space Shuttle in the 80’s.

HAVE A STORY ABOUT YOU OR A CLASSMATE CHANGING THE WORLD? Add your story at madeira.org/madeirawomen

DR. SALLY HEAP ASTROPHYSICIST | NASA GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER

Sally has worked at NASA for more than 45 years. Her research in the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab has primarily focused on hot stars. She has worked with the Hubble spectrographs and Cosmic Evolution through UV Spectroscopy to explore galaxies.

’60 We celebrate alumnae who are pursuing their passions and changing the world in unique and remarkable ways. Madeira women are trailblazers, community leaders, and change agents. With generations of scientists, media experts, social change leaders, arts influencers, politicians, and more — Lucy Madeira’s vision and our mission are alive and well.

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FUTURE LEADERS MADEIRA STUDENTS ALREADY CHANGING THE WORLD Madeira girls dream, do, learn, lead. Even as high school students, they are making an impact. They imagine what they want their world to be, and begin to make it happen. We celebrate the many talents and accomplishments of today’s Madeira girls who are already living the mission of women who change the world.

LILLY EVANS

GABRIELLE RUSSO

NATIONAL FUNDRAISING “STUDENTS OF THE YEAR”

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MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

Lilly and Gabrielle were awarded “Students of the Year” by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS). They participated in a fundraising competition that LLS holds annually and raised the most money, over $175,000, which was three times more than their original goal. All funds raised by the girls will benefit the mission of LLS. Gabrielle shared, “I have been involved in LLS because my dad is a leukemia survivor. LLS has saved so many lives, including my dad’s, and I am honored to contribute to the cure. The lasting impact we are making on the lives of the patients and their families with the funds we have raised is life changing.”


TARINA AHUJA SPEAKER AT MADELEINE ALBRIGHT EVENT

’20 “My name is Tarina Ahuja. I’m 16 and I want to be President of the United States.” That was the opening line of Tarina’s speech, when she was the only student speaker at the Madeleine Albright Luncheon, “Celebrating Risk-Takers for Women’s Empowerment.” Tarina joined an impressive group of powerful women who also spoke at the DC-area event, including several congresswomen and Tarana J. Burke, “Me Too” movement founder, who was the recipient of this year’s Madeleine K. Albright Grant. Tarina structured her speech to reflect the themes celebrated at the event. “My speech was about what it means to be a young person taking risks and how the risks of other women have paved the way for my generation.” Tarina shared that speaking with so many powerful women sitting directly in front of her is something she will

remember forever. “My speech felt surreal. I have always loved public speaking, and this speech was by far the most important one I have ever given. I made eye contact with these remarkable leaders while I spoke, which was such a powerful moment for me because they were reciprocating, smiling back at me.” Susannah Wellford, President of Running Start, selected Tarina to be the student speaker. “Tarina exemplifies what Running Start stands for: she is confident, passionate about creating change, and is already a powerful voice for her generation.” Tarina is also the recipient of the 2019 Katherine Kies ’07 PINK Award, which she is using to develop an application, called Advoc8, to encourage and help young people advocate for issues they are passionate about.

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 27


Mamma Mia! This year, Madeira theater produced the smash Broadway hit Mamma Mia! The energy around this production was incredibly high and the students loved being part of a newly released show. The cast and crew enjoyed the positive and femalecentric messages in the musical as they told the story of a young woman’s search for her birth father. Keenan Parker ’20 shined in the role of Donna Sheridan with show-stopping numbers “Slipping Through My Fingers” and “The Winner Takes it All.” The upbeat ensemble powered through tricky harmonies and dances, performing every musical number with the spirit of a rock concert. The record number of audience members were dancing in the aisles, singing along to their favorite ABBA songs.

ARTS

DA N C E

In March, Madeira hosted the Washington Area Independent School Dance Education Association’s (WAISDEA) annual festival. The Madeira Select dancers performed multiple pieces, including several choreographed by senior Sophie Fouladi. Dancers from Holton Arms School and Sandy Spring Friends School were in attendance, sharing their hard work. The Madeira students later showcased their work during the Dance/Gate All-School Meeting. Students choreographed pieces in collaboration with the Gate Literary Magazine team to create dances to spoken poetry. The event was a stunning showcase of the talent and skill of our Select dancers and writers. 28

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


ATHLETICS

Reaching new heights… Madeira adds rock climbing team While the sport of rock climbing is not new, high school girls’ rock climbing is seeing impressive growth across the country. Madeira introduced rock climbing as a team sport during the 2017–2018 winter season, guided by Dr. Lee Walker, math teacher and lifelong climber. Consistent with the popularity of the sport, Madeira had nearly double the number of student-athletes express interest for the 2018–2019 climbing season, so a junior varsity team was added. Viv Gillman ’19 was a member of the original 14-person rock climbing team and had the firsthand opportunity to see the program expand. “It was cool to see a group of people who climb become a team of climbers,” said Viv. “Gaining trust within our teammates was huge.” Madeira is a member of the Washington Area Interscholastic Climbing League (WAICL), which is comprised of 11 high schools in the DC, Maryland, and Virginia area. The Snails competed in six competitions and secured close wins over Bullis, Episcopal, and Flint Hill. Senior Laura Simpson said, “It was fun to watch my teammates challenge themselves. In this sport, falling happens 99% of the time, but to have that encouragement and support from your team helps you get back up and keep climbing.” The varsity team participated in contests comprised of top rope and bouldering competitions. Top roping means climbers are clipped to a rope on their harness and belayed by a partner from a fixed anchor point above the climb—protected from falling by passing a rope through a mechanical device that creates friction by placing bends in the rope. Bouldering is a style of climbing where the athlete stays closer to the ground. Bouldering “problems,” or routes, are generally shorter climbs than top rope routes. The climber does not use a harness, rope, or belay for protection, but instead utilizes a crash pad and/or spotter. The JV Team worked on climbing terminology, reading boulder problems, and reviewing climbing videos about techniques, famous climbs, and competitions. The coaches introduced the girls to some of the world’s leading climbers, including Akiyo Noguchi, Janja Garnbret, Sasha Digiulian, and Jain Kim. “These girls literally and figuratively stretched themselves,” said assistant coach, Sarah Yarborough ’09. “Serving as their coach was one of the most rewarding parts of my Madeira experience this year!”

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 29


CO-CURRICULUM

CORNER

30

Madeira’s Co-Curriculum program continues to afford its students great opportunities to gain real-world experience. With today’s Mod Schedule allowing a full five-

SOPHIE FOULADI ’19 NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO (NPR)

week block dedicated to

Sopie interned with the Arts Desk at NPR. She

the internship, students

helped select books, albums, and films for the

are able to participate in the day-to-day rhythm of an office, as well as take on substantive projects

NPR team to review. One of her most important moments was being interviewed on air about a multi-generational music piece. “I was working with reporter Sydney Madden on a piece about the song ‘No Scrubs’ by TLC for the 20th anni-

from start to finish. The

versary of the song. They wanted to interview a

exposure, experience, and

wide group of people from several generations to

confidence gained are

see the different interpretations of the song. They

invaluable to the educa-

interviewed Candy from TLC, a few local DJs, and

tion of every Madeira girl.

then they asked to interview me. I represented the

Here are a few Co-Curric-

to talk about how the song’s message is still as

ulum stories from recent

relevant today as it always was.”

senior placements.

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

younger generation, and I was honored to be able


KATHRYN FRONABARGER ’19

MARY SCHILLING ’19

GEORGETOWN MEDICAL CENTER

SAFE PASSAGE AND KEYSTONE

Kathryn interned at the Glasgow Lab at

Mary completed a remote Co-Curriculum place-

Georgetown, where she studied pancreatic

ment in South Carolina at two organizations,

cancer cells in zebrafish. One of her most

both of which deal with difficult subjects. Key-

profound moments in the lab was success-

stone is an organization that provides services

fully injecting a cancer cell into a fish. “It

for substance abusers and Safe Passage offers

was a very big moment for me, knowing that I actually got tumor cells into the yolk of the fish. I felt like I was making a difference. I can’t thank Georgetown and Madeira’s Co-Curriculum program enough for providing me that fantastic opportunity and experience.”

trauma services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. Mary saw first hand some of the best of what these organizations can do for people, but she also saw some heart-wrenching scenes. “This was a profound internship that had so many aspects to it— education, social work, psychology—to name a few. These internships helped solidify what I want to study in the future, which is law and criminal justice.”

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 31


EQUESTRIAN

Riding Wins In & Out of the Ring Ava Brugger “The unique thing about our program is that we take care of our own horses at shows. I have learned not only about riding my horse but about his care. And being on the IEA, ANRC, and show teams has helped me become a more diverse rider.”

“The most rewarding part of the program has been seeing tangible growth, like when I ride the same course from a few weeks ago and can feel the difference. I’ve come a long way in learning how to ride proactively instead of reactively.” HIGHLIGHTS: BONDING WITH FRIENDS, FEELING EVERYTHING CLICK IN PLACE WHEN I FIND MY LINE, AND WHENEVER I’M WITH MY FAVORITE HORSE (WHISKEY!).

HIGHLIGHTS: IEA NATIONAL FINALS; RESERVE CHAMPION AT ANRC JUNIOR NATIONALS. QUALIFIED FOR MEDAL, ZONE, AND JUNIOR HUNTER FINALS, AND VIRGINIA HUNTER CHAMPIONSHIP.

Samira Firouz “Growing up with a passion for horses, nothing seemed better than a school with a barn on campus. I have been riding at Madeira since I got here and have progressed thanks to the instructors and hours I have put in.” HIGHLIGHTS: MOST IMPROVED RIDER AWARD. MOVING FROM BEGINNER TO NOVICE AND PLACING FIRST IN MY CLASS AT REGIONALS.

Eloise Meyer 32

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


Madeira’s Equestrian Program has achieved recent tangible success—IEA Reserve National Cham-

pion, ANRC Team and Individual National Champions, USEF show championships, and numerous individual IEA Regional and Zone Finalists. But, as several senior riders share, the less tangible aspects of the equestrian program are equally successful. They use words like “Family. Support. Friendships. Mentors. Fun. Belonging” to describe this community who have grown as people and as riders thanks to Madeira’s equestrian program. “Our instructors are not just coaches, they are also trusted mentors,” notes Samira Firouz ’19. Madeira’s on-campus facilities serve both as a training ground for competitive success and home to the “barn family” bonding over a shared passion. Adds Bridget Vaughey ’19, “I can walk to the barn after school or during free blocks and ride.” It is this combination of great instructors, dedicated riders, and on-campus facilities that keep the equestrian program at Madeira strong, thriving, and growing.

Kelly Nance Bridget Vaughey “The most rewarding thing about riding at Madeira has been learning from coaches that teach life-long lessons in and out of the tack room, meeting girls both older and younger that share my same passion, and having a place to go that can make a good day fantastic and a bad day better.”

“Mr. McCartney gave me a great foundation, which set me up for my future successes. I would not be where I am today if he had not introduced me to the show world, and if he had not given me such a solid foundation to build upon.”

HIGHLIGHTS:

NATIONAL HORSE SHOW 3’3”

RIDING AT MADEIRA SINCE 2014. 2016 IEA RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION IN THE BEGINNER FLAT;

HIGHLIGHTS: 7TH PLACE FINISH AT THE EQUITATION FINAL IN 2017

“When we are in the ring we are individuals, out of the ring our dynamic is like a family. We support each other and lend a hand. I have learned so much about horsemanship, and what it means to be involved in something bigger than myself. The trainers and staff have pushed me to be the best person I can be, and I’ll always owe that to the program.”

“The program has taught me and helped shape me as a leader. Madeira allows you to make your experience whatever you want it to be. Whether you just want to ride for fun, or you want to be showing on the A circuits, the riding program offers it all.” HIGHLIGHTS: CAPTAIN OF THE IEA TEAM

HIGHLIGHTS:

5TH PLACE FINISH AT THE ZONE 3

SALLY TAYLOR SWIFT ’48

EQUITATION FINAL IN 2018.

MOST DEDICATED RIDER AWARD, CIRCUIT CHAMPION FOR HITS

MEMBER OF THE 2017 RESERVE

CULPEPER, WILL BE ON EAST

NATIONAL CHAMPION MADEIRA

CAROLINA UNIVERSITY RIDING

IEA TEAM; ANN SWIFT CRONIN ’58

TEAM THIS FALL.

MOST DEDICATED RIDER AWARD.

Sydney Newburn

Emily Cyrway SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 33


REUNIONS

A P R I L 2 6 – 2 7, 2 0 1 9


< LOUISE WHEELOCK WILLSON ’48 OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER AWARD RECIPIENT,

Margo Heun Bradford ’64 <Y  OUNG ALUMNAE RECOGNITION AWARD RECIPIENT,

Sarah Armstrong ’09 < ALUMNAE RECOGNITION AWARD RECIPIENT,

Jeanne Smoot ’89

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 35


2019 REUNION CLASSES

’54 Bunny Cann Willett, Julie Clayton

’59 Judy Kingsley Duncan, Kimmy Timolat Short, Ann Funkhouser Strite-Kurtz, Anne Hodge Livet

L-R:

L-R:

THE MADEIRA CUP for the most dollars raised for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the CLASS OF 1969.

’64

’69

L-R: Penny

Davis Preston, Daphne Flowers Wood, Margo Heun Bradford, Annie Penson Vreeland

50TH REUNION

FRONT (L-R): Julia

O’Brien, Kyle Carney Gregory, Trish Kiesewetter, Elsa Redmond Spencer, Carol Harkrader Pine, Sarah Garcia-Mata BACK ROW (L-R): Perry Carpenter Wheelock, Kyn Tolson, Pat Middleton Blood, Blair Soyster Fiore, Cathy Stone, Tina Freeman, Janie Gordon Rupley, Emily Fisher, Sarah Latham Kearns, Lyn Alford Cason

’74 L-R: Mary

Boney Denison, Anne McClelland Sullivan, Deborah Fairchild Harding, Sharon Coyle Kiernan

36

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019

’84 Ann Leighton Cyrus, Alison Vest, Amy Sears Nichols, Pam Parker, Missy McNeer Callaghan BACK ROW (L-R): Gina Melin Robichaux, Paige Williams Smith, Amy Porter Stroh, Karen Lisle Leming, Jill Roberts, Lauren Brockman, Uasma Kahn, Phi Phi Moore Wiley, Lisa Shaddick, deKoven Pelton, Lisa McCurdy-Hankins FRONT ROW (L-R):


’89 Erica Elliott, Jeanne Smoot, Mimi McNealy Langenderfer, Emma Tomarken Grimes BACK ROW (L-R): Beth Collier Groves, Nikie Gililland Micheli, Stacey Campbell Rutherford, Molly Ramey Racthford, Alice Parker

’94

25TH REUNION

Joanna Franco Marsh, Tara Kerr Carter, Monica Sanz Shook, Liz Whipp Grau, Pooja Budhrani Atwal, Jessica Mazur, Karen de Leon Chin, Lucinda Spurling, Cynthia Herrod

FRONT ROW (L-R):

L-R:

’04

’99 Katie Fitzgerald Lester, Kathleen McCabe, Nell Maceda Reilly, Liz Richardson, Jessica Uscinski, Danielle de Arment-Donohue, Katie Saunders Goldsmith L-R:

Irene Park, Beth Brokaw, Caroline Romanoff, Ariel Levin, Shannon Scott, Jackie Prater Lord, Brenna Killeen, Rebecca Landau Swanner L-R:

THE FESTINA LENTE CUP for the highest participation level for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the CLASS OF 2009.

’09 Kelly McKinley, Shelly Bagchi, Merrill Roth, Virginia Falzon, Nelly Cubahiro, Lindsey Miller, Eva Coll BACK ROW (L-R): Dorothy McQuaid, Sarah Armstrong, Justine Davenport, Marianne Courpron Trintignac, Luvie Abell, Penelope Drumming, Janet Osunsan Oyeledun, Whitney Chronister, Charlotte Simmons, Jackie Ozburn FRONT ROW (L-R):

’14 Erica Zeng, Jackie Schipani, Toulia Nwabunnia, Shelby Wildish, Natalie Campbell, Ayesha Mukherjee BACK ROW (L-R): Gabrielle Dreux, Kat Adstedt, Nora Becker, Kate Layman, Maddie Edwards, Emily Glamb FRONT ROW (L-R):

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 37


A LU M N A E E V E N TS H O US TO N, TEXAS —FEBRUARY 2019 The Menil Collection HOSTED BY: Guided tour with Natalie Dupecher ’05, Assistant Curator of Modern Art

NEW YO R K , N Y— FE BRUARY 2 019 New York Yacht Club HOSTED BY: Laura De Sole ’00 and Rickie De Sole Webster ’02

N AP LES, FL—MARCH 2019 Sukie’s Wine Shop­—Cocktails and Conversation HOSTED BY: Sarah Gardner Ridgway ’70

38

MADEIRA TODAY SUMMER 2019


U P CO M I N G EVENTS

SA N FR A N C I SCO, CALI F O RN I A—MARCH 2 019 California Academy of Sciences—A Conversation about STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math)

WINSTON-SALEM, NC OCTOBER 5, 2019

Reynolda House Art Museum Luncheon and Lecture with founder, 1.

Barbara Babcock Millhouse ’52 WASHINGTON, DC OCTOBER 25, 2019

Annual Alumnae Council Reception The Metropolitan Club

madeira.org/events

1.

2.

R I C H M O N D, VI RGI N I A—MAY 2 019 Drinks and Design HOSTED BY: Amanda Travers Nisbet ’82

1.

2.

3.

PHOTOS BY SARAH DER

SUMMER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 39


MCLEAN VA 22102-1200

SUMMER 2019

8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE

M A D E I R A T O D AY

FSC GOES HERE

ISSUE

M ADEIRA TODAY ISSUE 200

Profile for The Madeira School

Madeira Today Summer 2019  

Madeira Today Summer 2019  

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